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The Ubyssey Mar 14, 1986

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Array UBC Archives Serial
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXVIII.No.44
Vancouver, B.C. Friday, March 14,1986
228-2301
fo£
»e
By KAREN GRAM
B.C. Bureau Chief
Canadian University Press
February 26, 1986. Expo 86 president Jimmy Pattison sits perched on a tall stool
in front of an angry crowd, angry because some of Vancouver's poor people are facing evictions from their homes to make way for Expo tourists with lots of money.
A side door opens and several people pelt raw eggs at the stage. One smacks Pattison's face and dribbles slowly down his cheek as he speaks. Another lands on his
beautifully tailored suit jacket.
Not far away a sign outside a nightclub reads "Girls Girls Girls — Expo 86
visitors welcome."
If all the toilet paper Expo expects visitors to use during the fair was layered one
meter deep along the Trans Canada Highway, it would stretch all the way from the
B.C. Place stadium at Expo to Squamish 50 miles away.
That's how much shit Expo is bringing to Vancouver.
lOlf
According to Premier Bill Bennett's Social Credit
government, Expo 86 is supposed to solve all of
B.C.'s economic woes. It adheres to "mega project
logic" so familiar to British Columbians and
favoured by the Socreds. But many critics say the
Socred logic is faulty and that Expo will be a waste of
money, creating enormous social and economic problems.
Much has happened to Vancouver since Bennett
announced it would host the world fair. Not all of it
is good.
Construction workers put their jobs on the line in
wild-cat strikes that didn't shy away from violence to
protect union jobs threatened by Socred legislation.
In a confrontation that lasted several months, the
construction workers fought an unsuccessful battle
against the government, the press, and Expo 86.
Some of the events have been ridiculous: like the
American souvenir company which threatened to sue
the feds for using the Canada Pavillion logo on their
souvenirs. It seems Expo had sold those rights to the
Yankees.
Or the changing guard at the top of the Expo corporation. Several of Expo's top managers have been
regrettably "retired early." Expo did not take kindly
to the press discovering the creative uses some of
these executives had found for Expo money. Twenty-
one major managerial changes have taken place since
the corporation's formation.
Much of Expo is hilarious. Take for example the
giant hockey stick nestled between two bridges and
pointing the way to the Canada Pavillion. It's bigger
than you've ever seen. The biggest in the world, in
fact. Canada's great defence. They say it represents
the great Canadian style. Do they mean slapstick?
Or how about the Shinto wedding contest. All you
have to do is write Expo explaining why you want to
be married by real Japanese Shinto priests on stage at
Expo. Enclose a photo and you could be one of six
lucky couples who win the honor of getting hitched
in front of 15 million strangers. (If you look right,
that is.)
We have brilliant architecture. So brilliant each
wall is at a different angle and rain pours in through
every crack. Bring your umbrella.
At Expo, civilians can fearlessly ride on a toy space
shuttle, hastily rechristened after its namesake, the
Challenger, became another casualty of America's
"omnipotent" technology.
There would have been a fishtank dance floor with
hundreds of shimmering fish beneath the public's
dancing toes, but the fish got canned (mildly tainted)
before the shock of high heels pounding on their
faces left them floundering. Another brave rescue by
animal lovers everywhere.
There's more. Lots more. It's so exciting, Van-
couverites are knee deep in it.
But in the Ukrainian Hall in downtown Vancouver, hotel residents are angry.
May Heginbotham is 87 years old and confined to
her room with a painful leg condition. She until
March 19 to leave the room she has shared for the
last three years with her 83-year old friend John
Stefaniczan. Their hotel is being renovated in time
for Expo. Fifty people must find other lodgings.
At the Patricia, another resident hotel, 50 more
people just received eviction notices. Some of them
have lived there for 20 years. Now they have a week
to move. One man, in desperation, jumped from his
window to his death after hearing the news.
Although the residents pay $220 per month, the
hotel is planning to charge tourists $65 per night for a
single room during Expo, reveals a survey conducted
by the Downtown Eastside Residents Association.
DERA is a citizen's action group which represents
the people who live in the dilapidated urban ghetto of
the downtown eastside.
The DERA survey shows at least 30 hotels in the
area are planning renovations that could displace
more than 1,000 people. There are no rent controls to
stop the hotels. The Socred government did away
with the controls.
When asked for his help to lobby the government
for temporary rent controls during Expo, Pattison
humbly claimed his sphere of influence is limited to
the Expo grounds. However, he said he would be opposed to the evictions if the tenants have nowhere
else to go. (Jimmy is such a good Christian. Fundamentalist actually.)
Expo began as a humble transportation fair to
celebrate Vancouver's 100th birthday. It was supposed to cost $79 million. Now it's an $800 million
monster with a $400 million deficit.
But the Socreds aren't concerned because they
claim the losses will be recouped through a lottery
they've established (our dreams will pay for the
government's gamble) and through the influx of
tourist dollars.
Jimmy Pattison says we should have expected the
deficit. In an interview with the Vancouver Sun, Pattison said there is no way to hold a world class fair
for 5'/2 months and "recapture all the costs."
There's not much disagreement on that point.
Chuck Blackorby is an economist at the University
of British Columbia. As a member of a leftwing
political think tank, The Pacific Group for Policy
Alternatives, he has studied past world fairs for their
economic value.
"It is not possible to go through all the post World
War II fairs and find one that profited," said
Blackorby. New York, Spokane, Montreal, New
Orleans.Tokyo, all closed with deficits, he says.
Blackorby argues that world expositions just aren't
efficient means to rescue a failing economy.
And as a job creation scheme, it's pretty ineffectual, the economists say. Richard Allen, B.C. Central
Credit Union chief economist, predicts a two per cent
decrease in the unemployment rate during the fair.
"But where do the workers go in October?" he said.
Larry Kuehn, chair of the Pacific Group, said
employment rates during the New Orleans fair rose
by two percentage points but then returned to pre-
Expo figures right afterward. The same is expected
for Vancouver.
The jobs at the fair are mainly low-skilled, low pay
and non-union. Employees are guaranteed no more
than four hours work each day (but must be prepared
to work 16) at $4 per hour. The jobs only last 5'/2
months and applicants are asked their opinions on
unions before being hired.
"Is that an efficient way to create jobs?" asks
Blackorby. "I doubt it." It's not an efficient way to
improve tourism either, says Blackorby. He says Expo will steal business away from the rest of the province.
"During the Los Angeles Olympics, business at
Disneyland and other southern California attractions
was down by 30 to 40 per cent." Blackorby says
families on limited budgets will be forced to choose
where to vacation in B.C. instead of spending money
in a number of tourist centres.
Blackorby also doubts Vancouver will benefit
from an increase in tourism in the future. "Ever
heard of anyone going to San Antonio (Texas) or
Spokane (Washington)?"
For something that is supposed to do so much for
this province, Expo sure has a lot of side effects, says
Steven Leary, a vocal Expo critic and DERA worker.
A major one is traffic.
The theme of Expo is transportation and communication, yet the Expo 86 committee has not conducted any traffic studies, says Leary.
See page 2: BILL Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
...K
<f/
Friday, March 14,1986
Bill EXPOses
BC to mega-grief
From page 1
"The traffic planning is nil. Now
there are estimates that there will be
11,000 parking spaces short. We're
expecting 12 hour rush-hours,
which means emergency vehicles
won't be able to get through the
neighbourhood."
The shiny new showcase of advance transportation technology —
the skytrain — will do little to overcome the traffic problems, says
Leary. He doesn't believe the
system, which can move 8,000 people per hour, can possibly cope with
the hundred thousand the Expo
committee expects each day.
The first casualty is Create a Real
Available Beach (CRAB), a waterfront park which was finally created
after residents occupied the area in
tents for an entire summer. The city
is building a gigantic 1500-car parking lot, right next to the little park,
for Expo visitors.
Expo just doesn't make sense as
an economic renewal plan say
Blackorby and his colleagues. They
would rather see the money spent
upgrading social services, on
reforestation or salmon enhancement, projects they think have more
effective longterm benefits.
Expo was never intended to solve
economic problems says Wendy
Frost, founder of People First 86,
an anti Expo group. "Expo is being
used as an occasion to push the
Socred agenda."
Frost says Expo advances three
well known goals of the Social
Credit government: weaken the
labour movement, enhance free
enterprise, and clean up the uglies
of downtown Vancouver.
The clean-up, the excitement, the
carnival, the jobs, all add up to one
big hotdog. Re-election. Expo is the
perfect scheme for re-election says
Frost.
"It's a giant PR gimmick," she
said. It combines short term
economic renewal with 15,000 temporary jobs and presents them in a
fantastic package of novelties that
doesn't even come out of the Social
Credit party's coffers.
The government announced first
they will give away $500,000 from
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GREAT NEWS!
Mon. thru Thurs.
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P.J.'s on 4th is
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the B.C. lottery fund to cover the
travel costs of children wishing to
travel to the fair. This from the
same government that virtually
eliminated school field trips.
The second clue came from
labour minister Terry Segarty who
told his constituents in the B.C. interior they would only get money
from the Expo legacy fund for a
library if he is re-elected.
To boycott or not to boycott is
the question critics are wrestling
with. If a successful boycott is
mounted, the fair could easily flop,
destroying the credibility of the
Socred government. It could also
destroy the economy by creating an
enormous deficit.
But if there is no boycott, the
propaganda will be so pervasive
that many people will believe it and
vote Socred in the next election.
And that is something many British
Columbians don't want to happen.
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Ford Motor Company of Canada, Limited ■ Ford Credit Canada Limited ■ Oakville, Ontario L6J 5E4 Friday, March 14,1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Women must act to succeed
By EVELYN JACOB
Women must act if they want to
succeed in the political sphere, said
a UBC political science professor
Thursday.
"Fewer women than men are
available for political office because
women learn to behave differently
than men during childhood," Linda
Erickson told 15 people in
Buchanan 323.
"Women have traditionally
stayed at home with the family and
have had to wait until their children
grow up before they can enter
politics," Erickson explained. But
mid-life is considered too late for
women to compete with their male
counterparts, she added.
"By that time women lack the
necessary skills, experience, and occupational background to qualify
for these jobs, Erickson said.
Erickson rejected biological
arguments that women are less adequate for political office than men.
"Men may be more aggressive
physically, but women score higher
in verbal aggression, she said.
The number of women in the National Legislature increased from
3.6 per cent in 1972 to 13.8 per cent
in    1979.    Erickson   says   these
numbers are encouraging, but are
still lower than she hopes for.
"Women are still not visible in
cabinet, which is the real seat of
power," she said.
These minimal figures are partially due to the fact that women lose
elections more frequently than men,
because women are willing to run
for party ridings that are not considered "safe."
"ARE WE HAVING fun yet?" Fools in chairs waited days for a chance to  cares? We got dollars enough to buy gum, lollies and ALRT faresaver
see Whoolio Igloosius exude macho sincerity in the flesh only to be disap-  cards," slobbered drugged travellers,
pointed after rggime macho bigwigs scooped up all available tics. "Who
AMS bursary fund swells to five and more. . .
By DUNCAN STEWART
Need some money? The AMS is
just giving it away. This year, five
bursaries of $250 each are available
to students who have helped other
students and who are in financial
need.
The bursary was conceived in
1983 by student board of governors
reps Don Holubitsky and Dave
Frank.
"We felt we had to do something
about the student aid situation,"
said Holubitsky.
"The AMS fund was designed to
be the third-largest source of student aid on campus, and it shows
yet another student contribution to
UBC.
"While any AMS bursary would
not be much compared with federal
or provincial student aid, we
thought it was still worthwhile,"
Holubitsky added.
... but will it be in time
By DUNCAN STEWART
There is $1,000 just waiting to be
awarded to needy students. But the
AMS is afraid that the administration of its bursary by the Financial
Awards Office may keep needy
students doing exactly that: waiting
for the money.
Members of the AMS executive
are worried the bursaries will not
get through to students in time to
help them.
However, only one of this year's
five available bursaries has been
awarded since February 1, the day
the bursaries were made available.
"Students can still apply for bursaries, but there is a two and a half
week wait for an appointment with
an awards advisor," said Byron
Hender, director of the Financial
Awards Office.
"I understood that the bursary
was to be given out at the end of the
term, not right away," he said.
"I am disappointed that, due to a
failure of communiciations, more
bursaries have not been awarded,"
said Jamie Collins, AMS director of
finance.
"We decided to give the money
in February because by that time of
the school year most other sources
of funds have been used up.
"It would act as an emergency
source of student aid," said Don
Holubitsky, a former student board
of governors rep and one of the initiators of the bursary.
"The AMS bursary is not doing
the job of an emergency loan if
there is a three week wait for an
appointment," said AMS president
Simon Seshadri.
The bursary fund was set up as an
endowment, with the principal being untouched and the yearly interest being given to the financial
awards office on February 1 to
distribute to needy students, he
said.
"It was decided to give the
money to the awards office so as to
prevent any conflict-of-interest in
the AMS," said Holubitsky.
