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The Ubyssey Feb 2, 1973

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 Politics, services split slates
By GARY COULL
The two slates in the Feb. 7
Alma Mater Society election
have split on politics and
services as the key issue in this
campaign.
Democratic Students Caucus
presidential candidate Brian
Loomes said Thursday his
slates' priorities, if elected,
would be the implementation
of student representation,
equality of women and the
creation of a real academic
university.
Positions being contested in
the first-slate election' are
president, co-ordinator,
secretary, and internal affairs.
A second election to select vice-
president, external affairs,
treasurer, and ombudsperson
will be held Feb. 21.
Loomes said although DSC
priorities centre around
politics, they recognize the
responsibility to efficiently and
economically administer the
students' money.
"Under our platform, there
will be no cutbacks in sports
clubs and undergraduate
societies' budgets."
"We intend to continue those
services students have decided
they want: the new pool for
example, as well as develop a
wide variety of on-campus
activities."
Loomes said any major issue
involving student services
decisions will not be made by
the students council, but will be
openly        debated and
determined   by   referendum.
Students Coalition
presidential candidate Bob
Angus said the coalition will
work hard to continue projects
and services started by this
year's AMS council.
Angus  mentioned  the  new
Strike
rocks
UQAM
MONTREAL (CUPI) —
Students at the University of
Quebec here are continuing
their general strike protesting
the expulsion of 600 students,
amid charges the
administration is behind the
police interference with the
action.
At   a   Wednesday    press
conference UQAM students
said  the  administration  has
also intimidated professors
- and employees.
The students are striking
against a UQAM ruling
ordering the expulsion of about
600 students who had not paid
their tuition fees by Jan. 26.
An occupation of
administrative offices there
Jan. 24 was quickly broken up
by riot squad police. The
Comite D'Organization
Provisoire then called the
general strike.
The provincial government
has since extended the
deadline to Feb. 15.
In attacking the
administrative harassment, a
student spokesman quoted
from a University Council
resolution adopted Tuesday
and released to the media,
which declares "The
Universite du Quebec at
Montreal is presently open,"
and implies administrative
staff, professors and
employees are required to be
at        their        posts in
See page 2: TALKS
Angus divided his campaign
into four areas: academics,
services, communication and
recreation.
"We'll make a political issue
if we feel we're not getting
anywhere but our tactics are
different than those of the
DSC."
Angus said students also
want physical things such as
services and recreation
facilities; not just politics.
Both slates agree basically
on       budgetary       policies
predicting      next      year's  AWri|_
LOOMES ... politics are priorities    allocations to remain about the  ANljUi>
, 'students want services'
pool, the purchase of food
services and the construction
of a new pit as projects which
would be continued.
same. money available. He said next
Angus said he thought this year's priorities will be the
year's      budget      was      a same     as     this     year's:
reasonably fair one given the undergraduate   societies,
THE UBYSSEY
^ Vol" LIV, No. 32 VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 1973
48     228-2301
intramural, The Ubyssey and
women's studies.
Loomes says there will be no
cuts in sports' or
undergraduate societies'" budgets for next year.
Angus said he would like to
see the $5 athletic fee
dropped and funded through
the administration. "We will
work through the board of
governors on this," he said.
Perception of the function of
the AMS student council differs
with each slate.
The Students Coalition sees
the AMS as a liaison between
undergraduate societies and
the administration.
"The AMS is not a political
body. There are a lot of other
things which are more
important to students," Angus
said.
The DSC says the AMS is a
political body and, if elected,
they will press existing
administrative bodies to adopt
their policies.
The question of student
representation which has
See page 2: TWO
TRICKS OF THE TRADE are displayed by two Red Cross nurses
Thursday as they wait for your blood. Blood donor's clinic in SUB,
open for past two weeks, closes today. The Ubyssey has been told it
doesn't hurt that much -sucha singh photo
Tenants to oppose rent hike
ByRYONGUEDES
A proposed 9.75 per cent rent increase
for the Acadia residences may mean the
end of low-cost housing at UBC, John
Andrade, an Acadia tenants' action
committee spokesman, said Thursday.
The rent increase for Acadia Park and
Acadia Camp will be presented for
approval at a meeting of the UBC board
of governors next Tuesday by housing
director Leslie Rohringer.
"The concept behind Acadia has
always been low-cost housing for
married students," said Andrade.
"Applicants for residence at Acadia are
asked to give an approximation of their
income, and are admitted on the basis of
their need for inexpensive
accommodation. Now, if the proposal is
accepted, the entire purpose of Acadia is
defeated."
Andrade said Rohringer first
announced his intentions on Jan. 30 to a
group of Acadia tenant society
representatives, citing rising costs as
the reason for the increase.
"But he did not show any figures or
records of deficits to back himself up,"
Andrade said.
"He did give us one concession," he
said. "He forestalled the effective date
of the proposed increase from June 1 to
Sept. 1."
Andrade said tenants voted
"overwhelmingly" to oppose the
increase and the committee submitted a
brief which will be included in the board
of governors' agenda.
A petition is being circulated among
the tenants and will probably be
appended to the brief, he said.
The proposed increase, if accepted,
will cost tenants of Acadia up to $14 a
month more.
"The last increase for Acadia Camp
was during the Second World War," says
Rohringer.
"Acadia Park, which was opened in
1967, has never had an increase," he
said.
He said the reason for the increase is
simply because the housing department
can no longer maintain the buildings at
the present rate.
"I don't think student income has
increased significantly since then,"
Andrade said in response to Rohringer's
statement. "The' government has
imposed taxes on bursaries and
scholarships over $500.
"Married students are especially
vulnerable to financial problems. We
just cannot afford to pay more." Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, February 2, 1973
Students to hire, fire
HALIFAX (CUP) —
Students at St. Mary's
University will be represented
on tenure and promotions
committees, the academic
senate has decided.
Acting on a motion by
student senator Ken Langille,
the senate decided last week to
add two students to the hiring-
firing committees. The motion
was approved only after
administration president
David Carrigan, who doubles
as senate chairman, cast a tie-
breaking vote.
The move will be effective
immediately.
With the students added,
tenure committees will be
composed of academic vice-
president Hugh Gillis, the dean
of the faculty concerned, the
chairman of the concerned
department, two tenured
faculty members from the
department and two students.
The students must be in their
fourth year and have a major
concentration in the
department concerned.
With almost half of the 30
member senate absent, the
vote was eight in favor and
eight against the motion.
After casting the deciding
vote in favor of the motion,
Carrigan said in an interview
he voted without hesitation.
"I have always been in favor
of students being involved in
tenure committees," he said.
•The decision represented the
second victory within two
weeks for Canadian students
seeking power over university
staffing decisions. Earlier last
month sociology students at
the University of Toronto won
equal representation with
faculty on committees dealing
with hiring, firing, promotion
and tenure of professors.
Rec UBC looks for money
Recreation UBC may
remove the $3 membership fee
now charged for services.
Recreation UBC currently
provides supervision,
instruction, first aid and the
use of gym space and
equipment to approximately
700 casual athletes.
Doug Aldridge, Alma Mater
Society president and member
of the Recreation UBC
committee, said Thursday the
committee has drafted a
preliminary report requesting
funding from the university for
its program.
"If the university will
support the program
financially, the $3 membership
fee can be removed," said
Aldridge.
The $3 fee was imposed in
November as part of the
Recreation UBC program, set
up to supervise and allocate
gym and recreation services at
UBC.
Aldridge said university
support and the removal of the
membership fee would reduce
supervision costs.
Supervisors      hired      by
Recreation UBC receive $1.88
per hour.
The committee estimates
about $4,500 has been spent this
year   for   extra   supervisors.
Aldridge said the report
suggests some of the cost of the
program could be defrayed by
charging a small fee for sports
instruction Recreation UBC
provides.
The report will be presented
to the recreational services
committee, and to Robert
Osborne, school of physical
education director at a
meeting scheduled for Feb. 14.
Taiks with rector 'useless'
From page 1
order to assume their normal
service to the university.
A COPE spokesman also
pointed out representatives
met with the university rector
but the talks were useless. The
administration held to its
original position of dealing
with students individually
concerning the payment of fees
and completely disregarded
the student demands.
Two differ on reps
From page 1
confronted students and
faculty throughout the first
semester is an issue.
Angus supports student
representation at all levels of
the faculty, representation on
the board of governors and
some "input" on committees
concerned with tenure.
However DSC secretarial
candidate Stan Persky claimed
the Students Coalition is
scrambling on the question of
representation.
"Groups other than the AMS
council have lead the fight for
representation," Persky said.
"We have a working plan to
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reach this and are prepared to
carry it out."
The DSC will press strongly
for student representation on
all decision making bodies at
UBC, Loomes said.
"But token representation is
not good enough. We will be
making real decisions about
the direction UBC takes when
we achieve parity. We want to
work with students all over the
campus to achieve this goal,"
he said.
Both slates agree to remain
in the National Union of
Students (provided the March
fee referendum passes) and
the B.C. Association of Student
Unions provided they continue
to service students effectively.
But the students say they are
determined to continue the
strike and are working out new
tactics.
Several hundred UQAM
students demonstrated at
Phillips Square in favor of
their demands Thursday night.
The UQAM administration
announced a get-tough policy
for debtors in the fall and
declared Nov. 8 as the deadline
for the payment of all past due
accounts.
Student protest forced the
administration to extend the
deadline to Jan. 26, and Quebec
premier Robert Bourassa later
intervened to further extend it
to Feb. 15. All winter term fees
must be paid by March 1.
Students charge these policies
constitute economic
blackmail.
Meanwhile,- students at the
University of Montreal were
preparing to fight a similar
measure at their school, by
presenting an ultimatum to the
administration. They also are
demanding the Feb. 15
deadline be lifted.
ABORTION
KILLS BABIES
IF    YOU    ARE    AGAINST
ABORTION, COME   FEB.   7
TO SUB 105B   WED.   12:30
JOIN THE
RIGHT TO LIFE
ACTION COMMITTEE
Stan Kazun - 266-8676
Bernice Gerard - 266-9275
Tuesday, February 6
12:30 p.m.
SUB AUDITORIUM
Ziedan Atashi
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Sale.. $45.00
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Reg. $54.00*
Sale.. $39.00
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UNDERWEAR
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Reg. $6.90
Sale $4.00
SKI SUITS
Finnish
Reg. $59.00 and $69.00
Sale.. $45.00
COMFORTERS
Down filled
30% OFF
while stock lasts
SLEEPING BAGS
Quality polyester
Reg. $39.00
Sale    $25.00
HIKING-TENTS
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Sale $49.00
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1822 W. 4th AVE. 7314018 Friday, February 2, 1973
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
Judge judges
law to be guilty
—kini mcdonald photo
WOMEN ARE OUT of luck in the legal system, provincial court judge Nancy Morrison told a women's
studies audience Tuesdy. Morrison says women coming out of UBC's law faculty "will mean a profound
change" on the law profession.
By DAVID SCHMIDT
Women are excluded from
all levels of the legal system,
provincial court judge Nancy
Morrison said Tuesday.
Morrison was speaking to
about 100 people in the SUB
ballroom as part of the
women's studies seminar
series.
"Not only are women
excluded as lawyers and
judges, women are not
prevalent as jurists or as
minor court officials,"
Morrison said.
She noted many more
women are registered in the
UBC law school now and
"when these women hit the
streets it will mean a profound
change."
She said the laws as such
"don't discriminate a whole
bunch" but they reflect the
image of woman in society.
Morrison read out a section
of the family relations act
which prohibits a man from
visiting his wife after they
have been separated or
divorced if the woman doesn't
want him to visit her.
"This act pre-supposes a
man and wife are bound to live
together. The same basic
protection any single person
gets is not accorded to married
persons."
She criticized lawyers for not
giving family law the prestige
and importance it  deserves.
"Family law is given only as
an optional course in second
year law. Such cases are"
relegated as practise to people
just starting. Humans are used
as guinea pigs," Morrison said.
She mentioned the case of
one welfare woman who was
fighting for the custody of her
child. It was taken by a major
law firm as a charity public
relations gimmick.
"It was passed on by a junior
partner to an articling student
with the instructions: "See
what you can do with it. It'll be
good practice.
"As a result a woman lost
custody of her child," she said.
Morrison also called for the
opening of family and juvenile
court to the public and said the
press should be encouraged to
cover their proceedings.
She was asked why she let
city prosecutor Stewart
McMorran send her out of
court for wearing a pant suit
when she was working as a
deputy city prosecutor. She
said it was something she has
since regretted, while she
resigned immediately after the
incident.
"You can tell Stewart,
though, I have been sitting as a
judge in a pant suit and justice
hasn't suffered any," she
added.
Morrison advised people
being harassed by "bullying
bureaucrats" to find out who is
stopping them, what law, if
any, he's relying on and to take
these problems to the women's
legal aid society or to women's
action groups.
Muck-
The following is the third of a three part series
on the bookstore written,by a graduate student
who is a member of the bookstore committee.
By ETHAN SCARL
Behind  all  this  discussion  of   bookstore
problems is a sense of disbelief:
Is there something funny about UBC, or are
other bookstores having problems too?
In fact, other bookstores have felt the squeeze
of rising wages cutting into the 20 per cent margin
on textbooks but the problem at UBC is unusually
severe, for the following  reasons:
1) Geography. UBC is the most
isolated major campus in the U.S. or Canada. The
University of Washington in Seattle can get
routine stock from San Francisco 830 miles away.
Our stock must come from Toronto, more like
2,830 miles away. Our higher shipping costs are
not added to book prices, but paid from general
profits. On special orders shipping often costs
more than the 20 per cent margin, leaving the
store with an automatic loss. The long shipping
distance partly accounts for poor information on
book availability and long waits.
2) Higher wages. Bookstore wages amount to
over 16 per cent of gross income, where 11 per cent
is considered normal.
Store manager Bob Smith assures me this will
come down when the inventory backlog has been
cleared out. Nonetheless the bookstore pays a
minimum of $2.77 an hour, which will likely go up,
soon, while most stores pay the minimum wage.
(This is no rich man's wage, I might add; you
couldn't buy a home in Vancouver with it.)
3) Emphasis on textbooks. Many campus
bookstores supplement their income by doing a lot
of street business. They often look like a cross
between Woodward's and Shopper's Drug Mart,
and it pays them well.
4) Being Canadian. A nuisance in any
business, it is an outright handicap in bookselling.
Canadian bookstores must buy through franchised
distributors in Toronto, which add sizeable and
somewhat arbitrary markups to American prices.
