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Array APRIL 16,2015 | VOLUMEX
DICK BUTT SINCE!'  ~ // Page 2
FRIDAY ' 17
UNDIE RUN
10:30 P.M. @ NORTH SUB ENTRANCE
The Ski & Board club is hosting its sixth annual Undie Run. Join hundreds
of your scantily-clad peers in running around campus to have some fun and
relieve exam-period stress. Free
SATURDAY ' 18
OS    A
IiATIX
FIESTA
seviene
elverano...
FIESTA
8:00 P.M. @ KOERNER'S PUB
The Association of Latin American Students is hosting a Latin party where
you can show off all of your salsa and samba moves.
$8-10
SATURDAY ' 25
HOUSE PARTY
12:00-1:00 P.M. @ KOERNER'S PUB
Say goodbye to the school year atThe Calendar's House Party. Featuring live
music, hundreds of guests and loads of dancing, it's a great opportunity to
bid farewell to your friends before they go home for the summer. $5-10
ON
THE
COVER
Thanks to Robin Velghefor the art
inspiration.
- Illustration NickAdams
Want to see your events listed here?
Email your events listings to
ourcampus@ubyssey.ca.
<*w
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UBYSSE
\JTHE
Y
APRIL16.2015 | VOLUMEXCVI | ISSUE Llll
EDITORIAL
STAFF
BUSINESS
CONTACT
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OUR CAMPUS //
ONEONONE^
SUES
_EANDBUILDINGSTHAT
=HOTO CHERIHAN HASSUN/THE UBYSSEY
Dauvergne will take over as Dean of UBC Law in July.
For incoming dean Catherine Dauvergne, law is order
Austen Erhardt
Opinions & Blog Editor
"The first thing we do, let's kill
all the lawyers." This oft-quoted
line from Shakespeare's Henry
VI is reflective of many people's
attitudes toward the legal profession. Despite the popularity of TV
dramas such as Law £t Order and
Suits, the public perception of one
ofthe world's oldest professions
is far from unanimously positive.
UBC's incoming Dean of Law,
Catherine Dauvergne, hopes to
change that perception.
Dauvergne is currently a professor of immigration law at UBC's
Allard School of Law, and, in July,
will be taking over the role of dean.
Dauvergne grew up in Edmonton, and did her bachelor's degree
at Carleton University, studying
French literature and political
science, later pursuing a master's
degree in the latter subject at the
same university instead of directly
entering law school.
"The advice that I got at that
time and that I would still give
to people is, 'do another degree
before you consider law and do
something that you really want,
because you don't know if you'll
like law school... so do something
kind of fun," said Dauvergne.
After five years of working as a
civil servant and teaching English
in Japan, Dauvergne enrolled in
UBC Law.
"I had thought a little bit about
law before then, but I'm not sure
how hard I thought about it. I
didn't grow up in a family with
any lawyers, I didn't know anyone
who was a lawyer," said Dauvergne.
Dauvergne wrote the LSAT
during her undergrad and scored
in the 99th percentile. When she
enrolled at UBC she was still
somewhat uncertain regarding
whether or not law was a career
that she wanted to pursue.
"I came to law school at the
time when my LSAT was expiring.
So either I had to go to law school
that year, or I had to write the
thing again — so I thought, 'oh
well, I'll try it for a year and see
if I like it — and I really loved it,"
said Dauvergne. "And then I was
hooked. That took probably six
or eight weeks after starting law
school to feel like, 'wow — I really,
really like this.'"
Dauvergne graduated from UBC
Law in 1995, and though she now
focuses on immigration and refugee law, she stressed the fact that
law is inherently a career where
specialization isn't required.
"The great thing about law
school and the legal profession
is that law is probably the last
truly generalist profession... you
don't specialize!" Dauvergne said.
"This is not to say that lawyers
and their careers don't become
experts in particular areas and
not knowledgeable in other areas,
but specialization is an informal
process in law."
I think that the
majority of students
come to law school
because they want to
make a difference in
the world. I think our
students have that in
common more than
anything else,"
Catherine Dauvergne
Professor of immigration law and
incoming Dean of Law
Dauvergne's decision to go into
immigration law was influenced
both by the fact that she received
funding for her PhD in that field
and that she has worked and is
interested in government and the
state.