Last year there was enough interest for one bursary, this year
there is enough for five, and next
year sixteen bursaries should be
available, he said.
Holubitsky said the goal of one
hundred bursaries per year should
be reached by the mid-1990's, at
which time the value of each bursary will increase to more than
$250.
The total amount in the endowment fund is presently $29,917, said
AMS general manager Charles Redden.
The   endowment   is   funded   by
UVic AMS fires paper editors
The staff of the University of Victoria student newspaper walked
off the job Thursday to protest the firing of the paper's two-member
editorial collective.
The Martlet editorial staff action followed a decision by the Alma
Mater Society's to replace the collective with an editor-in-chief.
"The management board's action was completely unjustified,"
said former co-editor Corrine Moll.
"They breached our autonomy and our right to determine the
structure of our paper." She said "freedom of the press has died on
campus."
In protest of the management decision to impose and editor, the
collective had pulled the student society's election supplement ads.
"The collective has every right to boycott any organization whose
principles are undemocratic," said Moll.
The AMS accused the paper of breaching its contract which requires the paper to print all election ads.
The AMS now must recruit a new staff to publish this year's three
remaining weekly issues.
V
several sources, said AMS director
of finance Jamie Collins.
Starting this May, Student
Council will contribute $11,000 annually. Lease money from the
Teacher's Credit Union, or
businesses that fill the space, and
the AMS tuition fee lottery proceeds will also go into the bursary
fund.
Any student can apply for the
bursary said Byron Hender, director of the financial awards office
and responsible for distributing the
AMS bursaries.
"While not impossible, it is
unlikely that a student who does not
qualify for a Canada Student Loan
will be able to receive the AMS bursary. A student should exhaust all
other funding options before the
bursary."
AMS president Simon Seshadri,
however, disagrees.
"In my opinion, it should not be
necessary for a student to qualify
for a government loan to get the
AMS bursary."
"There is a general perception
among students that there is not
enough money available or that
they do not qualify for-student aid
he said.
Students fail
WINNIPEG (CUP) — A computer foulup gave more than 1000
University of Manitoba students a
nasty surprise in their first-term
mark statements — incorrect
notices saying they must withdraw
from their faculty.
The notices, which cited inadequate grade point averages as the
reason for the forced withdrawals,
affected 1,110 students in the faculty of administrative studies.
In 1970, one third of Canadian
women in politics experienced some
resistance to candidacy in the
nomination process, but women
fared better in local nomination
systems where there is proportional
representation, Erickson said.
Such countries include Finland,
Sweden, Norway and Denmark.
The women's movement in the
late sixties was a factor in improving overall attitudes towards
women in politics, but it was not exclusively responsible for the change,
she said.
An increasing number of educational levels among women,
younger generation with more progressive attitudes towards women
and changes in party recruitment
patterns have helped to encourage
more women to enter politics, she
said.
In 1984, the number of women
candidates had increased to 14.5 per
cent, from 9.4 per cent in 1974.
The number of women members
of parliament increased from 1974
to 3.4 per cent in 1974 to 9.6 per
cent in 1984.
Students
scalp Expo
By CAMILE DIONNE
The B.C. spirit hovered over the
SUB last week when tickets for Expo performances went on sale.
Students were buying tickets to
scalp to tourists later in the season.
The maximum amount of tickets
per person per show is eight. But
entrepreneuring students were getting their friends and other students
in the line-ups to buy tickets for
them.
"I'm getting 32 tickets for each
show," said one student scalper
who didn't want to be identified.
Tickets range from $14 to $30.
Scalpers were also at the
downtown ticket outlets. One man
said he was scalping the tickets for
between $50 and $100 but saving
most of his tickets for the tourists.
"Everyone is trying to make
money from expo", he said. "What
I'm doing isn't as bad as the
others", he added.
Students were lining up before
the SUB opened at 7 a.m. Monday
and Tuesday to get tickets. One
man, with a lounge chair and thermos of hot chocolate, said he'd
been waiting since 5 a.m. People
were sleeping in the streets at the
downtown ticket outlet. Students
preferred getting their tickets at
SUB even though the computer
processing the tickets was slower.
"Why sit outside downtown all
night when you can come here at 7
a.m.," said Brenda Chinn, commerce 4.
According to a sign behind the
ticket office, tickets give admission
to the Expo site only 90 minutes
before the performance and
customers would need an Expo pass
for any matinee performance. Most
students said they had no objection
to entering the Expo site.
Most students said they weren't
concerned about the adverse affects
of Expo despite recent news
coverage of hotels evicting tenants
of 30 years to make room for Expo
tourists.
One student said that it was unfortunate but inevitable.
"It isn't right but its understandable that hotel operators want to
make money," said Brent Bossom.
"People say beggars can't be
choosers, it sounds really callous
but that's the way it is", Bossom
said about the evicted. He added
that the poor people who were
evicted are dependent on society
and that society does what it can for
them. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, March 14,1986
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TfcmA: carefully about Socreds
It really disturbs me when emotions become involved in an argument and the facts become
distorted. We have a classic case of
this occurring in British Columbia
where some students blindly continue to protest against the restructuring of our educational system. I
do not blame student's at all for
their fearful reactions in seeing
education spending cut in this province. But could it be that there
were actually reasons for this cut
back?
As some of you may well know,
Canada, and B.C. in particular, are
in the process of recovering from a
recession which crippled our
economy. There were moves taken
to increase efficiency in all sectors
of the economy by both business
and government. Faced with a constrained budget, the B.C. government was forced to tighten its belt
and moved to control spending. As
education spending was controlled,
the education system had to respond by making itself as efficient as
possible. It was in this process that
students felt the effects of restraint.
Many students acknowledged the
reality of the economics of the
1980's. Others did not and shouted
for a return to levels of spending
which could no longer be sustained.
Perhaps if this group of students
paused for a moment and considered the whole situation instead
of closing themselves in their own
little worlds, they could come to
understand what has occurred and
why it has occurred. No matter
which government was in power in
B.C., sooner or later something
would have had to be done to gain
control of spending. I am glad it
was now and not sometime later in
the future when the cuts would have
been more drastic and painful.
And then there are those that
believe the current B.C. government actually diverted federal funds
supposedly earmarked for education into its own 'pocket'. I can only guess which leftist group can be
charged with dreaming up this fairy
tale. Under the Established Program Financing (EPF) agreement,
the transfer of funds from the
federal government for medical
care and post-secondary education
is largely UNCONDITIONAL. In-
cidently,    unconditional   means
federal monies are received in a
lump sum with no specific spending
requirements attached to it.
There are other sectors in this
province besides education which
must be considered when funds are
being allocated. For example, from
1975 to 1984 the cost of providing
health care in this province grew
282% while the GNP grew only
154°7o. Thus Health Care's portion
of the provincial budget grew from
24«7o in 1975/1976 to 37«7o in
1984/1985. To compound this
strain on the province's budget, Ottawa's EPF contribution to B.C.'s
health care and post-secondary
education progrms fell short of the
equal share with the province it was
to provide for. Of the $3.2 billion
budgeted by the province for these,
Ottawa transferred only $1059.5
million — $543 million less than
what the original funding formula
called for.
This shortfall had to be made up
by the B.C. Government. Consequently, Victoria had to carefully
and fairly allocate constrained
funds according to greatest need —
a difficult task at the best of times.
I would just like to ask those
students, then, who choose to continually protest education cut backs
to consider the full scope of the
situation in B.C. before jumping to
negative conclusions about our
government's spending policies.
Dave Picton
commerce 2
Try harder
Erik Neilson says that government spending is out of control. And he
was mad so he wrote 21 volumes on the subject.
Erik tells us the reforms outlined in the report are just suggestions — not
recommendations. Those were his words. Good thing for you Erik,
because you said some things we didn't like.
Neilson "suggested" phasing out Canada's student loans and let the
provinces pay for them. Erik, are you short a domino? No, we don't like
that one.
But we did like some of the others. Erik wants to make the provinces
squirm. We like that. He says, let's put a floor on provincial spending for
education. That could be good for us. But, how low is this floor?
Erik also says, let's give money directly to the students. This will make
Billy turn even bluer. However, it will make us very happy. Now we can pay
rent and buy some food.
Maybe.
Erik takes a tough line and says, job centres run by the feds have got to
make money or be turfed out. He wants to limit files at job centers to
special counselling and skilled workers.
Maybe you got something there Erik. Limiting job files to people who
really need the service and others with demand business skills would speed
up job contacts and cut down on costs. But don't be fooled. We still don't
like you Erik.
Gov't doesn't care
In regard to the letter in the
March 11 issue of the Ubyssey from
John Landis, President of the
U.B.C. Social Credit Club, I feel
compelled to reply. Unfortunately I
was unable to attend the speech
given' by Mr. Fraser so I cannot
comment on the alleged poor
behaviour of some of the audience
members but if there was a problem
as such, I do not condone it.
Nonetheless, I do take offense to
Mr. Landis' comment that "these
individuals repeatedly chose to ignore any of the positive potential of
the government's program and instead concerned themselves with
negative nitpicking." In a liberal
democracy it is imperative that
everyone is allowed their right to
freedom of speech, yet people like
Mr. Landis continue to desire the
silence of those who criticize or
jeopardize their ideological position. What Mr. Landis calls
"negative nitpicking" perhaps
would be called constructive
criticism in more progressive circles.
During the last ten years, the Social
Credit        government        has
Security problems misunderstood
The story "Guards hired, vandalism cited" (March 7) gives a
false impression of the security problems we have experienced in SUB
recently. The misconceptions
should be clarified.
Essentially there are two problems. The most significant problem is that of teenagers running
around and loitering in SUB, mainly on Friday and Saturday evenings.
Some use the Games Room
facilities, others go to the movies,
but many just loiter in the
stairwells, hassle people in the Pit
line-up and skateboard through the
corridors.   These   youths   have
damaged AMS property near the
restaurant and in the conversation
pit, and are also suspected of setting
off the fire alarms. The vandalism
in SUB is due to these youths, not
the "greater volume of bookings"
in SUB on weekends, as the number
of bookings on weekends has not
increased appreciably.
The second problem results from
AMS clubs and constituencies
holding events on Wednesday
nights in SUB. This year, a greater
number of campus groups are
holdng their functions on Wednesday evenings. Problems arise from
poor control over AMS and liquor
V
THE UBYSSEY
March 14, 1986
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Friday throughout
the academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff
and are not necessarily those of the administration or the
AMS. Member Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey's
editorial office is SUB 241k. Editorial department,
228-2301/2305. Advertising 228-3977/3978.
Michael Groberman's pink tuxedo glowed sensuously in the spotlight. Evil Lynn gazed up with rapturous eyes. She sighed but Michael remained coldly indifferent. "Let the disco dance-a-thon begin"
he said. Camile Dionne and James Young set a fast pace as they polkaed through the crowd. Svetozar.
Kontic and Gordon Clark clicked their castamets passionately in the heat of fiameco. David Ferman
erupted on to the floor, even. The heat was on. Edward Mou and Debbie Lo couldn't find their feet and
pasted themselves on the wall. Power flowers. Corinne Bjorge waltzed gracefully (yes, veritably
floated!!!!) across the room. Steve (babe) Chan boogied down and crashed into Doug Schmidt who
promptly fell over. Janice Irving and Stephen Wisenthal sizzled in the corner ignoring the mayhem.
Martin deJonge and Neil Lucente squared danced themselves into oblivion and finally disappeared
regulations during these functions.
Because of these problems, a
Wednesday night security team is
being hired.
These misconceptions clarified, I
would like to point out some
mistakes in the article which particularly bother me. First, SAC (as I
have pointed out to The Ubyssey
many times before) is the Student
Administrative Commission, not
Council. If your reporters are not
sure what SAC stands for, just ask!
The answer is a phone call or short
walk away.
As the administrative body of the
AMS, SAC, through its Security
Commissioner, is responsible for
the AMS SUB Security Team. SAC
does not hire "guards" as your
story implies. The word "guard"
conjures images of hulks with night
sticks and silly uniforms. The
Security Team consists of UBC
students whose responsibility is to
patrol SUB and oversee and enforce
policy as set forth by SAC. As your
fellow students, they are friendly,
and have established a good rapport
with the groups who hold functions
in SUB.
If you would like to see the problems they face first hand, join us
for a tour of SUB one weekend.
Martin Cocking
AMS director of
administration
demonstrated over and over again
that they do not care to listen to
views that do not reflect their own
particular brand of ideology. I suggest that they would prefer to see all
their critics fade away into the
woodwork rather than allow them
to participate in the political arena.
In regard to Mr. Fraser being a
"welcomed asset to our educational
system", I beg to differ. The Social
Credit government has shown the
citizens of this province how little it
cares about education hence I have
grave reservations about the ability
of Mr. Fraser to revamp our post-
secondary education system to an
acceptable level. The recent announcements of an "Excellence in
Education" fund and the extra $6.2
million for student financial aid are
nothing more than empty political
rhetoric that will only be another
placebo for the dying education
system. How about reinstating the
grants for student aid? Or how
about spending the federal transfer
payments for post-secondary
education on post-secondary education? I would place more faith in
Mr. Fraser if he would prove his
commitment to post-secondary
education rather than proving his
similarity to the former minister of
post-secondary education.