They have often earned a reputation for bad
service: no stock on hand, neglecting to inform us
when books are unavailable, slow replies to
orders.
Smith gave them a bit of a scare recently by
threatening to do his own importing. He obtained
promises of reform, but results are not yet in.
Incidentally, there is little point in pressuring
your prof to buy Canadian; the present state of
Canadian publishing offers little alternative. Even
Farley Mowat's paperback publisher is in New
York.
5) Seasonal variation. I understand the big
September sale is without equal in Canada. Other
campuses have fewer students or better spreading
out of sales. The armory sales require huge
amounts of bookmoving and a large temporary
staff. All proposals for a new bookstore building
are aimed at eliminating this mess.
6) Physical plant. Most bookstores do not have
to pay for their own heat, light, janitorial staff,
building repairs or even remodelling, as does
ours.
7) Shrinkage. The UBC bookstore's shrinkage
(unexplained loss of inventory) in 1970 was some
six times the (unusually low) rate at SFU, and it
remains to be seen whether this problem is under
control or not. Shoplifting has clearly been a
severe problem here, and I am sure it is partly due
to an unusually bad feeling towards the bookstore.
This is largely because the campus has not been
informed of the nature of the bookstore's
problems, and the recent attempts to solve them.
Efficiency and service have often been
extremely poor in the recent past. Present efforts
to change this are sincere but need close
examination by the whole community.
8) Management. The UBC bookstore was
unusually ill-prepared for the general economic
squeeze. Much of the present management's
effort over the last two years has been devoted to
getting things running right. Results should
become evident soon, if ever.
Given these problems, unless publishers can be
persuaded to increase the 20 per. cent profit
margin on textbooks, it appears the bookstore will
never again be a moneymaker, although it can be
expected to improve somewhat.
Smith confidently talks of reducing labor costs
back down to around 12 per cent once the surplus
inventory problem has been cleared out. I am not
convinced this is possible or even desirable. While
better use is undoubtedly being made of the
store's staff than ever before, wages will (and
should) go up.
Decreasing of shoplifting and book-keeping
losses should continue to reduce shrinkage losses
to a reasonable level.
There has been talk of a new building, one with
enough space to take the September sales out of
the Armory and allowing wide range of high profit
department/variety store goods. This may make
the store look like Shoppers Drug Mart, but if it is
to pay its own way this seems to be the kind of
thing we'll have to put up with.
There is a new point of view forming in the
minds of Smith and the staff which is a step in the
right direction: The university bookstore is a vital
service whose good performance is essential to
the academic well-being of the community; in this
view it is more important to have an experienced
and able staff on hand to give students and faculty
the kind of service they need than to make a profit.
This view puts the bookstore on par with such
university-supported departments as the library
and purchasing departments rather than the
current case where it is lumped with such things
as food services.
A change in status might mean textbooks could
be sold at cost to registered students.
The legality of this approach is being
investigated as it would involve change of the
status of the store from its current self-supporting
requirement.
Also there should be continued investigation of
the possibility of setting up our own importing
system, perhaps in co-operation with other
western Canadian universities, unless Toronto
distributors come up with some real
improvements in prices and service.
As for competing with downtown stores the
store already has an official policy of not being
undersold. If you find a book in another store for a
lower price then tell the bookstore and after the
possible hassle of phoning to check they will meet
the competition.
Watch for different printings or editions but
even if you decide to buy the books downtown let
the bookstore know so other students will benefit.
The university community should know the
bookstore has a new management which is
claiming to be dynamic, hard-headed, service
oriented and problem-solving. There is still a
great deal of cause for dissatisfaction but students
should make an effort to hold the management to
their claims.
If you feel ripped off, do something. Bitch to the
management or to member of the bookstore
committee like myself. Phone me at 873-2387 or
write me care of the physics department or The
Ubyssey.
We need to know what's going on. Page 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, February 2, 1973
Rip-ofi
There is no excuse for the proposed rent increases in
Acadia Park and Camp.
Of all the students living in residence these people will
be hardest hit by rent hikes. Students living in these
quarters are either married with children or are single
parents with children.
Very often they are on fixed incomes and have no
room in their budgets for a 9.75 per cent increase in rent.
This increase will especially hit student couples and
single parents. They have daycare to pay for and are not
free to work.
Housing director Les Rohinger justifies the increase by
saying there has been no rent hike since WW II in Acadia
Camp and none in Acadia Park since it was built in 1967.
And rightly so.
Acadia Camp consists of old army huts none have
exactly ideal living conditions. They are usually duplexes
with one bedroom forcing either the parent or the children
to sleep in the living room.
Acadia Park is in good condition but that is no criteria
for rent increases. Most people are there because of their
limited funds.
This is not to say that students in other residences are
getting a good deal. They're not.
They just faced a rent hike last year and the people in
the Gage Towers pay an outrageous $75 per month to share
an apartment with five other people.
It's pretty obvious that student representation on the
housing committees is not adequate. As well as fighting for
representation on academic committees students should
begin working for parity on housing committees.
Living conditions are just as important as working
conditions and is an area where students should have
control.
The board of governors should not be allowed to make
decisions about student rents. These decisions should be
made by students. --
We fully support the Acadia tenants action committee
in their effort to prevent the rent hike. The board of
governors should seriously consider their brief before
making any decisions on rent increases.
Students should also lobby with the provincial
government to become recognized under the Landlord and
Tenants Act.
At the present time student living in residence are not
covered by the tenants act but are under the jurisdiction of
the Universities Act which does not provide any tenant
protection.
Tenants rights are important. Students need more than
token representation in the formation of residence policy.
Book bind
There is certainly a lot to say about the university
bookstore as our three part article by bookstore committee
member Ethan Scarl proves.
The bookstore management has been saying a lot too.
They claim to be dynamic, hard-working, problem
solving ad nauseum. It's pretty easy to say this but we really
haven't seen much proof.
The only changes we have noticed is an expansion of
the brick-a-brack section of the store. Book ordering,
shelving and pricing doesn't seem to have improved.
There has been a lot of talk by the manager, by the
committee, and by concerned students.
So far the only concrete action has been the founding
Alma Mater Society co-operative bookstore.
MU8YSHY
FEBRUARY 2,1973
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university year by
the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial
opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS or the
university administration. Member, Canadian University Press. The
Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review.
The Ubyssey's editorial offices are located in room 241K of the
Student Union Building.
Editorial  departments, 228-2307; Sports, 228-2305; advertisinq
228-3977.
Co-editors: Jan O'Brien, John Andersen
"What's the point of this goddam war?" whined Spencer.
"Y goddam yella wet-nosed punk! I'll tell ya what we're fightin' for!
We're fightin' for Forrest Nelson, Simon Truelove, Roger MacNeill, David
Schmidt, Ryon Guedes, Deborah MacNeill, Josie Bannerman, Ken Dodd,
John Andersen, Jan O'Brien, Vaughn Palmer, Len Johnson, Mike Sasges,
Lesley Krueger, Christine Krawczyck, Gary Coull, Sucha Singh, Mark
Hamilton, Kini McDonald, Colonel Sanders and Betty Grable's left
buttock. Anything else ya wanna know, commie punk?"
"Yeah, sarge, why have you got your hand in my pants?"
ike. Ubyssey
"Some ass, eh."
Letters
Theft?
The article Jan. 26, concerning
the alleged bookstore shoplifting
consisting of a $125,000 loss was
extremely interesting. If one questions the figures given in the
article, one comes to some surprising conclusions.
Theft exagerated
For example:
If the average price of a book
stolen is $5.00, then there were
25,000 books stolen. If we assume
that the bookstore is open 250
days a year (it's probably much
less), i.e. (365-weekends=
52X2=104=250 days).
The bookstore then lost
approximately 100 books per day.
Assuming an 8 hour day, this
would indicate a loss of approximately 12 books per hour or one
book ever five minutes.
Now, the bookstore officials
may claim that the average cost is
much higher say $10. The same
procedure gives these figures:
12,000 books per year,
50 books per day,
6 books per hour,
1 book every 10 minutes.
Wouldn't you say that figure is
a little ridiculous? Maybe there is
a Mafia ring running this grand
larceny. If we assume that there
are 20,000 students on campus
then more than half of us could
be thieves, or some student has a
respectable sized library. IMPOSSIBLE! Try again, bookstore.
Admit you aren't losing books by
a massive student theft plot by
giving us our rebate back. Pick on
someone else for change. Maybe
the balance sheet looks O.K. but
something sure smells FISHY!!!
Thomas Dieisch
science 3
Gary Davidson
educ 4
John Vogt
educ 4
Marian Chamberlain
educ 4
I hope I didn't make it sound
as though I believe for a moment
that   $125,000  worth  of books
was being stolen ... as you point
out, that is a heavy mouthful to
ask anyone to swallow.
My only question is: Why
didn't you or somebody write this
letter last year, when that figure
was claiming to be believable?
There were obviously huge
losses that were unconnected with
thievery; my articles are trying to
document the proposition that
even if that kind of inefficiency
has been removed (and I am hoping as you are that this is what's
happening) the bookstore may
still not be expected to be the
profit machine it was once.
Ethan Scarl
Policy
After reading Muck in the Jan.
26 issue of Ubyssey it seems to
me that one solution to the bookstore problem of non-saleable
books is obvious. It should be
understood policy that if a prof
orders books and only a portion
of these are in fact sold, the class
budget must pay for the remainder.
Most science courses have
money for expenses and I'm sure
arts courses could have small
funds if they do not already. The
prof then would be more careful
when ordering books and if there
were some leftover, he or she
could loan these out to students
and/or turn them over to the
library. Hopefully then this source
of loss would be reduced.
Paul Bauman
grad 7
Your suggestion has been promoted by bookstore manager Bob
Smith. It should only be enforced
when a faculty explicity insists on
over-riding the bookstore's judgment. To my knowledge it has not
yet been carried out against any
faculty.
ES.
Paranoid
About the muck you've been
spreading in last Friday's paper.
Yes, Ethan Scarl I have a story
about the poor service and unavailability of texts at the UBC
bookstore; specifically for the
chem eng department. You gave
The Ubyssey readers the impression that the chem eng faculty is
wildly overordering the number of
required texts. The survey you
quoted from was not for the
present year but 71/72. The faculty does NOT order texts but.
estimates the enrolment of students. For the above year the
faculty estimated the student enrolment in 15 courses to be 350;
they were liberal, 349 registered.
To suggest that the faculty in my
department is at fault is absurd.
Up to Christmas seven courses
were offered 3rd and 4th year
students and involved six required
texts. The faculty estimated the
enrolment accurately again, to
which figure the bookstore arbitrarily cut by 25 per cent.
Including the number of texts
purchased secondhand, of the six
texts one was sufficiently ordered,
four were underordered by an
average of 25 per cent, the sixth
text for a course terminal at
Christmas was shelfed less than a Friday, February 2,  1973
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 5
Letters
month before the exam. The missing text was ordered by the faculty on June 7, the bookstore
purchase order is dated June 20.
In November the text was 'found'
on the basement shelves, two
weeks later it was on the main
floor. You see Ethan, it is not the
chem eng faculty but the undermanned textbook section of the
bookstore which is making the
mistakes. As a former member of
the bookstore committee the
change in priorities from a university textbook and supplies store
to a mini-merchandising oriented
novelty empire is obvious. Have
you tried lately to get by the
bargain table at the entrance?
Please Ethan save the tears for
genuine misfortunes. The backlog
of books has accumulated for
many years due to the bookstores
lack of competence and organization. The loss at Brock hall will be
debited against one year's profit
only. As an ancillary service the
bookstore is charged with supporting itself financially. That is if
the bookstore wants to move to a
new site the cost of the new
building must be paid for through
it's profit, not from the general
university grant. Thus a prosperous bookstore becomes a nonprofit business as all profits are
hidden in the future expansion
fund, simple. The $100,000 Brock
hall loss should be well balanced
by the $100,000 hidden profit.
It was my experience this fall
in the armouries to have to wait
half an hour for the information
that the book I wanted had not
arrived. I could have charged it to
the usual bookstore sloppiness,
but to see the manager joking
behind the counter with his managers after waiting half an hour just
to get into the armouries was
frustrating. Such little details like
one computer printout information sheet for 20,000 students
make a shambles of the bookstores credibility.
After seeing so many of my
three classmates missing books
this year the bitterest moment
was learning that the three publishers selling the six required
texts have 100 per cent return
policies on unsold books. Oh well,
excuse me for complaining Ethan
if the bookstore claims it sells 80
per cent of the chem eng texts
the majority of UBC students
must have pretty bare bookshelves.
Oh yes as I do not wear a red
jacket, shit, broad, fuck, piss ...
Robert Brent
UBC IV
Either you are paranoid or I
can't write. Chem engineering was
being used as better-than-typical
example (for space reasons I had
edited out a much more extreme
example involving an art text).
As of this writing I haven't
been able to check your facts, so
assuming they are correct: if students want to buy only 80 per
cent of their assigned texts one
year and 100 per cent the very
next year, you see the kind of
problem the store is up against.
The only solution is to get your
profs to promise to keep the same
texts next year, so that they can
confidently take a chance on overstocking. Losing a textbook is
completely inexcusable; we can
only say that as recent reorganizations  settle  in, new staff learn
their jobs better^ and the huge
basement backlog is cleared out,
this kind of thing had better stop.
The Brock dead stock is the
bookstore's fault, of course (although it has already been
charged gainst several year's profits). What I have been trying to
describe is the kind of steps the
bookstore must take to prevent its
recurrence, and how the community will be affected.
Unfortunately, there is no hidden $100,000 ... wishful thinking!
The armouries problem is
sometimes severe, alright. As I
understand it, the problem was
not that the tills were undermanned, but that there were too many
students taking too long; not then-
fault, but the fault of poor layout.
This is the biggest reason behind
talk of a new building. I shall
champion your suggestion (?) that
more printouts be made available.
You have the right to expect
improvement, red jacket or no.
ES.
Insult
In reference to your hot flashes
section and the statement; "Engineers and people are invited ..."
I believe this to be an intentional insult towards a group that
I belong to. Surely you must
realize that insults merely offend
the receiver and indicate lack of
maturity on the part of the sender. They do no good whatsoever.
I must confess that I am baffled as to your reasons for doing
this and I will look forward to
your reply.
Douglas H. Nicholson
mech 3
This type of discrimination is
inexcusable. As for our reasons,
we suggest you read the following
letter from a fellow student.
Eds.
Disgusted
In support of the disgusted
gear (Friday, Jan. 26), I also am
one of those "different engineers.
