UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Oct 26, 1984

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0126992.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0126992.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0126992-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0126992-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0126992-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0126992-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0126992-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0126992-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0126992-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0126992.ris

Full Text

Array THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXVII. No. 14
Vancouver, B.C. Friday, October 26,1964
y£.\>i 48 228-2301
*>«^
$£';
,.,.v
*V
^g&
WRITING DIFFICULT MIDTERMS can exhaust most students and changes of scenery
are helpful in influencing study habits. Pleasant weather and good company often
stimulate receptive areas of brains, allowing more information to be absorbed. Also, such
outside elements have relaxing effect on human nervous system, thus allowing students to
—enc eggertson photo
calm down from midterm pressures. Professors, too, are influenced by these factors —
there's always possibilities for class to be delayed or cancelled altogether so students and
faculty alike can enjoy pastoral atmosphere.
Tennis court transfer still mysterious
By PATTI FLATHER
Who made the decision to transfer four
grass tennis courts to UBC three months ago
still remains a mystery.
The universities minister, UBC's board of
governors chair and UBC's athletics director
all deny responsibility.
The manager of the Vancouver Lawn Tennis and Badminton Club, where the courts
came from, said the club dealt with universities minister Pat McGeer in the transfer last
July.
courts were taken out," said Graham Lax-
ton. He said McGeer, a club member, knew
the courts would be thrown away and approached the club himself.
"He came to us. We were all set. We had
the bulldozers in the yard and everything,"
Laxton said.
Laxton said McGeer told the club the grass
would go to UBC. The club gave McGeer two
days to complete the transfer and he did it,
Laxton added.
The courts cost $15,000 per year to main-
"Dr.  McGeer was here on the day the     tain at the club but may cost less to upkeep at
Cuts stall native plan
By ROBERT BEYNON
Changes to UBC's handling of B.C.'s
native culture are still a long way off despite a
recent report, UBC's president said Thursday.
George Pedersen said he cannot implement
policy changes quickly. He received in June a
report from an ad hoc presidential committee
on native peoples and native communities in
B.C.
"It's the same problem we have in other
areas. We don't have the resources to implement the changes we are discussing,"
Pedersen said.
Native people are vastly underrepresented
at UBC as compared to the percentage of
natives in B.C.
Pedersen said the medicine faculty is considering establishing a program assisting
native students entering medicine, adding
this would mean no additional university funding.
He said both the Native Indian Teacher
Education Program and the law faculty
have been very successful in attracting native
students to their faculties.
Changes to UBC being considered in the
future include setting up a native studies program   similar   to   women's   studies,   coor
dinating existing native-related courses
among different faculties, providing more
special counselling services and introducing
new courses relating to natives, Pedersen
said.
The university is currently considering
seeking funds from off-campus sources such
as the Ontario-based Donner Foundation,
Pedersen said, to start these programs because UBC has no funds it can allocate.
Verna Kirkness, native committee co-
chair, said before UBC can realistically seek
outside funding it has to show some commitment itself. Kirkness, who also coordinates
NITEP, added she believes the president is
interested in implementing change and committee members are still hopeful some
changes can be accomplished.
"We certainly hope some of the report's
plans can be implemented soon," Kirkness
said.
She said a basic step required is for the
university to find office space for the project
and hire, even part-time, someone who could
coordinate on-campus projects involving
native students or native culture.
The committee was set up by Pedersen in
June 1983. Its composition included former
justice minister Tom Berger as well as education, law and arts professors.
No noro |MH"luii(| ovoi"llnio
Drivers beware — towing begins Tuesday in the University Endowment Lands.
"We will not be issuing tickets. Vehicles found ovetprked in one hour parking zones
or in no parking areas will be impounded," said UBL manager Ron O'Genski Thursday.
"It's strictly a towaway situation."
O'Genski said tickets were issued last year but students'did not pay them. And it is
too costly for the UEL to go after people in court, he added. "We just don't have the
facilities."
Signs will be posted Monday warning of the new policy, O'Genski said. "We want to
fair to the students."
V£
UBC, he said. Laxton did not say how much
the transfer cost.
McGeer earlier received retractions from
MacLeans magazine and The Ubyssey for
stories saying McGeer authorized UBC to
spend $80,000 on the transfer.
McGeer had nothing to do with the
transfer decision, McGeer's ministerial assistant Jane Burnes claimed Thursday.
"He doesn't have the authority to tell them
what to do. He couldn't go to Laxton and say
'I'm moving the grass to UBC," Busnes
said.
Under the Universities Act only UBC's
board of governors can determine UBC's expenditures.
But she said McGeer did use some of the
grass for the baselines on his own tennis
courts because the serving areas were wearing
out.
Burnes said she understood UBC's board
of governors made the decision to transfer
the courts.
But board chair David McLean said the
board has never even discussed the court
decision, nor specifically approved it.
He said the UBC athletics department was
the source to talk to.
"Why are you even discussing this issue? I
don't consider it worthwhile taking the time
to talk to you about it," McLean said.
Bye George?
Despite provincial cutbacks and difficult
decisions UBC's administration president
turned down a tempting proposition this
summer.
George Pedersen said Thursday he turned
down an offer to become the president of
the University of Toronto. The U of T is not
suffering from such serious cuts as UBC is
and many think it is more prestigious than
any other Canadian university.
Pedersen said he thought leaving UBC at
this point would have been ethically inappropriate. "It would have looked like I was
abandoning ship," Pedersen said, adding
this would have further demoralized his
faculty and staff.
He added as president he felt that he had a
duty to continue the job he accepted from
UBC's board of governors.
Margaret Copping, student society president and former student board member, said
if Pedersen had left, UBC would definitely
have suffered. She said if staff change quickly at any institution valuable knowledge is
not passed on and the institution can suffer
badly. Pedersen became president in June
1983.
"Why would the board get involved with it
at all?" McLean said. The board must approve all capital expenditures at UBC. "We
run a two hundred million dollar budget and
you're talking about peanuts."
UBC athletics director Bob Hindmarch
also claimed he did not know who made the
decision to acquire the courts. He said he
thought it was an administrative decision
which would involve the chair of the board,
McLean. UBC president George Pedersen
was in Germany when UBC acquired the
courts.
Hindmarch said he was the one who
organized the court transfer. When asked
when he first heard of the available grass, he
said: "I first became aware (when) Dr.
McGeer mentioned it to me."
There were only two or three days to complete the transfer, Hindmarch said, or the
turf would be thrown out.
"We had to make a fairly quick decision."
Hindmarch added people implying the
transfer was wrong made him angry. He said
if a facility for medicine was made available
no one would make a fuss.
The court's maintenance costs will be
about $2,500 per year, not $15,000 and the
money will come from user fees, Hindmarch
said.
"Oh, they're beautiful!" Hindmarch said
of the courts. They are located behind the
tennis bubble near the Thunderbird Winter
Sports centre. New grass is sprouting in the
places the transferred grass does not cover,
and there is a row of newly planted cedar
seedlings outside.
Sports surviving
Most athletic teams whose budgets were
cut are surviving by one means or another.
Women's athletic director Marilyn Pomfret said she had to discontinue women's ice
hockey and curling. Fencing, skiing, squash
and badminton are now maintained at students' expense, Pomfret said.
She said this year the board of governors
reduced her department's budget to 1977-78
levels, although inflation has increased costs
sizeably.
Men's athletic director Rick Noonan said
his budget is $48,000 less this year than last
year. But he said the department maintained
teams whose funding was cut by fundraising
efforts. He said men's gymnastics is discontinued, but golf, tennis, squash, badminton,
skiing and field hockey are maintained
through the contributions and support of
alumni and private clubs. Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 26, 1984
Frozen Quebec fees
likely to increase
MONTREAL (CUP) — Tuition
fees at Quebec universities, frozen
since 1975, will likely increase next
fall, Quebec's education minister
has warned.
"It may now be time to ask ourselves about the relevance of the
reasons behind our policy of freezing tuition fees," Yves Berube told
a parliamentary commission on university financing in Quebec City
Oct. 9.
Berube said Quebec education
policy since 1978 has "significantly
reduced the average cost of
educating a university student," so
that Quebec pays less to educate a
student than any other Canadian
province. The policy has also made
Quebec schools much more accessible.
But the policy has also left the
province's universities short of
cash, Berube said.
Berube said new money is now
Geers improve on
beer-drinking look
TORONTO (CUP) — Some engineering students at the University
of Toronto are tired of their image
as "beer guzzling party-ers" and
want to stress the "intellectual" aspects of engineering.
The U of T engineering students
say they will educate their peers
about the negative image prompted
by their antics on Canadian campuses, when they gather for an
upcoming Congress of Engineering
Students.
"Of course people go to a conference to have a good time," said
David Stubbing, chair of the congress organizing committee. "We
want to make sure that people go
home with more than a hangover."
IN A HURRY?
See us for fast
high quality copies
kinko's copies
5706 University Blvd
Vancouver, B.C.
V6T1K6
(604) 222-1688
[
»^^>^> ^w^w^»%^^^^^^^^^>
EARN
***
$12,000
PER MONTH
IN YOUR SPARE
TIME
Then come and
spend a little of it at
FELUNI'S
GREAT
SANDWICHES,
FABULOUS
CHEESECAKES,
CAPPUCCINOS,
ESPRESSOS,
NANAIMO BARS
Located at the back of the Village
on Campus
needed to help graduate studies and
undergraduate applied sciences at
Quebec schools.
Quebec university students pay
$570 a year in tuition.
B.C. university tuition fees were
increased last year, with UBC tuitions rising 33 per cent on average.
Another tuition hike will be considered this year due to reduced provincial funding.
RED LEAF
RESTAURANT
Luncheon Smorgasbord
Authentic Chinese Cuisine
228-9114
10% DISCOUNT ON
PICK UP ORDERS
LICENSED PREMISES
■Mon Pr.   11 30 9 00 p m
CLOSED SATURDAYS      ,
Sundavs and Holidays
, T 4 00 p m   9 00 p iti
■   -      2142 Western Paikwdy    ■
UBC Village
SUPER MEATS LTD.    ,
v/ 738-2160 3 *"'
Fresh quality meats and seafood
BBQ WIENERS
SMOKED PORK PICNIC SHOULDER
BEEF PATTIES
YOUR CHOICE ONLY $1.29 PER POUND
And much much more.
■Active
HALLO^gEN
For zany wigs, masks
clown costumes and
the best masquerade
make-up come and see
Tfee
DaRGe Shop'
DANCE, EXERCISE & FASHION
We have moved to
1023 W. BROADWAY
Vancouver B.C.
