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The Ubyssey Oct 1, 1971

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Array Vol. Llll,
No. 9
VANCOUVER, B.C.,
FRIDAY, OCTOBER  1,  1971
" 228-2301
Indian Week features rare dance
The Indian Week committee has exceeded
its budget, according to Gillies Malnarich,
acting AMS external affairs officer.
"We hoped the whole thing was going to be
free, but because of this we've got to charge
for two events," Malnarich said.
The committee will charge $1 admission to
'The Animal Kingdom', a dance by a troupe
from  the  Kwakiutl  tribe, held  7:30  p.m.
Friday in the SUB auditorium.
"It is really an honor for these dancers to
be coming here, because they've only
performed the dance five or six times — and
then only at Indian ceremonies," she said.
They also have to charge the price of the
salmon at the salmon barbeque to be held in
the SUB plaza from 3 to 6 p.m. Friday.
"This will" really be a unique event," said
Malnarich.
"We wanted to do away with disposable
utensils, so we decided to serve the salmon
and the baked potatoes on a split log, give
everyone a cedar shake for a plate, and let
them use their fingers."
Only 200 people can be served.
The rest of the events are free.
Further information about the Indian week
schedule is in the Page Friday section of
today's Ubyssey.
■>'  .....   -,,>,.-.. ' ..    -   t..,Ml»^!"'^^ IH Ii  I ■ ■II1#-*'A?' '?
—gary gruenfce photo
LOGGERS for a day, UBC foresters take a dive Thursday into Empire Pool. Dainty water nymphs participated in forestry week birling.
Reactionary council ousted
ST. JOHN'S (CUP) - Students at Memorial
University in Newfoundland, aided and
abetted by the student newspaper The Muse
and former student leaders, ousted their entire
student council in a referendum Wednesday.
The reactionary council, led by 34-year-old
Dave Rooney, who is connected with the
provincial Progressive Conservative party,
were facing their second non-confidence
referendum since being elected in an election
last spring.
This time the council's usually efficient
political machine could no longer hold out
against    the    charges    of   corruption   and
patronage. The final vote in the referendum
was 1,530 against Rooney's council, with 895
supporting it.
Politics, the provincial sport in
Newfoundland, are decided on the university
level here much the same as on the provincial
level, by personalities rather than by issues.
But the student bureaucracy at Memorial
during Rooney's prematurely-ended reign, was
also run in a manner akin to provincial
politics: by patronage rather than by
democratic means.
The directors of the council's $80,000
Opportunities for Youth program read like
the list of council executive members, and
most paying jobs in the council bureaucracy
went to council members or Rooney
supporters. Rooney himself was accused by
The Muse of taking a $ 1,000 salary as summer
president in addition to $1,500 as the OFY
program director.
So Memorial students, rather than put up
with a miniature Smallwood government,
decided to oust the council and start afresh.
The new election date (Rooney has said he
will not contest another student election, he
may have his eye on the provincial election in
Newfoundland this fall) has not yet been set.
Aggies egged on to yolk of the century
The yolk was on agriculture
students Gordon Blankstein, Peter
Leggat and Brian Mennell last
Sunday.
Five and a half dozen of them,
that is — the number of attempts
they made before breaking the
world raw egg-throwing record
with a toss and catch over a
distance of 241 feet, four inches.
The previous record, set by
two Vancouver men who now
have egg on their faces, was 240
fbet.
The trio took turns throwing
the cackleberries over a 3%-hour
period until Mennell egged on by
Leggat, made a successful toss to
Blankstein.
- "We    had   to    have    breaks
because   our  arms were  getting
MENNELL, BLANKSTEIN, LEGGAT .
champion egg-throwers
—david phillips photo
worn out," Blankstein explained.
The record toss was made at
Oyster River on Vancouver Island.
The eggs were purchased at
UBC. They cost only 25 cents a
dozen because they were
unsuitable for eating.
As for the libidinal motive
force behind the egg-tossing,
Leggat said: "We'd read these
newspaper articles on egg-tossing
for the past few months and
thought it would be the thing to
do one of these days so we went
ahead and did it."
Blankstein said the trio intends
holding a world record challenge
match in January during Aggie
Week on campus.
The previous world record
holders will be invited to join the
competition, he said. Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 1,  1971
Report backs preservation
of UBC endowment lands
By JUDY McLEOD
A report submitted Wednesday
to student council recommended
an end to university endowment
land expansion in favor of a
wilderness area park.
"Recreation and conservation
considerations dictate that the
endowment lands be made a city
or provincial park," said science
rep Adrian Belshaw who compiled
the one-man report.
It goes on to advocate the
establishment of campsites, trails
and picnic areas, developed under
the administration of the
provincial department of lands
and forests.
Council members received the
report, but refused to accept it
until they have had time to
consider it and discuss its
implications.
"Out of this, we hope, will
come some concrete proposals on
the part of the Alma Mater
Society," the report states.
The report reviews the
economic       history      of      the
Student poll
on arts centre
The arts undergraduate society
is conducting a student opinion
poll on a proposal to turn the
study area in the Buchanan
building into an arts
entertainment section.
"We would like to put up a
small stage and install a sound
system, among other things,"
Alma Mater Society arts rep
Laurie Farquhar said Thursday.
"We anticipate few practical
problems in carrying out the
plan," she said. "We would only
have to knock out one glass wall.'
endowment lands and cites
various proposals that have been
made for its use.
These include the 1956 Turner
Report and the 1961 Webb &
Knapp Plan which both envisage
full development of presently
forested land with "high class
housing."
Belshaw attributes rejection of
these plans to the fear of
amalgamation with the City of
Vancouver, the Vancouver school
district and a rise in property tax
which would "fatten up the
budget of the megalopolis."
Belshaw has personal interest
Minister of disease Ralph
Laffmark at the opening
Thursday of a new research wing
for the pharmacy building. The.
$800,000 wing will be used by
about 15 students.
in the development of the
endowment lands as he lives on
them.
He said it is unlikely that the
taxes made off the development
of the endowment lands would be
used to support the university.
"No other government body
(the provincial department of
lands and forests) is likely to
allow tax revenue out of its own
hands."
The proposal states: "Since the
student population of UBC has
probably peaked, there will be no
need for major capital expansion.
"Financial considerations
should no longer be considered
crucial in the development of the
endowment," said Belshaw, so the
current view that 100 acres east of
Wesbrook and south of Sixteenth
Avenue should be set aside for a
revenue producing "industrial
park" is termed "irrelevant" in
the report.
On-campus student housing,
private dining and entertainment
facilities could also take place in
"areas already occupied on
campus, such as Fort Camp."
Belshaw has set out a list of
uses to which he feels the
endowment lands could be put.
However, bis report does not
contain any concrete proposals on
how they could be undertaken.
The report supports the
proposal of the recent Scientific
for Pollution and Environmental
Control Society reports which
stated that it is vital to preserve
wilderness areas dose to cities.
Belshaw's report also suggests
the improvement of current trails
to provide students with jobs,
citizens with quiet walking areas
and a place where teaching and
research could also take place.
TAs' union cites 'stall tactics'
By LINDA HOSSIE
The president's committee on teacher's
assistants is stalling and ignoring the complaints of
the arts TAs, a non-faculty Teachers' Union
spokesman told a meeting Thursday.
"Gage set up the committee as a delaying tactic
last summer," said Mark Madoff. "It's obvious they
weren't trying to do us any good.
"There's a passing of the buck going on. Gage is
quite willing to let hatchetmen take care of us. The
men who have any power are never exposed to us."
The NFTU was organized in August, 1970, and
so far it has had no success in getting its demands
from the university.
The two most important demands are a pay
increase from $2,500 to $3,200, and some kind of
standard policy toward TAs.
There is no standard policy now, Madoff said.
"Decisions are made about how TAs run their
classes without ever consulting the TAs.
"We want to be dealt with as employees of the
university not as charity recipients," Madoff said.
In a recent letter to the NFTU Gage said: "This
university established a policy of assisting graduate
studies by appointing students as TAs instead of
hiring full-time lecturers."
This is the attitude that Madoff is objecting to.
"We're doing the same thing the faculty is
doing," he said.
"The total responsibility of the TAs is not
recognized by the university," Madoff said.
"Without us they can't function."
He said in not granting the arts TAs higher
salaries Gage is saying 'people who want to come to
this university better be from the upper middle class
so they can afford to pay' the extra money they are
not making as TAs.
"I can't expect to handle a full dass load, teach
a section of English 100 and go out somewhere and
work as a bus boy and still remain in one piece.
Gage is saying I should."
The NFTU plans to continue working toward
its goals despite a relatively small turnout. It is
holding a meeting and election Thursday at 8 p.m.
in the Graduate Centre garden room.
Garrod decides against China trip
AMS president Steve Garrod is not going to
China after all.
Garrod was to have spent a month in China
between Oct. 10 and Nov. 10 in a cultural exchange
group sponsored by the China-Canada Friendship
Association. He and UBC graduate Ralph Stanton
were to have been the two students in the group.
But at a human government caucus meeting
Thursday night, Garrod was asked not to go.
"The facts of the situation are that Steve has
become the most public of us," said treasurer David
Mole.
Mole and some other caucus members argued
that since Garrod had become the major spokesman
of the human government, he should not leave the
campus for a month during a "crucial period" in the
AMS program.
A series of by-elections is slated to take place in
October, and on Oct. 27 there will be a referendum
in which students will be asked, kt effect, whether
the human government segment of the AMS should
be retained or fired.
Following arguments that he would be neglecting
duties to the human government and his
constituency by spending four weeks in China,
Garrod agreed not to take the tour.
GENERAL PANTS CO.
Announces that this week
s S-T-R-E-T-C-H
your dollar week. Not only is every
item in the store on sale but with
your G.P. STUDENT DISCOUNT
CARD you get an additional
10% OFF
Apply now at GENERAL PANTS CO.
for your Student Discount Card.
You may be the winner of one of
two AM-FM radios to be given away
this week to lucky student card
holders.
GET IT ON AT
GENERAL PANTS
339 WATER ST. GASTOWN
Alma Mater
Society
PUBLIC
NOTICE
1. SENATE ELECTIONS
Nominations are now open for the
following student seats on Senate:
SENATORS-AT-LARGE
—Three seats—2 year terms ('til Fall '73)
-oneSeat-1 year ('til Fall '72)
2. AMS EXECUTIVE
Nominations are now open for the following AMS Executive
seats:  a)  External Affairs Officer       b)   Internal Affairs Officer
Nominations are open until Wed., Oct. 20th at 4:00 p.m.
Election takes place Wed., Oct. 27th.
Nomination forms available in the AMS Executive Office (SUB
236) Friday, October  1,  1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
Engineers build
a wonder car
By JOHN SYDOR
The UBC urban automobile will neither
radiate a chromed light nor propel you at a
tremendous speed along the highway.
But it will allow you to move within a
city in comfort, quiet and safety at a
negligible cost to both the operator and
environment.
The automobile is being designed and
assembled at UBC by about 130
engineering students. Once completed, it
will be taken east where it will be the UBC
entry in a competition involving 44 other
Canadian and American universities.
Its top speed will be 60 m.p.h.
"The competition is mainly concerned
with a vehicle's performance, safety,
production cost, human and environment
compatibility, and energy efficiency," says
Don O'Connor, engineering 3, one of the
project coordinators.
"The anticipated cost of the project is
around $18,000, and it is being raised by
donations from the university community
and industry.
"The   money   will   be   used   to   buy
materials and manufacture components
unique to our vehicle," O'Connor said in
an interview.
"The only mass produced parts will be
the Fiat 128 engine, the drive train, and
the suspension, which will be modified."
When asked how much it would cost
to run the vehicle, O'Connor said: "We
anticipate 40 miles of city driving to the
gallon of liquid natural gas, which costs as
little as five cents per gallon.
"Since natural gas is a clean fuel, very
few engine parts will fail from combustion
deposit and oil changes will only be
needed every 25,000 miles, thus
maintenance cost will be quite small," he
said.
"Another benefit from natural gas is
that the exhaust emissions will be about 95
percent less than that of an ordinary
gasoline engine.
"Technical modifications such as the
electronic timing will allow the engine to
perform efficiently over a wide range of
speeds, while a .system of heat exchangers
will allow utilization of heat energy that is
normally lost.
"Also the vehicle will have mufflers and
sound insulators that will make it virtually
noise free," said O'Connor.
The priority concern in the design of
the urban car has been safety.
For instance, the vehicle will be made of
two separate frames. One will hold the
passenger compartment, the other will be
used as a shock frame.
The frames are held together by shear
pins. In the event of a high speed collision,
most of the force will go into shearing
some of the pins and bending the shock
frame. This will leave the second frame and
its occupants intact and free from harm.
"The manner in which the motor will be
mounted is also safety oriented.
"On high impact it will be pushed under
the car instead of into the passenger
compartment, as what quite often happens
with today's automobiles," said O'Connor.
"Other safety features include a
collapsing steering column, seat belt alarm,
padded interior and shock absorbing
bumpers which will allow the vehicle to
withstand a five m.p.h. barrier crash.
"Safety and efficiency alone did not
define the design of the urban vehicle," he
said.
The designers were well aware of the
problems that often make driving
frustrating and an effort was made at
designing "convenience gadgets" for the
vehicle.
One gadget is the "common service
point". By attaching a special refuelling
mechanism at the service station, the
vehicle will have everything vital to its
operation checked out while it fills up with
natural gas.
The body of the vehicle will be made of
plastic panelling. Instead of going to a
body shop and getting a smashed fender or
crumpled side fixed, the owner would buy
a new fender or side and simply snap it on.
Other conveniences designed into the
car are large windows with no blind spots,
small turning radius for easy parking and
manoeuverability and a push-button
electronic anti-theft device on which a
combination of numbers must be struck
before the vehicle can be driven.
Whether the UBC urban car will ever go
into production, O'Connor does not know.
"If it ever is mass produced, the cost per
vehicle should be around $2,400, which is
quite reasonable for a car that holds two
people and eight bags of groceries," he
said.
The Shadow
by Lamont Cranston
As all things end, so must the age of Gage.
At least we hope it will.
Administration president Walter Gage has been
associated with UBC now for 50 years. He is 66 years
old. He has to retire some day and that day should be
soon.