Though she's never had a legal
practice, Dauvergne is a member ofthe Law Society of British
Columbia and does pro bono
work for the Canadian Council
for Refugees and the Community
Legal Assistance Society. She's
represented the former in multiple
cases before the Supreme Court
of Canada.
"There are serious access-to-justice problems in
our legal system, and they are
reflected in that sort of configuration ofthe profession — that a lot of
the profession is about managing
significant transactional work and
sort of in-house stuff and corporate structure and things like that,"
said Dauvergne.
While Dauvergne acknowledges
that some students do attend
law school primarily or entirely
for monetary reasons — to get a
high-paying job — she believes that
most are influenced by more altruistic or intellectual factors.
"I think that the majority
of students come to law school
because they want to make a
difference in the world. I think
our students have that in common
more than anything else," said
Dauvergne. "Some people come
to law school really thinking, 'I'm
coming to law school because I
want to have a comfortable lifestyle' — but that's not the majority
of people."
Dauvergne is entering her new
role as dean in a transformative
period for UBC's Law program,
with Peter Allard having made a
major donation to the school this
year.
"There are some goals on the
horizon that are related to honouring the spirit ofthe new gift,
like strengthening our presence in
human rights and really fostering
the kind of research that puts the
school on the map internationally,"
said Dauvergne.
Part of Dauvergne's vision for
the faculty includes improving
the school's experiential learning
department. Though she stresses
that experiential learning (in the
form of clinical work) has been a
foundational part of law curricu-
lums since the 1960s, Dauvergne
wants her faculty "to re-jump on
the bandwagon of experiential
learning."
In regard to concerns that some
students have about entering
the legal profession due to an
uncertain job market, Dauvergne
had reassuring words — so far, for
this year's graduating class, there
is a 92 per cent placement rate in
articling positions. Dauvergne
also stressed that there's much
more to law than simply career
options.
"I actually think that the value
of studying law has very little to do
with the fact that you might get a
job as a lawyer," said Dauvergne.
"It's just a very good liberal arts
education. It's very good for
understanding how contemporary society is both organized and
disorganized. I think that law is a
very powerful ordering mechanism ... I think that understanding
the mechanics ofthe law is deeply
revealing about how societies are
structured." Xi // News
EDITOR VERONIKA BONDARENKO
EXAMS »
MONEY»
AMS makes online database for Board of Governors passes two
past exams, but faces challenge of  per cent increase to tuition and
getting profs to upload material
non-academic fees
=ILE PHOTO GEOFF LISTERffHE UBYSSEY
A two per cent annual increase to tuition is intended to inflation.
The AMS is proceeding with plans to create an online exam database.
Kosta Prodanovic
News Administrator
After several years of planning,
the AMS is rolling out a central
exam database.
In March 2011, student senators
brought the idea of reinstating an
exam database to Senate as a topic of
interest.
The plan was to create an online
hub where old exams would be
collected and made available for
reference.
An AMS Academic Experience report from 2012 shows that
an overwhelming proportion of
students favoured the idea ofthe
database. Accordingto the report,
83 per cent of students "felt that an
exam database would be a positive
academic resource."
The idea behind the project is to
equalize access to reference material
by abating the need for third party
web sites where students might
need to pay for unauthorized course
material.
Associate VP Academic Daniel
Munro pointed to the 2012 Academic Experience Report and noted that
"students felt there was unequal
access to [reference material] depending on students' social circles or
financial means."
Regardless ofthe overwhelmingly positive response, the
project has been in limbo since
being endorsed by Senate in 2013.
It was placed under the purview
of a steering committee chaired
by the AMS and composed of representatives from the Registrar's
office, the library and the Centre
for Learning and Technology.
The committee then reached
out to hire a project manager
based on an internal grant from
the university. This project manager was charged with building
the system for the database and
collecting content from professors.
Over the course ofthe project
manager's term, UBC introduced
a new policy regarding the use of
teaching materials in UBC courses
that pushed for "the free and open
distribution of teaching materials
beyond the UBC community."
According to Munro, many
faculty members took issue with
the openness ofthe policy in
regards to intellectual property
ownership.
"That, I think influenced the
culture of faculty here to be a
little bit more defensive over how
they use material like old exams,"
said Munro.
=ILE PHOTO JOSH CURRAN/THE UBYSSEY
As a result, the exam database
had to be designed in a way that
was responsive to these concerns.
"The way that the database is
[built], professors can define who
can access the material that they
upload," he said.