In conclusion, I hope that in the
future the dialogue between opposing ideological views is allowed to
flourish. John Stuart Mill said in his
famous essay 'On Liberty' that
"the peculiar evil of silencing the
expression of an opinion is that it is
robbing the human race", so I suggest to Mr. Landis that he consider
that phrase when confronted with
"negative nitpickers" in the future.
Joan Young
political science 3
NDP leader comes
to SUB auditorium
The provincial leader of the New
Democratic Party will be speaking
today at 12:30 in the SUB
auditorium. With the continuing
crisis in education funding in this
province, it will be interesting to
hear what he has to say about his
party's policy on education funding. With a provincial election on
the horizone, it is important that
anyone concerned with the ever
shrinking funds available know the
position of all parties. I
sincerely hope that education and
health care funding will be a priority for which ever party is elected.
Freyja Bergthorson
arts 2 Friday, March 14, 1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
666 in 4/4 time
By LAURA MALLENE
The Rock and Roll seminar entitled "No one here gets out alive"
presented by the Marantha Christian Club drew a varied crowd of
about 300 people to Scarfe 100 last
Tuesday.
The "fact-filled mini-seminar",
was hosted by University of Tennessee Education graduate David
Dalton.
Dalton said the rock and roll industry generates 15 billion dollars
of business per year. He stressed the
psychological impact of rock and
roll on young people today, using
quotes from both Newsweek and
two psychologists to support his
theory.
The Marantha Club also apparently knows the impact of the
were displayed. "Another one bites
the dust" by Queen when played
backwards at the seminar sounded
like "start to smoke marijuana".
The Led Zepplin classic "Stairway
to Heaven" had messages proclaiming Satan as god when reversed.
Dalton admitted there is no
psychological evidence suggesting
backmasking can be deciphered by
the human mind.
Interspersed throughout the commentary were biblical quotes and
Dalton's own story of becoming a
Christian. He explained how, upon,
"opening his heart to Jesus", he
was immediately cured of his back
problems and chronic asthma. How
this was relevant in a rock and roll
seminar is difficult to say.
He then asked the audience to
perspectives
music industry on people today, as
the seminar and the large picture of
Jim Morrison on their flyers indicate.
After urging his audience to keep
an open mind, and assuring them he
ws not trying to force his views
upon anyone, Dalton began the
presentation.
The lights dimmed, and music
filled the room as Dalton began the
seminar accompanied by the advertised "concert footage".
Album covers were the main part
of the show. Dalton showed how
Jim Morrison, Ozzy Osborne, Pink
Floyd, Styx, Heart, Blue Oyster
Cult and the Beatles used anti-
Christian and Satanic symbolism on
their album covers and in their
music.
Symbols such as the inverted
cross and the "666" were discussed.
Dalton used quotes from the Bible
and even from the Book of Satan.
Earth Wind and Fire, Jethro Tull,
AC/DC, Iron Maiden, Cindy
Lauper, The Dead Kennedys, ELO,
and others were criticized for their
content.
Michael Jackson, because of his
Thriller video, was said to have a
fascination with the occult. Madonna and Springsteen promote sexual
immorality in their songs said
Dalton. John Denver was seen as
anti-christian because of his endorsement of "est" which Dalton
called a cult.
The presentation then moved to
the issue of "blackmasking".
Many instances of the technique
habooclles
bow their heads for a brief prayer.
The seminar concluded with a
slide presentation of the life of
Jesus Christ accompanied by "inspirational music". During this
time, Dalton urged all those in the
audience who had "let Christ into
their hearts" that evening to join
hm at the front of the stage. Seven
out of 300 went forward.
When later questioned aobut
what was to be done about rock and
roll Dalton was evasive and never
really advocated any action.
Laura is a UBC accounting student who sends stories by courier.
Debate team
wins contest
Two UBC students have resolved
that the provincial government
should not fund B.C.'s food banks.
Colin Lim and Julian Hedgecock
were the winning team in the annual
English 100 debate contest with the
final round held on Monday,
March 10.
The debate contest has been held
each year for the past several years
and is sponsored by the English 100
Committee. The winners will
receive the Frank deBruyn
Memorial Debating Prize of $100
each with runners-up Tony Kwan
and David Wong receiving prizes of
$50 each.
Kaboodles is hopping with spring goodies
for the whole family ....
HOP BY FOR:
•  Jelly skipping ropes & boomerangs
Designer trash bins & light jewellery
Sunglass photo frames & heart bath pillows
Robot pens & pearly heart bracelets
Bunnies of all sizes & shapes
Hideable Easter Treats for the hunt
Windsocks & jelly beans in ice cream sundae dishes
Balloons, cards & wrap in super spring colours
4462 W. 10th Ave.
224-5311
Kids Only Market
at Granville Island
684-0066
(kwik) adj. 1. rapid; swift; speedy
2. prompt to understand or learn
3. without delay 4. Kinko's
FREE SELF SERVICE TYPING AVAILABLE
FOR A LIMITED TIME
IBM SELECTRiC
kinko's
5706 University Blvd.       222-1688
M-Th 8-9  F 8-6 Sat 10-6 Sun 11-6
Rum Flavoured, Wine Dipped
COLTS & COLTS MILD
The Sociable Little Cigars
.jaJSk     TiP»>cd.
COLTS
by
OLD POUT
Tipped
COLTS MUD
Rum flavoured -Wine dipped
END THE ARMS RACE and A.M.S. SPEAKERS present:
DR. HELEN CALDICOTT
STOP STAR WARS - STOP THE ARMS RACE
Thursday, April 3rd, 7:30 p.m.
WAR MEMORIAL GYM, U.B.C.
Tickets: $6 — Students and Seniors
$7 — General Admission
(plus the ticket centre service charge)
Available at AMS Box Office
$8 - At the Door
Charge by phone:
280-4444
STORM THE WALL!!
Si:
';W i	
op
a
-r—XL1"™
Attention UBC Students, Faculty & Staff
Storm the Wall competition will take place Monday, March
17 Thursday, March 20 from 12:30 p.m.-5:00 p.m. on the
course outlined below. Traffic lane closure will be in effect on
Easl Mall and on 16th Avenue between East Mall and Bianca.
Supervisors will be on duty throughout the race course to
assist: please note all traffic control signs. Pedestrians and
drivers are advised to use extreme caution when competitors are on the course.
$
7 ■
/  :. Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, March 14,1986
Placement payment rapped
TORONTO (CUP) — Campus
employment officers are cautiously
disapproving of a new placement
agency that charges students $25 to
send their resume to employers by
computer.
The University and College
Placement Association, representing about 1,000 employers and
campus employment centres, refused last semester to endorse Campus
Connections because it charges
students for a service the UCPA
feels they get for free on campus.
However, campus placement officers admitted they were unfamiliar
with the new service and that it
might be of genuine benefit for
students.
The company began operation in
December and, according to
founder Dale Richards, has signed
on "a couple of hundred students".
The system is currently only
available in Ontario, but may be extended nationally.
It offers resumes electronically to
5,000 companies worldwide (3,500
in Canada) on the I.P. Sharp data
transfer system.
Graduating students pay $25 to
be listed for six months and most
companies pay about a dollar a
minute to I.P. Sharp for computer
time.
Richards defended the idea, saying both students and employers
will   save   money.   He   said   his
Students eyed for cash
MONTREAL (CUP) — Students
have been targetted as an extra
source of government revenue as
Quebec's Liberals examine ways to
reduce the provincial deficit by $1.5
billion.
In a speech to the National
Assembly on the economic state of
the province, Finance Minister
Gerard D. Levesque suggested that
university tuition fees be raised, and
cited Ontario's nearly doubled tuition fees as justification.
Levesque also recommended
reducing the cost of education by
increased teacher workload or
student/teacher ratios. "It would
be irresponsible to hide certain
possibilities," said Levesque.
"These situations are hypothetical
and as such all hypotheses must be
considered. These recommendations are not binding."
Students think Levesque is testing
the waters. "Every time the Quebec
government hints tuition fees will
rise, it is leaked in a non-committal
fashion to the media. The reasons
these things are leaked is because
they want to gauge whether
negative student reaction will outbalance positive public reaction,"
said Peter Wheeland, student coun
cil vice president communications
at Concordia University.
"If students make a lot of noise
now, then the government is going
to say it is only a hypothesis. If
students are quiet, then there will be
an increase," he said.
Qubec tuition fees, frozen at $570
a year since 1969, are the lowest in
Canada.
research indicates job-seekers
generally spend more than $25 to
send out applications, and that the
approximately $30 a firm might
spend to look at resumes is less than
the $500 they often spend on
newspaper advertisements.
The 26-year-old University of
Western Ontario graduate said
Campus Connections deals with
more employers that do campus
employment centres.
Student reps on campus get $5
for each fellow student they sign up
for the service.
So far, some 100 companies have
pulled about 1,000 resumes from
the databank, Richards said.
But campus employment officers
and some companies are wary of
the service.
"I generally am not supportive of
these types of services that are
already available to our students
free of charge," said Jan Basso,
past president of the UCPA and
manager of the Wilfred Laurier
placement centres. Three other
employment officers echoed that
comment.
UBC
TCE-X-C
HE
E •• L-L-EvN
EAT E
fY
1 FREE DINNER sp^Il
This is a terrific deal! Bring a friend or a sweetie, purchase 2 of
the daily specials and receive the least expensive one FREE.
This coupon applies to daily specials only, isn't valid for takeout or with any other coupon. HAVE A GREAT DAY!
3431 WEST BROADWAY
738-5298
>
(0
TUDIO
FREE
0 GRADUATION PHOTO SESSION
•  For Grad Photography That Is Different •
This is your invitation to have a guest sitting and see a complete selection
of colour previews without cost or obligation. This offer is valid to all 1986
UBC graduating students. Phone now for an appointment.
•  UNIQUE FRESH STYLES FOR 1986 •
Purchase only whatever you wish. Prices start at $6.95.
2111 West 16th Ave.
VANCOUVER, B.C.
736-7281 or 731-1412.
TUDIO
O
■5'
(A
0)
<
ENGLISH COMPOSITION
TSST SEMINAR
"HOW TO PASS"
Guest Speaker:
Ms. Nancy Horseman
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 19
12:30
SOB AlllTORHI
FM
SONGFEST
v
'86
v
March 14th, 1986
Queen Elizabeth Theatre
■M^ CO-OP OUTDOOR
^-y GEAR SWAP
Want to sell those hiking boots that
never really were ydur size? Buy the
gear you need to go summer backpacking without spending a
bundle?
The Co-op's Spring 1986 Out
door Gear Swap is the answer.
Call 872-7858 for more details.
P.S. you don't have to be a
Co-op member to
participate.
Win a
Pentax
Binocular
When you come to the Gear
Swap be sure to enter to win a
Pentax Mini Binocular to be given
away at 3 PM the day of the Gear
Swap. No purchase necessary to
win. Binocular is courtesy of
Pentax Canada Inc.
M
MOUNTAIN
EQUIPMENT
CO-OP
Gear Swap
Sunday, March 16, IOam-sfm
428 W. 8th Ave., Vancouver
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
The Cecil H. and Ida Green
Visiting Professorships
1986 SPRING LECTURES
ARTHUR TERRY
Professor Arthur Terry is a foremost critic and scholar in the field of Hispanic Studies and a leading specialist
in the Golden Age of Spanish Poetry, the 16th and 17th centuries. In the Department of Literature, University of Essex, his trail-blazing research on Catalan writers of different periods contribute to the understanding
of the socio-cultural links of Catalonia with the rest of Spain and ultimately with European literatures. Dr.
Terry's two excellent Pergamon anthologies are well-organized critical guides and his many articles are in
every case thoughtful seminal studies of important subjects indicating a thorough understanding of literary
theory as well as sensitivity of interpretation.
THE POETRY OF PABLO NERUDA
Monday, March 17 In Room A-100, Buchanan Building, at 12:30 P.M.
READING SPANISH POETRY
Monday, March 17 In Buchanan Penthouse, at 3:30-5:00 P.M.
THE ILLUSION OF REALISM: The 19th Century European Novel and its Modern Critics
Wednesday, March 19 In Room A-100, Buchanan Building, at 12:30 P.M.
SPANISH BAROQUE POETRY AND THE ENGLISH METAPHYSICALS: Similarities & Differences
Wednesday, March 19 In the Buchanan Penthouse, at 3:30-5:00 P.M.
ALL LECTURES ARE FREE - PLEASE POST AND ANNOUNCE
Occasionally unadvertised seminars are presented.
Marclt 17, 1fj|0, 21 & 22
UBCOIdMitorium
Tickets & Inter 228-3113 Friday, March 14, 1986
THE.
iY
Page 7
ttW*1
Most,
By JACK BRANSWELL
Reprinted from the Link
Canadian University Press
"The best preparation I had for being a political cartoonist wasn't art school, it was being on welfare", says
Terry Mosher. The Montreal Gazette's political cartoonist
— better known as Aislin — has a lot of respect for the
average Joe in the streets; he used to be there himself.