That may sound like a particularly student desire,
but it isn't. All across the campus, in various niches in
the hierarchy, petty poobahs and impotentates are
planning their moves for the inevitable, if distant, day
when Walter Gage decides to step down.
Like Mafia capos, they are skulking and scheming,
for the top perch on the pecking pole, each with his own
reasons for wanting the presidency.
And yet, Walter hasn't given any indication as to
when he will step down, and he hasn't even asked that a
"presidential search committee" be set up. In fact, he
says he hasn't even given any thought to it.
This is a conversation I had with him the other day:
LAMONT: (dial, dial, dial, dial, rdrdrdrdrdrd.)
SECRETARY: (crisply) President Gage's office.
LAMONT: Hello, I'd like to speak with Walter
Gage, please.
SECRETARY: (firmly) Yes. Who is calling please?
LAMONT: The Shadow.
SECRETARY: The uh.. . (pause) Just a minute
please.
LAMONT: Uh-huh. (pause, pause, pause.)
SECRETARY: The president will speak to you
now. (bzz, clck)
WALTER: Hello, this is president Gage speaking.
LAMONT: Hello, Walter, this is Lamont Cranston
of The Ubyssey calling.
WALTER: Yes Laddy, what can I do for you?
LAMONT: You remember me?
WALTER: Why, of course, although I don't
remember seeing your name on the enrolment list.
LAMONT: Well, I'm calling about your retirement.
WALTER: Ha-ha. My retirement, you say. Ha-ha.
(pause) What do you mean?
LAMONT: We want to do a story in The Ubyssey
about your plans for retirement and any plans for
finding a new president.
WALTER: Well, ha-ha, the matter hasn't come up
yet, you see ...
LAMONT: Have you struck a "presidential search
committee?"
WALTER: Well, no ...
LAMONT: Do you have any definite plans about
when you will retire?
WALTER: Well, no .. . ha-ha.
LAMONT: Thank you, Walter, (click.)
So there you have it. Walter isn't planning on
retiring just yet, but all those minor moguls are already
jockeying for position so they'll be ready to pounce
when the time comes to fill his shoes, or seat.
In the inner circle of power, many are the names
that have been raised as aspirants.
Some are highly touted, others are dark horses, but
the word is, that no matter who it is, he will have to
have the support of the various faculty guns. That means
he will have to have his PhD, and he will have to be a
strong administrator. Those in the know and in positions
of power to affect the choice, see the presidency as a job
for a power broker. He must be able to keep the lid on
the campus (as they credit Walter with being able to do)
and he must understand and have the relative trust of
the academic heads of departments. It's rather like a
band of cut-throats searching for a Lancelot- to lead
them.
THE CONTESTANTS?
Various names have been suggested, kicked about
and slandered in conversations about who will succeed
Walter.
Applied science dean Liam Finn is one name that
has been mentioned, but the trendy
Wallaby-wearing-wonder boy is, at the age of 36, too
young, and there is some suggestion that he is the only
one who thinks he's capable of the job (whatever that
means).
Jumping Jack McCreary of medicine is another
candidate. At least, there are some factions who would
like to see him in the presidency because he has the aura
of a winner, the prestige of being associated with that
almost godlike (in the public eye) profession of medicine
and because he knows how to handle the idiots who
populate the downtown media. Jumping Jack, however,
doesn't want the job. He has made it quite clear in
power bull sessions, that he just wants to look after his
new, prestigious hospital.
See page 17: HOME GROWN Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
On to Siberia
Friday, October 1, 1971
**.   I %»^
Steve Garrod isn't going to China.
Good thing, too.
The needs of the human government aside, elected
student presidents don't as a matter of principle go
chasing off across oceans on fact-finding missions in the
middle of their terms of office.
However, we could easily be pursuaded that this
principle does not apply to other UBC hangers-on.
Health minister Ralph Loffmark, as far as we are
concerned, should continue his blunders in Victoria,
neglecting his post as a UBC commerce professor in the
interests of more quickly aiding the demise of the
Socreds.
Les Rohringer, we submit, should simply buy a
one-way ticket to one of his innumerable,
expense-account housing conferences.
Prices-and-incomes man John Young, former dean
of arts, should stick with the cancerous Liberal camp in
Ottawa and stay away from any contest over Walter
Gage's successor.
And this is not even to mention all the second-rate
profs who should extend their one-year leaves of
absence into a lifetime.
Airplane hijackers, where are you when we need
you?
,,!#**"    v^mr*r
\? #**',*,****
. \v ****
m ■
Indian Week
Next week is Indian Week.
Hopefully it will be a time in which the
white-middle-class university community will learn
something from the people our society has come close
to destroying.
For the Indians of Canada, if a white, middle-class
student newspaper can presume to speak for them, have
over the past few centuries been crushed by the
Industrial Revolution, mercantilism, imperialism — in
short, have been decimated by our capitalist system.
Considering that B.C., of which this university is
part, has been built on the blacktop covering the Indian
nation, the events of the coming week demand our
response and participation.
til
Letters
Y*V^\"
a\\ >'*v V"*
■ ^'if-'"' -;' -' > *lf^:*>'^' ■ -
—dirk visser photo
Flash
After spending an adventurous
summer with the provincial
museum, I decided to concentrate
on my personal role as a student
- to remain aloof from the nearly
irresistible lure of the human
government sales talk.
Classes began, the rains began,
and, one night on my way to the
library I noticed a pile of old
Ubysseys on the floor. In a
moment of weakness I picked up
a copy and continued into the
stacks. Later on that same night I
devoured four pages of policy
huckstering that reminded me of
the Information Canada "Stand
Together" theme seen on
billboards all over B.C. This
similarity of theme intrigued me.
As I left the library I suddenly
became aware of a public relations
barrage of Mamooks posters. All
exhorting human government
entertainments designed to
involve me in my university, my
musnsEv
OCTOBER 1.1971
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the writer and not of the AMS or the university administration.
Member, Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a
weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices are located
in room 241K of the Student Union f
Editorial    departments,    228-2301.    228-2307;   Page    Friday,    Sports,
228-2305; advertising, 228-3977.
Editor: Leslie Plommer
As Sandy Kass did her rendition of Chatanooga, Judy McLeod, John
Sydor and Tricia Moore choo-chooed while Rand Frith did the actions as
Sandi Shreve and Lesley Krueger tap-danced to Helen Hossie belting out
gospel songs. Mike Buck through Lawrance Leader had welked out on
Linda Hossie but Shane McCune told John Andersen he was just crabby
and sleepy because Dick Betts was critically analyzing Vaughn Palmer and
Kini McDonald as well as Tween classes. Garry Gruenked as Brett Garrett
and Greg Deacon watched Paul Knox threaten to stop farting much to
Leslie Plommer and Jan O'Brien's surprise. Gordon Gibson, Dirk Visser and
Dave Phillips were also surprised when one little toot went home early.
Grant Dickin told Bernard Bischoff, Stan Persky and Karen Loder PF
forgot again.
Canadian status, and my global
responsibility — I assume.
In a cosmic flash, I realized
that I had finally found the Just
Society.
Eager to learn more, I read
back issues of The Ubyssey. I
learned how the human
government had administered a
sizeable amount of projects for
the Opportunities for Youth
program — a shamefaced piece of
Liberal propaganda. I learned that
true to form, the policy of the
AMS was being formulated in
cabinet (er ... caucus) and that
few cabinet (er ... executive)
members could be relied upon to
attend meetings of the House (er
... AMS Council).
The final jolt occurred last
night when I attended an AMS
Council meeting. The whole
human government policy-line,
party defence, and capacity for
clever, witty and arrogant
put-down lay in the hands of one
man — Dave Mole. On his capacity
for eloquence and rebuttal rested
the power of the party. It rather
reminded me of another clever,
witty arrogant and longhaired
fellow in Ottawa.
Viola — we have in our midst a
group of student reformers posing
as   anarchists and Fabrian (sic)
socialists. In their approach they
are Liberal reformers — a phrase
they only feign to shudder at.
Confirmed in my beliefs,
assuaged in my worries, I can
return to my student role. I can
only wonder if the Canadian
Liberals can win another election.
Michael Robinson
Anthro 3
Logic
While it is easy for people with
limited intelligence to condemn
new ideas by classifying them as
"irresponsible" or "radical", it
now seems as though they must
also display their ignorance by
singling out one person as the sole
bearer of popular views.
This is to be expected, for it is
much simpler to put down Steve
Garrod than the entire student
council.
I refer to Conrad Winkelman's
letter in The Ubyssey (Sept. 28),
in which he claims that it is
"irresponsible to give a few
radicals a ride to the border to
have some fun," while it is, I
presume, responsible to rip off the
entire student body so that less
than five per cent of this group
can play games.
Winkleman claims that the
Douglas border demonstration
was   ". . . in no way beneficial to
the   students. . ."   to   which   I
respond, bullshit.
I don't really think it is
necessary to remind anyone of the
insanity of the -proposed
Amchitka blast, but surely it must
be ". . . in the interest of the
students. . ." to oppose it.
While only 1,500 students
attended the blockade, the
majority of students supported it.
Add to this the fact that the
1,500 students involved far
outnumber the 1,000 who use our
money to participate in
extramural sports, and surely
anyone will see the ludicrousness
of Winkelman's logic.
Obviously, money must be
allocated towards sports at UBC,
but these sports should be open to
anyone who wants to be involved
— not just the "chosen few."
Please, Conrad, in future keep
your reactionary views within the
engineering department.
Tom Gunnarsson,
 Arts2
The Ubyssey welcomes letters .
from all readers.
Letters should be signed and, if
possible, typed.
Although an effort is made to
publish all letters received, The
Ubyssey reserves the right to edit
letters for reasons of brevity,
legality, grammar or taste. Friday, October  1,  1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
The true story
of a has-been
Last year, brash young Shane McCune realized his wildest dream.
He became a columnist for The Ubyssey. In seeking to duplicate his
feat this year, he has run into difficulties. Herein, McCune's story.
By SHANE McCUNE
My footsteps rang hollow in the shadows of the corridor and had
anyone been in the immediate vicinity, he would have noticed how the
echoes of my size 12 Keds diminished as I approached the Inner
Sanctum, or sanatorium or whatever.
In my left hand I clutched the parchment bearing the manuscript
of my latest foray into the campus literary thicket, a volume slim in
physical proportions but rich in the lore of the Late Show and the
mighty Fleer Funnies. Within my gilt-illuminated Duo-Tang there
languored three-liners previously known only unto Uncle Miltie.
I passed a series of oaken portals, panelled with stained glass (a
painful feat) and stood in the dim vestibule outside the mysterious
chamber.
Even as I stood there, contemplating the runes and hieroglyphs
scrawled upon the heavy dooir (some of them I would guess to be
medieval letra set; others, such as the cryptic "Phucke Ye" looked more
like early HB Verithin), the tumblers of the brass lock clicked and
slowly the door swung open.
As I watch, horror-struck, an emaciated philatelist wilted to the
floor, trembling spasmodically. With a gnarled hand he grasped the hem
of my cloak, and turned his rheumy eyes toward mine.
Bending closer to hear the dying youth, I barely made out his last
fragmented words.
'"Tween classes ... deadline ... 'twee ..." He coughed blood,
retched and was gone. Gingerly I stepped over the puddle of palsied
plasma and entered the dreaded room.
To my surprise, the capacious Chamber about which I had heard
so many chilling tales was well-lit, as were its eerie inhabitants. Indeed,
it was a moment or two before my eyes and ears grew accustomed to
the glare and the din.
Suddenly I was aware of an egregious dwarf standing on the other
side of a long and thickset counter, scrutinizing me with an intense
scrute. She looked appraisingly at me, closed one eye and tersely
commented, "You got barf all over yer cloak, dude."
I had scarcely begun to relate to her the terrible scene that had
but passed, when she interrupted me.
"So he missed the deadline. The 'tween classes deadline is 11:30,
and verily Mickey's shadow passed that way over a minute ago.
"Now prithee tell us, dude, what brings you to this throat of the
forest?"
Furtively I cast my eyes about, not being overly desirous of
having my work fall into the wrong hands.
"I have a manuscript..." I whispered.
She turned around and bellowed, "There's some dude here who
wants to write a column."
None of the creatures made reply. They continued to clack away
at their devious contraptions, too awed to even look up. One or two of
the motleys sitting nearby belched reverently.
"Are there any other columnists dwelling herein?" I enquired of
the dwarf.
"Nay — there's a Rosicrucian who works on Page Friday, but we
have never seen anyone of your ilk heretofore. But if you are truly
possessed of talent, we have great need of someone to scribe the 'tween
classes."
I deposited my creation in one of the cylindrical filing cabinets
near the inner office and departed.
But it was not long until the desire to know the fate of my
manuscript overpowered me. Nevertheless, I had no wish to appear
once more before that motley crew.
Therefore I slipped into a nearby booth, inserted a bent shekel
into the slot and flicked the perforated wheel four times. Moreover, I
made a phone call.
When the ringing ceased, I instructed the zombie at the other end
to put the editor on the line. There was a lengthy pause, then:
"Hello?"
"Fair maiden, far be it from me to disturb the dainty labors of
one so ..."
"Who is this? What's all this chauvinist 'fair maiden' crap? Is that
you, McCune?"
'"Tis so, and I must perforce enquire as to the fate of my ..."
"I suppose you're calling about your column. Well, for starters
you can knock off whatever Grothic shit you're speaking — who d'ya
think you are, Edgar Allan Poe?"
"So be it — I mean, sure. Now tell me, is there anything you want
to change in it?"
"We killed it."
"That can be arranged - what the fuck?!"
"Listen, hack, this isn't Eke the old days, when all you had to do
was booze up the editor to get your drivel in print. You gotta be funny,
unnerstand?"
"Well, I mean it's not a big bellylaugh sort of column, I'll admit.
The humor is more mellow ..."
"Mellow my ass! About as mellow as stale beer. In fact, your
copy paper is covered with stale beer!"
"Well, I dunno ..."
"But no more of this grotesque stuff, huh? Culcha is all very well,
but no more Poe, okay?"
"Nevermore."
And so saying I repaired to my tripewriter, uncorked my dinner
and swore to wreak vengeance upon the heathen Jezebel.
If she doesn't print this, I'll tell everybody about her and that
dirty old raven of hers.