733-6116
554 W. GEORGIA
Watch for the
opening of
The Red Caboose 681-8757
on Granville
Island!
s
TUOfJ^GS
THE ELECTRONIC COMPONENTS PEOPLE
13
DIGITAL «•*.¥.
CAPACITANCE METER  K#|l|
Accuracy: BdS'c -iccijMcy t".» i ■
one count) on pF   n<  i.inqrs   3%
i *  one counti on uF range
Range: 1 pF to 9 999 uF"
Display: fur 4 diqil   high e^icipi
cy IFD rJiSp'dy   Decmji points
■ight up when brine". '% 'rw or
wher capacitance i*.; ove"j'>ye
Powtr: One 9V battP"y mot included I
Warranty   One year   parts   ■
labor
69XX |MC 100AI
T
S0LDERLESS
BREADBOARD
1 Terminal Strip, Tie-point
840
2 Distribution Strips.
° ?
13
10%
DISCOUNT
ON
ALL BOOKS
DIGITAL CAPACITANCE
METER (LCD)
S0LDERLESS
BREADBOARD
3 Terminal Strips
Tie-point 1890
5 Distribution Strips
Tie-point  500
4 Binding Posts
69052 (WBU-206I
DESOLDER
PUMP
Atvo Probe-it facilitates testing pn nigh-
density boards  Its sma^i hook contact
provides positive connection to the most
delicate reads
Comes in six colors   red. black   blue
green   yellow and white
40085 (923848)
digits
pF to 2000
13
57077 (MAXI)
DIGITAL
MULTIMETER
Handheld 7-tunction  35 ranges
with 200uA AC and DC   Hi-low
ohms diode check
Built-in transistor test function
Tilt stand tor bench use
1 year parts labor guarantee
69613 (4060)
DELUXE PC
MINI DRILL
•3
•0
• Low battery indicator
Includes 2 test leads-
spare (use - 9v battery
nstruction manual
69XX (2200)
r-d p dbtiL
Designed for light-duty
££       cutting on paper, soft and
it       lightweight materials or
°!      wood
13       86269 (XN-100)
KIT
Kit includes 25 watt SP23 soldering iron. 3 tips (screwdriver,
chisel, cone), soldering aid tool
and coil 60 40 rostn core solder. Blister packed on hang-up
card 110 volts.
86212 (SP23K}
Designed *'ff P !'  boa'C *■-
but capable of rundi.ng i-ieta
chassA boxes too   Ope'dtes
tabie or-l   W   batleces rot ,rcudedi
at 2500 RPM with a wei<-gea'ed nolo-
tor high to'Que   An enterr.a' powe' iao
permits use wth a 9 or 12V DC powe'
supply  A power cord and connector are
included  A:so ncluded wit" the DmI are J
three conels that -*n\< accept bits up tc
125     three popular bits   a gr-ndmn
wheel, collet wrenches and a "ingec
plastic storage bo»  A dnn stand is
available separately
76093 112-107i
^
EPROM ERASER
13
Low cost EPROM Eraser designed in a plastic
enclosure The UV element and components are
installed in trie top lid and the EPR0MS are placed in the bottom half.
Erases as many as 8 EPR0MS in 15-20 minutes. 90 day warranty
69603 (QUV-T8'1)
DIP IC INSERTION TOOL
.,      WITH PIN STRAIGHTENED
A      14-16 PIN
0IFFR EXPIRES 0C-neFB Jl   1994
.IMII 1 PER CUS'OMFS   AIIH COUPON
ULTRASONIC
TRANSDUCER
Narrow profile permits tool to work
on densely spaced patterns while unique insertion mechanism assures accuracy as well as excellent   (eel
Additionally the tool includes a unique
pin straighlener built into the handle
86077 (INS-H16)
OFFER EXPIRES OCTOBER 31   1981
LIMIT 3 PER CUSTOMER   WITH COUPON
Transmits or receives 40 kHz ultrasonic waves  For remote controls,
radios. TV s, appliances  also tor
remote switching such as door
openers, remote signaling and
ultrasonic intrusion protecting devices and alarms. Diagrams ot
practical circuits included
76080 (J4-815)
CPUs & PERIPHERALS
Stock No.
41001
41002
12001
12005
12017
12021
12053
13
Description
Z80-CPU-PS
Z80A-CPU-PS
6502 PC
6522 PC
6821 PC
6850 PC
8088 DC
Price
$ 6.49
$ 7.29
$ 9.10
$ 8.89
$ 4.39
$ 5.60
$36.90
MEMORIES
Slock No
Description
48002
f>2114-20
48003
P2114-20L
48005
P2016-15
48049
P5101-45L
48050
P5516-25L
48007
P6116-15
48008
P6116-15L
48014
C251645
48021
C2532-45
48016
C2732A-30
48037
P4116-15
4801)
P4164-15
13 48012
P4164-20
Price
S 6 80
S 6 80
111 60
S 7 20
113 00
$11 20
$12.80
$ 7 40
$ 8 79
$11 50
$ 2 19
$ 8 50
$ 8 25
FERRIC CHLORIDE
,1 ETCHANT
- S  • Industrial Strength
5E   •! Litre
69012 (415-1L)
LIQUID TIN
~ £ 'Tin Plates Copper Circuits
^ ^     in Minutes
S |  -500 ML
"   69053 |421 500 ML)
3070 KINGSWAY
VANCOUVER, B.C. V5R 5J7 (604) 433-3321
STORE HOURS: MON      THURS  8 00 AM - 6 00 PM
FRIDAY  8 00 AM  -  9 00 PM
SATURDAY  9 00 AM - 5 00 PM
MAIL ORDER:
5651 FERRIER ST.. MONTREAL. QUEBEC
H4P1N1    (514)-731-7441
TOLL FREE: 1-800-361-5884 Friday, October 26,1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Forum examines B.C.'s goals
By GINNY AULIN
"Who determines the goals and
dreams of life in B.C.?" a UBC
Chaplains' Association representative asked at an education Day of
Concern forum Wednesday.
"We called this meeting because
we want you to set such goals," Ray
Schultz told 25 people in SUB 200.
There is a lack of appreciation of
human potential in B.C. due to the
provincial government's preference
to import a skilled work force
rather than develop its own, Shultz
said. B.C. people are increasingly
unable to compete for jobs because
of such importation, he added.
"Students are becoming ruthless
competitors and a dissociative force
is growing at UBC which is harmful. We must get together as a community and take a common stance
on educational needs," Schultz
said.
Margaret Copping, Alma Mater
Society president, said, "One year
ago I probably would have spoken
about possible cutbacks affecting
the quality of education but this
subject is no longer appropriate —
it has already happened. The future
came fast."
The big concern now is that people are accepting such cutbacks as
normal, Copping added.
"The government does not
believe that education is beneficial
to society," Donna Morgan, Canadian Federation of Students exec-
tive officer, said. "It is up to us to
talk about the benefits of education
since the government is not looking
at colleges and universities with
anything but animosity," said
Morgan.
Unless broad support is mobilized for education, the government
will continue to believe it has public
support to cut back and universities
will have no future, Morgan added.
John Dafoe, Teaching
Assistants' Union vice president,
said he did not prepare notes for the
meeting as the issues are ones that
he comes across everyday.
"Teaching assistants are getting no
pay increases this year, tuition and
the cost of living have gone up, and
our ability to live as human beings
— our ability to teach and carry out
our studies — is being affected,"
Dafoe said.
To identify the problems is not
enough, Dafoe said. "We exchange
sad stories and then go away and
feel rotten about it, yet when we
hold meetings like this one only 25
people show up. We need to build
solidarity on campus."
Fairleigh Wettig, a representative
from Association of University and
College Employees local one, said
113 support staff positions were cut
this year, meaning 226,000 support
staff hours were lost to students.
"We can no longer afford the
costs of political reticence. We must
get off our duffs and do something
if we are going to survive," Wetting
said.
The forum was sponsored by the
UBC Community Campus Alliance
and was one of several provincial
Day of Concern events organized
by Defend Education Services
Coalition.
Quebec squeezes arts
— rory a   photo
THIS PARKING CRACKDOWN even more serious than previously thought. While penalties for canine parking
are unknown, illegal parking in Endowment Lands will become very expensive as of next week. (See story page 1.)
Gays band together on Alberta campus
EDMONTON (CUP) — Gay and
lesbian students have banded
together to form a social and education club at the University of Alberta, one of the few universities that
did not have one.
"One of the reasons that this is
happening now is that there are
enough interested people who are
willing to be active," organizer
Rick Hurlburt says.
The club attracted 45 participants
to its inaugural meeting and will
provide social activities for gays on
campus, says Hurlburt. It will also
function as a liaison with other
local organizations, both on and off
campus.
The group wants to gain club
status with the students' union to be
eligible for office space and
funding.
"Reception has been quite
good," says Stephen James,
another group organizer. James
says the council executive has promised to "rubber stamp any application for official club status and
that there would be no problem at
all."
UBC's Gay/Lesbian Club recently gained status as a service
organization from the Alma Mater
Society.
Questionnaire not tabulated
Students for a Democratic University are unable to release results
on a quality of education questionnaire they distributed to students
in September.
The results, which they advertised would be released at an open
meeting Thursday, will be available next Thursday, SDU spokesperson Alicia Parsallo told 20 students in Buchanan A204.
SDU hopes the questionnaire results (approximately 500 were filled out) will identify main concerns common to most students, Parsallo said.
"If we can identify the problems expressed (in the questionnaire) we
can concentrate the fight (for students' rights) on specific issues,"
she said.
"We have to convince students that they can effect change," Parsallo said, "and then we can address problems effectively."
MONTREAL (CUP) — The
Quebec government plans to
squeeze out arts students by placing
funding priorities on business administration and the sciences, the
Quebec education ministry has revealed.
In the context of its "economic
recovery" priorities, the Quebec
government plans to pump more
money into the computer sciences,
management, pure and applied sciences, education minister Yves Berube said last week.
At the parliamentary commission
on university financing in Quebec
City Oct. 9, Berube said he "was
happy to note that 90 per cent of
new enrolment in universities was in
management and pure and applied
sciences."
Education ministry coTnmuniques
released after Berube's speech fail
to mention arts or humanities studies.
"We're reorienting students into
sectors where jobs are," said Martin Desmeuls, material and resources director at the ministry's
universities department.