Born in Ottawa 42 years ago, Mosher used to make his
money on the streets as a portraitist and caricaturist in
Quebec City, drawing for tourists in the summer.
He has come a long way from then to becoming one of
Canada's most respected political cartoonists. Back in 1961
he was kicked out of school in Toronto for selling pot. He
later had short stints at both Toronto's Central Technical
School and the Ontario College of Art, before graduating
from the Ecole des Beaux-Arts in Quebec City.
Mosher has said that if he hadn't become a cartoonist he
probably would have been a professional forger. In fact
that is precisely how he gained his college entrance; he forged his own high school leaving certificate.
One thing is for sure, he is not doing too badly for a guy
who began cartooning while hitch-hiking around Canada,
the United States, and Mexico, drawing caricatures of people in bars. Today, Mosher's cartoons are syndicated in the
Toronto Star, and he is known worldwide. The Pope has a
copy of a caricature which Mosher did of him. Rock singers
David Bowie and Bob Dylan also have Aislin originals of
themselves. In fact, Brian Mulroney is known to have one
of himself by Aislin hanging in his office.
• •
mocks madness
Former Conservative party leader
Robert Stanfield once said about
political cartoonists that, "there is
no way you can deal with a heckling
cartoonist. If he is good there is
nothing you can do about it, you
just have to take it". Mosher over
the years has had many politicians
in that very position.
Mosher sees himself as a satirist
and not a political cartoonist. When
Mosher sits down in his director's
chair in his studio and puts pen to
paper, he does so as someone who
has been infuriated by a particular
government or one of its actions. In
this sense he is your average citizen.
There are two differences, however.
He has the medium to vent his
anger, and he does not have any
political affiliations.
"When people ask me if I'm left
or right (political leanings) I always
answer them that I'm North."
Mosher firmly believes that he
should not have any political commitments, "When I started to get
work I was totally apolitical.
Despite what would appear as a
total disdain for authority, Mosher
is actually grateful to politicians.
"If governments didn't try to cover
their asses, I'd be out of work."
You don't make too many friends
in Mosher's line of work. About
. every two to three months he will
anger one group or another, he
said. "I like to think of myself as
evenhandedly malicious... I would
like to think, at one time or another
I've upset them all."
While there are probably a few
people Mosher hasn't upset, there i
are lots more he has; Gazette ombudsperson Clair Balfour regularly
receives complaints directed at
Mosher.
During the 1984 Montreal Urban
See page 10: CARTOONS
GOVERNMENT STUD? SHOWS HON
AMERICANS SEE CANADIANS.-
■• ■ ■w
EH:
Sixties slant distracts As You Like It fun
By MARTIN DE JONGE
A mixture of pastoral romance
and pre-contemporary Utopian
idealism combine to make the
Frederic Wood Theatre presentation of Shakespeare's As You Like
It both mirthfully exhilarating and
strangely perplexing.
The source of humour in As You
Like It lies in the hilarious succession of events leading up to the
marriages of four different couples.
The chief pair of lovers, Orlando
and Rosalind, are portrayed by
Lawrence K. Ball and Kathryn
Bracht. It is they who ultimately
epitomize the experiences of the
other three couples.
Touchstone, the clown, is portrayed so well by Chris Rosati that it
suffices simply to survey his face to
appreciate all of the action on stage.
The usurping Duke Frederick,
played by Darrin Andrichuk, is to
the audience's confusion, played as
a cross between a California cult
figure and a sardonic disco king.
After the principal characters flee
to the forest, the setting becomes
very 60s:  long hair and groovy
threads; peace and contentment are
the only objectives.
When the audience is first exposed to the set, the tone is sombre,
lighting dim, colours restricted to a
very oppressive combination of
black, white, and grey. The court's
tension and corruption is reflected
here.
In the forest scene the audience
first sees a plain meeting-place
around a large tree. This is where
the banished duke, portrayed by the
charismatic Errol Durback, and his
loyal followers congregate and sing
songs of joy. When Orlando starts
posting love poems on a tree,
foliage and verdure descend to
create a colourful, spring forest.
And during a final tender moment
between Orlando and Rosalind, the
screen behind the set becomes a
star-filled sky.
Geoffrey Dunbar's lighting is
flawless. An appropriate luminosity
and distinctness reflects the mood
and tone of the play.
The music, created by UBC
music student Adam Con, is subtle
and appropriate at some points, but
the twangy electric guitars and
sporadic drum rolls are more 60s
parody than sensitive theme
enhancement.
A perplexing element is the
disparity of diction. Orlando and
the banished Duke speak in a manner which befits a conventional production of a Shakespeare play. The
native country dwellers speak in
American hillbilly drawls, and the
rest either sound mildly English or
purely Canadian. The speech is not
consistent with any particular time
period or location.
This As You Like It succeeds not
because of its 60s slant, but in spite
of it. Certainly, Shakespeare did intend to contrast love with hate,
peace with oppression, and innocence with corruption, but is it
justifiable to cynically associate this
idealistic play with a time period in
which idealism and individualism
eventually bow to materialism and
conformity? The metaphor of the
60s as a brief respite in the forest is
obvious in Brockington's production, but the parallel is unnecessary,
even distracting. Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, Mar
VI
ws
Grapes and Moev:
professional purple
By PETER BURNS
The acoustic was meshed with the
synthetic as two of Vancouver's
most promising bands played an all-
ages show Friday night at UBC's
SUB Ballroom.
The illustrious ballroom played
style   —   electronic   Eurodance
host to a gig which saw a contrast in
preceding REM-sensibility, British
Columbian guitar pop.
Grapes of Wrath and Moev
headlined the show which drew a
sizable crowd due in large part to
the 'all ages' tag which enabled the
Grapes to draw their teen legion (all
dressed in prerequisite black) and
Moev's older, artsier crowd to the
same venue. It was the AMS's first
major all ages show in a while and
with a sidebar added next to the
Ballroom, those past puberty were
well looked after.
Moev and the Grapes, along with
Skinny Puppy, form the triumvirate
that is Nettwerk Records. The company has succeeded in putting a
professional stamp on Vancouver's
fledgling local scene through hi-tech
graphics and production and a
work ethic unparalleled in local
recording. The company's professionalism has been snickered at by
envious would-bes while the outfit
has quickly spread its distribution
tentacles to the UK, Eastern
Canada and the U.S.
Moev offered interesting arrangements and jungleish
movements from new singer
Michela Arrichiello who fancies
himself as a sex object of sorts, but
nevertheless combines with
keyboardist Cal Stephenson in
some tremendously, moody vocals
that understate rather than play on
the obvious.   Like Mark  Jowett's
GRAPES OF WRATH ... on its way up
guitar lines, subtlety is a large component in Moev's stuff. Kelly
Cook, formerly of French Letters
and Idle Eyes, provides brilliant
bass lines that will probably make
his playing a greater focal point for
the band.
Like Nettwerk, Moev has been
growing in leaps and bounds despite
the overt criticisms following
former lead singer Madeline's
departure some years back. With
material from Dusk and Desire,
however, Moev brought the crowd
to their camp and won others over
with great versions of Took Out the
Lace and the bassy textures of
Beautiful Beast and Alibis.
Grapes of Wrath seemed uncomfortable with their new-found near-
stardom and vocalist/guitarist
Kevin Kane's appreciation for the
crowd was conveyed through rather
self-conscious ramblings to the
crowd in between songs. The songs
themselves however were sweet indeed — a full sound and a delivery
that belied the presence of only
three guys (from Kelowna yet).
Tom Hooper's bass and vocals have
solidified into a perfect complement
to Kane's shimmering guitar and
vocals. Theie's a touch of so many
influences in the Grapes playing —
Kane's guitar echoes Tom Verlaine
at times and Neil Young creeps in
too — but it's unfair to compare
because the Grapes are fruits unto
themselves.
The Hooper brothers (Chris on
drums) fine rhythm sense came
through strongest on Lay Out the
Trap and Laughing Out Loud from
the first EP. Even the teeniest hoppers were dancing and screaming,
forgetting the solemnity of their
black outfits. The Grapes material
from the recent September Bowl of
Green also kept the crowd happy.
And one of the nicest versions of
the Beatles' If I Needed Someone
put a nice cap on a Nettwerk evening that left Grape and Moev fans
(young and old) with purple stains
that will never come off.
Visual smorgasbord void
of warmth and emotion
TOM HOOPER . . . solid bass and vocals
By MICHAEL GROBERMAN and
EDWARD MOU
Dead leaves. Everywhere. And
banana peal.
I went down to see Stuart Dee's
exhibit down in the Gallery. And
that's what I saw: a whole lot of
dead, decaying, rotting vegetation.
About   half  of  the   prints   are
Dance and dancers are new
but the show is inconsistent
By GRETCHEN LANG
There are new dances and new
dancers in The Paula Ross Company's current production, but it's
still the old timers that are stealing
the show.
The Paula Ross Dance Company
Weekend Performances
Paula Ross Dance Centre
until March 22
Three of the four dancers are in
their first season. They are interesting and effective, but the
shiner in the ranks is Paula Ross
veteran, Dean Smith.
The first piece is a Smith solo. He
presents a subtle, steamy interpretation of The Blues When Everyone
Goes Home for the Day.
If this program stars one dancer,
it also stars one dance. Strathcona
Park is a work based on a family
trip to the Vancouver Island park.
The grandeur and mystery of B.C.'s
primitive wilderness is suddenly
right in front of us. Performed in
silence, with the wind fanning the
audience, movement and stillness, a
masked face, a shrouded eye
envelopes the audience in a sensuous, natural experience.
But this production is, at best, inconsistent. Dancing and Other
Things Dancers Do for Fun and
Money, second on the program, is
one of those modern dance works
that simply has nothing to say.
Costumes, lighting, music, and
dance seem to disperse rather than
combine to form any cohesive idea.
First conceived in 1984 and set to
Jane Siberry music, this long work
has undergone a series of changes
and has metamorphosed into mush.
Paula Ross's latest work, Buffalo
Bill, is bursting with great comic
timing, and Dean Smith's interpretation of Laurie Anderson's
Gravity's Rainbow is exciting and
well lit.
B&W. One of them is called
"Pineapple Field". The whole
thing is a study of the texture of
decay. Stuart is one of these formalists. Whatsat? He's concerned
about form (hence the name formalist). But what about the pictures? They're great. A lot of the
prints were done with 35mm format
film. The prints are absolutely
beautifully done, no grain to speak
off in them.
His technical ability is flawless.
His subject on the other hand is
devoid of any immediate impact.
One can relate to them on an intellectual level, but the emotional
gut feeling is non-existent. Dee
chose leaves as his subject because
he wanted to use a subject which
would not connote any image or
idea beyond itself. Another print is
entitled Flower Arrangement #3. It
is colour. It is a visual smorgasbord.
It is stunning. But it is also meaningless.
Dee's lens is accurate in its
microscopic detail. It captures subtle textures not appreciable by the
unaided eye. Dee's eye is blunt,
unflinching, unromantic. It is his
honesty, and love of his subject,
that give the viewer the experience
of sharing a quiet, secret of life.
But Dee's imagery is contrived.
His work is sensuous, but
repetitive; and it loses its honesty to
its manipulation.
The large artistic question of the
legitimacy of arranging the leaves et
al rises unmercifully from the ashes
of Dee's Phoenix.
Certainly we accept a novelist's
basic right to arrange events and
characters to manipulate its reader.
So too, the painter with his canvas.
But a photographer, capturing a
real image on light sensitive paper,
is in a different position. Not that
he shouldn't select his subject
carefully. He may certainly arrange
his photograph, as long as it doesn't
look arranged. Dee here proudly
displays the fact of his purposeful,
selected positioning of the flora,
and then expects his audience to
react to it as if it were not contrived.
His intent is not cynical, but his
presentation, though unintentionally, is.
Dee's technique is flawless, his
creativity genuine and innovative.
But this is self-conscious art that is
not supposed to be self-conscious. 14,1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 9
Beijing director confronts Party
H
By PATTI FLATHER
Special to the Ubyssey
ONG KONG — Chinese Youth Art Theatre director Zhang Qihong does not give up easily.
When the Beijing native wanted to stage an adaptation of the passionate 1936 Chinese play Wilderness, the
playwright himself told her the project would fail. The
play hadn't been performed in China since 1949 and the
playwright feared the critics' pens. ;|.
During  rehearsals  in   Beijing   Zhang   received  an ;
anonymous letter warning her not to rehearse a play
with an "unhealthy" topic.
And before the play was presented to the Chinese
public, Zhang had to make countless revisions after
criticism from Communist Party officials at private
screenings.
Zhang, 55, admits in an interview in Hong Kong that
she thought her version of Wilderness, by China's most
famous playwright, Cao Yu, would never be seen.