I am proud to be an engineer
from an academic standpoint of
view, and wear red to show it, but
I am disgusted (pissed off) by the
activies of the engineering undergraduate society who have caused
the word "asshole" to be associated with the word "engineer".
Certain weak, immature people
exist in the EUS who get their
"jollies" by forcing their beliefs
on others and for those victims I
feel sorry. It is these people practising racism, exploitation of
women, etc., etc. who have
besmirched the name of the engineer. I am sure the EUS' reputation has turned away many a
prospective engineering student
especially women.
There are a lot of applied
science students on this campus
who are dedicated to their careers
and its too bad somebody has to
spoil things for them. At least
there are a few engineers who are
"nice people."
No signature
for obvious reasons,
another disgusted gear.
Failure
We would like to express our
disappointment with the women's
action committee for their failure
in sending representatives to the
scheduled open meeting in the
SUB conversation pit on Monday
noon. We feel sexism at UBC
should be discussed in an open
meeting with the students at some
later date convenient to both parties.
Representatives of the EUS
Thanhs
I would like to thank the men
and women of the university
health service who helped me on
Monday.
At 11:30 a.m. without previous appointment I hobbled into
Wesbrook with a sore foot. After
having been served by one secretary, two nurses and two doctors,
three X-rays were taken and developed. With these filmed results
before me a doctor pointed out
the bone damage. At my choice
he taped my foot and at 121 was
finished.
All of this was set into motion
by signing a sheet which took less
than one minute. I think that we
students are lucky to have such an
efficient service as this.
David Hill
mech 4
Blood
This is just a note to thank The
Ubyssey for the incredibly thorough coverage that it has given to
the spring Red Cross blood drive.
Perhaps I should be a little clearer,
as you are campus journalists, and
might not recognize cynicism
when you see it. This is the first
time that I can remember that
The Ubyssey has not given at least
some kind of token coverage to
the blood drive. This is particularly unusual, considering that I
made a special trip to your offices
last week, talked with a staffer,
and left a note requesting coverage.
I do note a letter in today's
(Tuesday) paper from a donor. He
has a good point; how can people
rave about changing the world
when they can't even find time to
donate blood? And how can The
Ubyssey talk about Argentina,
women's studies, unions, etc.,
■ relevant as these may be, when it
can't even report a clinic directly
below their offices?
Doug Baker
president
forestry undergraduate society
You're right we failed miserably.
We don't know quite how it happened.   However,   we   hope  the
picture in today's paper helps end
the blood drive on the right note.
Eds.
Walked
Re: Mr. Lawrence Milne, Commerce 1:
If you would like to take the
hour's job of riding through the
campus naked on a horse for $50
or $100, feel free. One would
hope that no woman or man
would find such employment
attractive, but if you have a taste
for humiliation and a palm itching
for a quick buck at any cost, help
yourself.
Lori Whitehead,
staff
See page 6
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SUB 8:30 - 4:30 Continuous
Do Your Part Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, February 2, 1973
Letters
Student rassling.
From page 5
Preppy!
Dear Preppy!
Having been at the wrestling
match in question, it is very clear
that you, Mr. Richey, missed Miss
Hodgins point entirely. It seems
to me that in your reply to Miss
Hodgins, you read many of your
own thoughts into her letter and
reconstructed your own letter, defending points which were entirely different to the one which Miss
Hodgins brought up. She specifi-
cially attacked Mr. Forrest Nelson's poor sportsmanship (not his
fancy, sarcastic penmanship).
Misinformation could definitely be applied to both teams, as
wrestlers of the calibre of Tara
Hyrb and Steve Martin, need feign
nothing to prove their superiority.
It is also clear, after viewing
the bout between Bob Hodgins
(SFU) and Dencan (UBC), that
Bob can defend himself without
Ruth's assistance.
Finally, it doesn't take a
knowledge of the entire wrestling
handbook, Mr. Richey, to recognize poor sportsmanship and a
cry-baby attitude when it is displayed.
Barabara Hellwig
p.e. 2
Theatre
The recent issue involving the
engineering undergraduate society
and their plans for the Lady Godiva ride brilliantly underlines the
convention of sexual discrimination against women which
remains strongly and overtly
enforced by the EUS. The use of
the university campus as a theatre
for such spectacles is an affront to
all those in the university community concerned with respect for
human beings.
The Report on the Status of
Women at UBC documents the
almost complete exclusion of
women from engineering. Engineers perpetuate this situation
with a vengeance by initiating and
supporting activities which exploit, degrade and mock women.
One woman alone is not the
object of their abuse; the attitude
behind such actions affects any
woman teaching, working or
learning in such an environment.
It is completely inhospitable to
women and is clearly an obstruction to any movement towards
equal educational opportunity at
UBC. Since the parties initiating
these kinds of activities do not
seem fully aware of the meaning
of their attitudes and actions, it is
the responsibility of other members of the university community
to indicate their disapproval and
censure.
Students' council
Alma Mater Society.
Rules
The   student   union   building
policy with regard to the reservation  and  use   of SUB   rooms
states:
1) Priorities
a) Student groups
1) AMS organizations
2) Other recognized UBC
student   organizations
3) Students at large
b) Non-student    university
groups
c) Non-members of the university community.
The group of students for
whom I tried to book a room
qualifies under the a-3 priority. It
should, therefore, be easy to get a
room for one lunch-hour meeting
every month. No such luck. The
booking clerk tells me that there's
little chance of getting a room
unless we are a recognized UBC
group. And there's little chance of
my group being recognized by the
AMS. Sort of a catch 22.
Then the shrug - "Well, I
didn't make the rules. Your best
bet is to see the janitor and ask
him to unlock one of the rooms."
So now we know where all the
power in SUB and the AMS lies —
with the janitors!
It is ridiculous to have to tell
almost 50 people - "Meet me in
front of SUB and well go look for
a janitor and if we find one maybe
hell open a room for us. Then we
can have our meeting."
I finally had to go elsewhere
for room. If SUB has a building
policy, then why the hell don't
they stick to it?
Ron Dumont
arts 1
Meetings
Two clarifications regarding
the arts student committee's
action Monday: One directed to
the students and the other to the
faculty and their committee.
This committee was elected by
the students at an open meeting in
November. Our duty was to meet
with the members of faculty in a
joint committee. As we decided in
a meeting earlier in January, we
would accept the offer of the
faculty even though they had
deleted the clause concerning a
joint committee. At that same
meeting we were directed to press
for open meetings, to request that
we become de facto members of
that committee, press for parity
and finally issue a date for the
report to be completed.
In the two meetings we had
with the faculty, it was evident
that they were not willing to
change their basic attitudes regarding students in general, and in
particular the student delegation.
The first two points or conditions
were met with incredible resistance — so much as to require the
student delegation to make compromises we were not happy with.
The second meeting proved to be
more successful. We decided that
from the first meeting, making
compromises on the first two
points reinforced the position the
students have continuously been
in at this university — one of
inferiority and impotence. It was
a political decision on our part to
leave the- meeting. Sure if we
stayed we might have gotten one
or two more representatives on
the faculty committees and in the
faculty meetings. But that is only
hypothetical. What would have
have more likely happened is that
our proposals wouldn't have influenced (except in a token manner)
the recommendations going back
to the faculty meeting. The attitude of the faculty members was
despicable. We could not in good
faith work with them! That is
why we left.
To the faculty and the committee members: When we walked
out of the meeting Monday, it was
for very good reasons, (as outlined
above, in Students & Politics No.
7 and also in the statement we
presented at that meeting). We are
still willing to negotiate the details
of student representation, but not
until we see a positive move on
the part of the faculty in general
and the committee members in
particular. This would either entail a reconsideration and change
in the procedures of the meetings,
or the establishment of a new
committee elected by a faculty
meeting (so as to be more representative of that body). The decision is yours to make. We have
tried to work with you, but we
will not put ourselves in conditions of humiliation and degradation.
The student committee
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[sifflMfBMi^Mf^^
ATTENTION
ALL
STUDENTS
Get Out and
VOTE
There will be an election for the following positions on Tuesday,
February 6 and Wednesday, February 7,1973.
PRESIDENT
SECRETARY
COORDINATOR
INTERNAL AFFAIRS
Polls will be open as follows:
Wednesday. February 7,1973
10:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m.
Buchanan
Angus
Civil
MacMillan
Main Library
Sedgwick Library
Sub North
Sub South
Woodward Library
Advance Polls will be open as follows:
Tuesday, February 6,1973
11:00 ajti.-3.00 p.m.
SUB LAW WAR MEMORIAL GYM
EDUCATION MEDICINE
and from 5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.
PLACE VANIER - TOTEM PARK - GAGE
Bring Your AMS Card - Take an Interest
YOUR VOTE COULD BE VITAL
Annual Italian Dinner ■ Dance
SPONSORED BY
ITALIAN DEPT. - DANTE ALIGHIER SOCIETY - IL CAFFe'
Sat. (Tomorrow) Feb. 3 — 7:00 P.M.
Enjoy Italian Food and Music   in the Student Centre
EVERYBODY WELCOME!
Advance Tickets Available in the Italian Dept. & Members of II Caffe  Books
Socialist Cinema
Eastern European bleach-blond bends elbow in affected Western decadent pose. Mr. Skvorecky
studies script.
All the Bright Young
Men and Women: A
Personal History of the
Czech Cinema.
A Personal History of
the Czech Cinema by
Josef Skvorecky.
Peter Martin
Associates, Take One
Film  Books,   Toronto.
Socialism in
Czechoslovakia, despite
its evils, has made
remarkable progress in
areas where the West has
been traditionally bogged
down in questions of
individual and corporate
freedom. What
immediately comes to
mind is the excellence of
the state health services
and educational facilities
and the almost total lack
of discrimination
between the sexes.
Culture is of course a
state monopoly and
socialist countries in
general have enjoyed a
reputation in the arts for
excellence in the
traditional, if not the
avant-garde.
Czechoslovakia how-
over, until very recently,
has been making a name
for itself in the excellence
of its cinema. With prizes
going to the Czechs at
international film
festivals, Western film
critics, used to "socialist-
realism" in Eastern
European cinema, began
to take notice.
The Czech film
industry was one of the
first facets of national life
to benefit from the
socialist takeover in 1947.
The entire industry was
nationalized and a
national film academy
was established. This had
an important effect.
Suddenly time, money
and the availability of
equipment ceased to be a
factor and the academy
began to turn out highly-
trained directors, actors,
screenplay writers and
cinematographers.
However, the socialist
bureaucracy demanded
of its artists works that
were beneficial to the
socialist revolution.
Many such films were in
fact  produced,   but   the
Czech workers
complained that these
films made their arms
ache to watch them and
in the West the critics
referred to them as
"tractor-movies."
But political censorship
merely made the filmmakers more aware of
their social milieu and of
their responsibilities as
artists to be honest.
During the post-Stalin
years a thaw in the
political climate led to a
budding excellence and
by the late sixties the
Czech film industry was a
mature blossom amidst
the socialist deserts.
Joseph Skvorecky's
book is subtitled "A
Personal History of the
Czech Cinema" and it is
just that. A novelist,
humorist and screenplay
writer, Skvorecky
presents a great deal of
interesting information
as   well   as   personal
anecdotes about the
people and the events
that shaped the "New
Wave" in Czech film. One
gets the impression that
there was all the
romantic air of a
"movement" surrounding these people and their
down fall in 1968 adds to
the mystique. Many of
these film directors now
work in the West and the
once famous Prague
Film School has lost its
importance in
international film circles.
Skvorecky himself lives
in Canada now; the book
was produced during his
year as writer in
residence at the
University of Toronto.
The book presents an
interesting commentary
on the role of film in a
socialist state. In
Czechoslovakia, films
arid literature are not just
entertainment on
different      levels      of
sophistication, nor are
they the subject of
snobbish conversation, as
is all too frequently the
case in the West. They
play an important part in
the lives of the masses.
Even the tedious
arguments between the
directors and the
bureaucracy were in a
sense more dignified than
the quarrels of the same
directors with some of
their Western profit-
oriented patrons. They
argued aesthetico-
political approaches, and
nobody was terribly
concerned about the box-
office profit.
In a country where jazz
was long rejected on
ideological grounds as
decadent, and where the
political awareness of the
people is the result of
continuous political
education, it is not
surprising that film
subjects are to a large
extent political in nature.
The directors' work was
assessed by the
bureaucrats not on
intrinsic truth but on the
impact that a truth may
have on the audience. It is
not surprising therefore
that Czech film became
very sophisticated in its
portrayal of politically
symbolic theme. The
Czech audience became
equally adept at grasping
what was being shown
them; Western audiences
often fail to catch a point
that is immediately
obvious to a Czech.
The book is as much an
elegy for a very brief,
almost golden era by a
homesick emigre as it is a
book of factual history.
With at least half of the
text pictorially
representing great
moments in Czech film, it
is an enjoyable work.
—Ed Cepka
Chinese Food
Back on
Campus!
Starting Mon. Feb. 5th
11 a.m.-2 p.m. Mon. thru Fri.
Auditorium
Snack Bar
To celebrate the year of the Ox —
Next Week Only -
Combo Plate
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Free Tea and Fortune Cookie
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at
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670 Seymour
duthie
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Page Friday, 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, February 2, 1973 History, culture* economics, labor
A Marxist analysis of B.C.
By MORDECAI BRIEMBERG
The Grape
"Well this farmer, his son went off
to UBC and never came back. So he
had this tractor and was too old and
had to sell his land to the Yanks." It
was the voice of a worker from
Trail. Many in the audience were
students. The taped interview was
being played at UBC. It was part of a
two-day program on the "Political
Economy of B.C."   •
Professor Phil Resnick has
organized this first regional
conference of the Committee on
Socialist Studies. Main-stream
university professional associations
have a very narrow definition of
reputable scholarship.
So three years ago university
faculty and students who were
interested in or considered
themselves socialists formed a loose
national association. Their main
activity is the presentation and
discussion of academic papers once
a year.
This first regional B.C. conference
was open to the public and was not
aridly academic. Faculty were a
minority of the 150 people at the
Friday Jan. 12 opening.
Resnick began the discussion with
a talk on a "Marxist perspective on
,the political economy of B.C."
He tried to pinpoint some of the
particularities of the B.C. situation.
Among other things be contended
that the B.C. business class had
"their own pattern of trade
dependency" which did not go via
Toronto or Montreal and that they
had a greater autonomy and
maneouverability than the
capitalists of other regions. Aside
from Quebec.