Since 1983-84, the ministry has
subsidized students in technological
revolution-related studies at 70 per
cent of the cost per student. Students in the humanities and lan
guages get a 50 per cent subsidy.
The ministry plans to continue
this formula through 1985-86, Desmeuls said.
The government also announced
it will grant money to attract 40 new
research teams to Quebec over the
next five years.
Quebec's largest student association criticized this policy at the
hearing, saying Quebec schools are
being used to service new technology, instead of new technology serving universities.
Celine Seguin, a spokesperson
for l'Association nationale des
etudiant(e)s du Quebe said, "Berube considers education as a column of numbers with a total at the
bottom."
ANEQ said the effect on funnelling talent and resources to computer studies should be examined by
other sectors of the university. It
also said emphasis on this sector
should not be at the expense of
Quebec universities' arts programs.
William Sayweil, Simon Fraser
University president, has proposed
large cuts in the Centre for the Arts,
and the eradication of other programs such as Latin American and
African studies. At the same time
he recommended creation of a new
faculty of applied sciences.
CHECKERS
Restaurant & Lounge
(home of the 1 litre frosted mug)
and probaby the
JUICIEST BURGER IN TOWN
NOW
A SALAD BAR & COURTYARD
for your enjoyment
(full menu available)
Book Your Party
682-1831
TW
By Th* Sea
overlooking English Bay^
.1 Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 26, 1984
THE UBYSSEY
October 26, 1384
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Fridays throughout the academic year by
the Alma Mater Society of the University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are
those of the staff and are not necessarily those of the university administration or the
AMS. Member Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey's editorial office is SUB
241k. Editorial department, 228-2301/2305. Advertising 228-3977/3978.
Things have gotten pretty static here atSUB241K. On any given day you might find Robert Beynon reclining at the city desk, his contemplations of life shat
tered by irate readers. Nearby Charlie Fidelman would jabber at her phone on the entertainment desk, pleading for Chris wong to get in his review while Larry
McCallum and Dave Harper waited to hear her verdict on their stuff. Between the two desks Yaku would sift through a pile of photographs looking for his
pen, grousing to Rory Allen about the habits of the photographers. At the news desk Stuart Colcleugh would be seen telling a joke to Victor Wong, who
would explain the joke to Ginny Aulin. Sometimes old hacks like Eric Eggertson and Kelley Jo Burke would wander in, ready to lend a hand to novices like
Tim Pettit or harried editors like Patti Flather. The only time the routine broke would be when a ghost story arrived, scaring the hell out of everybody.
Letters
Sorry Kinahan, life not perfect
Contrary to John Kinahan's opinions expressed in The
Ubyssey ("Most UBC students
'whiny' and 'wimpy' ", Oct. 23) all
is not for the best in the best of all
possible worlds — sad but true. We
are sorry that you feel this way.
There are many potential qualified
students who are being denied the
experiences that you so value. We
are not whining, we are concerned
for you, for them, and for
ourselves. We don't want a huge
slice of the cake but want and
deserve more than the crumbs.
You acknowledge that the cutbacks have played a role in the
declining quality of education. Yet
when we criticize the government
you get angry. It is a fact that the
government has succeeded in
destroying the quality of education
in B.C. Even supporters of the provincial government like Jim
Matkin, president of the employers
council of B.C., spoke out in
favour of better funding of our
universities. So, as students, we
shall protest to any government,
Social  Credit  or  NDP,  when  we
Vote now for science reps
On June 30, 1985 Dr. C V. Finnegan will retire as clean ... ^.ence.
The university must choose a new-
science dean and UBC president
George Pedersen is forming a president's advisory committee to this
end.
This committee will consist of
four faculty and two student
representatives. The student
representatives are to be elected
from the body of science undergraduates and graduate students
associated with the science faculty.
We feel that the student elected
positions should be filled by persons who have had a long standing
association with the faculty of
science and therefore have an informed perspective on matters concerning this faculty. We have both
completed B.Sc.s at UBC and are
now pursuing post-graduate degrees
in science. We have both been involved in various campus organizations and committees over the past
seven years and therefore feel we
possess the necessary experience to
help select a new science dean. Thus
we seek the support of science grads
and undergrads in the upcoming
election.
The election will be held in Hebb
Theatre all day on Friday, Oct. 26.
We urge all science students to
vote in this election and by doing so
participate in the selection of a new
dean.  This is  an important  issue
that  will affect  the rest of your
academic life. If you have any questions feel free to call us at 228-5267.
Dave Harper
horacio de la cueva
graduate studies
witness such a shameful sham.
We are not selfish. We are not
only earning our tuitions, but also
our living, as are many students at
UBC. We feel fortunate that we
don't have to care for any children
as some of our fellow students do.
Has it ever occured to you how
single parents can cope with the
financial. burden imposed by the
elimination of grants?
Along with the declining quality
of education in B.C., as you are
willing to admit, it is inevitable that
a degree from an institution in this
province will not be recognized as
matching the standards set at other
Canadian universities.
What will you do when your BSc.
is not worth B.S. outside of B.C.?
Helen Reeve
arts 2
Thierry Chatelet
physics 3
Mike I.ooney
botany 3
Natives
It is time for us to give serious thought to the place of our native peoples
in Canadian academia.
Although B.C. has the highest per capita native population in Canada,
there is no discipline involving the study of natives in particular available in
the province. That is a shame for natives have played a valuable part in
B.C.'s history.
It would be easy to fault the B.C. government — "there is not enough
money to establish a native studies program" — but the academic community is equally culpable, for not showing enough interest to lobby effectively for such a program.
The educational program at the elementary and high school level suffers
from problems and the situation is worse for the native child. What is there
of interest to the native people in a school system geared for the white
population?
The economic status of most natives is a further discouragement to
higher learning. The government should be faulted for failing to establish
adequate student aid for B.C.'s native population.
When one considers the problems between natives and the Canadian
government, especially in terms of natives' rights, one may think it a good
and fair idea to encourage us to study Canada's native culture.
Smell
Something smells at UBC.
And it smells a lot worse than wet Slazenger tennis balls, even after they
have been played on grass courts.
For some reason the chair of UBC's board of governors, B.C.'s universities minister and UBC's athletic department head do not know who finally
approved the transfer of four grass tennis courts to UBC from the
prestigious Vancouver Lawn Tennis and Badminton Club.
Perhaps the universities minister can be forgiven this lack of knowledge:
he is not responsible for UBC's day to day management although some
sources say he was involved in this deal.
But, why do neither the board's chair nor the athletic department's head
know who made the decision? UBC's president would have had trouble
making the transfer from Germany.
Something smells here. The stink should at least be made public and
aired, otherwise it looks like something is rotten here.
Letters
Kinahan 'docile'
Whiny and selfishly wimpy, huh?
I could just as easily label Mr.
Kinahan ("Most UBC students
'whiny' and 'wimpy' ", Oct. 23)
docile and easily conned. His letter
not only lacked insight but seemed
completely oblivious to several glaring facts.
His claim that hard work will pay
for a university education is
preposterous, and I find the insinuation that students are lazy very
insulting. This summer, I worked
full time for four months at twice
minimum wage, and my earnings
were still insufficient to finance my
year, prompting me to take out a
$2,000 student loan. If you live at
home with your parents' support,
perhaps minimum wage will suffice,
but many UBC students can't live at
home and must therefore shell out
an additional $3,000 or more for
room and board.
Rising tuition coupled with a
poor provincial economy only
worsen the plight of the student living on his or her own. The B.C.
government may not be purposely
out to destroy quality education,
but its inactions are doing just that.
While cutting back university funding and student aid it pours huge
amounts of money into outrageous
fiascos like Expo 86. How will B.C.
manage to come up with all this
shiny new technology being
displayed at Expo without the scientists and engineers to design and
build it?
Declining  quality at  UBC  and
TkR
oommflTES
il Grea
fTlnrqwij
Scn«dY,
you dt -for
*'     •>
Summer ■
~\
Well, i-l u/is-one of
Vneor yvernmwrr pro-
y«»»>e*-,mo4erarfe f^j
fa/+ idatj ccni rfiois",
all, a sense   of
arti'jfic   fr/fidraif.  /
(So
7/  rJ
other universities ultimately affects
all of Canada. Fewer highly trained
professionals means slower industrialization and the prospect of
Canada being left behind in a
technologically accelerating world.
It is true that tuition at UBC is
not really that high, especially when
compared with American universities. But it is my right to cry
"foul" when I am being charged
more while quality is discarded. Mr.
Kinahan's contentment with the
present situation shows he is the
timid sort who would bite his
tongue while his tailor charges him
twice as much for a suit that doesn't
fit.
The fact that Mr. Kinahan can
charge that his fellow students are
wimpy while blissfully preaching
how delighted he would be to be
taken for all he's worth shows how
narrow his view of the world is and
how hypocritical his sincere, alternate viewpoint is.
N. J. Roese
zoology 2
Desks unfair
to left-handeds
During the past couple of years as
a student as the University of
British Columbia, I have become
increasingly aware of "The
Dropped-Elbow Syndrome". I
think it is time the moral majority
spoke out to combat discrimination
against the left-handed population.
After all, isn't it logical to think
that every person born has a 50 per
cent chance of being either left-
handed or rig' t handed? Why is it
that in every classroom one walks
into, a mere zero to five per cent of
the desks will be designated for left-
handed studc   •,''
the   ultimate   test
i al exams when the
«"   position   must
or three hours. In
not outrageous to
na bonus marks for
1- urthermori
c-.-nes during ■
"Dtopped-E     ■
be l.eld for i
t'f. ■. case, it  >
cv^ %ider awai . :
endurance!
Janet Hofer
science 3 Friday, October 26,1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Air Farca levelsbff
By VICTOR WONG
One of the more popular featJ
of CBC radio is the Royal Canadiafl
Air Farce, a radio comedy program
which has flourished for the past 11
years. On Nov. 9 they will be performing a benefit concert at the Or-
pheum for Big Brothers of Canada.
Air Farce Live
performed by the Royal Canadian
Air Farce
CBC Records $8.98
Their record, Air Farce Live,
has its funny moments — indeed,
many of the tracks are good.
However, a few routines fall flat on
their faces, because the Air Farce
has trouble putting humor into
them.
Air Farce listeners will tell you
Air Farce tends to rely on character
twists and odd turns in the script.
This works sometimes, but the
recording is too full of thei
rather, too full of twists which
been used to exhaustion.