But the play was a success when it was finally performed for the public in 1984. Cao's story of a young
Chinese peasant who has been wronged by a landlord
and seeks revenge was performed more than 100 times
in Beijing, at a time when Chinese theatre audiences are
dwindling. The play Wilderness has always
Zhang brought the play to the Hong Kong Arts been controversial. Chiang Kai-
Festival for six February shows, and was visibly excited ^f^f 7^ f^ZT^-
at the opportunity. nographic and overtly violent."
Zhang is a woman with a strong body movements intensify when she Communist   Party officials  are
will who is deeply committed to the describes a key scene or the nature equally sensitive about the play,
theatre. Her eyes light up and her of a character. Zhang says the individualism ex-
ZHANG QIHONG
. more artistic freedom
12.
WILDERNESS . . . Beijing to Hong Kong
Rank and File are real happy
By CORINNE BJORGE
mmmmmmmm, yep.
Sure was hot out there tonight.
mmmmmmmm, yep.
The sun set over the desert. The
air started to cool, And then the
music began. The band, Promise,
stepped on stage and people started
to dance. The Rebel Kind followed
and more people danced. Strains of
cowpunk filled the air. Promise
stressed the cow, The Rebel Kind
stressed the punk and the music was
good. Feet warmed the floor, toes
tapped and then it got hot. Rank
and File stepped on stage.
Their hair was shorter and their
style was looser, but the music
melted socks and the audience loved
it.
One complaint.
The Town Pump packed in ticket
buyers like sardines (I can't name a
desert fish). When they couldn't
dance, they swayed. And when they
couldn't sway, they wriggled. But
they were happy. The band was
happy too.
The band was ecstatic. Maybe it
was the clean mountain air. They
don't get much mountain air in
Texas, and even less clean air in Los
Angeles where the band is now based.
Yup, it must have been the clean,
mountain air. They sure were happy-
Rank and File have changed
direction. Tony Kinman has lost his
25-gallon Texas cowboy hat and
brother Chip has lost his tie, and
donned a pink mack-shirt and
leather pants. They're not angry
young men anymore. They are happy-
The band is small, only three
guitars and a drummer. But they
come out with a full, clean sound
and their songs are of love — "she
came early, and I came late, we
never met, it was a hell of a date"
and death, "on this train, the conductor wears black."
Rank and File's biggest asset is
the voices of the two lead singers,
brothers Tony and Chip. Tony's
deep voice plays a medieval basso
continuo while brother Chip croons
melodic cowpunk.
The sound is strange, and it may
even be a little off-key. But it is
good. Real good.
The stage started to cool after the
last song, the lights dimmed, and
the encores were played.
Everyone was happy.
Real happy.
pressed in the play's characters is
seen as a threat by some Chinese
critics and officials.
In Communist China passion for
one's country is acceptable, she
says, but passion in interpersonal
relations is not.
The young male peasant in the
play, Chou Hu or Vengeful Tiger, is
full of anger at life's injustices. The
local landlord killed his father, sold
his sister, sent Chou Hu to prison,
and forced his childhood sweetheart
to marry his son.
Zhang says Chou Hu is unusual
because he feels his love still
belongs to him, and because he
plans revenge.
The peasant's love, lusty, hot-
tempered Jinzi, is played by
27-year-old Song Jie in a style rarely
found in China. Although dressed
in a loose-fitting tunic and pants as
is the norm, in one scene when she
and Chou Hu are reunited they
argue and she beats him with her
shoe and her fists. Jinzi then has the
nerve to hold out her foot for Chou
Hu to replace her shoe, which he
does. Later they embrace, he
caresses her, and they sing together.
Puritanical Chinese officials
criticised the adulterous relationship between the lovers, who spend
10 days in the wilderness together
although Jinzi is married.
Zhang tackled the play because
she feels it is a masterpiece that
should be" seen by modern audiences. She argues that the peasant's individual revenge symbolizes
the fight against injustice that all
peasants have faced. And she compares Cao's language to that of
Shakespeare, whose works she has
also directed.
Wilderness has elements of
romanticism and symbolism, she
says. Not content to merely stage
the play, Zhang has also adapated
it, bringing to the beginning a controversial supernatural scene.
Officially atheist Communist
authorities frown on superstition,
and other theatre groups who
followed Zhang's lead in
Wilderness omitted the scene
altogether. In Zhang's version
Chou Hu has just escaped from
prison, and goes to his father's
graveyard. The peasant sobs as
ghosts drift across the dark, steam-
filled stage. The atmosphere is eerie
as Chou appeals to the god of hell
and five other beasts, all with glowing eyes, about life's injustices.
Zhang is as intense as any
character she brings to life through
drama. She says she always had a
wild imagination, and fell in love
with Cao's writings when she was
As a girl Zhang performed parts
of Cao's plays in front of her
devoted grandmother. Zhang's
parents discouraged her from
theatre.
In 1945, when Zhang was 14, she
followed her older brother to a
region of China under Communist
control, a "liberated" region. She
studied drama there and then joined
a touring theatre troupe performing
for the Red Army, which was
fighting a civil war with the
Kuomintang (Nationalist army).
Zhang studied theatre in the
1950's at the Central Academy of
Drama in Moscow. Her husband
also studied in Moscow and France
at this time.
But during China's so-called
Cultural Revolution Zhang was
branded a Russian spy, and her husband a French spy. The first attack
came from a "big character poster"
accusing Zhang of supporting
rebellion in China because she
helped produce Romeo and Juliet.
While the charges appear
ludicrous, Zhang and her family
suffered greatly. Others were
murdered, tortured, and exiled on
similar charges.
But Zhang is a survivor. "I wrote
back and attacked others," she
says, during the "Cultural Revolution".
Many Chinese have not recovered
from the years of turmoil before
Mao's death and the Gang of
Four's arrest, but Zhang has not
given up. She says she loves the
theatre and her country, but has no
desire to become involved in
politics.
She describes a three-hour talk
she had with Cao Yu when she tried
to convince him she should produce
the play.
"I burst out into tears because he
didn't think it would be a successful
play," she says. "I tried hard to
convince him I had to do it."
In the end Cao Yu praised
Zhang's adaptation of his play as
one of the best he's ever seen, and
most critics no longer view the play
as "unhealthy".
Zhang does not pretend that she
has artistic freedom but says the
climate has improved under current
Chinese leader Deng Ziaoping. She
smiles impishly, though, as she promises to reverse for Hong Kong audiences some of the changes she was
pressured to make in Beijing.
Patti Flather is a former Ubyssey
staffer now working in Hong Kong. Page 10
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, March 141986
Cartoons draw fire
From page 7
Community transit strike, Mosher
drew a cartoon with a frustrated
transit user holding a gun and asking a bus driver if the bus passed by
Lawrence Hanigan's house
(Hanigan was the Chairman of the
MUCTC at the time). Long time
Montreal Mayor Jean Drapeau
wrote a letter to the editor of the
paper deploring the cartoon and the
Gazette apoligized to Hanigan.
Perhaps his two most controversial cartoons were ones in which he
depicted Prince Charles as a puppet
on Queen Elizabeth's lap and
another inviting readers to send a
message with the words "Quit Now
Slime Bucket," to either Ottawa
(for Trudeau) or Quebec (for Levesque).
Following the cartoon about the
Queen and Prince Charles, the
Queen's press secretary wrote to
Mosher and asked him what the
point of the caricature was, and he
responded that it was a specially-
made German drawing tip.
The only real trouble he encountered was when he drew a cartoon of then Conservative Party
leadership candidate Claude
Wagner shooting at the CBC logo.
The CBC suggested in a report that
Wagner had Vancouver mafia connections, and Wagner sued both the
CBC and Mosher. However,
Wagner died and the lawsuit was
dropped.
While some politicians are not
always enamoured by Mosher's
talent, most of his peers are. Jean-
Pierre Girerd, the political cartoonist for La Presse, is impressed
by Mosher's style. He credits his
black humour as his biggest asset.
However, Girerd criticized
Mosher on a couple of points. He
felt Mosher sometimes, "has too
many things in his picture, and he
rarely draws about international affairs.
It takes two to four hours to draw
a cartoon and Mosher does this five
days a week for nine months a year.
While the workload doesn't sound
back-breaking there is more to consider.  He says he monitors seven
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daily newspapers and watches
television news regularly for
material.
"I spend more time researching
than I do drawing," he says.
According to Mosher the hardest
part of the job is keeping up, and,
he was quick to add, you have to
know every side of the issue,
"otherwise you could end up with
egg on your face."
There were times in the early
seventies when Mosher thought he
would never draw a good cartoon
again. As in any profession, he
said, "you come to realize that you
have good weeks and bad ones."
Things have changed for Mosher
since then. His style has matured
and he has gained self-confidence.
It has been 18 years since he had
his first cartoon published in the
now defunct Montreal Star — he
moved to the Gazette in 1972 — and
he has published the same number
of books, including a book on the
history of political cartooning in
Canada entitled The Hecklers, as
well as a children's book and
several anthologies of his
caricatures. He is currently working
on a religious novella called, The
Sound of One Testicle Hanging.
So where will the future lead this
man, who is, among other things, a
member of the Baseball Writers'
Association of America? He says he
wants to do material that is more
universal, such as a book on the
nature of man. "I enjoy doing what
I do immensely, but I would like to
do immensely, but I would like to
do stuff that is understood in
Pakistan as easily as it is in
Canada."
FOR THE ENTREPENEUR
SEEKING A SEASONAL BUSINESS
This portable Clown Kiosk will provide a fun way of earning high
returns on investment (of $5000 and up, depending on equipment
package).
All prime locations still available.
A viewing is arranged for March 18, 1986. Interested parties should
contact:
CLASS "A" FOODS
533-4541 or 530-2792 (evenings)
AN APPOINTMENT WILL BE MADE FOR FURTHER DECISION.
(^&Schnappy
'u~-
After your favourite activity schnapp over to a couple
of fresh alternatives. Peppermint Schnapps and new Orange Schnapps,
two cool blasts of freshness. So what are you waiting for?
HIRAM WALKER SCHNAPPS
TASTE THE DIFFERENCE Friday, March 14,1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 11
UBC women win CIAU
By IAN ROBERTSON
For the second year in a row the
UBC women's swimming and diving team won the Canadian Interuniversity Athletic Union title
defeating the University of Toronto
435 to 429 in a hard fought battle.
The women were led by Barb Mc-
Bain's double gold medal performance in the 100m and 200m
backstroke. Her winning times were
also under the previous CIAU
records set by UBC's Wendy Hogg
in 1979. Other UBC medalists included Jen Good with a bronze in
the 100m breaststroke and Kim
Austin with a bronze in the 200m
breaststroke.
The women's 400m freestyle
relay also garnered a silver behind
Toronto, with both teams bettering
the old CIAU record. Relay
members were Anne Martin, Janet
Oakes, Nadeane Holley and McBain. The 400m medley relay of
McBain, Good, Sandra Mason and
Martin collected a bronze.
"The whole team swam well this
meet. The results are extremely
satisfying after a whole season of
hard work. All the girls on the team
should be happy with their performances and with the end result,"
said head coach Ken Radford.
In men's competition UBC
finished fifth, slightly behind
fourth place Victoria and
significantly ahead of sixth place
McMaster. UBC's depth was insufficient to overtake Victoria who
finished with 5 gold medals, tops in
men's competition
Top finishers for UBC were
Bruce Berger with a silver in the
100m backstroke and Geoff Donelly with a bronze in the 400m individual medley. The men's 4x200m
freestyle consisting of Berger,
Donelly, Kevin Stapleton and Dave
Young placed fourth.
"The men faced some of the
toughest competition in Canada at
this meet, but they rose to the occasion and performed extremely well.
Nearly all the men swam personal
best times, in many cases bettering
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
SPECIAL APPLICATION
DEADLINES
The Office of the Registrar wishes to remind students considering applying for transfer of the following deadlines:
Architecture -March 31
Commerce and Business Administration -May 31
Education -May 31
Education Diploma Programs -April 1
Engineering (Applied Science) -May 31
Fine Arts Studio Program -March 31
Landscape Architecture -April 30
Medical Laboratory Science -April 30
Music -May 15
Nursing (Four year program) -May 31
Pharmaceutical Sciences -May 31
Change of Faculty forms are available from the Registrar's
Office, G.S.A.B. Hours 8:30 to 4:00, Monday to Friday.
V\Oh What A Fun ///
»»*     Dl A/~E 77~»  DC       III
m
PLACE TO BE
Home of the frosted mug
###
Thru' Mar. 15th — Richard Stepp
Mar. 17-22 - John Hall
CNECKER3
CHECKMATE
$5.95
12 oz. Burger
on a 10" bun
Share it with a
= friend =
rW
^overlooking English Bay^
a.
team records," said Radford.
In   the   diving   portion   of   the
championships UBC placed well,
with Mindy Kalchman placing
fourth on both one and three meter
boards. Melody Smeaton placed
fifth on three meter and sixth on
one meter.
For the men Steve Church finished fifth on one meter and ninth on
three meter. Brother Calvin Church
was ninth on one and tenth on three
meter boards. The diving scores added significantly to the men's and
women's overall team scores.