DO VOOH. pAREA/TS 4SK YOl>, WHAT HAPP6A/ED fitf 5cH<X>A-
-TODAY?AUD <»Ht*l ^U TKtL TH6M tWE^ SAy'VWATS A//CE,
OtAR?"^ ^o CAN YETti- P/CsTYLt   M&HbecaoSS.   tfS
/&ovr  yovR  xnoou,tr yo» (mmtt to  t£U. *somkoa/e
MAT REALLY  HAPfXrVSQ7VST WlTE'•™aTsXc%T<<F$1
PIG STYE HIGH cartoon offended school board member.
Pig Stye High lets fly
By TRICIA MOORE
A cartoon in a newspaper
distributed to 45 local high
schools has come under attack as
"subversive" by a member of the
Vancouver school board..
"This cartoon is subversive to
the orderly conduct of high
schools," board member Sydney
Taylor said Wednesday in an
interview.
The cartoon is entitled Pig Stye
High.
"This type of thing can cause
unnecessary problems as it acts as
a catalyst to people who are
looking for trouble," Taylor said.
The cartoon appeared in the
September issue of the inter-high
school student newspaper, the
Oganookie Standard.
During a school board meeting
Monday, Taylor proposed a
suspension of distribution of the
paper in high schools.
"The tone of the cartoon is
objectionable, offensive to good
taste, an insult to the principal of
any high school," he said.
The motion was defeated
although the board agreed that
the editors of the paper should
have used better judgment in
allowing the cartoon to be
published.
"We included the cartoon
because a high school student
volunteered it and we try to
include anyone who wants to
contribute," Bill Annett, one of
the student editors of the
Standard, said Wednesday.
"There has to be room in the
paper for all kinds of opinions,
and I think this cartoon would
appeal to a lot of high school
students because it shows the way
they feel," he said.
Jackie Weller, a former editor
of the inter-high paper, said
Wednesday that the cartoon is a
valid criticism.
"It actually satirizes the
student as well as the principal,"
Weller said.
"It is talking about the whole
clique-social status-sexist role that
high school kids play.
"Most people didn't see it that
way. I really dug it."
Another school board member
said the cartoon was obviously
intended as a joke and shouldn't
be taken seriously.
"We want a lively controversial
paper and we are not afraid of
dissent," said Olive Johnson.
"However, the editors should
adhere to standards of good
journalism and this cartoon is
probably in bad taste."
Annett said he understood the
agreement to use "good
journalism" meant no obscenity
and no libel.
'Pig Stye High' is a serial and
will continue to be published in
the inter-high paper. Page 6
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, October 1, 1971
• — brett garrett photo
PARADISE for bicycle-seat sniffers can be found outside most UBC buildings these days as students
temporarily abandon their bikes for fall lectures.
Sex, nationality basis
for discrimination charge
DOWNSVIEW (CUP) - A University of
Toronto PhD graduate has charged York
University's Atkinson College with discrimination
against her because of her nationality.
The Ontario human rights commission is
investigating the complaint made by Jean Cottam,
41.
Cottam has also complained to the women's
bureau  of the  Ontario department of labor that
Inflation hits
Inflation has struck again. And this time it's hit
where it really hurts.
The price of beer in the Pit has gone up to 40
cents a bottle from 35 cents.
The Pit, open four nights a week, is the Alma
Mater Society-run pub on the second floor of SUB.
SUB manager Graeme Vance said Wednesday
the price increase was necessary because of the
increased wholesale cost of beer and because Pit
workers have been given wage increases.
Atkinson College discriminated against her because
of her sex.
Cottam, a Canadian, was one of 105 applicants
for a position teaching Russian history. The college
hired a PhD candidate from the University of
Wisconsin.
Atkinson College dean Harry Crowe said every
staff member in Atkinson's history program
screened all 105 applicants and reduced the list to
eight.
Cottam was not on this list, Crowe said, but the
eight included Canadians and one woman.
Cottam said Tuesday she received notice of her
rejection last February and has been gathering
information since that time.
"I plan to make a big issue out of this. We have
hundreds of academics from the U.S. applying for
jobs in our universities," she said.
"I don't see how a country that loses control of
its universities can remain independent. American
control of our universities is just as important as
American control of our economy," she added.
CHARISMATIC
types and friends
MEET AND EAT
Monday, 7:30 p.m., Oct. 4
5611 Heather St.,
Vancouver (Oakridge)
Phone: 266-9275
Bernice Gerard, Chaplain
Acropol
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Fri. and Sat.
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Sunday 10 a.m. to 10 p.m.
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2946 W. Broadway 733-2412
CUSO DAY
tuesday, October 5th
9:00 a.m. - 9:00 p.m.
international house
FREE COFFEE AND 10 KINDS OF TEA
Over  1,100 Canadians are now working on two-year
contracts    for    the    governments    of    over    forty
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find out why and how
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Valid any day except Saturday 'til October 30, 1971
FREE APPOINTMENT SERVICE - 731-4717
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1.00 CLIP THIS COUPON AND SAVE! 1-00
Student Charter
FLIGHTS FOR CHRISTMAS
VANCOUVER-LONDON
ONLY     $245.00    RETURN
Dec. 19 - Jan. 4
VANCOUVER-TORONTO
ONLY    $125.00    RETURN
Dec. 20 - Jan. 4
WESTERN STUDENT
SERVICES
TRAVELOFFICE Hours:
Room 226 SUB 1:00-4:00 P.M.
228-2980 -Mon.-Fri.
woie
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Budget Terms, of course
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LIMITED
REGISTERED JEWELLER, AMERICAN GEM SOCIETY
Granville at Pender Since 1904
«&
9?
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the 201 h <:i:ntm:y si;irn: s
lEnitok & Co.
I THE MUSIC IS GREAT: BARTOK (his four major concertos)* STRAVINSKY* L
I IVES * BRITTEN * COPLAND * LUK AS FOSS * SHOSTAKOVICH * NORDHEIM*!
WALTON * PIERRE MERCURE *
[ THE GUEST ARTISTS ARE SUPERB: IOHN OCDON * BELA SIKI *and |
i ELYAKIM TAUSSIG will perform the three Bartok Piano Concertos. MASUKO
, USHIODA, delightful young Japanese violinist will play the Bartok Violin
\ Concerto No. 2. LUK AS FOSS and BORIS BROTT will each conduct one
concert and SIMON STREATFEILD will conduct two concerts.
,THE PRICES ARE EXTRAORDINARILY LOW:
OI\LY$9f$12 0R$15i
CONCERT DATES: OCTOBER 1.3, NOVEMBER 4
NOVEMBER 19, DECEMBER 17
at 8:30 in the Queen Elizabeth 1 heatre.
Ioi (oni|)!<'lc prr
ihe ^\ mi ilioiv.
gramme ink
IIIK('-()H">-I
will
lllillC
spoi
'ns*ed by
CPAir little traces in my mind
-     I*- j .
brought me back where i was born'
:1k
just my back shook
ift,"
.-■in- -
yW  -
ation
at the crying of m^flying mother
Little traces in my mind, by Saratn Stump, 'the-one-who^wlls-the-boat', poet and illustrator o
Page Friday introduces Indian Week, October 4-8. "My friend Mike Rattan told me of his earliest years
spent on the schoolyard next to the reservation. They
played cowboys and Indians and the Indians always
wanted to be cowboys ..."
ART GALLERY
In residence all week, 11 a.m.-4 p.m.:
legend-tellers: Charlie Drainy - Shuswap
Baptiste Ritchie - Lillooet
Domanic Charlie
Josephine Charlie — Squamish
Louis Miranda
carver:
Douglas Cramer - Kwakiutl
"There was a meeting after the Fort Lawton
invasion, where some Indians didn't want whites
to stay and other Indians said some of the whites
were very helpful. It was decided that everybody's
welcome, but leave your white outside."
"Domanic wants to carve a little paddle from
yellow cedar to give to each person he talks with,
to remind himself of the years when he and
Josephine paddled to Squamish in one day and
Victoria in a day and a half, and the sky was
•always clear and everyplace a good camp."
"Her sister came home from residential school
very ill, telling her mother to the end, don't send
Bernie."
speakers: 12:30 p.m.
"And then the missionaries came with God. For
Bernelda Wheeler — Cree-Seaultaux eighty years museum collections grew — totem
George Clutesi - Tse-shaht poles  only   a  $1  a foot, and the hearth fires
Alvin McKay — Nishaga contained totem spirits. In 1969 Robert Davidson
Chief Dan George - Capilano carved and erected the symbol of his dead family
Jimmy Sewid - Kwakiutl in Masset."
silversmith:
Robert Davidson - Haida
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Friday
SUB AUDITORIUM
Monday 2 p.m.: Tse-shaht Dancers-Singers
Friday 7:30 p.m.: "The Animal Kingdom"
Kwakiutl Dancers
Films: October 5th-8th,
2 showings: 12:30 & 2:30 p.m.
Ballad of Crowfoot
Age of the Buffalo
This Land
Travelling College
You Are on Indian Land
Pikamgikum
SALMON BAKE
"She came from the North to live at Totem Park
and her parents so proud. Went down to the city
and was stopped by the policeman. Not yet
eighteen years old she was sent to the Willingdon
school for girls under the 'Protection of Children's
Act."
"I guided my Indian friend to the woods for the
first time. He was nine too and knew a lot about
schools."
Josephine and Domanic Charlie
SUB Plaza, Friday, 3-6 p.m.
"Through the halls past the murals Work, Truth,
Justice ... behind the bench Judge white-maned
black-robed, before the bench head hung tied
hands Indian, behind the Indian white man with
gun. Rotunda, Parliament Buildings, Victoria."
The only one in all the Squamish
This is a legend told by Domanic
Charlie to an interviewer in August, 1965.
It is entitled The Coming of Religion to
the Squamish People.
O.N.W. - "When your people got
together to pray before the white man
came — did they pray to thank their chee
- AHM for their food?"
D.C. — "Yes, — they danced and sang —
sorry I didn't get that song — it's
something like the Shaker people, they
dance and shake, and hold their hands
up."
"Thanks are given when a deer is taken
and fish are caught - my grandfather
was a great hunter. He would just go and
get a big lot of deer and bear. It was too
easy because he prayed. He prayed and
asked the chee-AHM. There is a
chee-see-AHM - he is the great high
master."
O.N.W. - "When the Squamish prayed,
did they have someone to pray for all the
people to the great one above?"
D.C. — "My grandfather — he was the
only one in all the Squamish. He was a
great hunter. Every fall, every spring, he
is up in the mountain. He's got a place
there for a home — a cave — and every
fall and every spring he is there. He was
hunting and tired and he made a fire. He
was laying down — his back toward the
fire and he heard something from up in
the sky - he heard something just like,
you know the thunder,
AY-nihn-YAH-hun. When the thunder
comes — he goes, — quh-h-h-h ... as it
comes down. He heard it coming, my
grandfather never turned around — never
looked — he knew — somebody was
coming down - you see. That noise -
just like a thunderbold noise - and it hit
on the other side of the fire. He knew it
hit the ground; the bump it shook the
ground. This man that came down, he
ahd a 'tih-CHAHTS, a talking stick, and
he poked my grandfather's back and he
asked my grandfather, 'Are you sleeping
or are you awake?' He talked our
language."
"My grandfather says, Cheh-MUHN!
He means 'I'm awake.'" "Sihns
KIY-ate-kuhm-meh-uht-tihl-
HAY-HUM-eh,! my grandfather said, 'I
know you are coming donw from up in the
sky.' And this man says, 'Well, I see you
are here all the time, every spring, every
fall - what are you doing?"
"Oh my good man' he says, 'I have
lots of family at home and I come here to
get their food, to dry meat and to get the
wool we use for our clothes." '
"And this man says, 'Yes, I see you all
the time, right here all the time; that's
why I come, - I come to help you,' he
tells my grandfather, 'I come to help you.
I've got something to give you.' My
grandfather never turned around —
never looked. And this man told him, — 'I
have something to give you.' He turned
around and saw something like a mat on
the other side of the fire and the man
says, 'When you get down to your place
you teach the people this here.' It's all
written ( I didn't see) but they told me."
"My grandfather had it all rolled up
and put it inside a hide so it wouldn't
break. When he got down he told his
frineds. It's up there, at a place called
yoo-SEH-UHLK - away up the Squamish
River. And these people go away up and
told all the Indians, 'You go down to
YUHK-uht - that's the first camp.' Then
this man learned the people how to start
the church in his own language, long
before the white mans came. And on this
mat, that's our story you know."
The first one: - 'You not tell lies.'
The second one: — 'Not steal anything.'
The third one: — 'Not go fool with other
man's wife.'
The fourth one: — 'If you are good and
plant everything around your house,
everything.'
"This Indian teacher his name was
see-WHAL-tuhn."
Page Friday, 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 1, 1971 Wall mural.
Totem Park residence
common block, UBC.
From the journal of
Alexander Mackenzie, Special
Collections, UBC:
July 26, 1793. It was
eight in the morning of
a very fine day when
we arrived . . .
We were received
with great kindness, and a
messenger was dispatched
to inform the chief,
whose name
was Soocomlick, and
who was then at his
fishing weir, of our
arrival. He immediately
returned to the village to
confirm the cordial
reception of his people, and
having conducted us to his
house, entertained us with
the most respectful
hospitality . . . The young
chief, to his other
acts of kindness, added
as large a supply of fish as
we chose to take.
George Clutesi
Ko-ishin-mit goes fishing
Cloosmit the herring, hosts in the night.
The flash of silver, the flame of your gold.
With the grey of the dawn you are gone.
Clossmit the herring, the shoal of the sea,
Come! Dance upon the waters in a sea of spray.
Come! Feed the children of the land with your spawn.
Closmit the herring, hosts in the night.
The flash of silver, the flame of your gold.
Come! Make thunder upon the waters in the bay.
With your hosts make thunder in a sea of spray.
Come! Dance upon the waters with the dawn.
Come! Feed the children of the land with your spawn.
Gusty winds were here. The sun would come out
bright and bold; the cloud, black with anger, would roll
and push it out of sight. The rain and snow would make
the sleet cold with fury, and the winds would push them
all away. The sun would shine again. The Moon of many
Moods was here.
It was early spring. The growing, budding season had
come; the herring, in great shoals, were coming into the
bay to get ready for the huge spawn. The fish would
come swarming into the bay in great schools. In the
morning with the break of day and the dusk of the
evening the herring would come up and play upon the
surface of the waters, or swish across the bay like a roll
of thunder in a sea of spray.