The worst track on the record is
"Pastor Quagmire's Sermon" performed by troupe member John
Morgan. The ending — which is the
climax of most Air Farce sketches
— is taken out of Reader's Digest.
Quagmire (Morgan) says, "If I
had my way, all the alcohol in this
city would be thrown into the
nearest river. And now, let us sing
our final hymn, 'Shall We Gather at
the River'."
A very dull ending, that one.
Another horrid sketch is "Factory Baby Outle't" performed by
Roger Abbott. He portrays a hustling used-car salesman-type m;
an ad for an organization sShg
human infants. It doesn't wbrk
because there is no room imjahe
sketch for shock value — that i:
say, not one of the other player?
acts like we would.
In general, the best Air Farce
sketches are not solo acts. They require someone to bounce it off. The
exception to this is Dave
Broadfoot's Sergeant Renfrew,
which is not on the album but may
be performed at the Orpheum.
What Air Farce does best is
satire, especially of Canadian
politics (with emphasis on a Toronto point of view). The two best
tracks on the album are "The
Emperor Speaks" featuring Don
Ferguson, and "Please Report To
Immigration", featuring Broaj
and Morgan.
In the latter sketch, Morgan is a
stuffy Brit trying to get into
Canada, and Broadfoot is the immigration officer with an East In
dian (although wa^Kr find out it is
Newfoundlaa^^cent.
•erguson does his
impression — former
prime   minister   Pierre   Trudeau.
"Is it safe to test cruise missiles in
Alberta? Certainly it's safe —
there are no Liberals in Alberta."
Lest you think Air Farce is reactionary, be warned — none of the
national parties are held sacred.
Tune in to their radio Staow and it is
obvious. Brian Mulroney is seen (or
rather heard) as indecisive. ("Uh,
can I get back to you on that?")
Most Canadian comics might
have trouble making fun of Ed
Broadbent, but Dave Broadfoot
found a way. (Every time Broadfoot does a Broadbent imitation, he
always says first, "Hi, I'm Ed
Broadbent!" as if to show he
exists.)
The rest of the tracks on the
e in between
id towards being better than average. The quality
has to be judged by taste — Air
Farce isn't as crass as Maclean and
Maclean (CBC obscenity standards
seem to have been breeded in) but
neither are they as insipid as a Walt
Disney cartoon.
Suffice to say if you are a regular
Air Farce fan you will enjoy the
album; if you prefer stuff like Steve
Martin or Geoge Carlin you may
find the album very tame; but if you
like stuff like Bob Newhart and Bill
Cosby, you will like Air Farce.
ive
UC EGVpTSON
Fidurance oflne band while
Bands split w or fizzle out
Usually be traJH to controlled
energy on the part of the band
members and the staying power of
the band's songwriter. If you're
talking about a punk band, the energy is almost out of control, and
the songs tend to have a sameness
about them that becomes tiring.
So if punk rock is so hard to keep
vital over the years, why aren't the
Dead Kennedys dead?
Jello Biafra.
The Dead Kennedys' lead singer
is a mixture of opposites that clash
with such energy on the stage that
you forget punk is dead and con-
 Jhroaty voice, his
perpetuaTmoTl^^machine of gestures and gesticuWtons, his bizarre
mime routines, ^d his strong
political message.
The Dead Ken^Bys played the
DEAD KENNEDYS . . . energy keeps them alive.
-eric eggertson photo
(New) York Theatre Saturday and
Sunday nights, with backup band
Industrial Waste Banned starting
the Sunday show.
The DKs, famous for such top-40
tunes as California Uber Alles, Nazi
Punks Fuck Off, and Holiday in
Cambodia, played their alternatives
to the California sounds of the
Beach Boys with frenzied flair. The
sound was awful, with Jello's voice
disappearing during some songs,
but nobody was there to worry
about the sound. When the Dead
Kennedys come to town you either
accept the medium of the message,
or don't go.
If you've seen the band before,
their latest show offered little new.
Their most recent songs are much
the same as their oldest — fast,
powerful songs heaping abuse on
Ronald Reagan and any other institution that dares to show its face.
Unlike many of the punk bands
that burned out quickly, the Dead
Kennedys have the musical talent
and theatrical flair to make their denunciation of society carry some
weight. When someone assures you
the American war machine is evil
and insidious the way Jello Biafra
does, you believe him. Or else.
Spunky O'Jays whoomph tackily
-Chris wong photo
O'JAYS . . . soul-spunking AM airwaves.
By CHRIS WONG
Imagine a 40-year-old Michael
Jackson. He's wearing a white suit
dotted with a floral design that
reached levels of tackiness even
Liberace can't match, he launches
into awkward dance moves that
pre-date the hustle, and he belts out
a tune with a sincerity and youthful
vigor that makes his performance
an unquestionable thriller.
Jackson may well ourn-out —
hair and all — by the time he is too
old to moonwalk. But a group currently appearing at the Plazaizz in
North Vancouver more than fits the
above billing.
That group is the O'Jays — the
vocal trio that injected some spunky
soul into the discofied AM airwaves
of the early seventies with the help
of the Philadelphia songwriting
team of Kenny Gamble and Leon
Huff.
Remember those three or four
minute slabs of slickly produced
rhythm and blues that created a
sound with more substance and bite
than disco could ever offer? (Hint:
they had titles like the Backstab-
bers, Love Train and For The Love
of   Money.)   Sure   you   do.   The
O'Jays along with groups like
The Three Degrees, Harold Melvin
and the Bluenotes and The Intruders were the talented vocalists
behind that sound.
Sitting near the stage in the tiny
Plazazz showroom provides the
perfect opportunity to experience
the powerful whoomph generated
by the vocal acrobatics of the three
O'Jays: Eddie Levert, Walter
Williams and Sammy Strain. Yes,
Virginia, these lads know how to
make the best of their vocal chords.
After over 20 years in the
business, they still possess the
stamina to perform an hour and a
half worth of material — all in the
"I fell in love/I was cheated on/I
fell in love again" vein they do so
well.
Rather than merely subduing an
audience with an unwavering wall
of sound, they inject dynamics, a
keen awareness of pitch and individual inflections to broaden the
sound. Indeed, these guys may be
the best thing America has produced since the invention of lip balm.
No yoke. The O'Jays are okay.
And the secret of the O'Jays suc
cess is evident when sitting two feet
away from them. The fillings in
their rear molars and the hairs on
their exposed chests are apparent up
front. But the most telling aspects of
their physical appearance are the
gobs of sweat dripping off their
faces. It's not just the hot lights that
provoke the perspiration. These
fellas are working hard, reaching
deep down to their diaphragm —
that wall of muscle underneath the
lungs invaluable to vocalists — to
collectively supply a breath of fresh
vocal air.
But while their choral capabilities
are in fine working order, their
material is getting a bit stale. The
O'Jays performed several selections
from their latest album which are a
tad too syrupy to rank with their
earliers material. The obnoxious
synthesized strings coming from the
keyboards do nothing to enhance
the tunes.
For the most part though, the
O'Jays and their tight 10 piece
backup band avoided the watered
down approach that Philadelphia
soul artists adopted in the late
seventies and entertained the crowd
with an orgy of infectious funk. Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 26, 1984
Letters
Student disgusted with
cyanide pill proposal
I read with disquiet and a great
deal of distaste, though not with
any undue surprise, the editorial in
last Tuesday's Ubyssey on the proposed stocking of cyanide by the
university for the use of students in
the event of nuclear war ("Shocking", Oct. 23). i
It seems to me that this rather
puerile approach by the UBC
Students for Peace and Mutual
Disarmament typifies the Gucci
sensationalism and perverse irrationality of the so-called
"Popularist Movement" in the
disarmament debate (equivalent in
intellectual content and practical
impact to that pervasive, trite and
wholly asinine bumper sticker:
"One nuclear bomb can ruin your
whole day"). It appears that
hysteria-inducing rhetoric is not the
sole prerogative of the Reagan administration.
The issues facing the human race
with respect to the dilemma posed
by the current arms acquisition
policies of the superpowers require
critical analysis and not the morbid
sensationalism and the disturbing
lack of regard for the sanctity of the
human existence that is manifested
so crudely in the editorial. If certain
individuals feel that suicide as a
contingency would provide a
psychological crutch for their fear
of a post-nuclear world, then I suggest that it .should be a personal
decision on their part and not a
decision aided and abetted by this
university's administration or the
Alma Mater Society by way of a
political statement.
The administration and the AMS
(the latter which represents all
students) should not be involved in
expressly or implicitly condoning
such an odious and immoral stance
by either proposing or adopting a
"cyanide resolution." Peace, if it is
to be achieved, must be sought
through positive endeavor and not
by invoking negative, self-
destructive emotional responses in
an area of public concern that must
be the subject of rational inquiry.
The underlying premise in the
proposed issuing of the cyanide
capsules has no logical basis. Vancouver as a major port and
transportation nexus would undoubtedly receive a number of
Soviet warheads in the event of a
nuclear war, if only to interdict its
use by the United States. A 10
megaton airburst several kilometers
above downtown Vancouver would
obviate any need for cyanide pills.
No one would be alive to, as the
staff phrases it, have their "...
small, inadequate say in his or her
own destiny;" but then, logic has
never been the forte of the sensationalist.
Stephen M. G. Richards
law 3
3637 W. 4th Avenue
wmnEm*    734-7573       734-7574
PASTAS, PIZZAS, & MUCH MUCH MORE
FREE DELIVERY! FREE SOFT DRINK!
West of Burrard & North of 41st Avenue With order over $8.00
on minimum order of $7.00
[inquire About Our Prime Rib Special
BUSINESS HOURS
Monday to Thursday 11:30-1:30
Friday & Saturday 11:30-2:00
Sunday & Public Holidays 11:30-11:00
15% student discount on all meals in the Restaurant
Open for lunch 11:30-5:00 Sunday Brunch 11:30-5:00
DINNER DELIVERED?
Call Candia Taverna
Traditional Greco-Roman Cuisine
4510 West 10th Avenue
Open Sunday through Thursday 5:00 p.m. to 1:00 a.m.
Friday and Saturday 5:00 p.m. to 2:00 a.m.