GIU11M STUDENT
SOCIETY REFERENDUM
A mail-out fee referendum is presently being conducted through campus mail. If you are a graduate student and have not received the referendum package
please contact the AMS Admnistrative Assistant at 3971.
CLOSING DATE, FRIDAY, MARCH 14, 4 p.m.
(iRADl ATE STUDIES AT McMASM
• Joii is ii 1988-87 for ov (tateuial Year*
We offer a wide variety of graduate programmes in three Arts Faculties — Business, Humanities and Social Sciences.
Both doctoral and master's programmes are offered in:
• Anthropology
• Business
-Master of Business Administration
-Ph.D. in Management Science/Systems
• Classics
• Economics
English
History
Philosphy
Religious Studies
Sociology
Master's programmes are offered in:
• French
• German
• Music Criticism
• Physical Education (Adapted Human Biodynamics)
• Political Science
• Social Welfare Policy
Teaching Assistantships and Scholarships are widely available for entering and continuing Master's and Doctoral
students. Supplementary awards to recognized winners of SSHRC and OGS scholarships will be available in 1986-87 to
entering students and will be renewable.
For further information write to the Department of your choice or to:
Mr. J. A. Williamson, Secretary
School of Graduate Studies
McMaster University
1280 Main Street West
Hamilton, Ontario, L8S 4L8
You may also call: (416) 525-9140, ext. 4204.
r^\V
$
$
0^Uyi^[
AW,J\
tf»
"*"!-■"•
**.:>
OPENING FRIDAY MARCH 14th AT A FAMOUS
PLAYERS THEATRE NEAR YOU, CHECK LOCAL
LISTINGS. Page 12
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, March 14,1986
^•••••••••••••••••••••••••5
FERMAN
singing
GROBERMAN
. . tap dancing
KONTIC . . . smirking
JACOB . . . giving the evil eye
Fab four seize power
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
DANCE
presented by
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
ALL WELCOME
SAT., MARCH 15
8 p.m.
SUB BALLROOM NO MINORS
Tix $5: AMS Box Office, War Mem. Gym
*
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• ■ t*\ ▼«#. j-iiviv; uua wiiivw, wai iviciii. vsyin «*.
*•••••*•*•*••••••••*•••••••
By ANNA BANANA
The two Ubyssey autocrats have
survived a year of late, late nights at
the printers and out of the dark appeared four friendly eager new
rulers Wednesday.
The four united and proposed to
work as an editorial collective, taking next year for "better".
David Ferman a once aspiring
tennis star, did the Becker tap dance
when he found out he was
unanimously elected. Ferman a.k.a.
thoughtfully pondered running for
the collective for hours in a charming, wishy washy way.
When he earlier realized his life
ws becoming consumed by the
Ubyssey, he indignantly shed his
fuzzy beard and curly hair. He has
since resigned himself to the
Ubyssey and has let his curly locks
grow long again.
The Grad
Class Gifts
for 1986
WILL BE:
Handicapped Access in
SUB
awarded $3,000.00
A.M.S. Bursary Fund
awarded $2,000.00
Work Study Abroad Info.
Library
awarded $3,000.00
The Grad. Tree will be planted
between CPAX and the
Bookstore. The ceremony will
be Thursday, March 20, at 2:30
pm with'wine and cheese to
follow. All graduating students
are invited.
Curly twin Michael Groberman a
definite Spielberg look-alike has
become notoriously famous at the
rag. His quiet Woody Allen-like
manner aims to please all except
Mussoc.
Groberman, a Vancouver native
and former Ottawa page has carved
a musical niche at the printers.
Especially in the printers' ears
which can't seem to take enough
cotton to block out his early morning lyric-complete sing-a-longs.
Evelyn Jacob, the lone woman on
the collective, will give commands
subtley in her low, calming voice.
The sophisticated muscle-bound
Evilynne loves to write. She will be
very useful for enforcing deadlines
in next year's sleep-conscious collective.
Big Svetozar Kontic is the sports
man with a strawberry muffin-like
manner — hearty, hefty and sweet.
The only flaw in the conspiracy
hopes to recruit staff with his
friendly style, which includes talking beer, beer, and more beer.
Good luck and good taste to next
year's nice collective who have vowed to supply all Ubyssey staffers
with cookies on press days.
F^ APPLICATIONS NOW Pm
AVAILABLE FOR
the position of
^
JOBLINK COORDINATOR
Resumes Required
with Applications
Deadline for
Resumes & Applications
Friday, March21,4 p.m.
Applications
Available
SUB 238
How to
leave
home
without
wony.
CREATIVE   FOOD A BEVERAGE CO.
)i\\ 733-3^33
Choose a Wardair Contiki
holiday and relax. It's a holiday full of fun,
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And if your folks start to worry, tell them
not to. Tell them it's a Wardair Contiki tour.
Tell them Contiki has been taking people
your age around Europe for 25 years. They'll
know about Wardair's great reputation, but it
can't hurt to play it up. Make sure they know
that there's an experienced tour manager
on every trip so you don't have to take care
of hassles with customs, currency and
accommodation.
Now with any little worries out of the way,
you can concentrate on the good time you'll
have. You'll travel with a group that shares
your interests and your age (18-35s only).
Wardair's Contiki tours draw young people
from around the world, so you're sure
to meet an interesting range of new friends.
No one's going to force you to traipse
around endless old, cold buildings either —
Contiki tours are planned to appeal to your
interests, and if you'd rather plan some of
your own activities, that's okay too.
Tours range from 13 to 65 days, and can
cover most of the high spots of Europe and
Britain. A Wardair Contiki tour is as much
fun as you can handle!
Your Travel Agent has the new Wardair
Contiki brochure and all the information
you'll need to plan to leave home on the
trip of a lifetime.
^Wardair Holidays Friday, March 14,1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 13
Fed scheme fails
WINNIPEG (CUP) — The
federal government's scheme to
privatise a new research centre has
failed, and what was supposed to be
a world centre of industrial and
technological research lies vacant.
Science Place Canada, the size of
a city block, was built by the federal
Liberals for National Research
Council staff in Manitoba, but
Tory Finance minister Michael
Wilson cancelled NRC involvement
in Nov. 1984. The new government
hoped to draw the private sector,
universities, and various government researchers into the facility
although after 15 months of delay
only the Manitoba Research Council has signed up for the project.
Manitoba minister of industry,
trade and technology Eugene
Kostyra said the federal Conservatives have failed miserably.
"This has become a real sham,"
he said. While Science Place
Canada, built at a cost of $36
million "is ready to be open, there's
no one ready to move in except us.
They don't seem to know what's
going on."
Kostyra said the government
assumed other groups would pick
up the deserted project. "There was
no consultation whatsoever with the
province (before the announcement). All we knew is that we were
not prepared to subsidise a national
centre," he said.
While the Manitoba Research
Council will contribute up to $3
million per year and commit some
50 researchers on projects, Kostyra
said the province can't be expected
to help find other tenants.
"We're providing some level of
support, but it's their responsibility."
Alex Mayman is the director of
the institute owned by the NRC
even though the research agency
hasn't been told what it will be able
to in the facility.
"Our mandate at the moment is
to ensure the building is completed
and ready for whatever the government wants to use it for," Mayman
said.
Mayman, who expected to have
only NRC research at the institute,
said he was "very disappointed" by
the government's move to attract
business into the facility. But, "this
is what happens with what they call
budget rationalisation," he said.
While no universities have formally agreed to participate,
representatives from both the
University of Manitoba and the
University of Winnipeg have been
involved in lengthy discussions
about the troubled institute.
Marion Vaisey-Genser, U of M
associate vice president (research),
says her university will likely take
part once a plan is adopted.
"It's an excellent facility, right
down our alley," she said. But,
"everyone's waiting for the feds to
say, let's go."
Vaisey-Genser said U of M, with
its strong interests in applied
sciences has "quite a list" of interests for potential research at the
facility, but must wait until the
federal government decides what
role the university can play in
Science Place Canada.
"We're very much looking forward to taking advantage of the
facilities. We would want our
teachers and students to participate
in a collaborative effort," she said.
University of Winnipeg president
Robin Farquhar said arts-oriented
U of W researchers plan projects
that will "give the community the
human side of technology.
"We want to be able to translate
what's going on in that great big
building so that it won't be just an
edifice. We want it to be something
they can understand," he said.
"We hope this will be a truly national resource. We want to find a
focus that will spread across the entire country," he said.
10,000 Times A Week
We Get Taken
For A Ride!
One year ago nobody had ever heard of Take & Bake
pizza. But now, thanks to Mama Alda's, it has become a
weekly treat for thousands of Vancouver families.
If you haven't tried one of our pizzas, hot from your
own oven at "It's Moment of Perfection," you're
missing something.
Go ahead. Take us for a ride.
PfMnflJlLDAS]
,„ Home Bake Pizza & Pasta L
LARGE   9£1
You-Top-It  °
Pick your favorite topping from our
selection of more than a dozen fresh
meats and vegetables. (Excluding seafood)
Extra toppings just 90"!
Valid Through April 6, 1966
LfnamfljiDfls
^
Home B*W Plzz* & Past
Trafalgar St.
734-1818
Dunbar St.
228-1818
Richmond
278-1818
Cambie St.
874-9213
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
ENGLISH COMPOSITION TEST
The English Composition Test Will Be Held On
FRIDAY, MARCH 21, 1986
From 7:00 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.
Room assignments are listed below
and at the end of the exam timetable, p. 12.
Every student must attach to the examination booklet a "Fee Paid" sticker ($10.00),
which must be purchased from the Department of Finance. A student writing for the
first time should attach a "Fee-Waived" sticker obtainable from the Registrar's Office.
University regulations state, "Each person taking the exam should be prepared to produce, upon request, his or her Library/AMS Card."
Students are permitted the use of a dictionary
Room
Assignments
Report to the room
according
to
your surname
HEBBTH
AAA-CHAM
BUCHA106
CHAN-DAL
BUCHA104
DAM-DUM
BUCHA102
DUIM-FIS
HENN200
FIT-HAN
HENN201
HAO-HOU
MATH 100
HOW-KOL
GEOG 100
KOM-LIL
ANGU 104
LIM-MCL
ANGU110
MCM-OSL
WOOD (IRC) 2
OSM-SHO
SCRF100
SHP-TEZ
WESB 100
TFA-ZZZ
NOTE: The ECT will next be given on Friday, July 18, 1986 from 7:00 to 9:30 p.m., and on
Thursday, September 25, 1986 from 5:00 to 7:30 p.m. The July and September examinations are open only to those students who have credit for English 100 (or
equivalent credit).
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UNDER THE GRANVILLE BRIDGE • AT FOURTH AVENUE • PHONE 736-4547 Page 14
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, March 14, 1986
('4J00ti
TODAY
UBC SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK
Speaker Svend Robinson, "Equality rights in the
'80's",  noon,   Graham  house  lecture hall A,
School of Social Work. Cecil Green Park Rd.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Greg Ball, world wide speaker, 7 p.m.. Woodward 1.
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Beginners' Cantonese conversation dees, noon,
Buch B317.
UBC FILM SOCIETY
Film:  "Prizzi's Honor", 7 and 9:30 p.m.,  SUB
auditorium.
UBC NEW DEMOCRATS
NDP leader Bob Skelly speaking today,  noon,
SUB auditorium.
THE UBYSSEY
Sign up if you're coming to the year end banquet. We still need more help so see Camile or
Evelyn to help (this means you) alt day,  SUB
241K.
UBC NEW DEMOCRATS
Presents NDP leader  Bob Skelly,  noon,  SUB
auditorium.
AEROSPANCE AND ASTRONOMY CLUB
General   meeting   and   elections,   5:30   p.m.,
Astonomy and geophysics 142.
STUDENTS FOR PEACE AND MUTUAL
DISARMAMENT
V.  Makarov,  first secretary of the Soviet embassy  in  Ottawa:   "The  Reagan   -   Gorbachev
arms proposals", noon, SUB 207/209.
ARTS AND SCIENCE UNDERGRADUATE
SOCIETIES
Spring dance, 8 p.m., SUB ballroom.
BAHA'I CLUB
General meeting on Mona's story video "Mona
with the children", noon-2:30 p.m., SUB 212.
UBC CREATIVE WRITING DEPARTMENT
"Sideshow '86", fourteen new plays by UBC
creative writing students, free, noon and 8 p.m..
Hut   M24,   near   Univ.    Blvd.   behind   Arts   1
building.
ECONOMICS STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Grad  dinner  tickets  on  sale,   11:30 a.m.-1:30
p.m.. Economics lounge (9th floor Buch tower).
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Drop in classes at $5, 8:30-10 a.m., SUB par
tyroom, noon, SUB plaza south.
POLITICAL SCIENCE STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Bzzr garden, 4-8 p.m., Buch lounge.
SATURDAY
UBC CREATIVE WRITING DEPARTMENT
"Sideshow '86", fourteen new plays by UBC
creative writing students, free, 7 p.m.. Hut M24,
near University Blvd. behind Arts 1 building.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE/BALLET UBC JAZZ
Cultural dance workshop: Introduction to belly
dance, 3-4:30 p.m.. International house, lower
lounge.