Munro also said that this will
hopefully give professors more
control over their own content.
The database is built, but the
major hurdle now is getting faculty
to upload their content voluntarily.
Munro said that he hopes that
framing the discussion in terms
of broader learning initiatives will
help the cause. He'd like to have
enough material in the database to
consider rolling it out to students
by September.
"I think what we are trying to do
now is to get profs to see how this
can be a way of starting a broader
conversation around exam practices and assessment practices," he
said.
Considering how positively
the idea for the database has been
received, the VP academic's office
has clearly been pushing to support
the interests of students even
amidst all the challenges that have
been posed so far.
The database is available online
in its current form. Xi
Veronika Bondarenko
News Editor
The Board of Governors approved the annual two per
cent increase to tuition and all
non-instructional fees.
The increase, which happens
every year in order to keep up with
inflation, had been discussed both
in public and in camera meetings.
The tuition increases apply to domestic undergraduate and graduate
students, as well as international
graduate students. The non-instructional fee increases apply to
all students.
Louise Cowin, VP students,
said that the students they consulted made it clear that they were
opposed to all fee increases by the
university. She also talked about
the letter submitted by the AMS on
behalf of students, which said that
students wanted more affordable
tuition, but not at the cost of a poor
quality of education.
"The letter that they provided to
us made it clear that they wanted
lower tuition, but also referenced
the AMS Academic Survey in which
the majority of students responded
to the survey and identified that
they did not want to reduce tuition
at the cost of a lower quality of education," said Cowin.
Cowin also said that based on
both specific consultation regarding
the fee increases and the Academic
Experience survey sent out to all
undergraduate students, responses
about the cost of education yielded
similar results. Students that they
talked to also said they wanted more
consultation regarding the increases
and a clear breakdown of where the
money was going.
"I also acknowledge that there
are still some improvements that
the administration could make
with respect to communication,"
said Cowin. "I also made reference
to a theme in the students' verbatim
comments that students are looking
for cost savings and the administration echo the report from the
comptroller as the ways in which
the centre's budget has been reduced to the tune of $6 million this
year and that the administration is
looking very closely at reducing its
expenditures and trying to focus its
funding on value to students."
Board Chair John Montalbano
asked whether the Board should
focus on what is expressed in AMS
letter rather than the wished of
individual students.
"The AMS is the voice ofthe
students in many respects," said
Montalbano. "In a case like this
where it's tuition increases, would
the students not just expect the
leadership on something so important would take that forward? We
should pretty much be mindful as
we are on the AMS' position and
other constituents and perhaps the
numbers of respondents should be
expected to be lower because this
is one where want the leadership
voice to be dealing directly with the
Board of Governors."
Cowin said that both were important, although the Board should
take the sentiments expressed in
the AMS letter seriously.
"The fact that the AMS has
taken the time to write their
response, I think, is illustrative of
the way in which they see their
responsibility in terms of representing students on this campus,"
said Cowin.
The increase comes after the
university increased international
tuition by 10 per cent and student
residence fees by 20 per cent. Xi
"Our only limitations are those
which we set up in our own minds,
or permit others to establish for us"
Elizabeth Arden: Self-Made Maven
In a time when women dare not wear make-up or run their own businesses, Elizabeth daringly
did both. She was not a trained chemist, yet she pioneered the concept of scientifically
formulating cosmetics. She was not a business graduate, yet she created a global empire.
Curiosity and drive were her teachers; the world, her classroom.
We think Elizabeth would have simply adored AU, giving people all over the world the chance
to make their mark, on their terms, in their time. Beautiful.
J
open, online, everywher
Learn more at business.athabascau.ca NEWS    |   THURSDAY, APRIL 16, 2015
ACADEMIA»
Philosophy professor receives $12 million
research grant to study free will and morality
PHOTO KOSTAPRODANOVICTHE UBYSSEY
Paul Russell will be partnering with the University of Gothenburg to study morality.
Scott Jacobsen
Contributor
Philosophy professor Paul Russell
will be spendingthe next decade
studying questions of morality and
free will thanks to a large grant
from a Swedish research group.
The grant, which is worth
80 million Swedish kronor, or
approximately $12 million, and
has been awarded by the Swedish
Research Council, will go towards
Russell's research on moral responsibility and global issues.
Russell will now be dividing the
next 10 years of his life between
UBC and the University of Gothenburg in Sweden, where he will be
examining how free will influences
human responsibility in both local
and global issues.