For reservations and delivery: 228-9512 - 228-9513
"j-.uf'^'^if
J*mV
Try Candia Taverna's carefully prepared Greek dishes, from such standards
as Mousaka, Souvlakias grilled carefully to your tastes, Greek Salads
smothered with Feta Cheeses, to specially prepared Kalamaria brought to
your table piping hot and delicious. Sample the large selection of Greek and
Italian appetizars: Kotosoupa, Tzanziki, Homus, Italian Salad rich with Moz-
zarella. Candia Style sauces prepared for the Lasagna, Spaghetti and
Tortellini are great favourites, as are the wide varieties of pizzas. The chef
lovingly creates daily specials such as spinach pizza and BBQ Chicken for
your appreciation. A friendly staff member welcomes each customer at the
door and insures that a visit at Candia Taverna is a memorable one. And to
the delight of the customers, each Friday and Saturday evening dancers
perform their Dance Oriental.
A SUMMER IN OTTAWA
IMVIKSIl YOF Oil AViA  IMS? I ND1KGRADIA IF SIMMER RFSFARCH SCHOLARSHIPS
For students who foresee a career in research, the Summer Research Scholarships will provide
research experience with leading Canadian scientific investigators in one of the fields listed
below.
VALUE: S1,200 (minimum)/ month. Travel allowance
DURATION:    3-4   months   (May-August)    1985
Reasonable on-campus accommodation
REQUIREMENTS: Canadian or permanent resident. Permanent address outside of immediate
Ottawa/Hull area (Ottawa/Hull residents should
apply for a summer award, such as NSERC, which is
tenable at the University of Ottawa)- Full-time
undergraduate students with excellent standing;
priority given to 3rd year students (2nd year in the
Province of Quebec).
PARTICIPATING   DEPARTMENTS
Anatomy
Biochemistry
Biology
Chemistry
(icography  t physical!
Geology
Kinanthropology
Mathematics
Computer Science      Microbiology
ENGINEERING
Chemical
Civil
Electrical
Mechanical
Physics
Physiology
Psychology  (experimental)
Systems Science
Forward the required information together with your most recent and complete university era
script before November 15, 19X4 to the address below. Also request a reference from one profess
sent to the same address by November   15,   1984
1985 Summer Research Scholarships, School of Graduate Studies and Research,
University of Ottawa, Ottawa. Ont. KIN 6N5" Tel:  (61 M 2^1-*>«()■*
APPLICATION PROCEDURE:
Name 	
Rum flavoured
Wine dipped
Crack a pack of Colts
along with the cards. Friday, October 26, 1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
Film mocks lifestyle realistically
By LARRY McCALLUM
An old street, quiet in the late
night. Neon reflects in the glistening
pavement. As the theme music
"plays and the credits roll, a laughing
crowd spills out of Eve's Bar and
begins to dance with freedom and
flair, evoking a high-spirited, casual
elegance as they move never too
close, never too far apart.
Thus the tone and the drift of
Choose Me are neatly established at
the outset. Made on a shoe string
(under $1 million) partly as a vehicle
to launch Teddy Pendergrass's new
R and B album of the same, Choose
Me succeeds as an appealing and
highly original film in its own right.
It pokes fun at its urban nighttime characters as it does at film
noir, yet retains a fondness for
both, it's important to be aware of
this self-mocking quality, because
the film moves on a relentless current of verbal and visual gags and
parodies.
Choose Me
Directed by Alan Rudolph
At the Ridge Theatre
The dialogue is clever, the plot is
brisk. The characters weave in and
out of each other's lives by absurd
coincidences. But one must not expect mere realism from Choose Me.
Its offbeat humor comes largely
from a pervasive and very up-front
display of artifice. Many scenes
have a feeling much like modern
surrealist theatre. (At one point
Genevieve Bujold's welling emotional crisis snaps off at the ring of
the telephone.)
Two of the characters in the central love triangle are themselves
quite unreal. Mickey is a drifter and
mental hospital escapee who lives
life to its limits. A pathological romantic, he wants to marry every
woman he's attracted to. He talks
of his past as though he were telling
outrageous lives for fun. The fun,
for us, is that his past is disturbingly
real.
Dr. Nancy Love has a phone-in
radio show for the lovelorn. But,
like the unfortunate hero in Death
In Venice, she's too academic, having always avoided emotional involvement. When Mickey draws her
out of this shell she becomes hilariously confused.
Eve is more real and sympathetic.
She runs the jazzy bar where much
of the action takes place. She is very
sexually active, but we can sense her
frustrated desire when she confesses, "All my men are the right
man."
The "resolution" of these dilemmas is a beautiful pastiche of all
resolutions, the most absurd of
happy endings.
Dirctor Alan Rudolph, a protege
of Robert Altman, has given free
reign to his actors, and the performances are quite inspired. As Mickey,
Keith Carradine lends just the right
undercurrent of sexuality and intense fatalism to an otherwise buoyant persona.
Genevieve Bujold's cerebral
aloofness is well suited to the character of Dr. Love. And when the
role demands it, she manages to
quake and explode with humor.
And Leslie Ann Warren runs the
gamut of emotion convincingly.
Who cares if the mascara runs
too perfectly? From the pink and
blue neon credits down to every detail of the trendy-gorgeous clothes
and interiors, Choose Me, is a
highly stylized film and does not
have pretensions of realism. The
viewer's perceptions are freely included in the tongue-in-cheek artifice and cliche.
A Frenchman fumes, "First he
sleeps with my wife — OK, I can
understand, I'm French. . ." But
when sincere emotion surfaces, it
does so unambiguously, for all it
may be part of a larger irony.
There's no credibility gap in Choose
Me.
The visual flair and polish, the
pastel-chic and liberal use of mood-
heightening devices, are not mere
audience manipulation. Choose
Me is an esthetic statement with a
warm appreciation of the styles it
mocks.
There's a measure of shrewd so-
perm - $29        color $15 (henna cellophane)
Campus Cuts   *8cm
hair cutting for men and women
5736 university blvd.      228-1471
open 7 days
STUDENT DISCOUNTS AND
SAME DAY SERVICE
SAVE 20% &
SAME DAY SERVICE
AT THE.
WESTERN OPTICAL EYE LAB
With your prescription and
STUDENT I.D. CARD -
ChOOSe ANY FRAME
IN OUR STOCK.
WESTERN OPTICAL
 EYE LAB	
Mon.-Fri. 8:30-5:00
2nd & Burrard
(1742 w. 2nd Ave.)
731-9112
cial comment, but Choose Me is
never hardened or cynical. Though
most of the characters affect a jaded resilience they remain transparently vulnerable.
Choose Me has a certain under
standing of human foibles and
longings. It retains a fondness for
the lifestyle it pokes fun at, and a
conviction that human relations,
however problematic, are what we
live for. Only a little discretion is
needed, and a reduction of the confusing uncertainties, for these to be
worthwhile.
Choose Me is worthwhile. It's sophisticated fun. Best to catch it before it's degraded by any cult
followings.
Acting spoils plays direction
By DAVE HARPER
George Riley is not unemployed,
he's an inventor ... or at least
that's what he'd like the world to
think.
Riley (Sid Jenner) is the central
character in Tom Stoppard's tragic
comedy, Enter a Free Man.
The play is set somewhere in London's East End circa I960. Riley,
his wife Persephone (Jessica van der
Veen), and his daughter Linda
(Nikki Sharp), live in a house inherited from his father. In fact, he
could have had his father's business
as well, but opted for the life of a
"free man" (an inventor). Support
comes first from his wife and later
from his daughter who keeps his
head above water with weekly 10
shilling notes.
Enter a Free Man
written by Tom Stoddard
directed by Beth French
at the Dorothy Somerset Studio
Of course he's not "free" at all
except from the trappings of employment. Caught in a vicious circle:- idea, jubilance, application,
failure, sullenness, ideas ... he has
no way out save a brilliant idea. But
brilliant ideas don't come to people
like George Riley. He is admirable
because he upholds his philosophy,
defends his way of life, and endures
the pains of the human condition.
Persephone accepting his philosophy encourages Riley and his ridiculous ideas from the start. "If he
was going to be a failure anyway, he
was better off failing at something
he wanted to succeed at," she exclaims. So she goes about life meticulously cleaning and caring for
Riley.
Linda continually taunts and
questions her father, attempting to
persuade him into a more normal
lifestyle. Frustrated, she wonders
whal: "dad" is like at the local pub
— his home away from home — in
more ways than one. "There's two
of everyone," says Linda ". . .and
if the two of him's the same, I mean
if he's the same in the pub as he is
with us, then he's had it." Well,
he's had it.
Riley visits the corner pub regularly — usually after telling Persephone he's leaving her. The locals
include Able, a seaman (pun intended), Carmen the barman (Riley's
own rhyme), Brown, a textbook
salesman, and Harry (Stephen
Courtenay), a sly horse-better, who
feeds on Riley's excited delusions to
satisfy his own cruel sense of
humor.
Tom Stoddard is a great modern
playwright and his is an extremely
funny play. But its performance at
the Dorothy Somerset Studio left
me somewhat disappointed. Director Beth French did her best with
the talent at hand and the result is a
play that works poorly. The general
delivery of the lines created problems in the well directed play.
Sid Jenner gave at best a mediocre performance marked by unnatural posturing that at times suggested he was simply reading his
lines rather than performing them.
Occasionally his ability swelled, allowing the audience to feel the ever-
changing emotions of his character.
The shining performance was delivered by Nikki Sharp. She spoke
the only lines that elicited a laugh
from the audience. Her only fault
was her fading accent during the
second act.
The play had its bright moments
and its dim ones due to the uneven
performances by the cast. Many of
the best lines seemed to get lost in
the  shuffle.
All this aside, the script itself and
a few fine acting performances
make Enter a Free Man a worthwhile diversion.
Levis
501
Legendary
Red Tab
Button Fly Jean
Now Available
Work (/ Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 26,1984
Traffic 'randomly' ticketing
I found a "Traffic Offence
Notice" left on my vehicle Oct. 17.
My parking sticker, according to
what I was told at time of purchase,
entitles me to park in B-lot. When I
arrived at UBC on the 17th, the
marked spaces in B-lot were all occupied; however, there were no
signs, or yellow lines, anywhere indicating parking is prohibited on
margins, out of the way of other
vehicles.
1 parked at the end of a line of
cars, making sure there were two
lanes between my vehicle and the
curb. I had witnessed, daily, many
other vehicles parking wherever
room permitted, without penalty,
as long as traffic wasn't blocked.
Often vehicles are parked where
they are a nuisance. No ticket
results. I can only assume some
unusual form of behavior modification, possibly intermittent negative
reinforcement.
The department of traffic and
security is randomly ticketing unfortunate vehicle owners who have
nowhere else to park just often
enough to keep them coming back.