The Indian people were busy fishing for the herring.
The fishermen would stand on the bows of their canoes,
and with their long, long rakes poised high in the air,
they would push them slowly into the depths of the
waters, cutting into the schools of herring as they raked
the wiggling, silvery fish into their canoes. The good
There is my people sleeping
And there is my people sleeping
Since a long time
But aren't just dreams
The old cars without <
Parking in front of the 1
Or angry words ordering i
Or who steal from yon for your own good
And doesn't wanna remember what he owes you
Sometimes I'd tike to faM asleep too,
Close my eyes on everytmag
But I can't
I can't.
—Sarain Stump
of mind
fishermen would soon fill their craft with the herring
that shimmered in the early sun, and as they beached
their laden craft the people would come down to the
shore and take all they needed. The Indian people
always loved to share their foodstuffs with their
neighbours.
Ko-ishin-mit liked to watch the fishermen come in
with the fresh herring stiD wiggling and flipping about,
some even managing to leap over the side and so escape
back to sea again. The sleek, colourful bodies, at one
moment all silver, the next changing to the colours of
Tsa-wah-youse, the rainbow. Then best of all
Ko-ishin-mit loved to fill his biggest basket with the
beautiful fish to take home to his little wife, Pash-hook,
who would then smoke and dry the fish for summer use.
Pash-hook was a dutiful wife. It was said that Pash-hook
was light minded and very forgetful. This is why she was
named Pash-hook, which means exactly that. Pash-hook
was the daughter of Dsim-do the squirrel. She was
always trying her best to please her husband
Ko-ishin-mit.
One morning Ko-ishin-mit, the young Son of Raven,
asked the best fisherman, the man who brought in the
most herring every morning, why he used such long
poles for his rake.
"Why is your rake handle extra long?" he wanted to
know.
"I will tell you, Son of Raven, if you promise never
to tell it to anyone else," the man whispered. "This is a
secret of mine that no one knows. The longer the pole,
the wider the rake I can use. The wider the rake the
more herring get caught with it. It is very easy. Take
your pole, poke it down very carefully into the water
until it is straight up and down beside your chapahts,
your canoe. Then you must push it down into the
depths with all your might so it will go deep where the
herring lurk. Then you must peer over the side to watch
for it to come swishing back to you full of fish. It's that
easy. Remember the harder you push the deeper it will
sink and the more fish will stick on it." The man spoke
in a whisper, and very seriously asked Ko-ishin-mit never
to give the secret away now that he too knew the secret
as well.
"That is how I catch the most herring," the man said
as he walked away.
Ko-ishin-mit sat all through this long explanation in
goggle-eyed concern. He took in every word the man had
told him. Continued on page 4
Friday, October 1, 1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 3 Always copying others...
The next day Ko-ishin-mit
was seen making an extra-long
pole and very wide rake. "I am
going for herring," he told
everyone that passed by. He
assured his little wife Pash-hook
that she would soon have all the
herring she could possibly
smoke.
At last the rake was finished.
It was long. It was wide. It was
big. Pash-hook beamed as she
watched her dear husband trim
and polish the rake handle and
sharpen the barbs with loving
care. Pash-hook loved her
husband very much and was
always trying hard to please him.
It was still very dark. The
moon was not there. All the
fishermen were still fast asleep.
Ko-ishin-mit was up and busy
with his new fishing gear. He
pulled his cha-pahts, little canoe,
down to the water; he carried his
long rake next and placed it
carefully in the canoe. It was
extra wide; it was too long, but
Ko-ishin-mit did not care. This
was his new secret, he boasted.
Ko-ishin-mit paddled around
the bay; he paddled across the
bay; he paddled everywhere.
Every now and then he would
put his little paddle down and
peer into the darkness, listening,
listening for the flip of the
herring.
There was no herring! No fish
flipped upon the surface of the
waters. It was awfully dark. The
moon was not there. It was still
night. Ko-ishin-mit did not care.
He knew the secret. He listened
again. He would find fish, he was
sure. He would fill his cha-pahts
full of the fattest herring, he
boasted to himself.
He would land his cha-pahts
From pf 3
Ko-ishin-mit and his herring rake
in front of the village with the
herring spilling over the sides.
Then he would call with all his
might — "Ho-00000000 come
and receive your herring.
Ho-0000000 come and receive
your herring." He would be a
hero. He would be the best
fisherman, he smiled to himself.
Ko-ishin-mit stopped at a
place he knew was very deep. He
carefully lifted his long, long
rake. It was very heavy and hi#
little cha-pahts wobbled and
threatended to turn over.
Carefully he got the long pole to
stand straight up and down, as
the man had said, and he poked
it down deep, pushing it down
with all his strength. Straight
down he pushed his herring rake
— down, down it went until it
disappeared in the dark waters.
As the pole went out of sight
Ko-ishin-mit leaned down over
the side of his canoe to watch
the rake come up laden with big,
fat herring. He would soon have
his cha-pahts full. He would
soon be a hero, the best
fisherman.
So intent was Ko-ishin-mit on
his thought that he disn't see the
pole bounce suddenly out of the
water. It came back with a
mighty surge and — Wham! it
smacked poor Ko-ishin-mit right
on his nose. He was thrown
bacwards into his canoe and lay
still. One instant he had been
looking for the pole to come up
— the next there was a sea of
bright stars dancing all around
his head. When he came to, that
was all he remembered. Poor
Ko-ishin-mit! His nose swelled
and swelled and it was long and
black.
The people found him lying
in his canoe as it drifted in the
bay. They towed him home and
Pash-hook put him to bed. There
was no herring; there was just a
very hurt and very sick
Ko-ishin-mit.
When you push a pole into
the water it shoots back up like
a spear. It is very dangerous.
Ko-ishin-mit discovered this too
late. The man had not told him
this because he was always
copying other people.
It is said that children should
not always believe other people.
Sometimes they tell things that
are not true.
Raven the rook, would a herring
to rake.
Down to the waters, a herring to
take,
Down into the deep, he pushed
his rake,
Down into the depths, to see it
come back.
Up it came, smack upon his nose
it came back
And it swelled and swelled to a
big black nose.
From Son of Raven, Son of
Deer by George Clutesi,
published in 1967 by Gray's
Publishing, Sidney, B.C.
Learning languages
At one time Indians were beaten in
some B.C. schools if they spoke their own
language. Now they are being encouraged
not only to speak their language but also to
record native legends and to write them
down.
A team of professional scholars financed
by the B.C. government's First Citizen
Fund is busy trying to assemble
comprehensive language study kits to help
Indians learn their own language.
The Indian language project is headed
by Randy Bouchard who graduated from
the University of Victoria and later did
post-graduate work in linguistics at the
University of California.
"We are really running out of time,"
said Bouchard, "there are so few Indians
left who have a comprehensive knowledge
of their language."
Working with the Okanagan tongue,
Bouchard developed a method of writing
the language. Previously, there was no way
in which the tongue could be written and
understood.
With the help of many Indians the team
has built up word banks in a number of the
province's 30 native languages.
Bouchard is training Indian language
specialists from all 10 different Salish
language areas. He has also trained his
Indian assistants in tape recording
techniques.
The team uses a scientific linguistic
approach to the project but relies heavily
on Indians for collecting words, stories and
sounds.
Indian myths are first tape-recorded by
Indians   and  translated into  English  by
Indians. The translation is transcribed and
typed as a story in English and in Indian
using the practical writing system.
Experience in B.C. has shown that when
courses have been offered in Indian
languages that Indians have stayed away
and white people have dominated classes.
The study team has found that some
languages will be dead with two
generations. Haida, for example, is almost
gone and when spoken tradition has
disappeared entirely, it would be
impossible to construct a language teaching
kit.
By working as rapidly as possible the
team will be able to assemble a collection
of Haida words, a writing system and as
many stores as possible. The project also
includes the taping of as many speakers as
possible to get a firm idea of accents.
To establish good dialects the spoken
language of as many old people as possible
is recorded.
Getting around B.C. to work on the
project takes up much of Bouchard's time.
He travelled over 15,000 miles in the first
six months of this year.
The objective of the study is two-fold.
It will provide a means of preserving the
languages and it will also provide a means
of teaching the languages so that in time
they can be offered on reserves, in high
schools and universities.
All the material collected is stored at
the Provincial Museum in a resource
repository and it wll be made public in a
series titled Working Papers in British
Columbia Indian languages and culture.
The first material is expected to be
available by the end of the year under the
editorship of Bouchard.
The distinguished French anthropologist
Claude Levi-Strauss has agreed to serve on
the editorial board. Levi-Strauss maintains
in his book The Naked Man that B.C.
Indian languages and culture provide the
key to understanding all North American
Indian thought.
Most of the material published in the
working papers will be written by specially
trained Indians and to make it available to
as wide an audience as possible, the works
will be sold at cost.
With the spoken traditions dying
rapidly, it looks like an almost impossible
task to preserve the languages with a few
professional linguistics experts and trained
Indians.
Bouchard believes that only the closest
liaison between scholars and Indians can
make the task possible.
The myths that have been tapes include
many stories that have themes common to
a number of Indian languages.
The Coyote and the Woodtick is a
typical story spoken by Joe Abel of
Vernon, translated by Larry Pierre of the
Penticton Indian Reserve.
Another example is a legend of a great
flood, very similar to the Biblical story,
which occurs in many Indian languages.
In the Saanich dialect of the Straits
language it is told that a great canoe was
anchored near Mt. Newton at the
conclusion of the flood.
—Bill Thomas
Victoria Colonist
Sept. 19, 1971
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Page Friday, 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 1, 1971 Midsummer Night's Dream
Shakespeare said it: "In all the play there
is not one word apt, one player fitted." As a
summary of the North Van Centennial
Theatre production of A Midsummer Night's
Dream, the Bard is half-right at least.
Director Jane Mushet managed a lot of
the time to give her amateur actors a
professional impact, but in spite of her
careful attention we were treated to
innovations in acting technique we really did
not deserve: Roger Barton played his entire
romantic role of Robodemetrius with three
ball bearings in this mouth. Gordon Peck
"developed" the role of the other lover,
Lysander using the cardboard Bobbsey Twin
approach to characterization. Kerry Hughes,
alleged author of Acting as Hysteria, played
the romantic lead Hermia with an energy
bordering on incoherent frenzy.
The most interesting thing about this
production is that one is treated to an
experience   of  theatre   ranging  from   the
wine that left us drunk with their impact. A
nubile Puck, all energy and sensuous shivers,
conveyed a visual deliciousness that was
exciting sexually as well as imaginatively.
Bill Broughton's Wall captured playfulness
like a child, making the air warm. Above all,
Dune McLean as Bottom had fire and power
enough to unite the audience and the
production in a way that made the summer
dream alive. McLean made shadows of us all.
Another vital aspect to the evening was
the way in which the "On Stage" group who
produced the play have turned the
Centennial Theatre into a people place,
unlike the sterile cultural factory of, say, the
QE. Actors and audience appeared united in
their desire to enjoy themselves in an
open-ended congeniality which captures
many of the good feelings that must have
happened at the Globe. Around the
framework of the play itself has been
created   a   total   community   experience
embarrassingly ineffective to the sparkling.
The director's main job seems to have been
to pare away the amateurism of amateurs as
much as possible, so that while the dramatic
faux pas are never enough to make one want
to leave, neither have most of the actors
managed to achieve the best that is in the
play.
Too often the smooth and careful
movements of the production consumed the
script itself, resulting in a controlled visual
effect partially destroyed by lines performed
like lines.
The verbal orientation of Shakespeare
appeared to be a hurdle so high that, for all
the striking lighting and good theatre sense,
too many actors lacked the power to sail
smoothly over, slipping underneath instead
with a do-si-do trying to look like a
pas-de-deux.
On the other hand, several characters
lived the play, coming on like rich, dark
reminiscent of village theatre in the old
community hall: complete with plates of
cheese and nibblefoods left around to be
shared to the accompaniment of costumed
Elizabethan musicians.
In fact, this people atmosphere was one
of the most effective theatrical moods
created in the evening. It is a potentially
exciting alternative approach to amateur
theatre experiences, and one which was
certainly exciting enough to make us look
forward to the rest of the North Shore "On
Stage" season, namely:
Oct. 21-30: "Boeing Boeing",
Community Players; Nov. 4-6: A Modern
Comedy, West Van Little Theatre; Feb.
17-26: "Mame", Dunbar Musical Theatre;
Mar. 2-11: "Gondoliers", Greater Van
Operatic Society; Apr. 6-15: "New Moon",
North Shore Light Opera.
Barry Friesen
Interpretive Musicians
Last Sunday's crowd at the Q.E. Playhouse
Theatre was thrilled by skillful and
interpretive playing of the Hortulani Musicae
starring soprano Pat Sheiber. The audience
listened attentively through nearly two hours
of intricate and delicately beautiful music
representative of the Italian Renaissance.
Beginning with several varied anonymous
dances such as the difficult and deliciously
tantalizing Salterello, the instrumentalists got
off to a good start. Arranged between the
winds and strings in a simple and pleasant
balance, Hortulani Musicae proceeded to give
a warm and boisterous interpretation to them.
There was, however, a slight tendency to
limit variation and free interpretation in the
recorder and Krummhorn parts. This in no
way affected the mood created by the dances
which were followed by several Frotole, a
form of music popular around 1510. Here
were the first works sung by Shreiber. Her
superb solo work completely rounded out an
already rich sound created by the
instrumentalists and her voice soared and
danced with fullness and maturity.
Following the Frottole were the more
noble Madrigals, descendants of earlier
Frottole. These were played on three
recorders by Jon Washburn, Dave Skulski and
Ray Nurse. Involved and convoluted the
Madrigals gave the three ample opportunity to
show their controlled expressiveness. Dynamic
and bouyant, the Tedescha-Salterello was a
real success with the spellbound audience held
in silence several long seconds before they
broke forth in thunderous applause.
The next group of songs were executed on
the lute, the most favored instrument of
Medieval Italy. Ray Nurse, a past master of
technique, gave a safe and secure rendition of
all the Lute Songs and dances but it was in the
Canzonaper il basso with John Washburn on
bass viol that Nurse really showed his true
preceptive insight in his playing. This piece
turned out to be the high of the concert in
terms of intiutiveness even though it was not
as well received by the crowd as Fuggi Fuggi
in the second half.