"B.C. is the only province which
could envisage another alternative
to confederation." Resnick referred
to the mid-19th century advocacy by
Victoria merchants for annexation
with the U.S.
Harold Steves, New Democratic
Party MLA spoke next on "Natural
The B.C. business class had their own pattern of trade dependency.
Radical lit result of personal experience
By LESLEY KRUEGER
Radical literature in this province
has come as the result of intensely
personal experiences of three
British Columbia writers and others
they talked about at the socialist
studies weekend seminar.
Pat Lane, Vic Hopwood and
Dorothy Livesay said their poetry
and the writings of others
considered radical comes more
from individual experiences than
any concerted group action.
Hopwood detailed the evolution of
radical literature in the province,
which he said "must be a ova, from
the the egg, for there is no body or
criticism on such a tradition which
can be said to have even reached the
half-hatched stage of formulation."
"But such research is important,
for an awareness of the tradition of
struggle and its expression is a basic
part of expanding consciousness of
the present struggle for our future,"
Hopwood said.
He said this literature dates from
the time of the sea-otter trade off the
coast many years before
Confederation. At this time, three
seamen, Stephen Reynolds, John
Nichol and John Jewitt wrote
individually of the trade, which
Hopwood described as "something
between a series of Viking raids and
a rush of bootleggers."
The journals detailed the brutality
of the officers to the crew and of the
conditions of near mutiny existing
on the ships, he said.
The next major radical
contribution to British  Columbian
LIVESAY .
literature socially
conscious
literature came in David
Thompson's journal — which tells of
the communal life and traditions of
the Salish Indians.
But the Indian culture has
traditionally been portrayed as
"shameful", although works from
Emily Carr's to George Ryga's have
come some way towards giving a
clear perspective of the culture.
Hopwood said too the poems of
Pauline Johnson deserves to be
rescued from the scorn of critics and
placed alongside the works of recent
Indian writers.
He said the Cariboo gold rush
produced a number of radical poets,
writing in the Scottish style of
protest.
These pieces, all by individuals,
represent the greater part of radical
literature written in the past, but
Hopwood also pointed to the ethnic
and labor press as the source of
other writings.
And, he said the Canadian
temperance movement contributed
to this tradition, with their literature
protesting the capitalist liquor
industry.
"I'm making a perfectly sober
statement," he added.
Next to speak was poet Dorothy
Livesay, whose writing began in the
Depression when she worked as a
social worker in the U.S. and
Canada.
She said it was because of her
experiences as a union organizer in
Toronto and social worker in the
slums of American cities that she
began writing socially conscious
work.
Her detailing of literature was
highly personal, recalling
experiences in eastern Canada and
the west.
Pat Lane, a young poet from the
interior of the province also recalled
personal experiences in tracing the
development of his own poetry.
Both said they were influenced
largely by the conditions of those
around them, as were the other
poets working in their respective
time periods.
All agreed, as Hopwood pointed
out, "only socialism can bring
together the values of self-
development and the liberation of
workers from exploitation,"
Resources and Ecology." See story
PF four.
There were four sessions
Saturday, Jan. 13. The first centred
on Japanese investment in B.C. See
story PF five.
Al Smith of UBC and Martin Robin
of SFU completed the Saturday
morning session with a discussion of
the writing of B.C. history. Smith
elegantly exposed the biases in the
histories of B.C. written between the
1850's and the 1940's. He outlined
their approach to geography,
economy, society and values.
In terms of geography the
recurring themes were those of
linking B.C. in a chain to bind the
Empire — not Canada — closer
together, and to give Britain a new
route to Asia. B.C. was portrayed as
a northward extension of California.
References to the economy began
and stopped with proud listings of
the number of mines opened, the
number of fish caught. Foreign
ownership? External markets? No
mention of these. Hardly any
mention of workers.
One is given the impression that
B.C. was a society of businessmen
and politicians, with a scattering of
depraved Indians and orientals.
Correspondingly, the values
propagated were those of the self-
made entrepreneur.
Martin Robin then sketched the
Socred era, the subject of the second
volume of his muck-raking history of
B.C. While Socreds represented
themselves as self-made
entrepreneurs, "a little government
defending free enterprise", they
were "big, damn government
defending monopolgy."
Of all the speakers, including NDP
MLA Steves, Robin was the most
euphoric about the NDP. He spoke of
a unique time in B.C. history," of the
"possibilities for qualitative
changes." He did not move beyond
generality on this question,
however.
In the afternoon Jack Scott, a
former trade union organizer and
author of a forthcoming B.C. labour
history, spoke on the movement for
Canadian unions. Scott did not base
his critique of U.S. "international"
unions, the AF of L specifically, on
their nationality.
His criticism was directed
squarely against the AF of L
iphilosophy and practice of business
unionism, their consequent
unwillingness bo unionize more than
1/3 of the work force, their support
of craft unionism and U.S. foreign
policy.
There have been many union
strategies in American history.
There were the Knights of Labour,
the Western Federation of Miners
and the IWW, all of which had been
particularly active in B.C. It
therefore wasn't surprising that
there was a refatively stronger
opposition in B.C. than elsewhere, to
U.S. business unionism.
Scott argued that because of the
dominance today of the
internationals' "pure and simple
unionism", the fight for independent
Canadian unions was progressive.
He granted that this movement did
not have socially revolutionary
demands, but begins with anti-
bureaucracy, anti-corruption,
nationalist sentiments.
There were also excerpts played
from some tapes done in Trail and
Kitimat on the subject of recent
breakaways from the Steel Workers
of America. See story PF four.
Future meetings of the B.C.
"socialist scholars" (don't be put off
by the name), will be held. The tapes
of the first conference will be
published within the coming months.
Friday, February 2,  1973
THE       UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 3 Dissatisfaction leads to bres
By PAUL KNOX
The Aluminum Co. of Canada's smelter in Kitimat owes its
existence in British Columbia not to aluminum but to water.
You don't find bauxite (aluminum ore) in Canada; you find it
in Jamaica or British Guiana. You need massive quantities of
power to get the electrolytic reaction going which extracts the
pure aluminum from the ore. So Alcan dammed the Nechako
River about 175 miles from the coast, backing it up into a lake
as far as 10 miles from the salt water. They drilled a tunnel
through the Coast Mountains to take the water to a powerhouse
at Kemano, where the power is generated. The power travels
through a 50-mile transmission line to the mouth of the Kitimat
River, about 60 miles southeast of Prince Rupert, where the
smelter was built on the flat delta.
The isolation meant that a lot of Canadian workers
wouldn't live in Kitimat. Some came up to work on the
construction of the smelter and related projects; some fell in
love with the area and stayed while others went home.
Between 60 and 80 per cent of the workers, depending on who
you talk to, are immigrants — Portuguese, Italian, German
and others — many of whom bring their relatives out after two
or three years.
Trade unionism came to Kitimat even before the smelter
was operating, in the form of the Allied Aluminum Council,
composed of the international American Federation of Labor
craft unions such as laborers, operating engineers,
electricians and general aluminum workers. In the words of
one Kitimat worker, there was in reality "no union at all. It
wasn't functioning at all."
Dissension among the unions over jurisdiction and other
matters led to inferior contracts, as the AFL's craft union
philosophy did elsewhere. The steelworkers, one of the
industrial unions in the Congress of Industrial Organizations
which was the AFL's rival at that time, sent an agent into
Kitimat to try and organize all the workers there into a steel
local.
Ray Haeussler, national secretary of the Canadian
Aluminum, Smelter and Allied Workers' Union — the new
union formed by the former Steelworkers at Kitimat — says
Steel did a good job at first:
"When the Steelworkers first came in they made an effort,
like they always do when they come into a new community, or
a new plant. They sent top-notch people in here, there was a
big wage jump in the first Steel contract and then everything
was secure and they left.
"Once they have a community they don't care any more.
Their organization is set up not to serve the membership but to
expand."
Through the sixties the Steel officers elected at Kitimat
did at best an adequate job of running a typical business union
local. There were no strikes until 1970, when the 1,900 workers
were out from July to October in a walkout that many now say
was the result of a deal between Alcan, which wanted to stop
production for a while anyway, and Steel officials, who wanted
to give the impression they were leading the men in a
courageous fight. Be that as it may, most were prepared to
strike.
General apathy toward unionism in Kitimat changed to
anger for some of the workers when they found that after the
years of dues they'd paid, the international strike fund was
only going to cough up $10 per striker per week.
In fact, Steel representatives point out, only about 200 of
the workers got $10. Some said they didn't want anything
because they had other jobs, or their wives were working.
Some were given $15, $25 or as much as $40, depending on their
situation.
That's still not a hell of a lot, and many workers began
asking themselves what their union was good for if it couldn't
see them through a strike. As John Karpenko, CASAW local 1
president, says: "$10 a week — you can't even buy gasoline to
run down to the picket line for that."
People started to think, after the strike, about the general
lack of control over their union dues. They paid, on the
average, about $10 per month to the Steelworkers, of which
$3.50 came back to the local treasury. And the rest? "We don't
see anything of all these educational facilities they have. If
they do have them, they've sure been misleading us, because
they never told us the true facts," says Ray.
A worker outside the smelter adds: "Steel sits here and
takes the dollars, they have no union hall worth a darn, and
nothing to show for it, and where does it go? Apparently it goes
down to the States, eh? It's one thing you pay it and you don't
get anything for it here anyway, but at least you know it's not
going out of the country to the Americans."
About this time a split in the executive began to appear,
with some of the men who formed the nucleus of CASAW
arguing within the Steel local for more membership
participation. Steel representative Jack Diamond, who
maintains a forlorn (although not, according to him, always
empty) office behind a trailer park in Kitimat, says many of
them were opportunists, people out for personal prestige.
It's probable that some of the CASAW leaders knew they
were onto a good thing. But it's undeniable that there was
genuine dissatisfaction among the rank and file.
All of this led to the attempt launched in April, 1971, by the
Pulp and Paper Workers of Canada, to sign up a majority of
the Kitimat workers.
'B.C. is giving petroleum away'
By BERTON WOODWARD
There is no need to worry about the
U.S. and Canada signing a continental
energy policy — there already is one,
New Democratic Party backbench
MLA Harold Steves told the B.C.
regional conference of the Committee
for Socialist Studies recently.
Steves said B.C. alone is giving away
petroleum resources at a frightening
rate even while the U.S. restricts the
amount of petroleum coming south. Oil
is not expected in sizeable quantities
but natural gas is being sent out of the
province at the highest rate allowed.
In 1972, 264 billion cubic feet of B.C.
natural gas was exported while 120
billion stayed in the country. In 1971,
only 178 billion cubic feet was sent out
of the country, Steves said.
Steves called for a government
takeover of B.C. petroleum producer
and transmission companies.
Nationalization of B.C. oil wells and
pipelines would especially allow the
government   to   stop   the   wholesale
export of natural gas to the U.S. and to
control energy use both in over-all
quantity and to protect the
environment.
It would also provide a highly
profitable return to the government, he
said. "If we're going to take something
over, let's take something over that
will make a profit."
He said once export transmission is
begun, it is virtually impossible to shut
it off without coming close to war.
However, it is easier for the
government to shut off a tap turned on
by private industry than to stop
transmission it has begun itself.
A government takeover of petroleum
production and transmission would
also cut out the need to take over
petroleum refineries because it could
control the refineries through various
charges for petroleum and by the
amount it let them use.
Steves said a government pipeline
would probably still have to honor
contracts with Alberta producers, but
could go far to controlling B.C.
petroleum use.
Steves, who is MLA for Richmond,
said the move would go beyond the
NDP's platform position on the issue,
which called for a takeover of
transmission companies but not the
wells.
He said he would push the idea in
caucus meetings, in conjunction with a
public campaign by the Saskatchewan
NDP Waffle movement for a similar
takeover in that province.
The takeover would be highly
lucrative to the government, Steves
said. He gave the following percentage
figures for profits on gross sales for
B.C. companies: West Coast
Petroleum, 33.1; Columbia, 17.1;
Inland Natural Gas, 15.8; West Coast
Transmission, 7.6.
Steves said the U.S., using one-third
of the world's oil supply, is over-
consuming and should cut down on its
usage rather than dragging ever-
greater amounts of energy out of
Canada and other countries.
The PPWC was asked to ■
same nucleus that formed C
baiting counter-campaign
international pulp workers' i
at the Eurocan pulp mill in
still-unresolved libel suit, the
than half the members anc
Board for certification.
The board found that 11
the PPWC were forgeries —
course, by the CASAW 1
application. The gloating Ste
of the PPWC campaign up>
them guilty of trying to
memberships in Steel.
Klaus Herre and Tony
president of PPWC's Local 2(
members, were suspended
"Perhaps it was all the bette
failure, "because enough p>
only way to bring about char
In early 1972 CASAW was f(
was begun anew.
This time the adversary
stayed on the sidelines. The
was characterized by a new
Some 250 commercials wen
station:
The total Steel media Cc
$40,000, while CASAW spent
CASAW people, Steel lost a I
off the ethnic groups which i
force.
"They never said any thi
when they thought they wei
they held big meetings and
Portuguese only," said one
Jack Diamond, the Steel
this argument when he clain
split between English and G
seems that the Steelwoi
dissatisfaction that the only
was in terms of such super
When the question came
in October — three months a
Relations Board — the work*
There's plenty of ice in K
argument that only a big
company doesn't seem to ha
contracts with Alcan expired
some practice behind the th
Isolated as the communi
point the Kitimat workers v
Ottawa any more than Wa:
control is very strong.
What's more, while na
struggle, it wasn't a motive..
honest: we made the nationa
the Steelworkers.
"This thing started with
Steelworkers of America — n
strike pay being paid, not en<
The dissatisfaction started k
about nationalism." It would
of Kitimat at least, that the
any more militant than the i
was not with the Steelwork*
unionism. It was with their I
them. With this lack of a
membership participation is
union, a number of workers s
and CASAW. "We've cha.n£
common sentiment among t
Independent unions are (
Canada, and independence is
trade union movement. But \
unions, which are sure to g
other than nationalism will 1
become anything but replica
their members distrust so n
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Page Friday, 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, February 2, 1973 icaway
in by what is essentially the
'f a year later. Amid a red-
le Steelworkers and the
(which represents workers
iat), which gave birth to a
med to have signed up more
ied to the Labor Relations
signed cards presented by
iding fervently disputed, of
s — and threw out the
sers hauled 12 of the leaders
a union tribunal and found
:e men to give up  their
>r, the president and vice-
i same time they were Steel
ree years.
ay now says of the PPWC's
are now realizing that the
ay doing the job ourselves."
and the certification drive
imply Steel: the pulp union
counter-campaign this time
: massive .media exposure,
idcast over the local radio
gn is reported to have cost
th of that. According to the
upport because they turned
up a large part of the work
he Portuguese in years, yet
ng to lose some members,
•tise in Portuguese, for the
and-filer.
jsentative, added weight to
at the conflict arose out of a
is in the local executive. It
were so blind to the
they could see the conflict
issues.
jovernment-supervised vote
ASAW applied to the Labor
jported CAS AW 1,200 to 300.