Traffic and security has obviously sold more parking permits than
there are parking spaces! May I suggest ticketing only vehicles that do
not have permits or are obstructing
traffic.
I have asked the department to
refund the cost of my permit ($24);
not a trivial sum in this time of
restraint. I'll pay my $10 fine, and
have $f4 left to pay for parking or
bus fare to get to university.
Who can afford to pay $10
everytime you run out of assigned
parking spaces?
Steven Gray
graduate studies
PANGO PANGO (UNS) —
Island dictator Marginal Copper
has been keeping an official
"enemies' list," it was learned today.
The list so far includes Daily Blah
reporters Victorious Warmonger
and Libby Beans.
University of British Columbia
FREDERIC
WOOD
THEATRE
presents .
TWELFTH NIGHT
By Wm. Shakespeare
Directed by Pamela Hawthorn
NOVEMBER 9 - 17
(Previews - November 7 & 8)
Curtain: 8:00 p.m.
Matinees/ 13th & 15th at 12:30 p.m.
Student Tickets - $4.50
Previews/ 2 for the price of 1 Regular admission
BOX OFFICE    •    FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE    *    Room 207
Support Your Campus Theatre
?:v
■?*-
BEST GAS FUEL ECONOMY IN CANADA!
It's here! The newest Chevy way to go—
Sprintin' in the all-new Chevy Sprint.
Sprint gets the best gas fuel economy
in Canada*. A downright incredible
4.4 L/100 km on regular gas to keep sprintin'
by the gas pumps.
Sprint is the quick-shifting 5-speed that
sprints through traffic. From 0-80 km in a slick
9.9 seconds.
Sprint is the front-drive that sprints with
road-hugging, road-sensitive joy. Sure-footed in
rain or snow.
Sprint is the technologically innovative
3-cylinder with overhead high-rewing cam. All
the engine zip to sprint through country like a
sports car
Sprint sports MacPherson-strut front
suspension plus rack-and-pinion steering to
sprint through corners.
Sprint turns full-circle in just 9.2 metres.
Agility that makes it a breeze to sprint in and out
of tiny parking spots.
Sprint is roomy enough for four
Sprint's back seat folds down, so it's got
hatchback cargo space galore! Up to 513 litres.
Sprint comes equipped with 31 standard
features. Plus so much more, at a price so low,
you can't afford to wait—especially since supply
is limited.
So see Sprint at your Chevy dealer now.
Go Sprintin'!
■0&H
0$f^f
The New Chevy Sprint. From $59851
•Combined fuel eeononu sonsumptlun rating based on Iransporl Canada test methods lor The Mi Chevy Sprint shown equipped with 1 0 Lure [.I engine and s-speed manual transmission Other (,M produsIs excluded      ;M s K I' Dealer tr.a. sell li Friday, October 26, 1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 9
Mucous globs litter walk
Gray. An odd colour, especially when you consider that we render it from Mock ink. Is this an im-
jSpssibility? According to tne laws of physics black is the one colour which absorbs alt of the light »pec-
:'*mm, as demonstrated by the principles of Mack holes In space. Tina, it is trnposeWetopulteny colour
out of Week, or create a colour from bleck. Yet here al The Ubyssey we have done precisely that. The
only possible conclusion Is that The Ubyssey is not manufactured in a black hole, the appearance of
SJJS241K notwithstanding.
You step out of the safe, warm
corridors of Buchanan into the cold
afternoon air and behold, there it is
again. Some disgusting neophyte
has deposited another glob of
mucous on the walk in front of you.
Your first reaction is one of extreme
disgust, as you proceed gingerly to
step around this atrocity.
This scene is no doubt familiar to
you, and brings back many
memories of close calls with this
horrible substance we call spit. Spitting has recently become an increasingly popular bad habit employed
by many people. It is one of the
most disgusting of all the habits we
people become addicted to.
Spit is comprised mainly of
saliva, mixed with residues from the
membranes of our nose. When we
contract a cold, these membranes
We want your letters. They must
be typed, triple-spaced on a
70-space line. We edit for grammar
and brevity, and do not accept sexist or racist letters. And don't forget
that "Dear Sir" went out at The
Ubyssey years ago, but the letters
editor becomes overjoyed when she
sees a letter addressed to the "Dearest editorial collective."
excrete a greater amount of this
mucous, which trickles down our
throat and causes slight discomfort.
Anyway, enough of the gory
details, the point is that certain people of the human race decide to expel this built up mucous through
their mouths in the form of spit.
This 'spit' is placed strategically on
public walkways for unsuspecting
people to step in. You may ask why
people insist on doing this. It is
because they are no more than
disgusting slobs.
UBC could well do without these
slobs who enjoy making life hard
for the rest of us people who have
to dodge these slimy secretions.
Graeme Silvera
arts 1
UBC RUGBY
HALLOWEEN
DANCE
with
SECRET SERVICE
Sat. Oct. 27 8:00 p.m.
SUB Ballroom
Tickets: $5.00
AMS Box Office or Players
YUKON JACK ATTACK 5
The Walrus Bite.
Temper Vi ounce Tequila
with orange juice over ice.
Fire in 1 ounce Yukon Jack
* 1$ t0 ?ive t'le Walrus its bite,
ft X^ And you thought
^    Walruses didn't have teeth,
(tusk, tusk, tusk). Inspired
in the wild, midst the damnably cold, this, the black
sheep of Canadian liquors, is
Yukon Jack.
Yxkonjack
The black sheep erf Canadian liquors. Concocted with fine Canadian Whisky.
•*.        *        *        *
*•'••*        *        • •
*   LovE -
*:',■   ®   .,*
*?QuicheS  *
at
AAr
SCXJP/SAIAD
QUICHE
$5.95
/a\
*              Ewiyday ,./
/                 from .■/
y            5:30 • 7:30 /
;u ( at the back of the Village ) T^-, '
Cm* caffe ristorante
*Cin
*   * *  italiano
2090 Alma St.     (corner of W. 5th Ave.)
To celebrate our first anniversary and to introduce
you to the best CAPPUCINO and ESPRESSO
west of Rome.
WE ARE HOLDING A CAPPUCINO WEEK
only 99£ with this ad
Breakfast, Brunch, Lunch & Dinner
Open 10 a.m. 'till midnight
Closed Monday
$&"
«J*
S*S^
vxC
(P
HOTKL
VANCOUVER B.C.
Good to October 31,1984
Present your student card for this special offer. Page 10
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 26, 1984
TODAY
BALLET UBC JAZZ
More registration, SUB 216E, noon.
EAST INDIAN STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Floor hockey, gym F, 5:30-7:30 p.m; pizza and
video night, SUB 215, 8:30 p.m.
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Bake sale, SUB concourse, noon.
UBC DANCE CLUB
Special mambo class (first of three), SUB ballroom, noon.
UBC SCIENCE FICTION SOCIETY
Hallowe'en dinner and theatre sports, Cisco's
restaurant, 8 p.m.
AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL UBC
Bzzr garden, everyone welcome, Buch lounge,
4:30-7:30 p.m.
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Oktoberfest, Lutheran Campus Centre, 8 p.m.
AMS CYCLING CLUB
Novice racing clinic, two hour lecture, one hour
ride, non-members $5, SUB 215, 10 a.m.
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Bzzr garden: pre-Haliowe'en bash and fundraiser, SUB 205, 3-7 p.m.
NEWMAN CATHOLIC CLUB
Hallowe'en dance — disc jockey, wear costume,
$3 non-members, S2 members, tickets at the
door, St. Mark's College, 8 p.m.
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Tower of disguise costume dance. Sears tower
observation deck, 8:00 p.m. to 1:00 a.m.
ROCKERS
General meeting, SUB 213, noon.
STUDENTS FOR PEACE
AND MUTUAL DISARMAMENT
Talk on verification of arms control by Gary Marchant, SUB 205, noon.
CHARISMATIC CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
YWAM — drama presentation, Toymaker and
Son, SUB plaza, noon.
THUNDERBIRD SOCCER
Women's Canada West tournament, defending
champion UBC plays Saskatchewan at 12 p.m.,
at O.J. Todd field.
THUNDERBIRD FOOTBALL
UBC versus league leading Alberta, Thunderbird
stadium, 7:30 p.m.
THUNDERBIRD SOCCER
Men attempt to wrap up Canada West title with
victory over Alberta, 2 p.m., O.J. Todd field.
UNDERCOVER UBC
Pick up photo assignments,  SUB  119,   noon.
Last chance.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
Conversation   slide  show,   noon.   International
House.
INTRAMURALS
Horseback riding, organizational meeting, noon,
War Memorial gym, noon.
GRADUATE STUDENT SOCIETY
Hallowe'en   costume  ball,   everyone  welcome,
grad centre ballroom, 8 p.m.
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Bzzr garden: pre-Hallowe'en bash, SUB 211, 3-7
p.m.
ANAD OF GREATER VANCOUVER
Support group for Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia
sufferers, Brock Hall 223, noon.
INTRAMURALS
Great Pumpkin fun run, SUB plaza, 12:35 p.m.
INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR
STUDENTS OF ECONOMICS
AND COMMERCE
Selling Canada Savings Bonds,  SUB 230E, all
day.
SATURDAY
VARSITY WOMEN'S FIELD HOCKEY
Car   wash,  McDonald's restaurant at Terminal
and Main, 11-4 p.m.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Pianists workshop, $2.50 for Saturday and Sunday, 1:30-3:00 p.m. SUB partyroom, 1:30-3:00
p.m.
THUNDERBIRD SOCCER
Women's Canada West tournament, defending
champ UBC plays Alberta at 10 a.m. and Victoria
at 2 p.m.
SUNDAY
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Pianists workshop, $2.50 Saturday and Sunday, SUB
partyroom, 1:30-3:00 p.m.
THUNDERBIRD SOCCER
Women's Canada West tournament, UBC versus Calgary, 9 p.m., tiebreaker at 1 p.m. if
necessary, O.J. Todd field.
MONDAY
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration, SUB 216E, noon.
FIRST YEAR STUDENTS' COMMITTEE
Meeting, SUB 119, noon.
WORLD UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF CANADA
John Willcocks speaks on:  Comments on the
Black   Struggle  in   South  Africa,   Buch  B214,
noon.
INTERNATIONAL VOLLEYBALL
UBC women host Zhe-Jiang provincial team
from China including Chinese ex-internationals,
Notre Dame Senior School, 8 p.m.
SAVE OUR SCHOOLS
BENEFIT DANCE
THE VILLAINS
THE QUESTIONAIRES
THE RESTRAINTOIDS
NOV. 2, 8:00 p.m.