The Story of the second half was of
flawless perfection of technique despite some
heavy improvising because of the lack of
certain instruments from the Italian past. The
harpischord solos were well done and Layne
Powell received acknowledgement from the
audience for her involvement in her music.
The whole concert came together at the end
in the Cantata "Jubilent Omnes" which was
received so well that the Hortulani Miscae
were called upon to do an encore. This they
performed with flair and ease, choosing a
medieval divided monody to finish the show
on a delightful note. As we filed out there was
a kind of feeling as if we had just left a noble
Italian court to return to the reality of rain
and long bus rides home.
Bruce Wilson
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Friday, October 1, 1971
THE       UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 5 SUPERVISOR WANTED
S.U.B. CO-OP
BOOKSTORE
Apply Room 236 S.U.B.
By Noon, Friday
October 1
Mr. Norman Cousins
WEEKEND WORKSHOP
UBC Campus, Oct. 9 & 10,
Nov. 13 & 14
BEING INSIDE-OUT
TOGETHER
contacting and mobilizing
the body energy
LynnSereda ph. 731-0773
Mr. Norman Cousins, editor of the Saturday Review and one of
the most influential voices in contemporary journalism, will speak
twice at UBC on WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 6. He will speak at
12:30 P.M. in the FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE on "An
Environment for Survival" and at 8 PM. in the lounge of TOTEM
PARK RESIDENCES on "Planetary Management." Admission to
both lectures, sponsored by the Vancouver Sun Lectureships and
the Leon and Thea Koerner Foundation, is free.
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WARNING: Frequent swearing could be very
disturbing for some.       —B.C. Director
SHOWTIMES: 7:30,9:30
Avison reads
gut poetry
Pastels glow throughout the
gallery. Though the ponderous
oriental music is turned off,
there is still the sound of a
flute. Margaret Avison,
dark-haired, strong-faced, finds
the flautist, plays a few notes
on the flute and then returns
to her stand.
She began her Tuesday
reading, part of the poetry
series sponsored by the Human
Government with a simple,
refreshing little poem on spring
written by an eight-year-old
friend.
Avison said that she
recently discovered a bunch of
poems written in the thirties.
One of them which she
described as "kind of
psychedelic" contained a
startling image, heralding her
later development:
universal white paw
that smahes prisms
in pools of night
Another thirties poem,
Avison described as "too
terrible to read", except for
the first line which she threw
out to the poets and would-be
poets to play around with:
"Fierce, old and forest."
Avison is deeply moved by,
and involved in the lives of
people around her and this is
evident in her poem, 'To A
Con Artist With Love From
Me" and the series of poems,
she has entitled "the Jo
Poems".
The poem "To A Con Artist
With Love From Me" was
written by Joyce, an unmarried
mother in her thirties. Joyce's
children were always removed
from her and she never really
understood why she was losing
them.
A short three -line poem,
which Avison obviously liked
herself, bears a similarity to
Sylvia Plath's tulip imagery.
Plath: the heart "opens and
closes. Its bowl of red blooms
out of sheer love for me" and
"Their redness talks to my
wound, it corresponds".
Avison:
The tulips were cherry red
now, splayed out
they were unable to breathe
out
the light that falls on them.
And from this poem Avison
jumped to what could be called
her "whump-whirr" poem, a
poem which appealed strongly
to the aging children in the
audience. The poem describes
the noise pollution of a
construction scene and begins
with the unique simile: "Day
broke like a chunk of molar".
The high point of the
reading was the poem "Of
Tyranny in One Breath" which
was her translation of the
Hungarian poem by Gyula
Illyes. It is available in the
latest book, "The
Dumbfounding".
The publishing of this poem
released the 1956 revolution. It
was slipped into printed
government documents and
released all over the city before
the censors caught it. "Illyes,"
said Avison, "was such a big
poet,   he   was   put   into   an
insane asylum instead of a
prison. He is out now and still
writing." A line from one of
Jim Brown's poems, read in
Wednesday's Canada Tribe
readings seems appropriate
here, "no government can keep
a good head down."
The audience was visibly hit
in the guts by this poem. In a
poetic sentence of 46 stanzas,
the poet describes what
happens when tryanny invades
not only every-day life, but
dreams, ideas, until "It" finally
becomes God, the universe, all
life.
Illyes says that tyranny is
"in how a youngster guardedly
answers a strange passerby",
"in how a wife says to her man
when will you be home?"
Tyranny is "not only" in "the
chill when a handshake goes
limp" but
its Presence haunts
even your dreams
It's in the marriage bed
- before
that, in the desire
for you crave only to caress
the loveliness It first possessed
with It you lay when you
believed
you loved
and:
It eyes you still
like a disease
deep-seated as memories,
It is everywhere before you
It is in your tomorrow,
in what you think,
work at, eat and drink,
and the last two brutal stanzas:
for where It is, all's vile,
Nothing's worthwhile...
not this song, however true,
nothing you do
It stands above
your waiting grave,
It tells who you have been,
your dust will serve Its ends.
This poem made me feel
that same, awful, sick, ashen
feeling I had after witnessing
the Gastown "riot" (the only
small comparable horror I've
known).
Avison's poems were
skillfully sequenced. For it was
after this that a strong note of
faith, of Christian faith which
the audience appeared to
appreciate, crept in.
There was an intense
electric connection between
poet and audience when
Margaret Avison read her final
poem "Poem as Prose".
Sleep as a refuge, work as a
refuge and read Avison; "the
holy giver is my refuge" and
she concluded:
be Thou alone
our refuge.
There was utter silence, and
then overwhelming applause,
for a minute I thought
someone would call "encore",
but the clapping subsided and
friends, poets, photographers,
and a reviewer who didn't
succeed in getting copies of her
unpublished poems crowded
around her.
Karen Loder
Page Friday, S
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October  1,  1971 Corporate
Circus
Except for a few aesthetics morticians who can get off
on things like old comic books and 78 rpm albums, nobody is
likely to be very interested in watching the American circus
fantasy disintegrate. Like a dream releasing more subconscious
feelings than we care to talk about in the morning, perhaps the
circus is based in an adolescent structure we would just as soon
no longer have identified as part of our culture, that is the
post-pill-pot one.
Still, it was heavy to watch the Ringling Bros.-Barnum &
Bailey Repression Theatre hit town for what must be one of
the last times. Especially since Barbie Doll, through her
company Mattell Inc. and eight million dollars, straddled
Barnum and Bailey some time ago, adding her own particular
brand of efficient consumer exploitation to the older con
games.
So now the circus is just another part of just another
conglomerate, and growth stocks for the myth can be bought
as easily as plastic-sealed beaver magazines. And like the
magazines, the three-ringed soother is becoming outgrown
memory: the children of all ages have grown up.
Three images, like the rings, are central to an evening at
the circus. The most powerful is that of a stereotypical third
class prostitute squeezing along Hastings in a full length, pure
white wedding gown. Melodramatic, yes, but again and again
the Ringmaster with his music blatantly encourages us to
believe in the spontaneous celebration of virginity and Brand
New that is supposed to be happening. Everything is New and
Happy, and admittedly it does take awhile for the shimmering
superwomen below to finally come across as the tired old
blonds they are.
Lassie is the second metaphor for the experience: good
old smart king friendly happy Lassie, loving us for ourselves.
The gaiety of the trained animal acts is a hard feeling to get a
perspective abput, until you realize that every moment of the
happy stuff you are watching is coercive.
In. fact, everything about the circus has to do with the,
extreme pressure that must be put on body and mind to
achieve extreme effects. There is a cost to achieving superman
pectorals or dancing elephants which is not made evident to
the stands. How close the extremity borders on the surreal or
the mad seemed clear when we saw, in the midst of the whole
simultaneous poem of events, one dog who spent his entire
role on the sidelines mindlessly repeating the single act of
moving from a high stool to a low stool and back again: the rat
caught in a maze without exit.
The third image is sexual. The man in the center ring
commands twenty horses through a rote of magic. A woman in
each of the two other rings command horses to reproduce the
same tricks, but they each have only half as many. A sequined
woman passes a whip through the bars of a cage; her role
finished, the man inside controls the lions.
These mind-warping images aside, the circus remains
unique theatre. Conditioned as we are to having most of our
choices made for us in film, tv, theatre, it is a naked feeling to
discover that no one is editing the circus experience for us.
Spots emphasize the main events, but nothing prevents you
from diverting your attention to stagehands pulling cages
down in preparation for the next event: like watching a play
simultaneously from behind and in front of the proscenium.
At times the style of simultaneity, including hawkers
hard selling their Barbie junk throughout, becomes too much
to handle. The circus is spectacle, designed to overwhelm.
When three troupes of trapezists perform their feats with such
synchrony that the climactic trick is occurring simultaneously
in three areas, the attention is boggled and we long for the
choiceless ease of a film.
Finally we are left with the irony that the truly
magnificent physical feats of the circus performers fail to
impress us. We watch impossible symphonies of coordination
and vaguely wonder where the meaning is. Like Tarzan and the
missions of Apollo, the circus myths of Real Accomplishment
are hard to believe in anymore, and so they die.
Barry Friesen
H A R A M B E E-
Overseas and Canadian students are invited to an
INTERNATIONAL CELEBRATION
on SUNDAY, OCTOBER 3rd  • At International House
from 2:01} p.m. until 5 p.m.
Coffee, Teas and desserts from 14 different countries will be served free
to our guests. Displays of sale goods from overseas will give a carnival air to
the festivity.
All new students and faculty members are welcome.
For information call I.H. at 228-3264.
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f
SEE INSIDE FOR DETAILS
This fall, when you and Sally Torque goto the big game with Purvis U., take along a copy of the October
Issue of the National lampoon. For the 75 cents you would have spent on a football program to find out
that Billy Glefson, tight end for the Purveyors, hails from Mofongo, Indiana, and majors in port construction, you'll have something to do during half time when the Asher B. Durand High School Large Drum and
Aimless Marching Corps slides into John Philip Sousa's "Bataan Death March" for the fourth time. You'll
be reading a fifteen-page Mad parody; "125th Street," the educational TV show where those adorable
Muthas, Big Rat and the Cocaine Monster, teach ghetto children their place; "Magical Misery Tour,"
which records the Beatles' trip to a land where all you need is a lawyer; "The Final Seconds," a gridiron
gripper starring those inseparable chums, Moose Nixon and Ruff Mitchell; and "Right On!", the same
campus war game played for years in army think tanks and radical encounter groups. And much more. The
Back to S^ool issue of the National Lampoon is on sale at newsstands everywhere.
Friday, October 1, 1971
THE       UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 7 Canada Tribe
A group of poets and singers called
Canada Tribe performed on
Wednesday in the SUB art gallery.
This potpourri of poets and
musicians delivered a bewildering maze
of folk-songs, word-plays, Buddhist
chants, incantatory monologues, -
some poems. At their best they
acheived a sort of electric rapport (to
use that over-used word) with the
audience that is rare; at their worst
they were simply boring and trivial.
Canada Tribe was a fitting name for
the group, since they were obviously
making a conscious effort to create,
both among themselves and among the
audience, a kind of tribal harmony;
some bond that would bind all the
people together into a cohesive union.
Despite their seeming break with
previous poetic diction and style, I was
surprised to find how traditional many
of their concerns were. Again and
again, I was reminded of Thoreau and
Walden, or even of the early
Romantics. Much of their poetry
represented a sort of jazzed-up version
of Wordsworth and Shelley. The
predominant images in all the poems
that were read were rural images;
word-pictures of the country and of
the wilderness; an old cabin on a
deserted beach, crabapples, grass,
trees, seagulls, buffaloes, — and so on.
Much of it actually came across.
At other times it was tedious. Two
of the poets spent a great deal of time
chanting over and over: Om! Shantih!
Santih! and various other phrases that
have been passe ever since Ginsberg.
One of the more memorable poets
was Scott Lawrance. He shared the
predominant sentiments of the other
poets and his work abound in
naturalistic imagery, but sometimes he
has a certain biting, savage humour
that makes his work interesting. Here
is  one  poem that brought  a large
r
simple tradition lyric:
people don't die
they merely change disguises
and take ships to distant places
carrying casting rods
and fishing creels
Lawrance was followed by Jorj
Heyman, another young poet who
delivered wild anarchic lyrics in a
melodious voice interspersed with
terrible lapses into maudlin
sentimentality.
response from the audience:
that forms coming and going like
clouds in the tetons
111,000    ft.    pass,    way    below,
Wyoming, tents and fir
of   tents,   buffalo   meat   curing   in
summer grasses
Sometimes Lawrance dropped the
screen of his curious non-grammar and
enunciation   and   delivered   a   very
—bob mitchinson photo
The high point of one of his poems
goes something like this:
I'm having a butiful love-affair
a butiful friendship
all around me. dig it!
One of the more impressive poets
was Tim Lander, who interspersed his
reading with flute-playing. He read his
poems in an irritating accented tone of
voice but some of his poems had a
fine, skeletal simplicity which is very
effective.
All the old words
are like skates
which have lost
their edges...
Lander    even    achieves    a    tone
sometimes reminiscent of the Song of
Solomon:
And what dreams
the willow fluff
your mosquitoes
of thought
graze on my flesh
your hands
are the herdsmen
of all my valleys...
Richard Harper read a short poem
describing with great humour the
complex relationship between reader
and writer of poem, between artist and
audience.
Two singers also put in an
appearance. Joe Hall (no, not Joe Hill)
sang tough, funky (I just had to use
that word) folk songs in a gravelly
voice accompanied by guitar,
harmonica, and incredible facial
contortions. Randy Sargeant delivered
soft sentimental ballads and did some
sophisticated guitar-picking.
Perhaps it is unfair to single out
individuals like this since the
performance was obviously intended
as a total effect and as such it
succeeded. Canada Tribe was able to
generate a feeling of - well, tribalism,
and togetherness and laughter and joy.
But the various panaceas they offered
(get back to nature, love et al) only
worked within the confines of the
performance; once one had stepped
out of the art gallery into the outside
world again, their words seemed
curiously distant and inapplicable.
Bernard Bischoff
ERIC'S BUC STOP
We cure ALL sick bugs
VOLKSWAGENS TOO!