; at this time of year, but the
can bargain with a big
: much of it. If all of Steel's
j same time, there might be
of internationalism,
t's doubtful whether at this
want their money to go to
on. The demand for local
ism was
an issue in the
'Let's be
»""•       "wo      c*n      IClOUt     111      LUG
y Haeussler says, "Let's be
; an issue to get away from
tisfaction with the United
with the strike, not enough
ttention given to the strike.
;fore anybody ever thought
elusion to think, in the case
indent union is likely to be
ttional was. The discontent
rofessed goals of business
j, or inability, to live up to
imental change, although
ubtedly greater in the new
le difference between Steel
ie, label, that's all," is a
lk and file.
the keys to an independent
tarting point for a militant
the independent Canadian
i size and number, issues
o be debated if they are to
le American-based untions
Lower Mainland ports serve as a point of entry and departure for many of the products B.C. trades with Japan.
Japan, U.S. compete for B.C.
By CHRISTINE KRAWCZYCK
American capital is able to dominate
the capitalist market place because of
its higher concentration of capital and
until recently it's technological
superiority said Mordecai Briemberg.
Briemberg, a former Simon Fraser
prof, was a member of a two man panel
which discussed Japanese investment
in British Columbia. The panel was one
of the events featured at the conference
sponsored in the graduate student
centre by the Committee on Socialist
Studies. The theme for the day's events
was the political economy of British
Columbia.
The situation has changed somewhat
and the United States is faced with
more and more competition from both
European countries and from Japan.
"As these countries consolidate their
capital they become more of a threat to
American economic domination. The
deciding factor in the competition is
going to be the cost of labor."
"This will mean that the United
States will no longer be able to afford to
maintain the high wage level they
established while they enjoyed their
superior position. This will mean that
labor will become increasingly
militant, which is the best way of
achieving a socialist state," said
Briemberg.
Japan is one of the countries that is
most energetic in its efforts to compete
with the United States.
Unlike the United States which gets
its resources from underdeveloped
countries Japan gets the bulk of its raw
resources from advanced industrialist
states. That is the nature of Japan's
main interest in British Columbia and
Canada.
Japan and the United States compete
against each other within the
parameters set out by the capitalist
and imperialist system. On this they
have the agreement of the Canadian
government and Canadian capital.
"For this reason Canada and
certainly B.C. are going to play a very
important role in the maintenance of
the imperial network in what is now
referred to as the Pacific Rim" said
Briemberg.
The Japanese are suspicious of the
Americans and there is a certain
stigma attached to American capital,
due to that country's participation in a
war against Japan and'more recently
in the war in Vietnam. No such feelings
exist toward Canada and therefore it is
easier for Canadian capital to enter
Japan.
"If one reads the Canadian foreign
policy papers put out two years ago one
will see that Mitchell Sharp is quite
eager that Canada take an active role
in promoting the ideal of an economic
unit known as the Pacific Rim by
means of providing technical
assistance in Southeast Asia. This
again fits in with the imperialist
framework."
. Thus far there has been no conflict
between Japanese and American
capital in Canada. Such a conflict could
easily occur in two areas,
manufacturing of consumer goods and
long-term investment.
"The competition between Japan and
the United States in Canada could have
favorable effects on the development of
a socialist policy in Canada.
"The disappearance of total
American domination will force an
attack on wage and price controls, as
well as an attack on the trade union
gains that have been made.
"It will be possible in the long run to
utilize political conflicts between
Japan and the United States to try and
regain control over our own economy.
This is qualitatively different from
trying to play off Japan against the
United States in order to get a better
deal.
"I rather think that the present New
Democratic government in B.C. will
try and play off the attractiveness of its
: resources to get a better deal from
either Japan or the United States
without doing anything about gaining
control of the economy," said
Briemberg.
i The other member of the panel was
Iformer polisci student Bill Johnson,
who gave a statistical account of the
relationship between Japan and B.C.
"In the last few years there have
been a number of trade missions
travelling back and forth between
Canada and Japan involving 50 to 100
representatives of various corporations.
"in 1972 Jean -Luc Pepin then
minister of trade and commerce
headed one such mission. As a result,
three of the largest Japanese trading
companies dispatched buying missions
to Canada," said Johnson.
Some of the Japanese companies are
getting involved with Canadian
multinational companies, for example
Sumitome and Mitsui are working in
conjunction with International Nickel
in a multi-million dollar project in
Indonesia.
"Canada now ranks as Japan's
eighth largest investment market with
a total of $225 million."
The money was scattered among
11 projects giving Canada the
highest per project investment by any
Japanese investor. This is due to the
fact the major Japanese investment is
in the mining sector.
In 1960 Japan took 15 per cent of the
total mineral export of B.C. and in 1971
it took 44 per cent. This constitutes a
three fold increase in 11 years.
Also in 1971 only 5 per cent of total
exports to Japan from B.C. were in the
manufacturing sector, the rest were
raw and semi-processed. On the other
hand 97 per cent of Japanese imports
are manufactured, only three per cent
are raw or semi-processed, and most of
these are Japanese oranges.
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THE       UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 5 INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
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HIS LOST PLANET AIRMEN"
•••••——«
"ASLEEP AT THE WHEEL"
FEB. 2 & FEB. 3
9:00 P.M. TO 2:00 A.M.
In The Old Pender Ballroom
337 WEST PENDER
$3.50 at the Door Full Facilities
Best films
The old year hath drawn to a close. That
sentimental time when men looketh
hopefully forward and wistfully backward
hath again arrived. Film reviewers
(though we loathe to admit it) are prey to
the same human failings as the common
mass of mankind; we too have the urge to
sum up (howe'er hopeless it may be). Thus
appear the profusion of "ten best" lists. I
herewith humbly submit mine for your
edification and delight.
But first I offer some brief observations
on the fine art of film reviewing.
On being a film reviewer: The whole
business of being a "critic" is a dubious one.
What right does one person have to decide
whether a film is good or bad? None,
obviously; it is all a matter of personal taste.
The opinions of the person who thinks that
Airport is the greatest movie ever made are
just as valid as those of a person who only digs
Bergman and Kurasawa. I suppose we could
argue that one taste is more "educated" than
another, but why should educated taste
govern? Fortunately, reviewers' tastes differ,
so moviegoers must make their own
judgments.
I review films for two reasons: First, to
help those who haven't seen the film decide
whether or not they want to spend $2.50 on it.
Thus I try to give a brief picture of what kind
of film it is, to make some judgments about its
quality and, most important, to give reasons
for my judgments. Second, I present a brief
critical analysis of the film so that people who
have seen it can weigh their ideas against
mine.
I am aware that few people read my
reviews, that fewer read them closely enough
to see what I am really saying and that nobody
agrees with them anyway. Well, what the
hell; it's fun to see my name in print.
On acting: I seldom mention acting in my
reviews for two reasons. Most film acting
today is competent or better. Actors usually
have a good screen presence, good timing and
a reasonable feel for their lines. For example,
Jon Voight and Burt Reynolds are competent
in Deliverance, but I wouldn't say they gave
great performances. Most films simply
require an actor to strike a pose and be
consistent in it — as Brando does in The
Godfather.
A role that really tries an actor is one that
requires him to go through profound and
subtle changes. For example, Cabaret asked
and got, such a performance from Lisa
Minelli. And Diana Ross was 80% successful
in the very demanding lead in Lady Sings the
Blues. This has not been a prime year for
demanding roles, but Rod Steiger was
impressive in Duck, You Sucker and so was
Robert Redford in The Candidate.
And of course who can forget the sensitive
and moving performances of Raquel Welch in
Fuzz and the hound in Sounder?
Barbra Streisand ... no blatant message
On the best and worst: The "ten worst"
catefory is used by critics to express extreme
disapproval with films that they expected to
be better. Thus Rex Reed puts Lady Sings the
Blues down there with Greaser's Palace to
show that he isn't fooled by all those
melodramatic hystrionics. Obviously there
are dozens of films released every year that
are so bad they would never make a big
reviewer's ten "worst" list. Personally, I'd
rather forget about the bad films I sat
through.
I have tried to make my own "ten best" list
somewhat more meaningful by dividing it into
10 types of films. Although this sheds no light
on my critical criteria, it should give some
notion of the terms of reference for each
choice.
Really all this is just an excuse to
reminisce about some of the pleasurable and
rewarding hours I have spent in large dark
rooms with crowds of people watching a
flickering light projected onto a large screen.
11 openings
For Summer Employment
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essential teaching aids in our national
teacher division.
Students earn an average of over four
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If you are ambitious and want a
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appointment.
FOR INTERVIEWS ON
FEB. 8 & 9
Grolier of Canada
CONTACT YOUR PLACEMENT OFFICER
Page Friday, S
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, February 2, 1973 pictures
applauded
The best blockbuster: The big-news film of
'72 was The Godfather.lt caused a great stir in
the press and it obviously stirred the
imaginations of the millions who saw it. Who
knows whether such romantic exposes of
crime do harm or good? It was a carefully
done, big budget film in the classic Ben-Hur
tradition. And it turned out, after all the fuss,
to be pretty exciting entertainment.
The best western; Serge Leone's Duck,
You Sucker was funny and fun. James
Colburn and Rod Steiger, are a perfect pair
and an obscure Mexican revolution is the
perfect setting. Along the way, the film
develops some interesting statements about
the value of revolution.
The best film: Watching Cabaret is a
shock. Here is a film that is so good one
wonders how it was ever made. Why wasn't it
watered down by chickenshit producers? Why
didn't it get chopped, muted or mellowed
somewhere along the road a film must travel
to get to the screen?
But here it is in all its vulgar, elegant,
jaded and human glory. Here is a film so
exciting and original that for a moment it
wipes out the taint of all those feeble
compromises the film industry grinds out
every year.
The best comedy: Peter Brogdanovitch
turns his skill to comedy and comes through in
the best slapstick tradition with What's Up
Doc. Ryan O'Neal makes a good stab at
erasing the Love Story blot on his record,
while Barbra Streisand carries the ball. It
contains nothing original, but nothing
insulting either.
The best thriller: It was not a good year for
spy/police/detective movies. Hickey and
Boggs is nothing special, but it is gutsy and
fast. Robert Culp and Bill Cosby trade in their
slick T.V. image for a more interesting one as
down and out private eyes in sordid L.A.
The best adaptation: Transforming a work
from one medium to another is always
difficult. It has become a cliche that the book
is always better than the movie.
Slaughterhouse and Deliverance show that
this need not be so. Both are excellent films in
their own right that compliment the original
novels.
The best art film: What can you say about
FeHini's Roma? There he goes again:
unbelievably extravagant, grotesque and
compelling. His images are breathtaking, his
meanings obscure and his statements
simultaneously profound and shallow.
The best message films: The best thing
about The Candidate and Up the Sandbox is
that they don't have a blatant message. They
are intelligent discussions of politics and
women's liberation that don't take a
simplistic or closeminded view. Both are
entertaining, and both leave you with a
rewarding sense that you have not been
snowed in.
The best bad film: Paddy Chayefsky's
script for Hospital has many of the attributes
of a bad film: It has a plot that leans heavily
on coincidence, cliched characters and unreal
situations and dialogue. But it also has two
good attributes: its dialogue is unrelentingly
intelligent, and the film as a whole makes a
clear statement about modern life. I assume it
was the good things that caused it to fail at the
box office, because the bad things have
proved remarkably successful for many
movies.
The best
Calcutta ! ! ! ! !
Burt Reynolds .. . competent
pornography: Oh
—David MacKinlay
City Nights Theatre
150 E. Hastings - 685-5831
•99c - TONIGHT and SATURDAY - 99c
John Steinbeck's
"THE GRAPES OF WRATH" - 7:30 P.M
Humphrey Bogart in
"THE AFRICAN QUEEN" - 9:30 P.M.
Katherine Hepburn
99c- MIDNIGHT SHOW TONIGHT AND SATURDAY - 99c
"CAT BALLOU" - Jane Fonda
99c- STARTS SUNDAY FOR ONE WEEK - 99c
Sir Laurence Olivier's
"HAMLET"-7:00 P.M.
Ken Russell's
"THE MUSIC LOVERS" - 9:30 P.M.
Richard Chamberlain — Glenda Jackson
99c -Special Midnite Show Tues. & Wed. Feb. 6 & 7 - 99c
Marcel Home in his last Vancouver Performance
Live on stage — "Fire and Light"
also — silent Buster Keaton feature.
"RAM"
image!
TONIGHT
AND
SATURDAY
ONLY
661   Hornby St. 687-1547
UBC's Musical Theatre Society Mussoc
presents
PROMISES,
PROMISES
FEBRUARY 1 — 10
CURTAIN: 8:30 p.m.
UBC OLD AUDITORIUM
STUDENT PERFORMANCES FEB. 5, 6/8:30
FEB, 8/12:30 p.m.
TICKETS 1.00/1.50- THUNDERBIRD SHOP (SUB)
CAREER
OPPORTUNITIES
WITH THE
GOVERNMENT OF SASKATCHEWAN
DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE
The Budget Bureau has openings for university graduates
(doctorates, masters and baccalaureates) with high potential
who are looking for a challenging and interesting career
opportunity. The work is analytical in nature and involves the
evaluation of government programs, the review and control of
budgets, and assistance to the Treasury Board, Cabinet and
departments in developing solutions to a wide range of
problems.
There is also a limited number of positions in other branches
of the Department of Finance which will appeal to graduates
with an interest in management improvement, taxation and fiscal
policy, investment and debt management, and personnel policy.
While the positions may be of particular interest to those
in Economics and Commerce, graduating students in ALL
FACULTIES are invited to apply.
Starting Salary $8,000 and up
depending upon qualifications and experience.
Representatives of the Department of Finance will visit
the campus on FEBRUARY 14, 1973. For an appointment
and further information, contact your Student Placement
Office.