NEWMAN CATHOLIC CLUB
Annual talent night, 7:30 p.m., St. Mark's college common room.
EAST INDIAN STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Year end bash, 7 p.m., Tommy Africa's, on
Beach, downtown.
SUNDAY
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Worship service, 10 a.m., UBC daycare gym,
2846 Acadia Rd.
THE UBYSSEY SCHOOL OF SOCCER
Game,  11 a.m., St. George's field, 28th and
Camosun.
UBC ARCHERY CLUB
Regular practice, new members welcome, 7:30
p.m.. Armouries.
MONDAY
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Beginners' Mandarin conversation class, noon,
Buch B317.
THE SPACE STATION
Public lecture: Gregg Maryniak, executive V.P.
of space studies institute, Princeton, "The
harvest of space". Dr. David Strangway,
"Planetary exploration", 7:30 p.m., Robson
Square Media center.
INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS STUDENTS
ASSOCIATION
Nomination and election of president and
treasurer, noon, International house.
ROCKERS
Sin seminar, general meeting, attendance mandatory, noon, SUB 241E.
THE UBYSSEY
Sign up if you are coming to the year end banquet; Press day — come in and help us put out
the paper, all day, SU8 241K.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Drop in classes at $5, 8:30-10 a.m., SUB party
room, noon, SUB ballroom, 5:30-7 p.m., SUB
pla2a south.
TUESDAY
UBC SPORT CAR CLUB
Meeting, 7 p.m., SUB 211.
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Beginners' Mendarin conversation class, noon,
Buch B317.
MARANATHA CLUB
Bible study and discussion, noon. Brock hall 304.
THE UBYSSEY
Sign up if you're coming to the year end banquet, all day, SUB 241K.
Y'all come on down to hear why
Cowboy Bob Skelly wants Buffalo
Bill Bennett's job. Cowboy Bob will
be here in the flesh at the SUB
Auditorium for a roundup of all
young NDP's and any other whip-
persnappers interested in the
rootin' tootin' world of B.C. politics
at 12:00 this Friday.
Do you want to find out what is
happening in Victoria? Then come
and hear Bob Skelly, the leader of
the NDP. He will be speaking in
SUB auditorium at noon Friday.
••••••••••••••••••••••••••
¥¥ ¥ ¥
¥¥   AMS CONCERTS presents ¥ ¥
¥¥  ¥ ¥
this is it dance
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with
¥ ¥
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¥ ¥
CHILLIWACK
plus guests
VERTIGO
Sat. March 29, 8 p.m.
SUB BALLROOM
¥
¥
¥
¥
Tix: $4 Advance, AMS Box Office
$6 at Door, no minors please
WATCH FOR UPCOMING EASTER CONTEST
¥
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*•••••••••••••*•***•***
Jfr*	
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t
Eyeglass Boutique
3305 WEST BROADWAY
(at Blenheim)
VANCOUVER, B.C.
732-0008
Come to
FOR MEN
For smartly classic or uniquely
original clothes. For all occasions from casual to formal
wear.
Consignment Shop
with a difference—
5581 Dunbar at 40th Ave.     i
266-3393   Hours: Mon.-Sat. 10-5:30
n
r Our Ladies'
/ Consignment store
provides superb quality at only a
fraction of the original price.
5587 Dunbar at 40th Ave.
263-2728
Open Mon.-Sat. 10:30-5:30 p.m.
PRIZZI'S HONOUR
[Thurs.-Sun, Mar. 13-16
7:00 & 9:30 p.m.
ISUB AUDITORIUM!
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: AMS Card Holders — 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; Additional lines, 60c. Commercial — 3 lines,
1 day $4.50; Additional lines, 70c. Additional days, $4.00 and 55c.
Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 10:30 a.m. the day before publication.
'^'^ Publications, Room 266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
Charge Phone Orders Over $10.00 - Call228-3977
5 - COMING EVENTS
Free Lecture
THE LOGICAL
CERTAINTY
of
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
HEALING
BRUCE FITZWATER, C.S.B.
Member of the Christian
Science Board of Lectureship
WED. MARCH 19
12:30 p.m.
SUB RM207
THE VANCOUVER INSTITUTE
Free Public Lecture
Dr. Partha Dasgupta
Economics, St. John's
College, Cambridge
THE SILENT
FOOD WAR
(The E.S. Woodward Lecture)
Saturday, March 15
Lecture Hall 2, Woodward
Building, 8:15 p.m. FREE
STAINED PINE BOOKCASES: 42"x48"
($40). 60"x48" ($50), 84"x68" ($100). 60" x
68" ($60). 24"x28" ($15). 738-4172.
VANCOUVER-MONTREAL. Spend 2
beautiful weeks for less than $280 return.
Leaving Apr. 22 (Female) Call today Cecile
327-3208.
EMPANADAS LLAIMA! Order them now
for The weekend. 3 varieties: beef, chicken,
seafood. Ph. 731-3270.
j Single Vision Glasses.
„ Soft Contact Lenses
i Extended Wear
! Contact Lenses
I
•88       j
complete      !
ARC
UNDERGRAD MAGAZINE
on sale now:
-UBC Bookstore
-BUTO 397
-Creative Writing Office
$1.50
.50      N
complete /*
ft
»)
*179
20 - HOUSING
I     $10 OFF ON DAILY & EXTENDED WEAR CONTACT LENSES
I WITH THIS COUPON
WORKING AT EXPO? Need a place to
live? Affordable housing is available on
campus. Rooms starting at $200 per month
for a double room. Contact Colin at
224-9119 after 9 p.m.
| STORE HOURS:
j Monday/Thursday 9 a.m.-6:00 p.m.
| Friday 9 a.m.-8:00 p.m.
■ Saturday 9 a.m.-5:30 p.m.
MAJOR CREDIT
CARDS ACCEPTED
lOffer Valid Until Apr. 30. 19861
30 - JOBS
■E
.1—JL
WORK FROM HOME full-time, part-time
or anytime marketing nutrition products
and earn excellent income - 688-9076.
30 - JOBS
11 - FOR SALE - Private
IBM-APPLE-MAC PROG. $5-$20/disc.
Academy Software. #17—712 Robson St.
681-4184.
ONE-WAY FLIGHT - Vancouver to Toronto
leaving April 30. $150. Call Mike at
224-9431.
81 HONDA 900 A1 SHAPE. Proven tour
bike c/w extras. $1800 obo. Must sell. No
reasonable offer refused. 228-1282.
77 DATSUN B210, 4 spd, 74,000 mi., great
condition. Moving, must sell. $1,800 obo.
Call Nancy @ 733-4455.
COMMODORE 64 COMPUTER, colour
monitor, disk drive, G-Whiz printer interface plus spreadsheet and work processor
$900 obo Ph. 327-3771.
12 SPEED BICYCLE. Nishiki Landau. Like
new condition. Used one summer. $300
firm. Stephen 224-5861.
MALE COMPANION wanted for slightly
handicapped male senior citizen. Some
help with maint., garden & yard. Other help
kept. There is a friendly trained dog & cat.
Renumeration to be discussed. 228-9255.
SUMMER JOB TREE PLANTING
Nomadic Silviculture is hiring for this summer. May 1-July 1 and Aug. 1-30. Camp
and Cooks, Avg. price 12c/tree. Experience
preferred. Ph. 733-6975.
MALE OR FEMALE PAINTERS & foremen
$5.-7/hr., 30-40 hrs/week. Must have good
attitude, enthusiasm, motivation, & pleasant personality. Prefer you to have car Et
previous experience, but not necessary. Ph.
Merek 591-1227, 8-10 p.m. only for interview.
EARL'S GONE
FISHING
Earl   is   looking   for   high   energy,
responsible individuals for his new
200 seat seafood restaurant, CAFE
FISH, located at Broadway & Fir:
waiters,    waitresses,    hostesses,
buspeople,   bartenders,   kitchen
supervisors,    cooks,    preps,    &
dishwashers. Apply in person at:
Centennial Motor Hotel,
898 West Broadway
Sat. & Sun., Mar. 15 6- 16
9 a.m. - 4 p.m.
40 - MESSAGES
PLAY DOUBLE-UP, circular 2-man strategy
game. Tournament possible. For free instructions write: Double-Up Club of Montreal, Box 5453, Station B, Montreal,
Quebec, H3B4P1.
GET CULTURED. Van. Symphony and the
Pennsylvania Ballet present: La Sylphide.
Great seats for sale - Q.E. Theatre — March
22. 222-2216. (9 a.m. or dinner)
TRISH (History 205- U.Vic., '82/'83). Please
phone Wayne at 683-7054.
70 - SERVICES
PREGNANT?? 731 1122
-free tests - confidential help.
SUMMER OF 73 DAYCARE has openings
for 3-5 year olds 228-6406.
FEMALE VOLUINTTEERS
REQUIRED FOR DEPT. OF
MEDICINE STUDY
If you are taking oral contraceptives and are willing to
come to VGH for six appointments, we will pay you
$45.00. All records are strictly
confidential. For info call
Karen or Anita at 875-4588
M-F.
University Hill United
and Presbyterian
congregations
invite you to join us in
worship Sunday mornings at
10:30 a.m. in the Epiphanyl
Chapel Vancouver School
of Theology.
6060 Chancellor Boulevard
75 - WANTED
WANTED: Exper. tutor for 2nd year comm.
student. Preparation for finals, etc. Call
Randall at 224-4704.
80 - TUTORING
EDITING,   PROOFING.  WRITING   HELP.
English/German.   F.   David   B.Sc,   M.A.
738-6942 eves. Low rates.
SPEAKEASY TUTORIAL CENTRE. Find a
tutor or register as a tutor. SUB Concourse.
M-F 9:30 a.m. to 9:30 p.m.
85 - TYPING
FAST, EFFICIENT TYPING done on Word
Processor, $1.50/Page. Call Rachel,
228-3881 or 224-0866.
TYPIST: Will type essays, theses,
etc. Min. notice req'd. $1.00/page. Call
222-0150 after 5:00.
JAMTART & WAZZ offer free p/u and
delivery to UBC. $1.50/pg., dbl. sp. spelling, grammar free. Editing and overnight
avail. Call 733-4455.
WORD    PROCESSING    SPECIALIST.    U
write,  we  type  theses,   resumes,   letters,
essays. Days, evgs., wknds. 736-1208.
EXPERT TYPING: Essays, t. papers, fac
turns, letters, mscpts, resumes, theses.
IBM Sel It. Proofreading. Reas. rates. Rose
731-9857, 224-7351.
GEETECH WORD PROCESSING. Student
rates. Fast turnaround. 7 days-24 hrs.
Kingsway/Fraser. 879-2027.
WORDPOWER-Editing, proofing Et word
processing professionals. Xerox copies,
student rates. 3737 W. 10th Ave. (at Alma)
222 2661.
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST. 30 years ex
perience. Student rates. Photocopier.
Dorothy Martinson, 228-8346.
WORD    WEAVERS Word    Processing
(Bilingual) Student rates. Fast turnaround.
5670 Yew St. at 41st. Kerrisdale 266-6814.
FAST, ACCURATE TYPING. Student rates.
All types of typing jobs.  Fraser-Kingsway
area. Paula, 873-2227
JUDITH FILTNESS, quality typist. 3206
West 38th Avenue, 263-0351.
GALAXIE WORD SHOP for all your word
processing. Greek, math. P/U Et Del. on
campus. Stud, rates. Mastercard/Visa.
985-4250.
WORDSWORTH wordprocessing. Hardware: IBM. Software: WordPerfect. Call
Kerry Rigby. 876-2895. 12th Et Commercial.
TYPING    -   fast,   accurate
rates. 734-8451.
reasonable
ACCENT word processing / translation
French - English - Italian — $18/hr. Del. on
campus. 536 7172/536-9214.
ACCURATE Et EXPRESS-LY FOR YOU.
Typing starting @$1.00/pg. dble-spaced.
Call Marlene 736-4675 to reach or leave
message. I'll get back to you.
W/P & TYPING: Term papers, theses,
mscpts., essays, tech., equal., letters,
resumes. Bilingual. Clemy 266-6641.
ADINA WORD PROCESSING. Student
discount. High quality work. 10th Er
Discovery. Phone 222 2122.
TERM PAPERS Et resumes. Minimum notice. 222-4661. Wed., Thurs., Fri., Noon 5
p.m. Weekends before noon.
Student Rates $1.50/pg. db. sp. text
Theses - Equations - Reports
All work done on Micom Word Processor
FAST PROFESSIONAL SERVICE
JEEVA'S WORD PROCESSING
201 636 W. Broadway
876-5333       (hrs. 9-4:» p.m.l
Eves., Sun.-Thurs.   939-2703
SUPPORTTHE
UBYSSEY! Friday, March 14, 1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 15
Visla
Music
Mpendo'Moja an eleven piece reggae
dance rock band, has opened for
Mutabaruka, Mlao Poets and Steel Pulse,
Savoy (16 Powell St.), Wednesday March 19.