220 ESPLANADE
N. VAN.
1897 BURRARD
VANCOUVER
731-8171
1897 BURRARD ST.
731-8171
ERICS
BUG STOP
CLIP THIS OUT FOR YOUR
SPECIAL STUDENT DISCOUNT
Page Friday. 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 1, 1971 Friday, October  1,  1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 15
—greg deacon photo
PROTESTERS GATHER outside the U.S. consulate on West Georgia to demonstrate against the proposed
Amchitka nuclear tests. About 150 high school students staged the protest Thursday after a student
committee called for a mass walkout. Another walkout is planned for Oct. 6.
Cabbies lodge complaint
against limousine service
MONTREAL (CUP) - Murray Hill, the
limousine service that has a talent for getting on the
wrong side of the Montreal Taximen, has done it
again.
A newly-formed taxi drivers union, local 48 of
Montreal has boycotted all cab service to Montreal's
Queen   Elizabeth   Hotel   because   it   charges  the
CUSO day near
Canadian University Students Overseas will
reveal the why and how of the organization Tuesday
at International House.
Free coffee and ten kinds of tea will be served.
CUSO veterans who have returned from the
four corners of the globe will discuss their two years
spent abroad.
Series to expand
racism knowledge
The centre for continuing education is offering
a series of lectures on apartheid in southern Africa.
The first lectures a discussion of the internal
politics of apartheid by a former South African
Zayed Gaimet is on Tuesday at 8 p.m. in Bu. 332.
The aim of the series is to expand general
knowledge of racism in southern Africa with some
reference to the effect of Canada's foreign policy.
Future topics include the economics of
apartheid, apartheid and education, the impact of
apartheid on literature, and the future prospects of
southern africa.
For further information contact Gerald Savory,
director of public affairs program for the centre for
continuing education.
Free U starts
The fall session of the Free University starts
during the first two weeks of October.
Courses at the university, 1895 Venables,
include the future of teaching, a history of rock and
roll and the atom.
The university's phone number is 254-8522.
limousine service has an unfair advantage over the
taxi drivers.
"The service doesn't have to pay for taxi plates,
drivers don't have to buy a meter, they don't have
to get a pocket number and they don't have to get a
dome light. Yet they act like taxis," said local
president Rene Boutin Tuesday.
For the first two days of this week picketing
drivers from the union marched in front of the hotel
between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m.
"We apply for permits and yet limousine drivers
can pick up fares without them," said picketers at
the Queen Elizabeth Tuesday.
Union officials said they want the Murray Hill
limousine service discontinued. They also
recommend the company cut out frequent runs
from the major hotels to the airport and instead
have the Murray Hill service restricted to service
from a downtown terminal.
Boutin said the new union, an affiliate of the
International Teamsters Union, has only been
organized for a short time but has already attracted
up to 300 drivers. He said its aim is to give the taxi
drivers a better voice.
"We don't have much money yet but the
government won't deal with pressure groups, and
drivers need a real union," he said.
So far the Confederation of National Trade
Unions, one of Quebec's largest union organizations
which recently came out in favor of steps to make
French the working language of the Montreal school
board, has not taken a stand on the mater of the
taxi drivers.
Laws questioned
A women's abortion conference will be held
Saturday and Sunday in the SUB party room.
The first session, a panel on abortion law
repeal, will be held Saturday at 8 p.m. It will be
followed by workshops Sunday at 10 a.m.
The first two sessions of the conference which
is sponsored by the B.C. women for abortion law
repeal coalition are closed to men.
Vancouver lawyer Nancy Morrison will discuss
the legal aspects of abortion Sunday at 8 p.m. in a
meeting open to both men and women.
Residence expulsion illegal
HALIFAX (CUP) - A precedent was set here
this week when the residential tenancies board, a
provincial organization that deals with tenants'
rights, claimed the expulsion of two St. Mary's
University students from residence was illegal.
The two students,, Don Caley and Dave Miller,
were expelled Sept. 22 after being found guilty of
"removing  screens from  residence windows" and
"throwing water from residence windows".
The students then discovered that under Nova
Scotia legislation they have recourse to demand a
full pardon from the university and they also have
the option of legal action in the civil courts.
This is the first time that Canadian university
residences have found themselves confronted with
government legislation that removes their powerful
right of expelling tenants on the spot.
For Your
Convenience
We Are Now
Open Evenings
MONDAY-THURSDAY TIL 9 P.M.
the bookstore
228-4741
1 NITE ONLY! THURS., ACT. 7-8 P.M.
QUEEN ELIZABETH THEATRE
$6.50 - $5.50 - $4.50
FOR CHOICE SEATS - ORDER TICKETS NOW!
Tickets: Vancouver Ticket Centre
* All Eaton's Stores * Butcher
Srioppe * H. R. MacMillan
Planetarium * All Union Jacks &
Jeans.
For information 683-3255.
Vancouver Ticket centre Ltd.
630 Hamilton Street
Vancouver 3, B.C.
Enclose stamped self-addressed
envelope.
o continuing
§  fe/tivolof
opera
ballet
.symphony,
on film
ONE OF THE MOST EXCITING COLLECTIONS OF MUSICAL
PERFORMANCES EVER ASSEMILED
— SISKIND, MONTREAL GAZETTE
FRI., OCT. 1 - 3:00, 4:45, 6:30, 8:15, 10:00
"GISELLE"
CARLA FRACCI — ERIK BRUHN
AMERICAN BAUET THEATRE
SAT., OCT. 2 - 3:00, 6:00, 9:00
"CARMEN"
Salzburg Festival Production, Bumbry,
Jon Vickers, Diaz, Von Karajan
SUN.. OCT. 3 - 3:30, 5:00, 6:30, 8:00, 9:30
"I PAGLIACCI"
La Sea la Orch. & Chorus. Jon Vickers, Von Karajan
MON., OCT. 4 - 3:00, 4:45, 6:30, 8:15, 10:00
"GISELLE"
CARLA FRACCI, ERIK BRUHN
AMERICAN BALLET THEATRE
TUES., OCT. 5 - 3:00, 6:00, 9:00
"CARMEN"
Salzburg Festival Production, Bumbry,
•Jon Vickers, Diaz, Von Karajan
WED., OCT. 6 - 3:30, 5:00, 6:30, 8:00, 9:30
 "I PAGLIACCI"	
THURS., OCT. 7 - 3:00, 5:00, 7:00, 9:00
BEETHOVEN SYMPHONIES 6 & 9
Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra, Von Karajan
NO SEATS
RESERVED
REG. PRICES
DENMAN PLACE
1737 COMOX STREET   683-4647
CLIP AND
SAVE Page 16
THE      UBYSSEY
Pride/   C^oDer  I,  1971
'Tween classes
FRIDAY
CLASSICS CLUB
Meets at 4495 W 7th Ave., home of
the     inscrutable     Malcolm     X.
MacGregor for speaker Dave Smith
on "Monte d'lrsi".
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Drink beer with the colonials every
Friday   from   4-8:30   p.m.   In   the
Upper Lounge to live music.
AIESEC
Meeting, noon, SUB  105-B for all
economics and commerce students
who    wish    to    serve    imperialism
abroad.
UBC FRENCH CLUB
General   meeting   in   International
House   in   the   upstairs   lounge   for
slides of France. All welcome.
UBC ROWING CREW
An   informal   get   together  in  SUB
125.
PRE-SCHOOL WORK CLUB
Everyone     welcome     (welfare
recipients  included) to SUB 105-A
for the first meeting.
UBC BICYCLE CLUB
Organizational meeting in the clubs
lounge 12:30.
T-BIRD MOTORCYCLE CLUB
General    meeting,   all   welcome   at
noon SUB 125.
THUNDERBIRD BADMINTON TEAM
Tryouts  for  team   6:30 to  8:30  in
gym B near ice rinks.
HUMAN GOVERNMENT
Jazz-Rock   party   with   Headstrong
and    organic    refreshments   in   the
SUB ballroom, 8 p.m.
NDP CLUB
All   social   democrats  and   NDPers
welcome, noon, SUB 224.
CURLING CLUB
SUB   main floor for last chance to
sign up, noon.
SATURDAY
UBC WOMEN'S CURLING CLUB
(isn't sexism wonderful?)
Thunderbird winter sports centre at
9:45 a.m. for organizational
practice.
c.v.c
Games, music and people in the
clubs lounge, 8:30 p.m.
SUNDAY
UBC TAEKWON-DO CLUB
Practice led by Mr. Choi in Gym B
7-9 p.m. Winter Sports Centre.
PAN HELLENIC
Car Rally, B Lot 2 p.m., $1.00 per
car.
MONDAY
UBC WOMEN'S LIB
8 p.m. in Biological Sciences 2449.
LEGAL AID
Monday     12:30-1:30,     Thursday
12:30-1:30   SUB  rooms  228,  232,
234.
WOMEN'S SPORTS
Campus   tennis   league   begins   5-7
p.m.  in   part organization and part
playing time.
MOTORPHALLIC CLUB
General    meeting    SUB    105.    All
welcome.
THUNDERBIRD BADMINTON TEAM
Try Outs in Gym B 6:30-8:30 p.m.
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
God    squad    hosts    discussion    on
"Whose  bags  Is Christianity", SUB
party room.
EL CIRCULO
Talk and slides on Colombia 12:30
International House Room 402.
HELLENIC CULTURAL SOCIETY
General   meeting   and   Greek   style
dancing,   International   House  7:30
p.m.
TUESDAY
CUSO
Find out about Imperialism overseas
for two years upstairs International
House   upper   lounge   9   a.m._ to  9
p.m.
UBC SCIENCE SOCIETY
General    meeting,   all   welcome   at
noon SUB 215.
PANG0-PANG0 (UNS) -
Celebrations in this island
kingdom over the receipt of San
Marino's final war debt payment
ended abruptly when it turned
out to be a worthless slug.
&£
Bo Wider berg's film
•L#«
Friday &
PI ♦      ¥i
Saturday
Hebb Theatre
Oct. 1st & 2nd
7:30 & 9:30
Hebb Theatre
Next week
Tom Jones
only 75*
YOUR PRESCRIPTION ...
. . . For Glasses
for that smart look in glatOM ...
look to
Ptesclibtion Optical
Student Discount Given
WE HAVE AN OFFICE NEAR YOU
SPAGHETTI HOUSE LTD
4450 W. 10th Ave.
Hot Delicious Tosty Pizzas
- 22 DIFFERENT FLAVORS -
BARBECUED SPARERIBS
FREE DELIVERY - Right to Your Door
Phone 224-1720 -  224-6336
OPEN    FOR    LUNCH
HOURS - MON. To THURS. 11 am. to 3 am.
i FRI. & SAT. 11 am to 4 am -SUNDAY4 p.m. to 2 a.m,<
WEDNESDAY
PSYCHOLOGY CLUB
Film "Frontiers of the Mind" to be
shown to all interested students and
faculty,     noon.    New    members
welcome.
CUSO
All day till 9 p.m. on Why is
CUSO? International House.
VSTCSM
6:30-8:30 at the Chapel of the
Epiphany, 6050 Chancellor Blvd.
Sopranos and altos needed.
LAY SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY
TUESDAY NIGHTS - 7:30-10:00 P.M.
LEADERS:     OCTOBER 5-NOVEMBER 30
Father A. Szigmond and Dr. G. Strothotte - Biblical
Professors W. R. Crockett and R. A. Wilson — Theological
Mr. Bill Herger and Rev. F. L. Sanderson — Communications
Dr. John Ross — "Systems Thinking and Theology"
PLACE:   Room   103,   Vancouver School  of Theology,
6000  lona  Drive,,(under the tower off Chancellor).
COST:   $5.00 for students. $10.00 for others.
For Information Contact 6000   lona   Drive
Rev. Vol Anderson, Phone 224-0069 or 228-9031
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Campus — 3 lines, 1 day $1.00; 3 days $2.50
Commercial - 3 lines, 1 day $1.25; additional
lines 30c; 4 days price of 3.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable
in advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m.fthe day before publication.
Publications Offce, Room 241 S.V.B., UBC, Van. 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
DANCE AT GRAD STUDENT
centre to Troup 80 Sat. Oct. 2, 9 to
1 — $1.00 per person, tickets at
Grad  Centre office.  Refreshments.
1200 PEOPLE CAN'T BE WRONG!
Come to Undercut '71, Sat., Oct. 2
in SUB Cafe.
Greetings
12
Losl & Found
13
LOST LADIES' WATCH NEAR
Hebb, Hennings bldgs. Sept. 13.
Black strap. Diamonds around
face. Reward.  261-3517.	
LOST GOLD PENDANT WATCH
from chain, Sept. 15. Reward,
please Contact Cathy 299-4980.
LOST! GRAD RING VIC. OF DETH-
bridge 1970. Reward offered. Phone
224-1924.
Rides & Car Pools
14
NEED RIDE FROM BOUNDARY
Bay area. Can use own car sometimes. Staff; hours somewhat
flexible.  943-1658.	
WHY BUM A RIDE? SEE THE
Wheeler Dealer at the Cycle Center, 2320 W.  4th, 731-5531.
Special Notices
15
SUNDAYS 8:00 P.M. "FIRESIDE"
Program, Students' Common
Room, Vancouver School of Theology 6050 Chancellor Blvd., Oct. 3.
Guest Mr. Leslie Rohringer, Director of Residences, U.B.C. All wel-
come.	
DISCOUNT ON STEREOS — SAVE
dollars! Example: tuner-amplifier
automatic turntable, 2 speakers,
regular $199.00 your cost $125.00.
2-year parts guarantee. Carry
Sony, Sansui, Dual, Akai, A.G.S.,
Warfdale. Phone 732-6769 for savings.	
VANCOUVER SCHOOL OF THEO-
logy's Choir of Sacred Music.
Starting: Wednesday, Oct. 6—6:30
to 8:30 p.m. Place: Chapel of The
Epiphany. Vancouver School of
Theology. 6050 Chancellor Blvd.
Don Forbes, director. Men and women welcome. Sopranos and Altos
especially needed.
UBC BARBER SHOP — OPEN 6
days a week. Hairstyling by Dini
& Richard. 5736 University Blvd.
FOLK SONG SOCIETY GENERAL
meeting, Thursday, October 7. 12:30
SUB.    Room    125.    New   members
welcome!	
—    ELVTRA MADIGAN    —
—    WITH PI A DEGERMARK    —
Fri. & Sat.. Oct. 1 & 2 — 7:30 & 9:30
Hebb' Theatre — 75c for all.