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Friday, February 2, 1973
THE       UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 7 s
F F
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112
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159
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The A-35 may be used with amplifiers havingi
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* Distortion at rated 2 volt input: THD less than 0.05% 20 Hz to 20 kHz; IM less than 0.05%
with any combination of test frequencies.
* Hum and Noise: Magnetic Phono: 70 dB below a 10 mV input signal.
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Page Friday, 8
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, February 2, 1975 Friday, February 2, 1973
THE      UBYSSEY
Page  15
Ryerson report suggests
cut costs, not faculty
TORONTO (CUP) —
Ryerson Polytechnical
Institute can reduce its current
$1.3 million deficit by paring
administration costs rather
than firing instructors,
concludes a Ryerson faculty
report released Jan. 25.
Registration 600 short of
estimates last September
created the debt . and
administrators announced that
38 instructors may be fired at
the end of April.
The report challenged the
assumption that when an
educational institution is short
of money it must cut back on
teaching staff, increase the
student teacher ratio, and
increase the teaching load in
order to "balance the books".
"With some 43 per cent of
the budget being spent in other
areas than direct teaching
costs and direct academic a-
ministrative costs, it is
possible to make substantial
cuts without interfering with
the established teaching and
learning functions at
Ryerson," concluded the 24
page study.
"We wonder why the
president's office requires
$467,000, information services,
$211,700, vice-president
administration $275,200 and a
somewhat lame computing
centre $844,900?"
The report maintains the
claim by administration not to
need the 38 instructors hired
for September limps in view of
the fact the administration
hired 80 full-time equivalent
part-time faculty at the same
time. It asks why the
"surplus" could not absorb
some of the 932 weekly hours
taught  by  part-time   faculty
during the fall term.
Primarily the study asked
that cutback decisions which
affect directly or indirectly the
academic work at Ryerson be
made only after full
consultation with students,
staff and faculty.
"Failure to follow this
procedure must result in the
impression that the
administration deals with the
institute in terms which are not
primarily academic."
Further recommendations
included formation of a
committee to study ongoing
trends and changes in the
enrolment pattern, a review of
Ryerson entrance
requirements, and a provincial
grant system to provide short
term assistance for institutions
making   adjustments   to   the
changing needs and demands
of the community.
Photographic arts instructor
Bob Scott chairman of the
ad hoc committee said the
report strongly reinforced the
faculty position that cutbacks
be made with educational and
not financial considerations in
mind.
Institute president Donald
Mordell said the recommendations included in
the study have already been
implemented by the
administration and the report
merely confirmed their
intentions.
He said there were several
errors in the text but refused
comment until he had studied
it further.
Arts 'defeatist'
in career hunting
Arts students tend to take a defeatist attitude when looking
for a career, campus placement officer Cam Craik said
Thursday.
Craik said students who really want work get work.
Arts students with degrees in economics and psychology
have less trouble getting a job than other arts students at this
time, said Craik.
He said more students should use the placement office. "We
have a reading room with information on employers and
careers.
"Counsellors are always available on appointment for
consultation on career direction and other personal problems,"
he said.
He also said the placement office has begun its summer
employment enrolment plan and has application forms for
opportunity for youth grants.
"We want people to enrol with us rather than just come and
look at the board so we can call them if a job comes up which
suits their capabilities."
The placement office is located in building F, Ponderosa
annex.
Japanese enter B.C. market
at the development level
From pf 5
The exports break down by
mineral is as follows: 80 per
cent of molybdenum goes to
Japan, it is exported by
Endako Mines which has a ten
year contract with Japan, 91
per cent of all coal was bought
t>y Japan, 99 per cent of the
iron was shipped to Japan, the
Japanese took 95 per cent of all
copper concentrates which is
B.C.'s major export.
"Total exports to Japan have
increased from 4.7 per cent in
1960 to 15.4 per cent in 1971. The
United States is still the major
buyer taking about 33 per cent
of total exports."
There is an increasing
tendency for Japanese
industriesJ;o enter the market
at the development level. They
will sign a deal with a
relatively small exploration
company.
When the company makes a
find the Japanese will
immediately sign a contract
for all the expected produce
from that mine. This does not
give us any freedom of choice
when it comes to marketing
our resources.
Another factor in trade with
Japan is that the Japanese
operate on a fixed pricing
formula. They set a price at the
time the contract is signed and
that same price remains in
.effect until the contract
expires regardless of
fluctuations in the market.
In talking to a prominent
Japanese executive he
compared the economies of
Canada and Indonesia because
of their high dependence on
primary industry. He stated
matter of factly that Canada
needed Japanese investment
and therefore they were
sending their first ever foreign
investment study team abroad
to study the opportunities in
Canada.
"He thought that Canada
would continue to be Japan's
number one source of raw
resources, although he
remarked that in the near
future both Canadian and
Australian resources will not
be enough to satisfy the
appetite of the Japanese
industrial complex.
"When I asked him where
they were going to go next he
replied he really didn't know,"
said Johnson.
Ho tar the Japanese have not
become involved in the politics
of this province. This is mainly
due to the fact that they have
not been refused anything yet.
"Also      due      to      their
experiences in South East Asia
the Japanese are leery of
raising their imperialist head
again and prefer to negotiate
behind the scenes."
Call to all ARTS ONE Students
All Arts One students formerly enrolled in the programme and those
presently enrolled are invited to attend a meeting 2 p.m. Saturday
February 10 at Cecil Green Park. Students will be asked to share their
views on what they've gained and are gaining from the programme. They
will also be asked if they wish to act as liaison people between the students
graduating this year from the high schools and the Arts One programme.
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WARNING:     Coarse    language    and
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CAMBIE ,1 ia,h
• 76-2747
PETER O'TOOLE - SOPHIA LOREN
ALL SEATS RESERVED — CALL 688-2308
EVENING: Sunday through Friday—8 p.m. $3.50
Saturday 7 p.m. & 10 p.m. $3.50
MATINEES: Wednesday 2 p.m. $2.50
Saturday 2 p.m. $2.50
Sunday 5 p.m. $3.50 ]
EVERYONE INVITED
frustrated fanatics, anxious activists, rampant revolutionaries,
gregarious Guevaras, even apologetic apathizers
Hear the Candidates for:
PRESIDENT
SECRETARY
COORDINATOR
INTERNAL AFFAIRS
debate and discourse  in didactic drivel at
ALL-CANDIDATES MEETING
SUB BALLROOM
Monday, February 5 at 12:30 p.m. Page  16
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, February 2, 1973
UNB goes into deficit
FREDERICTON (CUP) —
It's becoming an epidemic.
The University of New
Brunswick has added its name
to the long list of Canadian
universities facing a huge
deficit this year and maybe
next.
The initial deficit for next
year, using unpared budget
submissions, will be $3,291,000,
acting president Desmond
Pacey told the university
senate recently.
The UNB student council has
also announced it supports the
university's bid for a revision
of the grant formula.
New Brunswick students
could not absorb the additional
financial burden of a tuition fee
hike, student council president
Roy Neale said. "The question
of accessibility to a university
education must also be
considered," he said.
The other alternative is to
cut back university
expenditures. But, Neale said,
"everyone is now feeling the
pinch; possibly they can cut
back  but the  province  must
Digs
course
given
Students interested in
archaeology will have a chance
to learn on the job this summer
through a four month course
sponsored by the national
historic sites service of Parks
Canada.
The course is open to Canadian
university students studying
archaeology, anthropology,
history and related disciplines,
said Jean Chretien, minister of
Indian affairs and northern
development.
Course activities will include
surveying, photography,
recording techniques and field
supervision of crews. It will be
offered at various historic digs
across Canada.
Students must be available
for a four month period
beginning in May. Previous
experience in archaeology is
desirable, but not necessary.
Besides working experience,
students will receive room,
board and travel expenses.
Applications should be made
as soon as possible through
Canada manpower or the
university   placement   office.
accept its responsibility in
insuring the continuity of the
UNB community and the
quality of education in that
sphere."
UNB's enrolment dropped
this year, and will fall a further.
200 next year, Pacey predicted.
This year's enrolment drop
meant a loss of more than
three-quarter of a million
dollars in grants.
Pacey gave no indication of
what steps would be taken to
balance the budget which must
be presented to the university
board of governors by the first
week of March.
"You can't get rid of a $3
million deficit without hurting
somebody, but we hope we will
be able to take the course
which will hurt the least
number of people," he said.
Council allows
Angus to run
By LEN JOHNSON
The Alma Mater Society council voted Wednesday night
to waive constitutional requirements and allow co-ordinator
Bob Angus to run for AMS president in the forthcoming
elections.
Angus, who is working on his master's thesis in electrical
engineering, does not meet the academic requirements laid out
in the AMS constitution. These state that any person running for
office on the students council must have achieved 60 per cent on
their last sessional exams in 15 units or 65 per cent if taking less
than 15 units.
AMS president Doug Aldridge pointed out that although
Angus is not taking any units, he is still a full time student and
should therefore be considered eligible for election.
Council also voted to give financial support to community1
visitation.
Community visitation is a program to provide up to date
counseling for high school students living in areas of B.C. which
do not have access to good counselling services. The subject
was referred to the finance committee to determine how much
money council should give to the program.
Council voted to support a Women's Tribunal sponsored by
the Abortion Action Committee. The tribunal will be a public
hearing held during women's week, Feb. 12-16, designed to give
voice to those wishing to express their opinion on abortion.
--«'
2002 W. 4th Ave.
(at Maple)
TEL. 732-7721
UNISEX
tt*0tt
LADIES'
&
MEN'S
HAIR
FOR  APPOINTMENT  PHONE 68B-0525
613 WEST PENDER   ST.
VANCOUVER   2.  B.C.
THE CANADIAN MINERAL INDUSTRY
EDUCATION FOUNDATION
offers
UNDERGRADUATE SCHOLARSHIPS
in
MINING ENGINEERING
$1,5OO - 9 months
to students wishing to enter the first or
subsequent professional year of a degree
course in Mining Engineering
For applications contact:
The Secretary,
Canadian Mineral Industry Education Foundation,
P.O. Box 91, Commerce Court West, Toronto, Ont.
The Dean of Engineering
Applied Science
CLOSING DATE 15 MARCH, 1973
iiill
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in Vancouver — the
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• Computer matching of crossover networks to drivers • Long-excursion woofers with
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1305 Burrard
685-0345
(Free parking at rear)
555 West Broadway
876-4414 Friday, February 2, 1973
THE       UBYSSEY
Page  17
Hot flashes
Curricufum
help invited
Individuals in the university
community are invited to help
work on two ideas which could
enrich the arts faculty curriculum.
These ideas include the development of:
* interdisciplinary programs
such as new arts I, urban studies
and international relations.
* an independent study program for third and fourth year
students. Each student's program
would be tailored to his abilities,
interests and aspirations.
For further information contact Bill Maries at 732-7740 or
Elli Miranda at 733-8028.
Collective meet
The women's free collective
will be holding open house for
women, 2 p.m., Sunday at 7710
Nursery.
Those interested in attending
the party and finding out what's
happening in the movement
should phone 524-4151 or
298-6251.
Promises
A few tickets are still available
for Mussoc's production of Promises, Promises.
The tickets are on sale at the
Thunderbird Shop in SUB base
ment and at The Coggery in Gastown. The prices are $1 and $1.50
for the production, which opened
Thursday and runs until Feb. 10
in the old auditorium. Student
performances are scheduled for
Sunday and Monday at 8:30 and
Tuesday at noon.
Nice socialism
Cy Gonick, radical economist,
Canadian Dimension editor and
member of the Manitoba legislature, will speak on democratic
socialism, noon, Monday Buch.
104.
Gonick's talk is sponsored by
the grad student association.
Vietnam memo
Vancouver Woman's Centre
sent a telegram to prime minister
P. E. Trudeau Jan. 24 urging the
Canadian government to recognize
the Democratic Republic of North
Vietnam and the Provisional
Revolutionary Government of
South Vietnam.
In the news release Woman's
Centre urged recognition "To
prove neutrality of Canadian
troops in Vietnam". In the previous International Control
Commission Canadian representatives sometimes acted as American
agents (see Pentagon papers).
The Woman's Centre said it
believes it is critical for "the
Canadian troops sent to Vietnam
to be neutral."
'Tween classes
TODAY
PRE-SOCIAL WORK
Tour of health sciences hospital,
noon, today, meet at psychiatric
unit, Wesbrook Crescent.
CUE
Cue-do lunch, noon, grad centre.
VARSITY DE MOLAY
Meeting, beer, cards, 8 p.m.. President's house.
CHINESE STUDENT'S
ASSOCIATION
Chinese new year dance, 9 p.m.-l
a.m., grad student centre.
OPEN HOUSE
Anyone interested in writing for the
open house edition of The Ubyssey
meet noon in The Ubyssey office
SUB 241K.
WOMEN'S ACTION GROUP
Meeting, all staff, faculty and students welcome,  noon   Educ.  1211.
SATURDAY
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Chinese new year dance, 8 p.m.
SUB Partyroom.
MONDAY
SHITO-RYU KARATE CLUB
.    Practice, 5:30-7:30 p.m. SUB 125.
ELCIRCULO
Azores Island, noon, I.H. 402.
KUNG-FU
Practice,  4:30 p.m., SUB 207-209.
TUESDAY
CHARISMATIC
Study on the late great planet earth,
noon-l:30 p.m., SUB 115.
TEACHERS
The older child, with Gerry Zip-
wrsky, Judi Bradley, Barbara Reid,
and Bernard Agg, 8 p.m., B.C.
teacher's federation auditorium,
Seventh and Burrard.
WEDNESDAY
KUNG-FU
Practice, 4:30-6:30 p.m., SUB ballroom.
PRE-DENTAL SOCIETY
Meeting, noon, SUB 205.
RIGHT TO LIFE
Meeting, noon, SUB 105B.
Fraser speech
Westwater research centre
director Irving Fox will speak on
the future of the lower Fraser
river, 8:15 p.m., Saturday in
Buch. 106.
The Westwater centre was
formed in 1971 to carry out water
resources research and Fox's talk
will be based on the centre's first
major study: a survey of Fraser
river water quality from Hope to
the sea.
CYVR intervue
UBC radio CYVR will be conducting an interview with all four
candidates for Alma Mater Society president, live and in color,
10:30 a.m. to noon Monday.
Hopefuls meet
A meeting of all candidates
running for Alma Mater Society
president, internal affairs officer,
co-ordinator, and secretary, will
be held noon, Monday in the SUB
ballroom.
Come out and heckle the candidate of your choice.