COMMADORE BALLROOM
TICKETS $10.00
$6.00 for the unemployed
at all VTC outlets and
AMS Box Office
SPONSORED BY CO.P.E.
Burger & Bear Nights
THE KEG
595 Hornby
687^)044
Two For One
Burger's
Plus
Student Prices
Every
Wed/Thurs.
84/85
581 Hornby
681-8611
PRESENT YOUR I.D. CARD, IN THE
COUPON SECTION OF INSIDE UBC BOOK
FOR YOUR GOOD TIMES
MANAGE YOUR CAREER
WITH A
ROCI
M t the University of Rochester's Graduate
School of Management you can manage your career
with a highly respected M.B.A.
With our wide variety of financial aid and loan programs,
you can manage your finances, too.
So, take charge, and manage your way to a
top quality management education.
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, CALL TOLL FREE:
From anywhere in the U.S.
outside N.Y. State call:
1-800-621-0095
From within N.Y. State call:
1-800-462-0073
Call toll free during these hours:
Monday-Friday    8:30 a.m.-   5:00 p.m.
Tuesday    5:00 p.m. - 10:00 p.m.
Saturday 10:00 a.m. -   2:00 p.m.
THE UNIVERSITY OF ROCHESTER
GRADUATE SCHOOL OF MANAGEMENT
Rochester, NY 14627
Any undergraduate major can qualify you as an M.B.A. candidate.
tftfFpfte*
Attention, all law students. There is a general
meeting today at noon in Law 101-102. The discussion
will be on Law library hour cuts and what can be done
to reinstate former hours.
wTHE CLASSIFIEDS'
RATES: AMS Card Holders - 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; additional
lines, 60c. Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $4.50 additional lines, .70c. Additional days, $4.00 and .65c.
Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 10:30 a. m.
day before publication.
Publications Room 266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
the
Charge Phone Orders over $10.00. Call 228-3977.
COMING EVENTS
THE VANCOUVER INSTITUTE
Free Public Lecture
DR. BENOIT MANDELBROT
IBM Thomas J. Watson
Research Centre
THE FRACTAL COSMOS: NEW
SHAPES IN THE SCIENCES
AND IN ART
Lecture Hail 2, Woodward Bldg.
Saturday, Oct. 27 at 8:15 p.m.
11 - FOR SALE - Private
WANTED TO BUY!! Old records: scratched
or unscratched. Call Al before 9 a.m. or
Sat. all day 228-0995.
1985 SALOMON. SX91 boots, never used
$275. Dynastar MV5 210 cm with Look
NR99, $275. Dynastar OME glass 207 cm
• with Look NR99, $275. Either with poles
N/C. Full package: goots, skis, bindings &
poles, $500. ph: Bill 731-6037.
15 - FOUND
PRESCRIPTION GLASSES on sidewalk
near road in front of UBC "Village" stores
(Pharmacy). Identity 733-2198.
FOUND NEAR BLOT. Oct. 23, one key on
ring. Loser phone 222-2595 to identify.
20 - HOUSING
FOR RENT: Bach, basement suite, on King
Edward bus route. Ph. Penny or George at
874-2891 aft. 5 p.m.
RM-MATE WANTED to share 2-bdrm apt.
on 10th Ave. 1 block from gates. Avail, im-
med. (19-22) preferred. Call 224-6688.
HOW ABOUT SHARED OWNERSHIP IN
A HOME? Look into owning a home with a
friend or friends. Contact me for how it
works; I have prepared very workable
details - better than renting. Good choice of
2 to 5 br. homes. Elizabeth Hopkins
943-5955 Block Brothers Realty 943-7441.
25 - INSTRUCTION	
LSAT, GMAT, MCAT preparation. Call
National Testing 738-4618. Please leave
message on tape if manager is counselling
LEARN TO BOX
come out & visit us
At The Point Grey
Boxing Club
Mon. 5:30-7:30
Wed. 7:30-9:30
Room 203 Armouries
30 - JOBS
NEED HELP to care for elderly gentleman in
UBC extended care. Please call Julie aft. 6
p.m. 224-7631.
AMS   FOOD   &   BEVERAGE   DEPT.   is
currently accepting resumes for P/T
employment in the PIT Pub & Gallery
Lounge. Applic. forms avail, in AMS
Business Office. Please submit resume &
application form to AMS Bus. Off. SUB rm
266.
35 - LOST
LOST FRI. OCT. 19:
mond   ring.   SUB.
224-7259.
Blue Lapis Gold Dia-
Sentimental.   Reward
REWARD: Lost on campus, Friday Oct. 19.
Large red fox pin. Great sentimental value.
Please call 733-1005.
40 - MESSAGES
DOES ANYONE HAVE a video cassette
of "Hiroshima Mon Amour" or "Last Year
at Marienbad"? Please phone Drew at
738-8315 or 266-2433. Thank you.
DO YOU HAVE an alcohol problem? A.A.
meeting on campus. 873-8466.
LIZ - HAPPY BIRTHDAY
Was that the 32nd!!
RB & PM
70 - SERVICES
MODE COLLEGE of Hairdressing & Barber-
ing. For students with ID, body wave from
$17. 601 West Broadway (B'way Plazal
874-0633.
85 - TYPING
TYPING — Fast, accurate, reasonable rates
734-8451.
WORD PROCESSING $1.50/PG (DS)
CRWR major - Winona Kent 438-6449
located in south Burnaby.
EXPERT TYPING. Essays, term papers,
factums, letters, manuscripts, resumes,
theses, IBM Selectric II, reasonable rates.
Rose 731-9857.
WORD   PROCESSING   SPECIALIST.   All
jobs,  year around student rates,  on King
Edward route. 879-5108.
WORD WEAVERS - word processing.
Student rates, fast turnaround, bilingual
5670 Yew St. at 41st 266-6814.
YOUR WORDS PROFESSIONALLY
TYPED - TO GO. Judith Filtness, 3206
W. 38th Ave., Van. 263-0351 (24 hrs.). Fast
and reliable.
WORD    PROCESSING    SPECIALIST.    U
write, we type theses, resumes, letters,
essays. Days, evenings, weekends.
736-1208.
WORD PROCESSING (Micom). Student
rates $14/hr. Equation typing avail, ph
Jeeva 876-5333.
WORD PROCESSING 90c/pg. Dot matrix
$1/pg Daisywheel. Mon-Fri. Pick-up on
campus. Spelling correction. Call 433-0167.
TYPING WITH EXPERTISE. 1.25/pg ds
Prof, quality; university exper. with
resumes, essays, term papers. Joan
299-4986 in Kitsilano.
MINIMUM NOTICE REQUIRED. Typing
essays & resumes. Spelling corrected
733-3676.
EXCELLENT TYPING English, French,
German, Italian; editing English. Verses for
special occasions/cards. UBC references.
Good rates. 734-1081.
DOTS WORD PROCESSING offers reason
able rates for students for term papers,
essays & masters. 273-6008 eves.
WORD PROCESSING by Adina. Discount
for all student work. 10th & Discovery.
Phone 222-2122.
EXPERT TYPING from legible work. Essays,
theses. Spelling, grammar corrected.
738-6829 10 am - 9 pm King Ed. Bus Rte.
WORD PROCESSING
SERVICES
DA YS/NIGHTS/ WEEKENDS
Spelling & Grammar
Expertise
Marpole Area
Reasonable Rates.
NANCY
266-1768 Friday, October 26,1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 11
HcvU6
SUBfilms (SUB auditorium, 228-3697):
Romancing the Stone, Oct. 25-28, 7 p.m., Fri.
and Sat. at 7 and 9 p.m.; Andy Warhol's
Frankenstein, Oct. 31-Nov. 4, 9:30 p.m.; The
Rocky Horror Picture Show, Oct. 31-Nov. 4, 7
p.m.
Cinema 16 (SUB auditorium, 228-3698I:
Pourquoi Pas?, Oct. 29, 6:30 and 8:30 p.m.
Pacific Cinematheque (1155 W. Georgia
St., 732-6119): a Tribute to Al Sens, Oct. 27,
7:30 p.m.; New Canadian Animation, Oct. 27,
9:30 p.m.; L'Amarcord, Oct. 31, 7:30 p.m.
Vancouver East Cinema 17th Ave. & Commercial Drive, 253-5455): Cannes 1982 International Advertising Film Festival, and Venice
1983 International Film Festival, Oct. 26-28,
7:30 and 9:30 p.m.; Abel Gance's Napoleon,
Oct. 29 & 30, 7:30 p.m.; Time for Revenge,
Oct. 31-Nov. 1, 7:30 p.m.
Studio Cinema (919 Granville St., 681-3847):
Rocky Horror Picture Show, Oct. 26, midnight; Clash/Rude Boy, Oct. 27, midnight;
West Side Story, Oct. 25 and 28, noon and 2
p.m.; The Black Stallion Returns, Oct. 27, 7
p.m.
Ridge Theatre (3131 Arbutus St., 738-6311):
Choose Me, nightly, 7:15 and 9:X p.m.
The Place Where The Mammals Die: Kits
House Hall,  until  Nov.  3,   Wed.-Sun.  8:30
p.m., 736-3588.
Da: a sugary Irish comedy written by Hugh
Leanard, best play of 1978, until Nov. 3, 8:30
p.m., 980-5552.
Suspect: a you-dun-it game of murder, by
the people who bring us Theatresports, 8:30
p.m., 688-1436.
Ain't Misbehaving: another great musical at
the Arts Club Revue Theatre, until Nov. 3,
8:30 p.m. until Nov. 10.
Overnight Exposure: Vancouver's late night
live talk show,  Friday nights at 11:00 p.m.,
Arts  Club  Revue Theatre,   Granville  Island,
687-5313.
Passion: Peter Nicholas Canadian premiere.
Arts Club Granville Island, 8:30 p.m.
Cloud 9: a play of multiple genitals and other
comical parts, at the Waterfront on Granville
Island, 8:30 p.m., 873-3311.
Blithe Spirit: an occult discovery by Vagabond Players, 433-4308.
Faust: Theatre Space production of Goethe's
Faust opens Oct. 25, The New York Theatre,
681-0872.
Season's Greetings: a comedy by Alan
Ayckbourn at Studio 58, until Oct. 28,
324-5227.
Bruhanski Theatre Studio: ongoing
weekend performance space, presents Sweet
Eros by Terence McNally and Home Free by
Lanford Wilson until Nov. 4, 879-2080.