In Canada, the Social Sciences
and Humanities Research Council
(SSHRC) receives significantly
less funding than its counterparts
in science, engineering and health
research. In the past eight years,
SHHRC's budget has also shrunk
by 10.5 per cent.
Accordingto Russell, the Swedish government is more geared
towards promoting support and
research opportunities to academics
in humanities. He also said that this
is the first program of its kind in
Sweden, which attracts researchers
in all fields to the country.
"[The Council] started a new
program to attract what they call
'leading researchers' to Sweden,"
said Russell. "This is, I believe, the
first one in the humanities area,
so quite a few of them are in other
areas like medical research, engineering, things of that sort."
Accordingto Russell, the University of Gothenburg established a
research project with a group led by
Gunnar Bjornsson. Bjornsson, once
he heard ofthe project, began talking to Russell about the possibility
of his coming on as an international
researcher for the project.
Most ofthe funding will go
towards hiring and establishing a
team of researchers to collaborate
and assist in the initiative. Russell
said that even $12 million can go
away quickly when hiring postdoctoral researchers and other
project assistants.
Russell's research considers
ethical issues, including traditional philosophical questions
regarding the moral responsibility of human beings and the relation of this responsibly to law.
Accordingto Russell, such an
issue splits into questions of moral psychology, personal values
and people's feelings of responsibility to other human beings.
"What is it about human
beings and human agents that
makes it intelligible to regard
ourselves and other human beings as responsible agents?" said
Russell.
Russell's team will also be looking
into how moral questions regarding
law, criminal and legal responsibility interact with people's feelings
of accountability for their actions.
"What makes them valid and
makes us think they are not fully
responsible and not liable to punishment?" said Russell. Xi
PAI»
Notice of Development Permit Application - DP 15010
Public Open House
Natural and Artificial Turf Soccer Fields
You are invited to attend an Open House on Tuesday, April 28 to view and comment on three
new UBC/Whitecaps soccer fields to be located next to the proposed National Soccer Development Centre within Thunderbird Park. Plans will be displayed for two natural grass and one
artificial turf fields.
lay, April 28,2015 4:30 - 6:00PM
nis Centre - Multipurpose Room, 6160 Thunderbird Boulevard
Representatives from the project team and
Campus + Community Planning will be
available to provide information and
respond to inquiries about this project.
For further information:
Please direct questions to Karen Russell,
Manager Development Services
karen.russell@ubc.ca   604-822-1586
For more information or to comment on
this project, please visit: planning.ubc.-
ca/vancouver/projects-consultations
This event is wheelchair accessible.   ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
This notice contains important information which may affect you. Please ask someone to translate it for you.
fan-ami. immis&mfo.
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o| «x|fegS«°li!^&lfeS!as!Sfi7hSoi 5Ut&M^.
AMS President Tanner
Bokor gives up bonus,
will still go through
performance review
FILE PHOTO CHERIHAN HASSUWHE UBYSSEY
Council denied Tanner Bokor's request to not undergo his performance review.
Veronika Bondarenko
News Editor
After AMS President Tanner
Bokor refused his portion ofthe
bonus awarded to executives and
requested to not go through the
evaluation process that comes
along with awarding the money,
Council voted to not allow him to
skip the review.
The review, which looks at
each ofthe executives' performance over the course ofthe year
and determines what portion of
the $5,000 bonus they receive,
is conducted by members ofthe
Oversight Committee and then
reported back to Councillors.
Bokor said that during his
last two years as an executive,
he has stated that he would not
be accepting his portion ofthe
bonus money. However, after he
started experiencing problems
with his health earlier in the
month, his medical team advised
him not to go through with the
review process.
"I explained very early on that
I did not intend on taking any
percentage ofthe funding to the
Oversight Committee, however
I did have an intention to go
through the process of evaluation," said Bokor.
"Unfortunately, there was a
circumstance that arose regarding my own health where I was
advised by my medical team that
certain elements ofthe process
would not be in my best medical
interest."
As a result, Bokor submitted a
request to opt out ofthe review
process to Council. At the April 8
meeting, Councillors voted to not
allow Bokor to skip the evaluation on grounds that executives
still needed to be held accountable for their performance and
should not be able to opt out of it
by refusing the money. Instead,
Bokor will be going through a
more sensitive review process.