HOMEMADE WINE. 6 BOTTLES. 6
weeks. All equipment included.
Complete kit guaranteed, $6.75
postpaid. Send monev order today.
Wineco. Dept. 1P9. 670 King East,
Hamilton. Ontario.
Wanted—Information
17
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
AUTOMOTIVE
Autos For Sale
21
'68 MINI 1000. EXCELLENT CON-
dition. Will paint to suit new own-
er.   Phone  224-5689.	
1960 VAUXHALL SEDAN $150.00.
Passed Motor Vehicle Inspection.
Telephone  274-1621   to view.	
'65 XKE, 40,000 MI. NEW BRAKES,
clutch, abarth. carpets, respray.
Owner leaving country. 731-8936.
'68 MGB-GT BRG. WIRE WHEELS,
new tires, radio, new clutch. $1800
offers! View 2105 West 7th Ave.
733-3574.	
'69 AUSTIN AMERICA 1300. 22,400
.miles. Excel, cond. Tncl. radio, roof
rack, chains. $1290 224-5524.	
'66 ACADIAN. IMMAC. CONDN.. 6-
cvl. standard, two new tires. $895.
Bruce. 9 a.m.-5 p.m., 682-2731 —
6-8 p.m., 327-7019.	
1969 MGB. 27.000 MI.. RADTO. W.W.
$1,950 or reasonable offer. Very
good condition. 732-7034. 	
Automobiles—Wanted
22
Automobiles—Parts
23
Motorcycles
25
'67 HONDA 300 SUPER SPORT.
A-l cond., 13,000 miles, black and
silver.   Ph.   Mike,   263-5171   after   6
p.m. $375.	
FOR  SALE 1966  SUZUKI  250.  Excellent condition. $280. Ph. 224-5189.
Automobiles—Repairs
24
CAR REPAIRS TO
VOLVO,MERCEDES
PORSCHE, VOLKSWAGEN
* Factory trained mechanics
* Fully Guaranteed Work
* Reasonable Rates
P.S. We also now repair
Datsun, Toyota, & Mazda Cars
SALES AND SERVICE
8914 Oak St. 263-8121
BUSINESS SERVICES
Art Services
31
STEAMBUBBLE GRAPHICS FOR
posters at student (not mamooks
ripoff), prices; and photography
services. John or Nick at the
Steambubble, third floor Lassere,
almost  anytime. 	
Beauty Parlors
31A
UBC BEAUTY SALON. WIGS &
Hairpieces cleaned & styled. Prof,
service — low prices. 5736 Univ.
Blvd. 228-8942.
Photography
35
tfje Htm anb gutter
Cameras!
3010 W.   BDWY.
736-7833
Cross-screen (Star)
Filter  $3.15-$3.92
Sakulite S-2
ELECTRONIC FLASH
SPECIAL $10.00
Kodachrome II guide number 25
Full selection of 3. 5. and 6
image lenses.
Rip-offs NOT our Specialty!
4*>
INSTANT BLO-UP, 8x10, $1.00;
16x20, $3.00. film processing, proofing, while you wait. 4472 W. 10th
Ave. 224-1732.
Scandals
37
HOMOSEXUAL? WORRIED ABOUT
being gay? Why not talk with
someone who is sympathetic?
Others have! Box 6572. Station
"G". Vancouver 8.	
SCANDALS GALORE AT UNDER-
cut '71. Tomorrow nite. Hard times.
Tickets off AMS or Foresters.
Typing
40
TEDIOUS TASKS — PROFESSION-
al typing. IBM Selectric — Days,
Evenings, Weekends. Phone Shari
at 738-8745 — Reasonable prices.
EFFICIENT ELECTRIC TYPING —
my home, essays, thesis, etc. Neat,
accurate work. Reasonable rates.
Phone 263-5317.	
EXPERT IBM SELECTRIC TYPIST
Experienced essay and thesis typist. Reasonable rates. Mrs. Ellis.
321-3838.	
RETIRED PUBLISHER WILL EDIT
essays, theses, mss. for grammar,
punctuations, syntax. spelling,
clarity, etc. 263-6565.	
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
SOMEONE TO CARE FOR TWO
children every Friday school in
session 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 or 2:00
p.m.  $1.00  per hour. 266-8492.
HEADS WANTED. SHORT HOURS,
good pay. Apply 4023 Macdonald,
3-5  p.m.,   Wed.,   Thurs..  Fri.  only.
Work Wanted
52
BINDING. ALL TYPES OF MAGA-
zines, booklets, etc., permanently
bound. Send for full details, cloth
samples and quotations to: Centennial Bookbinding, P.O. Box 130.
North Vancouver, B.C.
INSTRUCTION &
SCHOOLS
Music Instruction
61
Special Classes
62
CHILDREN'S CREATIVE ART
classes. Child art centre, Acadia
Road south. Monday, 3:30-5:00
p.m. October to March, Thursday,
3:30-5:00 p.m. October to March.
Fees for full session $8.00. Information & registration, phone 228-
5351.
Tutors—Wanted
64
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
USED AMPEX 1260 TAPE DECK
with speakers $250 (about $700
new)  excel, shape. 732-8920 or 291
3667.	
HEAD STD. SKIS 205, WITH SOL-
oman step-in heel and marker toe.
$95.00 phone  evenings  684-1077.
135 FOOT MINESWEEPER HULL
with superstructure, $4700, view
at 286 North Airpprt Rd., Richmond.
VOLUME  —  SHAKESPEARE   FOR
sale. 8 editions. Pictorials, hard
cover. (Good condition). Telephone
731-2596   (after 5 p.m.)	
FOR SALE SONY TC-355 STEREO
tape deck, three heads/sound on
sound. $200. Phone 736-6809.	
LEAVING COUNTRY PH. 987-6155.
'70 175cc Yamaha Enouro: '64 Ply-
mouth Belvedere, 6 cyl., 24,000 mi.
Dresser, 6 drawers, 6' x 4%- bed-
spring & mattress.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
SINGLE ROOM FOR MAN. AVAIL-
able now! Private entrance, phone,
cafe, near gates, comfortable —
very quiet. 224-7623.	
ROOM FOR A REAL GOOD TIME
at Undercut '7.1. In SUB tomorrow
night.  Hard  times.	
SPACIOUS SLEEPING ROOMS FOR
2 people; private entrance & baths;
l'./i blocks from gates. $40.00 each.
224-6389.
Room & Board
82
ROOM AND BOARD $110 MO.
Males. Excellent food, colour TV.
Sauna, 5785 Agronomy Road.
Phone  224-9684.	
ROOM AND BOARD FOR FEMALE
in exchange for baby sitting services. Private room and bath. All
facilities of house available. Close
to campus.  263-4764.	
ROOM AND BOARD AVAILABLE.
Mature women students. Vancouver School of Theology, 6000 lona
Drive.   Phone   228-9031.	
ROOM AND BOARD OR MEAL
passes available on campus. Phone
Mike at 224-9866, between 5:30 &
6:30.	
ROOM AND BOARD: MALE STU-
dent; laundry; private entrance.
Phone 731-3732.
Furn. Apts.
83
2-BDRM. FURN. APT.. LARGE
rooms, terrific view, Dec. 22-May
1. Kitsilano, $130. 732-8920 or 291-
3667.	
2 ROOM SUITE. $45 SINGLE. $65
double. Dunbar and 26th. Non-
smoker. Phone 738-5448.	
FURNISHED SUITE. CLEAN,
with kitchenette, share bath. Oct.
10th. 3536 West 1st Ave. $70 mo.
A. Sutherland.	
MALE STUDENT. SHARE APPT.
suite. 2 bedrooms; $67.50 plus %
phone, plus % hydro. Phone Ron.
731-0316. 10 min. bus. to UBC.
Unf. Apts.
84
STUDENT SPECIAL
3  Rooms of Furniture
From $199.95
HOUSE OF GROUPS
1278 Granville
Day 687-5043 Eve. 277-9247
Houses—Furn. & Unfurn.     86
FEMALE GRAD OR SENIOR STU-
dent wanted to share 2 bedroom
house nr.  campus $70.00.   228-9504.
5 ADULTS NEED 3-4 BEDROOM
house. Kits-Pt. Grey. Nov. 1. Terry
736-6805 ,or Pam. 253-8770 after 6. Friday, October  1,   1971
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 17
UBC club formed to aid Pakistani refugees
A club has been formed on campus to aid Pakistani
refugees in India.
India's ability to support these refugees is weakening,
and if significant help is not provided, she may be forced
to attack West Pakistan in order to end the civil war,
which could lead to a conflict of world-wide scale, said
spokesman Bob Gallagher, Tuesday.
He said the purpose of the club was to aid the
refugees by raising money, encouraging the Canadian
government to increase its aid and to mobilize political
pressure against the West Pakistani government.
A tag-day, a petition to prime minister Pierre
Trudeau, distribution of self-addressed letters to citizens
for their MP's, a dinner and an educational program in the
local high schools are planned, said Gallagher.
Gallagher said: "We will only support agencies that
guarantee 100 per cent of all donations reach the
refugees."
Gallagher said concerned citizens can get actively
involved by coming to the club's next meeting — Bu. 102
at 12:30 Tuesday.
The home-grown wonder and the hard-liner
From page 3
Charles McDowell, the power-hungry Lady MacBeth
of the chemistry department, would love to have a crack
at the presidency. He's said so. In fact, when it comes to
empire building, he's no slouch. He's very sharp in the
clutches and knows how (and where) to turn the knife. If
he can muster the support in other faculties he could be
the one.
Bill Armstrong, former applied science dean and
current vice-president in charge of academic affairs, would
also like the job, but he doesn't have a PhD, which in at
least one session seemed to eliminate him from the
running. Also, he seems like too much of a nice guy.
Watch for him though-
Two others who would like to be administration
president of this here university but who don't have a
chance are academic planner Robert Clark, who is the
laughing-stock of UBC's senate, and John Young, the
economic flunky for the Liberal government who helped
put all those people out of work last year while head of
the prices and incomes commission for the federal
government.
Now   we   come   to   the   two   heavies.   The   two
SUB FilmSoc
presentation
power-mongers who just may end up fighting it out for
the top position.
One is presently at UBC, and the other is currently
the administration president of the University of Calgary.
The home-grown wonder is arts dean Douglas Kenny
who we've already mentioned in the past. The other is
lawyer Freddy Carrothers who apparently would have
wide faculty and administration support if he applied for
Walter's empty shoes.
Unlike the others, neither Kenny nor Carrothers has
said anything public about the UBC administration
presidency.
Kenny, of course, isn't saying anything about
anything, which is wise considering the mess in the
English department. But don't dismiss him completely. He
is looked on by many as a strong psychologist who has
been able to "keep the lid on" (remember that phrase) the
arts faculty during a time of severe stress. And, more
important, he has a cohesive group of hatchetmen in other
faculties as Well as his own who see themselves benefitting
from his rise to supreme power.
On the other hand, Carrothers' name has come up
repeatedly in speculation about the job. About newspaper
reports that he has already turned down the presidential
position at the University of Toronto so he could have the
UBC job, Carrothers said recently: "I can't tell you. I have
no information on it."
In previous jobs and in his present post at Calgary, he
has earned the reputation of being a fairly hard-line
administrator, which is apparently part of his attraction
for supporters here. They seem to be worried about
something.
Whoever gets the job, one thing is certain. He will
have to be willing to live in the mansion which is the
official president's residence.
Walter, who lives in an apartment caused all sorts of
anguish and teeth-gnashing when he refused to move into
the mansion upon becoming president. UBC protocol
minister Malcolm McGregor was livid. Other people were
said to be aghast, which is something like being pissed off.
It as as if Richard Nixon has spurned the White House in
favor of a townhouse.
Whoever Walter's successor is, at least we'll know
where to find him.
WATERHOLE * 3
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FRIDAY-
Spanish Paella
MONDAY-
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TUESDAY-
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WEDNESDAY-
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c
Haida
KINGS'Yat   JOYCE
435-3222
SHOWTIMES: 7:30,9:30
SUNDAY MATINEE 2 P.M.
INTRODUCTION TO
CREATIVE ENGINEERING
Engineering and Photography
INSTRUCTOR:
MR. DENES DEVENYI, P.Eng., Special Lecturer in
Creative Photography, Assistant Director, Department of
Physical Plant and Planning, Simon Fraser University.
TIME:
Commencing SATURDAY, OCTOBER 9, 1971,
9:30-11:30 a.m., 10 sessions.
PLACE:
ROOM 214, Henry Angus Building, The University of
British Columbia.
FEE:  $45.00.
COURSE OUTLINE:
Specific techniques will be discussed that will increase the
creative thinking and problem-solving ability of the student.
The course will also help graduate engineers and engineering
students to improve their powers to communicate through
the visual media. It will explore areas that are normally
beyond the engineer's education and experience. By doing
this it will lead engineers to a more creative approach to
their profession as well as to teach a greater awareness of
the world around them.
Lectures, classroom exercises and group discussions are part
of the program.
REGISTRATION:
As enrolment is limited to 25 persons, advance registration
is advised. n, .    .
Please contact:
ENGINEERING PROGRAMS
Centre for Continuing Education, UBC
228-2181 Page 18
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 1, 1971
Canada and Cuba
at Pan-Am games
The Pan-Am Games resembles a mini Olympic
Games except only the countries of North and
South America compete for individual and team
honours. Although politics has no place in athletics,
the Pan-Am and the Olympics have tremendous
propaganda potential and are used as such.
Politics aside, UBC can be especially proud
since many UBC students competed very
successfully at the Pan-Am Games. These students
now form the nucleus of many UBC extramural
teams competing in the Western Canada
Intercollegiate A thletic A ssociation.
By NICK AUF DER MAUR
Last Post News Service
In 1967, the United States all but wiped out
the competition at the Pan-American games held in
Winnipeg. The U.S. won 120 out of the 170 gold
medals available, while Canada and Cuba trailed
badly with 12 and eight respectively. It was par for
the course.'
This year at Cali, it was slightly different. The
number of events was increased to 194 but the
American gold medal monopoly was reduced to
105. Canada added seven to its previous standing for
a total of 19, becoming the second most improved
team in the games. Cuba was the most improved
team and shot ahead of Canada into second place in
the team standings, winning 31 gold medals. Total
medal standings stood at 218 for the U.S., 105 for
Cuba and 80 for Canada. None of the other 27
competing teams came close. The Cuban total was
only two less than that nation had won in five
previous Pan-American games.