High Fraser and the Veji Band, Hugh has
played with Kenny Wheeler, Slide Hampton
and all the biggies, a concert appealing to jazz
and rock fans. Hot Jazz Club (2120 Main
St.), March 24. Great trombone.
The Magic Flute, Mozart's and the world's
greatest opera, Queen Elizabeth Theatre,
(682-2871), March 15.
Woody Herman Big Band, presented by
the Hot Jazz Society and Steinbeck productions, Hot Jazz Society {2120 Main St.
873-4131) on his 50th anniversary tour with his
Young Thundering Herd, March 17. Mojo,
African high tech pop present original work at
the Arts Club Review Granville Island
Theatre. March 16.
A La Carte — the fusion of three voices
and an exciting visual presentation Arts Club
Revue Theatre, March 23.
John Williams, the composer of some of
the most boring, err successful movie music
conducts a Judy Garland tribute and lots of
his own stuff, March 14-18 at 8:30 p.m., Orpheum (875-1661).
Blind Dancers, a touching and bittersweet
drama about one night stands, big dreams
and love. March 13-15 and 20-22 at 9:30 p.m.,
at the Firehall Theatre. 280 East Cordova St.
West Vancouver Little theatre presents
A duet for one, he emotional story about a
professional violinist who learns she has multiple sclerosis, March 14 and 15 at Eagle Community Centre. West Vancouver, 926-2248
or 921-9393. 5575 Marine Drive.
A Chorus Line opens March 29 at the Vancouver Playhouse 243 West 7th Ave.,
872-6622.
The Haunting of Hill house, held over until March 15 at the Vagabond Players in New
Westminster, 521-0412.
The North Shore Community players
present Filthy Rich March 26 to April 12 at
Presentation House. 333 Chesterfield,
North Vancouver.
The Would-be Gentleman a marvelous
comedy by Moliere, March 14, 15, and 17-22
at 8 p.m. at the Douglas College performing
arts theatre, 4th floor, 700 Royal Ave., New
Westminster.
Stage
Frederic Wood Theatre-UBC presents
William Shakespeare As You Like It 8 p.m.
until March 15 special information and reservations 228-2678..
Headlines Theatre company presents The
Enemy Within, a political comedy about the
premier, his cleaning woman, restraint, and
you. Touring the Lower Mainland until Mar.
23. 738-2283 for locations, playing at UBC
Graduate centre ballroom Mar. 19.
Capilano College Theatre Program The
St. Nicholas Hotel - Wm. Donnelly Prop.
Wed. to Sat. Mar. 12-15. Tues. to Sat. Mar.
18-22. 8 p.m. at Presentation House Studio
Theatre, 333 Chesterfield Ave, North Vancouver, 986-1911.
Cue to cue players present I Ought To Be
In Pictures, a Neil Simon comedy at
Cumberland Hall, 104 Ave. and 144 St. Surrey. 594-4785. Running until Mar. 29.
RED LEAF
RESTAURANT
Luncheon Smorgasbord
Authentic Chinese Cuismv
228-9114
10"- DISCOUNT ON
PICK UP ORDERS
LICENSED PREMISES
M,,n  Fri    11  30 H 00 |.  m
CLOSED SATURDAYS     j
Sur'clil.s dud  Hulitldys
4 00 p  m    9 00 p  in
2142 Western Parkwdy
I UBC Village
Stevie
A//OS.
■snais noh L»ifm jMphoA op jey/n
GREAT NEWS!
Mon. thru Thurs.
in March & April
P.J.'s on 4th is
offering all food at
Vi price
after 10:00 p.m.
WM H/sr4m. Avenue
Only in Vancouver held over through
Mar. at the Revue Stage, 687-1644.
Children of a lesser God, the story of a
fiercely independent deaf woman and her
hearing husband. At the Arts Club Theatre
Granville Island Stage, until March 29,
687-1644.
Carousel Theatre presents Shakespeare's
Romeo and Juliet Mar. 19-29 at the Waterfront Theatre Granville Island, 685-6217.
City Stage presents Mothers and
Fathers-Consummate Comedy from
Down Under Mar. 18th to 24th at 8:30 p.m. 2
for 1 Saturday matinee at 4:30, 688-1436.
Everyman: a musical morality, directed by
Sharolyn Lee, an MFA directing student and
promising stage-manager from Toronto who
changed her name and hair-colour and moved
to the coast to be an artist. March 19-22 at 8
p.m. at the Dorothy Somerset Studio.
Mstinee, Thursday March 20 at noon in front
of the clock tower, or in the Studio if it rains.
seventh annual all student dance show,
March 20, 21 and 22 Evenings at 8 p.m. Free
matinee March 21 at 12:20 p.m. SFU Mall
Theatre, 291-3514.
Galleries
tace
The Dance Brigade in Resistance: Love
in a bitter time, a look at social issues that incorporates modern dance, martial arts, sign
language, theatre, song, and comedy. March
18-22 at 8 p.m. at the Vancouver East
Cultural Centre. 1896 Venables. 251-1366.
Pennsylvania Ballet accompanied by the
Vancouver Symphony Orchestra presents
an all new program that combines the grace
and symmetry of classical ballet with the
creativity of modern dance. March 20, 21 and
22 at the Queen Elizabeth Theatre, 280-3311
or 280-4444.
The Tulsa Ballet in the tradition of the
legendary ballet Russa March 17. 8 p.m..
at the Queen Elizabeth theatre. 280-4444.
Simon Fraser University Centre for the
arts presents Moves in the Equinox the
The Burnaby Arts Council is extending a
special invitation to B.C. artists and craftspeople to participate in the annual visual arts
exhibition. Images Er Objects IV. A
preliminary local adjudication will be held on
Sunday March 23, with selected works exhibited at the New Westminster Arts Centre
(March 23-April 6), the Richmond Gateway
Theatre (April 7-251 and the B.C. Festival of
Arts in Prince George (May 4-6). For more information call 298-7322 or 525-3244.
The Surrey Art Gallery presents Shapes
Up — sculptures by children which explore
three-dimensional forms in clay, paper and
wire. Exhibition continues until May 7 at the
Centre (13750-88 Ave., Surreyl. For times call
596-1515 or 596-7461.
The Richmond Art Gallery presents a
Canadian Chinese Exhibition of paintings
and pottery from march 1431 at the Richmond Gallery (7671 Minoru Gate, Richmond). Call 278-3301 for more information.
Christos Dikeakos, a UBC Fine Arts
graduate is exhibiting 56 works at the Vancouver Art Gallery (750 Hornby Street) until
March 16.
E3BASF 90
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GRADUATION,
 BEGINUSING
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If you're graduating this year and you've
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at an annual salary of $10,000 or more
and have a clean credit record, you can get
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That's it. No strings. No gimmicks.
(And even if you don't have a job right now,
don't worry. This offer is still
good up to 12 months after you
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Why is American Express
making it easier for you to
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simply stated, we recognize
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THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, March 14, 1986
NORAD,
Star Wars,
and
Nuclear War
By James Young
Graphics by Carl Rosenberg
From March 17-20, Prime Minister Brian
Mulroney will be in Washington, wining and
dining in White House style and — more than
likely — renewing the North American
Aerospace Defence Command agreement.
Many Canadians fear the NORAD agreement is the back
door to the Strategic Defence Initiative, commonly called
Star Wars. They say NORAD will help the U.S. develop
nuclear first-strike and war-fighting strategies, weakening
the fragile balance between the two superpowers.
First signed in 1958, NORAD does not immediately seem
to be a particularly threatening defence agreement.
NORAD's current functions are to:
• monitor satellites;
• give early warning of Soviet missile or bomber attack
through the arctic;
• provide limited air defence against bomber attack; and
• facilitate global military communications for nuclear
decision-making.'
To fulfill this role, Canada and the U.S. have maintained
radar systems like the arctic DEW line and interceptor aircraft such as the CF-18s based at Cold Lake, Alberta, and
Bagotville, Quebec.
Last year, Mulroney agreed to a $7 billion overhaul of
NORAD, including the replacement of the DEW line with
the North Warning System and expansion of northern airfields to accommodate F-15 and F-18 fighters.
Mark Fettes, a biochemistry grad student and coordinator of UBC's Students for Peace and Mutual Disarmament, believes NORAD's real significance lies in American
nuclear strategy, which is more dangerous than most of us
realize.  _^_^__
". . . there will be tremendous
pressure for NORAD to be used for
the kinds of strategies that will make
nuclear war more likely."	
He said the Reagan administration has completed a shift
away from the nuclear stand-off known as "deterrence",
towards actual nuclear war-fighting strategies.
Fettes quoted American defence documents which call
on the U.S. to "prevail" in or win a "protracted" nuclear
war, forcing the Soviet Union to "seek earliest termination
of hostilities on terms favorable to the United States."
He said the U.S. is developing weapons like the MX,
capable of destroying hardened Soviet missile silos.
The two developments makes nuclear war more likely
Fettes said. While the U.S. moves towards the possibility of
a pre-emptive first strike, the Soviets are pressured to
launch first rather than losing their arsenal.
"As long as the U.S. is interested in these kinds of
strategies, there will be tremendous pressure for NORAD
to be used for the kinds of strategies that will make nuclear
war more likely," said Fettes.
In the first-strike scenario, Star Wars would mop up remnants of the high-flying Soviet ballistic missiles trying to
retaliate. NORAD could assist Star Wars with this, as well
as destroying any remaining low-flying cruise missiles or
bombers.
As U.S. Major-General John Shaud said: "If you're going to fix the roof, you don't want to leave the doors and
windows open."
Fettes says SPMD's educational work on the agreement
focusses on further NORAD-Star Wars links including:
• the development of Strategic Defence Architecture
2,000, a conceptual planning exercise to integrate Star Wars
and NORAD;
• the deletion of the ABM (anti-ballistic missile) clause
in 1981, which said Canada would not participate in Star
Wars-type defences;
• the change in the meaning of the "A" in NORAD in
1981   from the original  "air"  defence to  "aerospace"
defence;
• the NORAD headquarters in Cheyenne, Wyoming is
also headquarters of the Unified Space Command, considered the logical command of Star Wars; and
• the NORAD commander is also the Unified Space
Command commander.
The Canadian government has consistently denied any
NORAD-Star Wars links.
Fettes disagrees: "Whatever wishy-washy statements
Canadian government officials make, when the time comes
to start deploying Star Wars components, they are going to
be integrated with NORAD."	
"Canada is essentially a rather
politically inert country. We haven't
had an activist diplomacy . . . since
the 1950s."	
Given NORAD's probable links with Star Wars and
nuclear war-fighting strategies, SPMD recommends
Canada honor its commitment to stable mutual deterrence
by renegotiating NORAD to provide for an early warning
function only or to opt out of NORAD entirely and
establish an independent northern surveillance role.
Douglas Ross, a UBC political science professor, said
Canada should opt out of NORAD.
"I'd say disentangle, disengage from NORAD, but this
has to be part of a renewed process of commitment to a bigger share of western security," he said.
Ross said Canada has little political leverage in
agreements like NORAD and in western defence planning
in general because of the international perception of our
country as a "free rider", unable to take care of its own
security and unwilling to pay for it.
"Canada is essentially a rather politically inert country,"
he said. "We haven't had an activist diplomacy, an activist
approach to geo-political and geo-strategic issues since the
1950's."
Pauline Jewett, NDP external affairs critic and a member
of the external affairs and national defence parliamentary
committee, said although the Conservative-dominated
committee recently recommended renewing the agreement
for five years, she is speaking out against the renewal.
"If the government allows the NORAD agreement with
all its loopholes to go forward, and particularly if it allows
the agreement to go forward without a re-insertion of the
ABM clause, then it is basically saying, 'Go ahead with Star
Wars,' " she said.
"By just automatically giving carte blanche to NORAD
for another five years, we feel by that time it will be too late
— we'll really be totally integrated into the new strategic
doctrines and practices that we are so opposed to."
Liberal MPs have also been less than satisfied with the
renewal. In November, Liberal defence critic Leonard
Hopkins said defence minister Erik Nielsen was
"stonewalling" on the question of NORAD-Star Wars
links. And in a press release issued soon after the NORAD
report was tabled, Hopkins and Jean Chretien said they felt
"most strongly" that the ABM clause should be re-
inserted.
"By just a automatically giving carte
blanche to NORAD for another five
years, we feel by that time it will be
too late . . ."	
Ironically, there is very little debate on the most important of Canada's 800 defence-related agreements with the
U.S.
SPMD's Fettes says, "1 am sure that even in parliament
there are a tremendous number of people who don't even
know what NORAD stands for, let alone what's involved in
it."
Professor Ross sums NORAD up this way: "We've got
every conceivable reason for doing what we can to influence the balance, to influence the kinds of weapons
bought in the U.S., the kinds of tactics applied to the way
these weapons are deployed, and that goes for NORAD. If
any country in the world should have a coherent view on international relations, it's us, because we're in the middle. If
there's even a limited nuclear war, Canada is quite likely to
be involved."

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