Veronica Knott, chair of
Oversight committee, confirmed
that the committee will be going
through the performance review
without Bokor's involvement
and will instead be looking at his
goals on their own.
"Executives are only mandated to create goals for the year, but
they're not mandated to participate in any further evaluations,"
said Knott. "Tanner can just hand
in his goals, he's not mandated
to be a part ofthe rest of it, but
Oversight is still mandated to
evaluate."
Knott also said that the committee will be providing a record
of his performance to Council
at the next meeting. Still, the
information in the performance
review will not be made public.
"With the goals, we can kind of
evaluate his performance without
him having to be a part of the
process, which is really unfortunate because it's obviously not
ideal and it's not really why the
process is made, but in this case,
I think it's the best scenario for
both Oversight and for Tanner,"
said Knott.
Bokor said that he was not
asking for special treatment, but
rather acted upon the recommendations of his medical team. On a
larger scale, he believes that performance reviews of executives
are necessary, but feels that doing
it through the PAI bonus is not
the right way to go about it.
"I actually agreed with many
comments stated around accountability and transparency," said
Bokor. "I think it's unfortunate,
though, because PAI is actually
not an accountable or transparent
process to begin with, but I think
we do owe a degree of making
sure that students know what the
executive have done." Xi
a place of mind
campus+community planning
THE  UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Want to cover the news?
Send us an email.
news@ubyssey.ca THURSDAY, APRIL 16, 2015    |    NEWS
ACADEMIC »
Two UBC professors resign from selection committee of Canadian Science
and Engineering Hall of Fame over lack of female representation
HERIHAN HASSUNfTHE UBYSSEY
Only 11 out of the 60 people inducted are women.
Olivia Law
News Producer
Two Canadian scientists and UBC
professors have resigned from
the selection committee ofthe
Canadian Science and Engineering
Hall of Fame over disputes that,
for the second time in as many
years, there are no female nominees for induction. With these
resignations, this leaves only one
female board member, Jeanette
Southwood, in the panel of five.
Out ofthe 60 people inducted
into the Hall of Fame since 1991,
only 11 have been women. Accord
ing to the website for the Hall
of Fame, one of its key aims is to
"promote role models that will
help attract young Canadians to
careers in science, engineering and
technology."
UBC posted record numbers of
women involved in these departments this year compared to other
universities, with women making
up 29 per cent of its 848-member
first-year engineering students.
This is a 61 per cent increase since
2010, but still reflects the disparity
within the departments.
Neurology professor Judy Illes
and Catherine Anderson, the two
Professor Catherine Anderson says she will only photo cherihan hassun^he ubyssey
attend conferences if there is a diversity of speakers.
PHOTO CHERIHAN HASSUNfTHE UBYSSEY
Professor Judy Illes joined the selection committee in 2013.
UBC professors who resigned from
the committee, are both confident
that there are several Canadian
women scientists and engineers
who reach the nomination and
selection criteria.
"There are probably fewer
women at the highest level who
would qualify for this induction
because there have been fewer
women in the science and engineering pipeline," said Illes, who
resigned on April 3. "[The] trends
are changing but it can't change
overnight, you don't all of a sudden
have equal numbers of distinguished women at the very highest
level."
However, she also stressed
that, despite the disparagement
of women in the science and
engineering community, there are
women at these highest levels.
"There are women at that level,
and what the process has failed
to achieve is capturing them,"
said lies.
Anderson, who resigned after
Illes on April 9, commented upon
the lack of diversity in organizations called upon for nominations.
"The lack of diversity stemming
from the pool of nominations was
coming from a small group of
people," she said. "My suggestion
was that we should try to make
sure that more groups and more
diverse organizations knew about
the call for nominations."
The nomination process for the
Canadian Science and Engineering
Hall of Fame is straightforward
— open to the public and the
academy, along with a 500-word
essay and curriculum vitae
submission. Illes cites a lack of
awareness within the science and
engineering community as a major
reason for the deficiency in female
nominations.
"I am involved with many organizations who had never heard
of this. If the committee had done
anything it still wasn't efficient,"
she said.
Joining the nominations committee in 2013, Illes had pressed
for higher visibility within the
female population.
"I visited the head ofthe
program in the fall and we spoke
about how the Hall of Fame could
reach out more vigorously," said
Illes. "Whatever process [they]
undertook, whether it was augmented or not, I did not observe
any enhanced process over the
previous year."