On the basis of population, Cuba was the clear
winner. (For the sake of argument it comes to a
little over one U.S. medal per million, 13 for Cuba
and four for Canada.) The Cubans were also
enormously pleased when their teams beat the
Americans in their two specialties, baseball and
basketball.
The news of Cuba's spectacular and dramatic
success provoked charges that once again the
Communists were using sport for propoganda
purposes. Canadians, of course, were mildly pleased
their delegation had done well in women's
swimming and equestrian events but disappointed in
the overall results and again wondered why the
country is so hopeless in international competition.
A decade or so ago, Canada at least dominated
world hockey and the prevailing spirit was "well at
least   there's   one   thing   we   can   do".  But  the
collective humiliation of recent hockey disasters has
made the country a little more conscious of
Canada's poor sports showing. Now a greater effort
is being made by private and government sources to
increase the country's sports prowess. The notion
that physical health and development is important
to a country is growing, ergo the Canada Summer
and Winter Games.
But if Canada ever does well in international
sports nobody would ever accuse us of crude
propaganda attempts. The most anybody would
ever say is "What's Canada trying to prove?"
But in Cali, the president of the U.S. Olympic
Committee declared: "Cuba, with its trainers from
behind the iron curtain and its political propaganda
objectives, represents a new and very dangerous
threat to international sports competition.
"Like the Soviet Union and other socialist
countries;" he continued, "they consider that
superiority in sports proves the worth of their
system. For them, sport has become a powerful
political and propaganda arm."
Fidel Castro's response to these charges offers
an interesting view of the socialist attitude toward
sport.
"They're trying to say," Castro said in a speech,
"that Cuba is using sports as a political instrument.
Actually the opposite is true. Politics is an
instrument of sport. In other words, in terms of
human activity, sports is an end, not a means...
just as the betterment of education, culture, health,
material conditions of life, human dignity and the
spiritual and moral values of man are all political
objectives.
"They don't understand the role of politics: the
revolution is the instrument of education, of sports,
of spiritual values. They are the instrument of man.
Simply put, the revolution is made by man for the
benefit of man.
"But why all these stories? In Cuba, not only
sports, but education has been developed like never
before. But we don't have any international
campaign. Our campaign against illiteracy was not a
competition.
"We're doing everything we can to better the
lot of man.
"Cuba's progress has even provoked a greater
preoccupation for sports and athletic training in the
United States. Who would have thought of it?
Before they could win without trying. Now they
have to watch out.
"And we know that when other Latin
American countries have the same conditions as
ours, they'll get the same results."
Fortunately, they'll never be able to match
Hockey Canada.
FORESTRY PRESENTS
UNDERCUT 71
TOMORROW NIGHT
IN SUB
HARD TIMES
TICKETS AT AMS OR OFF FORESTERS
NUDE FURNITURE
DESKS
DRAWERS
TABLES
etc.
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4359 West 10th Avenue
CA 4-4241
PHENOMENON OF MAN PROJECT, INC. PRESENTS
Dr. Harry N. Olsen
and Frank R. Stone
LECTURING ON
TEILHARD DE CHARDIN'S
The Phenomenon of Man
Wednesday — October 6   7*0P.m.
TICKETS $3.00 AT THE DOOR 5840 Oak St.
For Further Information Call U n Jty Of VaIICOU Vef      263"3713
-Barry gruanka photo
CROWD GATHERS to watch enterprising young lady walk on water
(with a little help from some forestry students). Event was held in
Empire Pool as part of Forestry Week activities.
Intramurals
What's your racket?
For badminton and tennis
buffs it is smashing birds and
balls.
Great games depending on
what type of birds are smashing
and whose bails.
BADMINTON
Competitors with surnames
A-M will compete Mondays
7:30-10 p.m. and N-Z,
Wednesdays 7-10 p.m. Games are
at War Memorial Gym, September
28 to October 18.
Consult the ladder outside the
Intramural office for competition.
TENNIS
Results must be recorded
immediately after the game. Place
results in 'Games Result' box
outside the Intramural office,
room 308 War Memorial Gym.
Games must be played on UBC
courts only.
SPORTS MENU
Deadlines: basketball,
tug-o-war, and turkey trot (run
3'/2 miles, winner gets a fat
gobbler) are October 4.
HELP
Due to the tremendous
number of football teams (60),
more referees are needed. Drop
by the Intramural office and sign
up today.
Second Unit Managers meeting
is Tuesday at 7 p.m. in the
student council chambers. Be
there.
Team notices
GOLF
Anyone interested in trying
out with the UBC Golf team is
invited to the meeting in
Buchanan 104 today at noon.
If you can't make the meeting
call 261-1529 after 6 p.m. and
leave your name and phone
number.
ROWING
Anyone interested in joining
the rowing team, either with the
varsity team or the freshman team
is invited to the meeting in SUB
125 today at noon.
Size or weight are not
important to join the freshmen,
but you must be at least six feet
in height for the varsity team.
Sports Might
What happens if the AMS
referendum to be held in January
to decide the fate of the $5
athletic fee passes?
Does this mean that UBC will
no longer have such teams as
hockey, basketball, football,
rugby and soccer to provide free
entertainment (with your AMS
card)?
Not likely. The athletic
department is too firmly
entrenched in extramural sports
to pull out just like that.
After all, extramural athletics
are a big advertising device for the
university.
But a disturbing thought comes
to mind.
Will entrance to these games
still be free if the jock department
is deprived of their money?
My guess is no. Money will
have to come from somewhere to
support UBC teams.
And it will probably be the
students who will pay the bill
anyway (by paying to see the
games). Friday, October 1,  1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 19
'Birds lose football
win moral victory
Campus league for women
Women's sports on campus are featuring a new look this year.The
program will include the extramural and intramural sports plus a new
league, Campus League.
The Campus League is designed to be less competitive and time
demanding than the extramural program. The student is not obligated
to compulsory attendance nor to attending team practices.
Only two sports will be offered until December, tennis and
badminton. After Christmas, volleyball, basketball, golf and curling
may be offered depending on the response.
No registration is necessary. Just turn up and play at the specific
time and place.
Monday - Tennis, 5-7 p.m. - Armories.
Tuesday - Badminton, 8:30 -10:30 p.m. - Gym 'A'.
Wednesday - Badminton, 6:30 - 8:30 p.m. - Gym 'A'.
Thursday - Tennis, 9-11 p.m. - Armories.
The 'Birds win a moral victory.
Wednesday night in Winnipeg
the Thunderbird football team
suffered their fourth consecutive
loss to the University of Manitoba
Bisons, 36-20.
The Bisons, currently rated
third in Canada, had been
confident of "completely
annihilating the lowly 'Birds."
—garry gruenke photo
SOAKING WET nurse makes her way gingerly back up the boomstick
after a thorough dousing at the other end. The object is to run to the
end of the log and back WITHOUT falling in.
PANGO PANGO (UNS) - Residents of this long neglected island
republic today celebrated their independence by holding their Olympic
games. Three events were held with many non-athletic blorgs entering
each.
Cackling Granny Goose took the Cackleberry stomping
competition for the third time. Heavyweight Buster Grabknob won
both other events, the tulip eating and strom door construction
contests.
DAVE PEARCE
. . two touchdowns
Fklassen's
But the 'Birds surprised the
Bisons by finally putting an
offense together plus a good
defensive effort.
UBC quarterback, Jim Tarves,
was good on 15 of 27 pass
attempts for 248 yards.
UBC also managed 89 yards
along the ground.
Considering total offence in
the previous games appeared
almost in the minus figures, 337
yards gained is somewhat of a
miracle.
Tarves passed for three
touchdowns, Dave Pearce
gathering in two and Henry
Theisen the other. Jim Hill kicked
two converts to round out the
score.
The Thunderbirds were pleased
with their efforts. So much so
that one of them actually
dislocated his jaw cheering from
the sidelines.
Ian Jukes was injured in the
game but is not expected to miss
future Thunderbird games.
By scoring 20 points UBC
tripled their total points scored
for the season. Until this game the
'Birds   had   only   managed   10
JIM HILL
points, being beaten handily by
Alberta twice and Saskatchewan
once.
The Thunderbirds have had
130 points scored against them in
four games.
'Bird players have had their
confidence restored by their good
overall showing in this game and
are fully expecting to win their
next game.
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2/4 dr-sedan. s/w, h/t, conv.
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work, train or bus depot,
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FPR UBC 31 Page 20
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 1, 1971
Jericho—a road becomes
a power play
By SANDY KASS
'hen is a road not a road?
When it is the pawn in a power play
between   city   and   federal   officials   to
y~   redevelop  part of a city which citizens
want left alone.
The plan for Jericho Road is not new. It
was initiated in the 1930s by city engineer
Harlan Bartholemew in a power play to
gain control of the engineering reigns of
the City of Vancouver.
Bartholemew designed Marine Drive;he
also designed Point Grey Road. When it
came to connecting the two with Jericho
Road, he hit a snag.
The snag was World War II, which
officials thought warranted an army base
on the western mainland coast for defence
in case of enemy attack.
Because the department of national
defence took control over the now-unused
Jericho army base, a waterfront drive
connecting Marine Drive and Point Grey
Road became impossible, and
Bartholemew's Jericho Road plan had to
be temporarily abandoned.
In 1968, under mayor Tom Campbell,
the City of Vancouver bought 72 acres of
the DND site for the sum of one dollar.
The federal government retained 38
acres of DND land at Fourth Avenue and
Discovery Street to sell to private housing
developers to pay for the moving of DND
buildings to a new site at Chilliwack.
However, before the land could be sold
the area had to be rezoned by the city to
allow for housing developments.
By August, 1970, both were
accomplished.
When the federal government is slated
to get money from a deal that the city
government can also make money from (in
tax revenues), the co-operation between
the two is incomparable.
^■lity engineer Ran Martin, vying to
become engineering department head, took
control of the Jericho Road design, based
on Bartholemew's plan.
It was designed to cut east from Marine
Drive between Tolmie and Sasamat Streets,
cut diagonally through the area's only
«*r neighborhood park, Locarno * Park
Extension at Belmont and Trimble Streets,
between the 72 acres of DND land
purchased by the city and the 38 acres
retained by the federal government, and
connect with Point Grey Road.
*        The road was slated to have six lanes,
built two at a time over three years.
When the plan was released in
December, 1970, residents of city blocks
129 and 130 between Marine Drive,
Tolmie, Trimble and Belmont Streets
received  notices  informing them of the
Plan initiated in 1930s
to gain control of city engineering
—kini mcdonaM photo
LOCARNO PARK EXTENSION . .. six-lane highway.
planned expropriation of their property by
the city.
«JP%ccording to city and parks board
officials, because Locarno Park Extension
was to be destroyed in construction of the
road, another neighborhood park would
have to be built in the area.
Martin's plans called for the use of the
remaining parts of the two city blocks for
the park.
"It seems incredible that the city would
destroy a park to build a road, and then
destroy good homes to build a park to
replace the one that was destroyed," said
area resident Betty Delmonico.
In the 1930s the municipality of Point
Grey joined theCity of Vancouver.
"However, the park was donated to
Point Grey by navy captain Jack Haddon
who specified it was to be used as park
land only, and could not be touched, even
though it is now part of Vancouver," said
lawyer Lawrence Beadle.
"All we had to do to stop the road, was
find that stipulation in city records."
When it became known throughout the
city developers circles that land in the
Jericho beach area was soon to be rezoned
for townhouses and garden apartments, it
did not take long for a developer to start a
little speculating on his own.
The developer's name is William Clarke,
co-owner of Clarke and Clarke Real Estate.
Clarke, in 1969, began quietly buying
up   properties   bordering   along  Locarno
Park Extension, and subtly suggested to
city officials the part of the park not used
for road be rezoned for housing as well.
Needless to say, Clarke had just received
the Progressive Conservative MP
nomination for that riding, Vancouver
Quadra.
However, Clarke never got past the
speculation stage in redeveloping his land.
I.
n a plan for developing 72 acres
released in April, 1970, the parks board
made public its proposal for Vancouver's
own Coney Island, including plans for rides
of the Pacific National Exhibition type, an
ice arena, artificial lagoon, miniature
railway, offshore island, and marina for
both sail and motor boats.
When residents of blocks 129 and 130
banded together to form the Spanish Banks
Property Owners' Association to combat
the road scheme, citizens throughout
Vancouver joined them in fighting the
proposed commercialization of a quiet
park and beachland area.
In protest over the schemes, signed
petitions were collected and letters sent to
city council and parks board members.
A demonstration on the 38-acre plot
retained by the federal government was
held, and city council and parks board
meetings disrupted by citizens wanting to
be heard.
Vancouver Quadra MP Grant
Deachman, at the request of residents of
his riding, met with defence minister
Donald MacDonald and convinced him to
call a halt to the plans originating in "his
department.
In March, MacDonald declared a year's
moratorium on the plans for the road
connecting the two parcels of unused land.
Thirty delegations, including the Alma
Mater Society, presented briefs against the
road scheme at a public hearing at city hall
March 23.
A few weeks later, Beadle discovered
the records of Haddon's stipulation.
Parks board commissioner Sandy
Robertson presently denies all "Coney
Island" plans but still insists on a sail and
motorboat marina for the 72-acre site,
despite the fact it will be right next to the
best bathing beaches in the city.
Martin redesigned Jericho Road in
August, curving it through block 130,
eliminating the sharp corner at Trimble
Street and Marine Drive, leaving Locarno
Park Extension and block 129 untouched.
"This plan can go ahead at any time,
despite the federal freeze on the road
connecting the federal land with Point
Grey Road," said Vancouver alderman Art
Phillips Wednesday.
At public request, Campbell agreed to
try to acquire the 38 acres of federal land
for city use, to save it from sale to private
developers, and appointed Phillips city
negotiator to acquire it.
a^'hillips said he would not try to act
quickly in acquiring the land, as the
department of urban affairs is undergoing a
policy change in regard to federally owned
land in municipalities, and the 38-acre
situation could not be settled until a
formal departmental policy is determined.
Delmonico, a block 130 property
owner, said she could not believe city
council would try to push through an
arterial freeway under the dim disguise of a
scenic drive.
"This is just too much a power-play in
action," she said.

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