Raunthy mvsic
Commander Cody and his Lost
Planet Airmen will be appearing 9
p.m. to 2 a.m. Friday ^nd Saturday at the Strawberry Jam, 377
West Pender.
Admission to hear the group
who can be roughly described as a
"raunchy bar band", is $3.50.
Sea otters
Ian Smith of the Nanaimo fish
and wildlife branch, will discuss
progress being made in transplanting sea otters from Alaska to B.C.,
8 p.m. Monday at the Vancouver
aquarium.
The lecture is offered by the
centre for continuing education in
co-operation with the Vancouver
aquarium.
Poetry
Vancouver writer David Wat-
mough, will read a selection from
his series "Pictures of a dying
landscape," noon Friday at the
Vancouver Art Gallery.
PRICE BREAKTHROUGH
BRAND NEW 1973
GOOD SELECTION OF
COLORS WHILE THEY LAST!
BRAND NEW 1600 MODELS
FROM $2188
SOUTHSIDE
290 S.W. Marine Dr.
VA Blks. East of Cambie
324-4644
PFOoucr
OF NISSAN
YOU
CAN READ
BETTER
FASTER  and
ATTEND A FREE DEMONSTRATION
AND FIND OUT HOW!
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8 - 12:45 P.M.
S.U.B. Room 205 U.B.C.
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8 - 7:30 P.M.
Institute, 556 W. Broadway
SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 11 -3:00 P.M,
Hotel Grosvenor, 840 Howe
CLASSES STARTING FEBRUARY 15,19 & 22
Phone 872-8201
For Times, Locations and Reservation of Space in the Class of
your choice.
□
Evelyn Wood Beading Dynamics
Soonsored by Dynamic Learning Centre (B.C.)
556 West Broadway, Vancouver, B.C.      Call 872-8201
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Campus — 3 lines, 1 day $1.00; additional lines, 25c;
Commercial - 3 lines, 1 day $1.50; additional lines
35c; additional days $1.25 & 30c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone anil are payable in
advance Deadline it 11:30a.m., the day before publication _,
Publications Office, Room 241 S.V.B.. UBC. Kjn. <%, B.C
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
Lost & Found
13
DOST: EMERALD ENGAGEMENT
ring. Sentimental value. Reward.
Phone 278-6681.
FOUND: ONE SMALL WHITE
shaggy dog running along S.W.
Marine, Thurs., 8:30 a.m. has been
taken to SPCA.	
LOST: LONG NECKLACE, GOLD &
pearls. Sentimental value. Please
call 224-6355 eves.
LOST: ONE PAIR WIRE-FRAMED
glasses in Buchanan Building.
Needed desperately please phone
Joan 733T1760.
Rides & Car Pools
14
Special Notices
15
VARSITY OUTDOOR CLUB CON-
stitutional amendment posted in
club room 14.	
SKI AT WHISTLER. STAT AT
Garibaldi, 20 minutes from lifts.
$3.50 overnight. Call 932-5256 Andy.
CATAIN VANCOUVER CLUB —
Two for the price of one books
distributed by Assoc. Room 100B.
SUB.	
LARRY: MET YOU ON THE TRAIN
to Jasper in Aug. 72. Please contact—Celeste—6210 Curtis St., Bur-
naby  2,  B.C.	
DISCOUNT STEREO, EXAMPLE:
AM-PM stereo receiver, turntable,
base cover, cartridge, two speakers,
2-year guarantee, list f20O, your
cost $125.00. Carry AKAI, A.G.S.,
Zenith color TVs at savings. Call
732-6769.
RENT WHISTLER CONDOMINIUM
near gondola. Day/Wk. Ph. 7J2-
0174 eves, or before 8 A.M.
SKI TODD
Mid-Term   Break:   Transportation,
Motel,   Three  days  skiing — $53.
Phone  Deedee,  987-4807.	
BREAK THE CIGARETTE HABIT
comfortably — No weight gain or
nervousness. Smoke Watchers, 688-
5821.
Special Events
15A
$75 FOR 75*
40 Bonus Coupons In This
Year's Bird Calls
AVAILABLE   NOW
BUY   YOURS  TODAYI
Bookstore and SUB
THE POPPY FAMILY WITH PAPA
Bear is coming on Friday, Feb. 9,
8:30 p.m., War Memorial Gym.
Tickets only $2.00. Poppy Family,
Poppy Family, Poppy Family, Pop-
py Family, Poppy Family.
Travel Opportunities
*16
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
PHOTOS    WANTED    OF    PEOPLE
at work or play. Ph. 876-5000, B.C.
Daily News.
AUTOMOTIVE
Autos For Sale
21
Motorcycles
23
BUSINESS SERVICES
Photography
35
tfte Hena ana gutter
Camera*
IT'S  SNOWING!
SOMEWHERE
|SKI    TIME
CAN    BE   PICTURE
TIME  —  WITH   A   MINIATURE
AUTOMATIC   35mm    CAMERA
Konica  C 35 from    ...  $74.50
Olympus 35 ECR     99.50
Ricon Hi-color 35, with
motor   drive        69.50
Fujica Compacts    75.95
All above include case.
3010 W.  Broadway
Note our New Phone No.
736-8375
Scandals
37
Typing
40
ESSAYS TYPED — NEAT ACCUR-
ate work. 35c per typed page. 325-
9976, if I'm out leave your phone
number.
EFFICIENT ELECTRIC TYPING —
my home. Essays, thesis, etc. Neat,
accurate work. Reasonable rates.
263-5317.    	
EXPERT IBM SELECTRIC TYPIST.
Experienced Thesis Typist. Specialize in Formula and Math. Reasonable Rates. Mrs. Ellis, 321-3838.
Typing—Cont.
40
TYPING; ESSAYS, THESES. CALL
Donna, 266-4929, Kerrisdale area.
FAST ACCURATE TYPING OF ES-
says and thesis. Reasonable terms.
Call Mrs. Akau, days 688-5235
weekends   and   evenings   263-4023.
EFFICIENT ELECTRIC TYPING —
Essays, term papers, etc. 224-7918.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
ESTABLISHED DIAMOND IMPOR-
ting firm requires 12 senior student
sales representatives for the UBC
Campus. Clean, Neat Dresser.
Good Sales Ability. 3rd or 4th Year
students with pleasant personality
and some sales experience. Fluent
in English. Excellent commission
structure. Include in your application a recent photograph of yourself. Mr. Mel Battensby, General
Delivery, Vancouver Postal Station
A, Hastings & Granville, Vancouver,  B.C.
AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHERS
wanted. Ph. 876-5000, B.C. Daily
News.
EDITOR WANTED: WE NEED AN
editor for the challenging job of
editing Vancouver's newest publication. Our publication is not an
underground or political paper. We
publish news as they happen and
other current events. Ability to
read and write articles is all that
is required. Photographers and
other help wanted. Phone 876-5000,
B.C.  Daily News.
Special Classes
62
Tutoring Service
63
Speakeasy SUB Anytime!
228-6792 - 12:30-2:30
TUTORIAL
CENTRE
For Students and Tutors
Register Now! 12:30-2:30
INSTRUCTION & SCHOOLS
Tutoring
64
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
FOR SALE; MEN'S GITANE 10-
speed bike, $85.00. Call Vera at
263-0710 after 5 p.m.
FOR SALE SIAMESE FIGHTING
fish breeding tank complete with
pumps, filter, heater and dividers,
$15. 261-5526.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
ROOM FOR MAN ONLY. BSMT.
Warm, quiet, private entr., near
gate—ready now—224-7623.	
CAMPUS DOUBLE ROOMS, $50.
Kitchen, etc., $90/couple. Phone
Frank, 224-9549. Visit 5745 Agronomy Road.
Room & Board
82
ROOM AND BOARD AVAILABLE
at Delta Kappa Epsilon Fraternity
House, 5765 Agronomy Road. Reasonable rates. Color TV. Laundry
facilities. Ph. 224-9691 after 5:00
for  details.
Furnished Apts.
83
MATURE,      INDEPENDENT      FE-
male wants roommate, same. February-April, West End apartment.
Partial     transportation     provided,
" 684-3770.
Unf. Apts.
84
Communal Housing
85
Use Your
Ubyssey
Classified Page  18
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, February 2, 1973
Dr. Eric H. N. Chen
is pleased to announce his association with Dr. J. W. James for
the practice of general dentistry at
2288 Elgin St., Port Coquitlam
Telephone-941-2211
Hours - 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
FRASER TIRE SALES
LOWEST PRICES IN TOWN
WE OFFER J Q% OFF TO STUDENTS
On All Well Known Brands of Tires
Including
FIRESTONE - GOODYEAR - DUNLOP - GOODRICH - FISK, Etc.
5574 Fraser (Near 41st Ave.)
327-9115
SPORT
HIGHLIGHTS
THIS WEEKEND
Tonight-Friday, Feb. 2 - 8:00 P.M.
ICE HOCKEY - Winter Sports Centre
U.B.C. Thunderbirds vs. Univ. of Victoria
SATURDAY, FEB. 3 - 2:00 P.M.
GYMNASTICS - New P.E. Gym
U.B.C. vs. Washington State Univ.
SOCCER -Thunderbird Stadium
U.B.C. Thunderbirds vs. Westminster Blues
NEXT WEEK
Monday-Tuesday, Feb. 5 & 6-8:30 P.M.
BASKETBALL - War Memorial Gym
U.B.C. Thunderbirds vs. Univ. of Saskatchewan
PRELIMINARIES
6:30  P.M.   -   U.B.Q.   Thunderbirds   vs.
University of Saskatchewan
GREAT SAVINGS
ON
TOP QUALITY SKI
WITH ANY SKI  FROM $90 AND UP
YOU WILL RECEIVE A FREE BINDING
ALSO BIG SAVINGS ON
SKI BOOTS
FOAM AND REGULAR
336 W. Pender St. 681-2004 or 681-8423
OPEN FRIDAY NIGHTS UNTIL 9:00
■■^^■^■■■■FklEE PARKINS AT REAR OF STORE|HH|^HMIIM
—brace stout photo
THE DRIVERS are warming up for 16th annual Thunderbird rally starting today. Organized by the UBC
Sports car club, the Thunderbird is thought to be the toughest winter rally in Canada. It starts at 3:30
p.m. in front of SUB.
Hard work Johnson's rule
Thunderbird soccer coach
Joe Johnson has a sound
strategy which emphasizes
physical conditioning, sharp
passing, teamwork and strong
defensive play.
This strategy has finally
begun to pay off as the 'Birds
defeated Paul's Tailors last
week with a strong team effort.
The 'Birds, who are one of the
fittest teams in the Pacific
Coast League, showed it last
week as they ranPaul's into the
ground in the second half to
come away with a 4-1 victory.
The 'Birds will apply the
same strategy when they host
the New Westminster Blues 2
p.m. Saturday at Thunderbird
Stadium.
The 'Birds will utilize an
unusual 4-2-4 formation in
Saturday's game. In this
formation there are four
fullbacks guarding the goal
area, two halfbacks at midfield
and four forwards.
This differs from the
commonly used two fullback,
three halfback, five forward
system.
The most striking difference
is the four fullbacks used by
the 'Birds instead of the usual
two, an indication of Johnson's
stress on defensive play.
The four fullbacks enable the
'Birds to quickly clear the ball
from their own end,as was seen
FULLBACK ROY ZUYDER-
DUYIM ... the rookie
in last week's game which
featured quick shifts from
defence to offence with long,
accurate passes.
Johnson stresses teamwork
rather than individual play.
However, individual effort is
always apparent in the
goalkeeping where the 'Birds
have Greg Weber, one of the
two top netminders in B.C.
With Weber's goaltending, the
'Birds' defensive strategy
should     give     the     Blues
—gary gruenke photos
BERT     SMULDERS . ..     the
veteran
problems.
The 'Birds are currently in
fifth place, three points behind
the third place Blues although
they hold two games in hand.
The Blues have won by two
goals against UBC in both of
the previous encounters so far
this season — primarily due to
poor shooting by UBC.
If this problem can be
overcome, the 'Birds should
win and begin to move up in the
PCL standings.
Gage towers over forestry
By SIMON TRUELOVE
Gage Towers won the curling
bonspiel over the weekend,
beating the favoured foresters
12-8. The Gage team of Dave
Basaraba (skip), Dave Kirsop,
Rick Monchak, and Doug
MacLachlan came through
undefeated during the two day
event   with   victories   over
Score card
WEEKEND GAMES
TONIGHT
Hockey
8   p.m.   Thunderbird   Arena   UBC   vs.
UVic.
Thunderbird car rally
3:30 p.m., SUB
SATURDAY
Soccer
2 p.m. Thunderbird Stadium UBC vs,
Paul's Canadians.
UBC Squash Tournament
Feb. 16-18 Winter Sports Centre.
Entry     deadline     Feb.     13     phone
228-4479.
forestry V, geology, forestry X,
and dentistry II.
In the B event, (losers of the
first game) engineers VI beat a
half female team 13-4. Curling
for the gears were Dave Wall
(skip), Doug Seymour, Dave
Francis, and Ron Hart. The C
event was captured by forestry
VI who were thrown out of the
A event by a loss to dentistry
II. The forestry team was
composed of Howard
Slavinski, Steve Stupich, Mike
Dutove and Daryl Fietz; they
beat commerce II by 13-3.
The event ran super-
smoothly thanks to the flawless
genius of program director
George Mapson. Fifty-two
teams were entered. Upset of
the weekend happened to Tom
Lightburn's pharmacy rink
who were knocked out by
geology.
Tennis is at last within sight
of completion as finalist
William Darrough of grads
takes on the recent winner of
the semi-final, Mike Marshall
of Gage Towers.
The unit managers' meeting
is Tuesday night.
Alberta downed
Bev Barnes and Wendy
Grant led the UBC
Thunderettes to consecutive
wins over the weekend, at the
University of Alberta's
expense.
Saturday, Barnes shot for 13
points as UBC recorded a 54-34
victory for a perfect 7-0 record
in Canada West Intercollegiate
play.
Grant, with 17 points, helped
make it 8-0 in league play in the
Thunderettes' 60-19 wip
Sunday. Friday, February 2, 1973
THE      UBYSSEY
Page  19
Bench strength good,
but not good enough
JACK   HOY...   he's   been
championship teams before.
on
By DAVID SCHMIDT
A highly efficient University of Alberta
Golden Bears' basketball team virtually
eliminated the defending national champion
Thunderbirds from repeating their
performance this year.
For the first time in many years, the Bears
won in War Memorial gym, and won twice.
They beat the 'Birds 67-54 Saturday night and
72-51 Sunday afternoon.