This lack of progress from
previous years is also Anderson's
reason for stepping down.
"It didn't seem like change was
happening," she said. "It wasn't
necessarily just the lack of women,
it was the fact that positive suggestions had been made, and people
weren't taking a positive approach."
From this decision of stepping
down, Anderson has resolved to
attend conferences only if there is
a diverse range of people invited as
panelists and speakers.
"I won't be attending conferences unless there's a significant
portion of invited speakers that
are women," she said. "I feel it's
important that I support things
that show diversity, and in things
that do not show diversity, I'm not
participating."
Illes has not written off the
Science and Engineering Hall of
Fame entirely, however.
"In the future I would love to
become involved again once everyone regroups and puts in place a
better process for reaching out,"
she said.
She also hopes that weight will
be placed solely on merit rather
than prominence in the science
and engineering community.
"It could be that we create a
totally revised campaign and still
have no women nominees, or no
women nominees who make it
to the final selection," said Illes.
"That is, I suppose, possible
because it should be merit that
drives the question not gender. But
I can't imagine, knowing who's out
there now, that women would not
be successful at least to the final
selection process."
Going forward, Illes wants
more women to become aware of
the Hall of Fame and take a more
active role in the nominations
and getting voices heard. The aim
ofthe resignation was to protest
against the ideas and visions
which were not followed up from
previous years, not to boycott the
nominations or prestige.
"The bottom line message for
today is that we have to move
forward, we have to reopen the
nomination, we have to have a
vigorous immediate campaign
to make a more heterogeneous
slate and revise the campaign
for the long term," said Illes. "I
really think the hall of fame has
an opportunity now to provide
leadership for women in science
and engineering. Just take the
bull by the horns now and just
move forward." tJ
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shipgreyhound.ca • 877.463.6446 6    I    FEATURE    I    THURSDAY, APRIL 16,2015
DEPARTMENT
W
AND FILM
Here are some of our recent award
winning students and alumni. The
awards listed below are both local
and national.
Canadian Society of Cinematographers
JAMES GILL
STUDENT CINEMATOGRAPHY
Hnatyshyn Foundation
GHAZAL AZARBAD
DEVELOPING ARTIST (ENGLISH
THEATRE)
Daytime Emmy Awards
REBEKKA SORENSEN
DAYTIME EMMY NOMINEE
People's Choice Awards
TORRANCE COOMBS
FAVOURITE NEW TV DRAMA
Mayor's Arts Awards
KARIN LEE
FILM AND NEW MEDIA
Canada International Film Festival
SHARON LIN
RISING STAR
Mayor's Arts Awards
CARI GREEN
FILM AND NEW MEDIA
Vancouver Short Film Festival
ANDREW POLLINS
AUDIENCE CHOICE
Vancouver
jnal Film Festival
BRUCE SWEENEY
BEST B.C. FILM THURSDAY, APRIL 16, 2015    |    FEATURE
MATT KENNEDY: ACTOR, ENTREPRENEUR AND STORYTELLER
BY VICKY HUANG
From the unwanted old philosopher in
Triumph of Love to the much sought-after
romantic hero Mr. Darcy inPride and Prejudice, graduating BFA student Matt Kennedy
has walked lives of gloom and glory onstage.
Offstage, Kennedy is a co-owner of a film
company, educator at improv camps, judge at
film festivals and producer of a feature film.
The magic seed that inspires these achievements is a love for stories and storytelling.
After graduating from high school, Kennedy embarked on a trip to Ghana, where he
experienced a culture shock that paved the
way to his life philosophy to seize the day.
"Acting is... the way for me to continue [to]
explore... different people and different cultures.... Acting is kind of a branch of [travelling
that] really highlights humanity."
Unlike directors, who maintain a distance
from the individual characters in order to
oversee the entire production, actors indulge
in self-exploration. "It's really about [whom]
you are ... not so much about creating a
character.... It's like you're finding yourself within a character.... It's a very selfish
thing, but you're doing it for someone else,"
said Kennedy.
Kennedy's life offstage has been enriched
by his fruitful experience onstage. There
are times when he disagrees with his roles,
yet he learns to appreciate or at least be
non-judgemental ofthe world as seen from
his characters' perspectives.
"Logic and reason are ruled by the heart,"
Kennedy quoted the musical Triumph of
Love. "It's all about finding a balance."