Suicide in B b: a new wave/film noir comedy
abut a crime that may not have happened,
SFU Theatre Oct. 30, 12:30, free, Oct.
31-Nov. 3 and Nov. 7-10 at 8:00 p.m. $2,
students $1.
The Pied Piper, Carousel Theatre: 10th anniversary production, a musical morality adventure. From Nov. 10 to Dec. 29, 688-5306.
Terra Nova Playhouse: starting Nov. 2. Antarctic explorer despairs while freezing to
death. Understandable.
The Peal Talking People Show: begins
Nov. 2 at Tamahnous Theatre. Found theatre
from Vancouver's streets, set to music,
254-1911.
Billy Bee, King of the Hive: musical political
satire at the North Van Centennial Theatre,
Nov. 2, 3, 4. Call Vancouver Tipket Centre.
Twelfth Night: Shakespeare's most festive
comedy, at Freddie Wood, Nov. 7 through 17.
Enter A Free Man: by the author of Rosen-
crantz and Guildenstern are Dead, at the Dorothy Somerset Studio, UBC, until Oct. 28.
Startle The World: conflict of contemplation
and action, at the New Play Centre, Oct. 28.
The Place Where The Mammals Die: Kits
House Hall, until Nov. 3, Wed.-Sun. 8:30
p.m., 736-3588.
The Late Blumer: left over hippy dippy love
meets the sexual eighties. Arts Club Theatre,
Seymour St. until Oct. 27, 687-5313.
The second Annual Vancouver Dance
Week is taking place Oct. 28-Nov. 4: dance
lovers celebrating Vancouver's diverse dance
community. Live performances at the Vancouver East Cultural Centre, The Firehall Theatre and Main Dance Place will be staggered
through the week, as well as a film series at
Food shortage*.?!
J^rtofrUNt t<ce\lenT Eote™.  1^ u^ ^ev.
Vyxxt. O. Surplus. So for Hit wxov^ of    <    ?
November, tt\e*)V& <\wma a\*<vu
burners for a buc£ \ess. /Vo uou
_owt neeo a oewe*. m aasWovSmu
Vo v-eMvT.e. TW^txMe. Hxe: \jevu bes?
\*\ Vt*wv\ . So c^rv^W tow* H KJcVs        x
liaboodles
-the one stop
witch & pirate
shop . . .
Swashbuckle by for:
• noses, ears, hands & other assorted
body parts •  bats  •  spider webbing
• glow in the dark masks & face paint
• black nail polish • orange jelly
beans • black balloons and gross
grotesqueries • witch  hats & capes
• pirate hooks & patches
4462 W. 10th Ave.  • 224-5311
Open Thurs. & Fri. eve. Et Sun. aft.
the National Film Board, dance photography
at the Firehall Theatre Gallery and the VECC
Gallery.
Dancemakers: some of the finest from nationally renowned choreographers, James
Kudelka, Karen Jamieson Rimmer, and Carol
Anderson, Oct. 26, 27. 8:30 p.m. VECC,
251-1363.
La Groupe de la Place Royale: explores
many disciplines to create total theatre, Oct.
25-27, Paula Ross Dance Studio, 732-5332.
The Warehouse Show: that's right, a ware
house filled with art stuff, an event that is cur-
ated and juried. More than 200 local visual artists, scheduled concerts, performance art,
video tapes and films, panel discussion and
lectures, Nov. 3-30, 12-8 p.m./Wed -Sun.,
522 Beatty St., 732-6783.
Juggernaut Tableau: new paintings from
Vancouver, Calgary and Halifax, by Jack
Niven, David Janzen, Derek Dennett, The
Phoenix Gallery, 2066 W. 4th, 732-7135,
Nov. 2-25.
John O'Brien: Canada's foremost marine
painter in oil. J. C. Heywood: Fourteen Recent Prints of ideas layered with ink,
silkscreen, lithography and intaglio techniques, Oct. 24-Nov. 25, Burnaby Art Gallery.
6344 Gilpin St. 291-9441.
Whoop de-do-a: Gary Young, Vancouver
based artist, graphic designs, screen prints,
originals, designer of the Carnegie logo, until
Nov. 2, Carnegie Centre. 401 Main.
HUrilC
Jim Chivers and Friends: hot, whooh really
hot jazz, Nov. 4, Classical Joint, 231 Carrall,
689-0667.
Anner Bylsma: performing Bach's complete
cello suites, Nov. 2-3, UBC Recital Hall.
Images In Vogue/Fabulon: hey you neuro-
romantic hipsters, get your costumes on, you
may not even have to change, and have a
swell time at this Hallowe'en bash, Oct. 27,
Commodore.
FRASER ARMS HOTEL
1450 S. W. MARINE DR.
WE JUST MIGHT
PAY FOR YOUR
X-MAS HOLIDAY
NOT ONLY DOES THIS COUPON
GET YOU IN FREE OF CHARGE,
BUT GIVE IT TO THE DOOR GIRL
COMPLETELY FILLED OUT AND
ON   DEC.   8,  WE  COULD   DRAW
your name and you could
win $500.00
NOW WOULDN'T THAT MAKE
YOUR X-MAS MERRY?
Name	
Address	
Phone No	
Postal Code	
HALLOWEEN
ir BIRTWDAV
O*     BA5W
NO COVER CHARGE ('I vou^aracoslume)
LOTS OF BIRTHDAY CAKE
COSTUME CONTEST (trips to Vetera)
the BC. LIONS cream WmMQ
on our 15ft screehSaturday S3C£
mWmWi
Milltown Pub's
Oktoberfest Monday,
Oct. 29 through Wed.
Oct. 31. Don't miss
Tuesdays great Pie
Eating Contest.
Beverage & luncheon
specials.
Tuesday's Comedy
Night at Chasers
ti&
safes*
«5*-
The most practical compac. ready-reference
book for all your needs It's an original, a
12-month daily diary, address and telephone
book, birthday book, recorc of all your credit
cards, emergency notification data and an
automobile accident form.
Lots of room for quick reference telephone
numbers, calories and carbohydrates'
counts, metric conversion charts,
emergency numbers, personal data and
more!
The ultimate "Little Black Book" has
removable pages for complete details of the
really SPECIAL PERSON(S) in your life.
When that person isn't special anymore —
remove the page, but keep your book
looking new.
SOMEDAY: THE WHEEL
MAY TAKE SECOND
PLACE TO THE
INVENTION OF "THE
EVERYTHING BOOK".
It's just $4 95 plus 35C sales tax
Available in Navy. Brown or Yellow
Actual size of the book is 3V* x 6".
Satisfaction guaranteed or your money
refunded.
i ORDER FORM
Tr* WKYTH.rV* &00K
Please mail _ copies @  $4 95 plus 351- sales tax
Check preferred color   □   Navy   □ Brown   Q  Yellow
Postal Code Telephone  _
I enclose a cheque or noney oidet payable to
THE EVERYTHING BOOK tor S 	
I Mail to: THE EVERYTHING BOOK, 704-535 Thurlow St.,
" Vancouver, B.C. V6E 3L2
Also available at University Book Stores. Page 12
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 26, 1984
Extra! Extra!
Newswriters new and old — famed and funky B.C. bureau
chief Erin Mullan will conduct a basic newswriting seminar today at
noon in SUB 241K. Now is your chance, all you cub reporters.
P.S. We need your help. It's your student paper.
T CHOICE PIZZA & CURRY HOUSE     '
2953A West 4th Ave.
738-1218
| O    *20% DISCOUNT ON ALL
^ FOOD ORDERS
£>                          FREE DELIVERY
■ ~ ""»                   For pick up order 10% off ■
|     •Eatinonly                                Eat in or Pick-up j
j Offer_expmBS No^-_3°_2f_ _J
do
oi
PWW'gWl'llM'l'tttl'tM'l'l'tH'iygggll'l
Expo'86
will be conducting interviews
on campus November 14-22
for Part-Time and Full-Time
employment effective January
15,1985. Appointments can be
arranged IN PERSON through
the Canada Employment Centre on campus (Rm 214, Brock
Hall) up to close of business on
October 30, 1984.
THE ANNUAL
AMS - EUS
HALLOWEEN DANCE
Featuring
GILT
FROM MONTREAL
OCT. 26th & 27th
The ARMORIES
Door 8 p.m.
$5 ADVANCE from AMS Box Office
or EUS Rep
Enter The Costume Contest $150 1st each nite
$100 2nd each nite
$50 3rd each nite
fcEEZE
i
i
<
i
i
i
i
i
i
Imagine
a roomfull
of life size beers,
dancing up a storm
no, you're not in
heaven, you are at
the
TOgqrCJludA  %
/   HALLOWEEN BEER     r
Trivia Party & Dance
Wed. Oct. 31 1984
9:00 - Midnight
*Best Costume
Two Tickets (front centre)
MICHAEL JACKSON
*More prizes *Dancing
'Details at 7^/tlSWi
3293 West 4th KITS
ph. 73-BEERS
CHICKEN WINGS (Hot and tangy)	
POTATO SKINS (With cheddar and bacon)
ZUCCHINI STICKS (With sour cream)	
HOT HOT RIBS (With B.B.Q. sauce)	
ESCARGOTS (With herbs & garlic butter) .
KALAMARI (Battered deep fried squid). . .
SALADS
MAPLE'S (With shrimp and garden vegetables) 4.95
GREEK(Feta freaks' favourite) 3.25
SPINACH 2.95
SELECTIONS
LAMB CHOPS (With fries or Greek salad) ... .7.95
STEAK SANDWICK (With fries or spaghetti) . . 6.95
MEDITERRANEAN STYLE CHICKEN 7.75
(With fries or spaghetti)
Open fTlon.-Thurs.
Fri. V Sot.
Sunday
11i30 a.m.-liOO a.m.
11:30 a.m.-2iOO am.
Ili30 a.m.-mldnlght
ON THE SIDE
HOMEMADE FRIES (Hot and crispy).
FRENCH ONION SOUP	
(Savoury and cheesy)
. 1.50
.2.50
PIZZA
ASSORTMENT OF WHOLE WHEAT PIZZAS
PASTA
BAKED LASAGNA (With meat sauce)
BAKED SPAGHETTI	
(With meat sauce and mushrooms)
.5.50
.5.50
DESSERTS
iiSK^i^!*    J*sjS!S^iyi5
FRESH CAKE
CHOCOLATE MOUSSE
Licenced

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0126992/manifest

Comment

Related Items