The 'Birds were playing without both of
their starting guards, Bob Dickson and Stan
Callegari, and this showed in their play.
Dickson has been a good defensive player
and the 'Birds' playmaker on offence. His
replacement; Brent Francis, who has been
brought up from the Jayvees, tried but his
inexperience showed as he couldn't get the
'Birds organized or failed to spot openings
when they did arise. However, given a few
games' experience, Francis could become a
good guard for the future.
While Francis was trying hard to fill
Dickson's runners, nobody was filling
Callegari's, and most of the rest weren't even
filling theirs.
The Bears played a zone defence which can
be counteracted by good outside shooting.
Unfortunately, only Callegari can shoot from
the outside.
When the 'Birds tried a zone defence
Saturday, the Bears showed them what they
were missing, as all Bears shot well from the
outside.
When this failed, the 'Birds tried a man to
man defence but couldn't find anyone to stop
forward Wally Tollestrup. He scored 20 points
Sunday.
The Bears also showed the 'Birds another
thing they lacked: height at centre. UBC's
centre, John Mills, is only 6-3, and he was
totally dominated by the Bears' 6-8 centre Mike
Frisby.
Frisby did everything well, grabbing
millions of rebounds, scoring well (17 points
Saturday, 20 Sunday) and holding Mills to only
one field goal all Sunday. His performance was
even more outstanding because he seemed to
have bandages everywhere and walked with a
noticeable limp.
The 'Birds, on the other hand, seemed to
imitate the Canucks, as they turned
considerable individual talents into a lacklustre
team performance.
Their only asset, the fast break offence
(designed to score a basket before the other
team knows what's happening) broke.
The fast break depends on rebounds. In
order to work, the forwards must get the
rebounds and the ball must be passed quickly
down the court and into the basket. Against the
Bears the 'Birds weren't getting the rebounds
so people had to slow down and wait rather than
break immediately after a shot.
The few times the 'Birds did get the rebound
early, the passing broke down. Guards would
pass into the hands of the opposing players or
the forwards would move out of position and the
ball would fly by on its way out of bounds,
For UBC fans, both games were disasters
UBC played badly throughout and the Bears
didn't provide the flashiness we are used to.
What they did present was an effective
machine which played consistently,
methodically, and, perhaps more important,
effectively.
—gary gruenke photos
JOHNMILLS...so's,he.
The death of hockey
By CAM FORD
The Peak
The last of a three part series
The Death of Hockey claims that pro hockey has
been turned into show business. While this is so, it
happened years ago with the use of hockey as a profit
maker. The watered down National Hockey League
and the World Hockey Association with Bobby Hull
and florescent pucks are merely extensions.
Showbusiness is entertaining for the purpose of
making money.
The  Death  of Hockey,   by  Bruce Kidd and  John
Macfarlane [New Press, $5.95]
The Death of Hockey has best described the
development of hockey in Canada and the U.S. It
gives a very detailed look at how capitalists
(American and Canadian) have turned what was a
beautiful sport into a huge profit-making business.
But, its conclusions are as pretentious as the six
dollars asked for the hard cover edition of the book.
The solution to the hockey problem is in the book.
In the chapter entitled "The Child Buyers", which
reveals how the profiteers have exploited even our
children:
"Hockey should be fun, a game played for the
excitement and satisfaction it brings players
while they are playing it and the delight it brings
spectators while they are watching it. The joy of
hockey is of the moment."
We are also, according to the book, faced with the
problem of returning the game to its former beauty,
to its former calibre. Expansion has let every poor
player be introduced as "big league," from salary to
ticket price and especially the latter.
Kidd and Macfarlane feel there is a need to
maintain a high level of excellence in the game and
to do this we must establish a national hockey
institute.
"We must establish a national hockey
institute, perhaps attached to one of our
universities, so that we can develop skills,
strategy and training methods to Canadian
conditions and experience."
The purpose of this, I imagine, is so we can return
Canada's national pride, so that we can compete with
the USSR on the ice. It must be an effort to challenge
the Russians for the world championship.
First of all, the Russian approach is as poor if not
worse than professionalism. If selected athletes train
for 11 months of the year with scientific study of the
game, they are bound to be fully capable of beating
people who enjoy the game in season, or on a eight
month of the year basis.
State capitalism is a greater threat than free
enterprise. It controls all that happens. The Russian
players are rewarded the same way the Canadian
pros are. The better they are the more they get.
Except they gall faster.
The game is used as an escape for fans. It is used
to diffuse a lot of built-up energies. It is like when the
NHL suspended the Montreal Canadien hero
Maurice Richard at the close of one season. Without
"the Rocket" as he was known, there would be no
Stanley Cup. Ten thousand fans rioted and looted St.
Catherine Street. The league had taken away their
only escape valve. If the masses relieve their
frustrations through sport, it is easier to maintain
economic and political control over them.
Secondly, hockey as the Canadian game
originated with emphasis on skating and
playmaking. This emphasis remained until it
became apparent that to make it to the big leagues
and the big money, you no longer needed to spend so
much time playing the game as entertaining the
crowd. Fights and fighting reputations became a
short cut to the leagues, especially when you're
selling to an ignorant audience. The excitement is
blatant. It's easier to sell on a short term basis.
The book says why we should leave it to
spontanaiety: "We love it because it is one of the
most beautiful games in the world. The exhilaration
of rink-long rushes in the chilling air. The
satisfaction of a well-delivered body check. The
special elation of scoring a goal, that thrilling
culmination of physical and mental reflex, wit,
discipline, and sometimes, luck. Hockey is all of
these things, but it is first, the sheer pleasure of
skating . . . Skating makes hockey one of the most
sensual of sports which is why so many of us play it.
But it is also among the most creative, not as
programmed as baseball or football, where offenses
,and defenses are carefully worked out."
The beauty of hockey is its spontaneity and
teammanship. It is also reflective of the Canadian
countryside. It is coasting on the open surface. The
closed arenas with artificial ice in a warm climate
has removed much of the natural beauty. The
players have become actors, actor-businessmen who
must entertain.
The NHL has, for all intents and purposes, left
Canada. Within a few years, the game will be
producing American players. The need for Canadian
players   and    the    Canadian    Amateur    Hockey
Association will lessen all the time. There has been a
dramatic increase of American-born and developed
players in the NHL.
American colleges have developed a program
similar to baseball and iootball which excludes
Canadians of good calibre from playing on American
college teams. Canadian college sport offers no
scholarships, with the odd exception; Simon Fraser
being the odd. The level of college hockey in Canada
is the highest amateur you'll find in North America;
however, it is the hardest league to come from and
make the NHL. The NHL moneybarons have, for a
long time, scared players into deciding between a
college education and pro sport. You can't have both
was their most famous expression. One or the other.
While there are several players from American
colleges in the league, only three Canadian college
graduates come to mind: Larry Carriere of Loyola in
Montreal, now with Buffalo; John Wright, of the
University of Toronto Blues, now with Vancouver,
and Bob Berry playing with the Los Angeles Kings.
Berry, formerly "property" of Montreal was kept
in the minors for a good while and was finally lent to
Los Angeles the same year the Montreal Canadiens
stacked the Kings to ensure they would finish ahead
of the California Golden Seals, who's draft choice
Montreal owned. The Seals finished last and
Montreal got their first pick and picked up Guy
Lafleur, hottest amateur product since Bobby Orr.
But the answer isn't athletic scholarships and
Canadian university players in the NHL. The NHL
will leave Canada soon enough. The Canadian fan
and the league are heading in different directions.
When the Atlanta Flames made their first ever
appearance in Montreal, only 12,000 fans showed up.
Five years ago you could hardly get a seat for any
game. Only a few games are of importance any
longer, and the media is now having a hard time
exciting people with their stories.
They're more and more criticizing the game,
because they must do that or lose whatever
credibility they still have. The people are not dumb.
We should encourage the exodus of professional
hockey from Canada. We should encourage the
building of more arenas and the direct involvement
of the average fan and enjoy the game ourselves with
ourselves.
We can teach ourselves how to play and teach our
children how to play the game that we know is
refreshing and native to the climates and conditions.
And beating the Russiuns is not that important;
international sport is as corrupt as the pros, worse in
the light of Munich, worse in flag raising through
games and sport.
There is extreme beauty in watching well-
conditioned hockey players in action, the color and
the speed and co-ordination leave us tingling, but
professionalism of any sort is no answer. We can do it
for ourselves.
v»,s<s%  /0w0«4s.\,**»SU     s^ftV. Trf&vfrft, Page 20
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, February 2, 1973
Gear awareness course planned
By KEN DODD
An eight-man committee
from the applied sciences
faculty has advanced an
"applied humanities"
program intended to increase
the   social   perspective   of
engineering undergraduates to
the university senate for
approval.
The committee, which
consists of seven faculty
members and one graduate
student, was formed last June
with the purpose of proposing a
program to make engineering
students more "aware of the
problems which advanced
technology has created."
The proposed curriculum
change would see a new inter
disciplinary course called
applied humanities 150 offered
as an alternative to English 150
which is presently compulsory
for all first year engineering
students. Entitled The Living
City this course would examine
POSING IN A DRAMATIC TABLEAU from Hello Dolly, the
Spuzzum Travelling Theatre Troupe's latest production, players
Ronald Burgerbits as Humphrey Sway back, the one-legged homo-
—sucha singh photo
sexual brain surgeon, and Amada Zibtoing as Albert Snorkle, the
absinthe-crazed Marxist butler, await the entrance of Lord Nelson.
Appearing in Alma Mater Society executive office, Saturday..
Sitdown demands end to NDP delay
By FORREST NELSON
The first popular confrontation with the New Democratic
Party government began
Thursday with a sit in at the
opening day of the child care
information centre.
Three prospective day care
centres organized the sit down
which began shortly before
noon at 45 W. Eighth in
Vancouver.
It will end, the group
says, "when our demands are
met."
One of the demands is a
meeting with Norman Levi,
Dennis Cocke and Eileen
Dailly of the NDP cabinet,
according to spokeswoman
Carolyn Jerome. Since Levi
and Dailly are out of town, the
protesters expect to occupy the
information centre for several
more days.
Gladys Maycock, now in
charge of the child care
information centre said:
"We're trying to get done the
things which need to get done
today."
Peggy Conway, also an
employee of the newly opened
centre said: "A lot of things
they want, we want too."
Roger Gale, one of the
protesters and also a day care
worker, said one of the
grievances is that the
government officers have been
more a hindrance than a help.
The chief grievance seems to
be the difficulty in setting up
day care centres. The
protesters want payment to be
made to the centre two months
prior to opening of the centre
and the interim license to be
issued upon application.
Gale said much of the trouble
is coming from the system as it
has been set up. "The new
government is not really
handling the old government
bureaucracy.
"Given the real need in day
care, what the NDP is doing
amounts to nothing."
The three day care centres in
the sit down are Pooh Corner in
the west end, South Hill at 47th
and Fraser and the east end
Grandview Terrace.
Pooh Corner issued a list of
complaints which are:
• The development permit
took six weeks;
• Constant misinformation
from Victoria — Norman
Levi's office and Don
Bingham's office;
o The child care crisis in the
west end — the day care centre
has not been advertised and
the waiting list is now 25;
One notable exception on the
list was praise rather than
gripe: "Gladys Maycock has
been extremely helpful and
supportive in this mess."
The protesters were having
food brought in for dinner;
they planned to spend the night
in the centre.
So far the officials have
obliged and in effect just
moved over.
-,<. ■?•&$<"
; >vv^ „w -, »>■.
Thefts close games room
Eighteen pinball machine robberies in the last week have
caused the closure of the SUB games room, Alma Mater Society
coordinator Bob Angus said Thursday.
Physical plant spokesman Ed Loamis said Thursday the
robberies usually occur during the night after the room is
closed. Vandals use pass keys to get in and take machine backs
off to get the money. He said he thinks the vandals are probably
not students.
Angus is negotiating with Southern Music Ltd. who own the
machines to find solutions to prevent the robberies. The room
will re-open only if fool-proof solutions can be found.
The pinball games room is usually open between 8:30 a.m.
and 10 p.m. It grosses $350 per week. It is supervised only after 4
p.m. Further supervision is not profitable, Angus said.
Loamis saidthe pinball machine robberies are only a part of
a very grave theft and vandalism problem that has always
existed at SUB.
;J> S*¥ } ■""WWffVi'' * °* V^^'.T^'Ws^t^ST^'Wr* * *
how modern technology and
people function together in the
urban structure and
environment. Its emphasis
would be on the city as a living
space for people.
As well a second year course,
applied humanities 250,
entitled Technology and
Society would be offered. This
course would be a continuation
of applied humanities 150 but
on a more philosophical, global
level.
The proposed calendar
description lists the purpose of
the course as being to impress
upon the student "the immense
effect which technological
changes . . . make on the
quality of human life ..." and
"to discuss some proposed
solutions to the problem of an
apparently runaway
technology which threatens the
primacy of human values."
"It is desirable for the two
courses to increase the social
awareness of engineers,"
Norman Epstein, committee
chairman and professor of
chemical engineering, said
Thursday.
"Basically the feeling is
engineers should be exposed to
the human effects of
technology, not just the
technological effect.
"Engineers should be more
aware of the undesirable
effects of technology than they
are at present."
He said there has been
tremendous response from the
engineering faculty and
anticipates little difficulty
getting the required 100
engineering teachers.
"Forty-one have already
indicated their participation,"
he said.
The problem so far however
has been negotiating with the
arts faculty to release people to
teach in the new program. The
hang-up has been co-ordinating
time and finances for the arts
professors involved.
Epstein said he estimates 16
to 20 teachers from other
faculties will be involved of
which three-quarters will be
from arts.
As well a few teachers from
science, math and perhaps
commerce and law would
contribute.
He does not anticipate any
shortage of people willing to be
either lecturers or seminar
leaders from these faculties,
either.
The format of the course
would see weekly meetings
consisting of one-hour lectures
to the whole class and a weekly
two-hour seminar to no more
than 25 students. The seminar
groups would be led by one
engineering instructor and one
non-engineering instructor.
The first year course would
consist of eight to 10 sections
with a similar number of
seminar groups in each. An
estimated 1,200 to 2,000
students would participate in
this course. The format for the
second year course would be
similar.
The applied humanities
program was put before senate
at its Jan. 24 meeting but was
deferred because of the
unresolved matters of coordination between the various
faculties involved.
Epstein said he hopes these
matters will be cleared up and
the program passed at senate's
Feb. 21 meeting.

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