With grandparents who hold musical
aesthetics in a high regard and parents who
are ever-supportive and diligently attend
his shows, Kennedy has no reserves about
launching a life-long journey to the realm
of entertainment. Yet he is not oblivious to
the cutthroat nature of this industry, and
constantly exerts himself to break his own
limit.
"You can't be good at everything, but you
can always be better at everything.... I'll always continue to develop learning how to let
it go when the time comes ... [and] to be vulnerable, open and flexible," said Kennedy.
Kennedy values the experience that he
learned from past roles while always focusing on the present. "It's always the show
that I'm doing right now that I seem to love
the most.... I don't really have any dream
roles; they just seem to pop in and present
themselves to me, and then I fall in love
with them."
Kennedy spoke fondly of UBC as well.
"[It] is an amazing school in the sense
that it has everything that you could need to
develop as an actor in regards to providing
you with spaces to rehearse and perform;
they provide you with support and they
introduce you to all the people that you
would need to know to make a career. But at
the same time, it's up to you to take advantage of those things," he said.
"My advice is to take every opportunity that comes along, and to take every
experience and realize that how can you
be better next time — to be a little selfish
about your work and realize the whole
three years in the BFA acting program is
about how to be you. There's no one way
to be an actor; there's only your way to be
an actor."
Be it entrepreneur, traveller or storyteller, Kennedy proudly owns his identity
and is using his own way to navigate in the
sea of acting dreams. tJ
GHAZAL AZARBAD IS READY TO TAKE THE THEATRE WORLD BY STORM
BY MIGUEL SANTA MARIA
For Ghazal Azarbad, performing in theatre
is just as exciting as it was inexplicable
when she started.
"I didn't really know much about acting
[then], [but] I really liked affecting people
— making them laugh, cry, whatever," said
Azarbad, who started acting early in her
pre-teens, participating in various school
musicals and acting classes in Coquitlam.
"From then on I just realized that this is
what I really enjoy doing. I also enjoy singing, I enjoy improv... I don't know what else
to say really."
Originally from Iran and coming from a
fairly traditional family, Azarbad's pursuit
in acting was not something her parents
were keen on. Combined with the fact that
she was unable to properly articulate how
she felt, they initially wrote it off as just
another adolescent phase.
Realizing later how serious she was
though, they became all ears — albeit, with
a substantial amount of concern.
"My family are either doctors, engineers
or lawyers," said Azarbad, aware ofthe
disadvantage from the get-go.
"The fact that I'm not necessarily
guaranteed a job for the rest of my life and
even health insurance, at first really scared
them."
But she trudged on, joining clubs such as
UBC Players and UBC Improv in her early
undergrad, and ultimately getting admitted
into the BFA acting program.
Now about to graduate after starring in
multiple UBC productions including The
Bacchae 2.1, Triumph of Love and the film
Mercury Falling, the experience was a time
where she did what she loves and learned
from it.
"For so long [I did acting] on the side for
fun, [it] was a place where I got to relax,"
she said. "It became my work and became
the only thing that I was studying for and
memorizing things for, and actually [trying]
to understand and apply it to real life."
The connection between her work and
personal life is of utmost importance for
Azarbad. She found that the stresses and
merits of both aspects frequently spilled into
each other.
"I don't think how I can do better at the
rehearsal, I think how I can do better in my
life," she said. "When I say well in life, I mean
not taking care of myself, being as healthy
and as happy and as on track as I possibly can
be. That's where my work ethic lies."
On that note, the chemistry with the cast
and crew becomes just as essential. "If I'm
not in a place of love with everyone in the
room, then it hinders my performance ... I
can't open up or be vulnerable because I'm
scared," she said. "[If] you don't have that
love, understanding and chemistry then you
can't necessarily afford to go to those places."
Chemistry and emotional issues only
top the numerous issues Azarbad faces as
an actress. From the copious performance
multi-tasking— especially in musicals — to
her uninsured future, it definitely isn't a
path taken by those without the passion.
Fortunately, Azarbad credits her good company of faculty and fellow BFA students for
keeping her going.
"I learned so much from them... how
to embrace how different we can all be ...
how we're all just people trying to figure
out our process," she said. "On the first
day of classes [at UBC] they said 'you are
enough'... I've come to understand [what]
that means. I don't have to be a certain
way to impress [a] director ... It's my job to
be the kind of actor that I am so that they
can decide if [that's what] they need in this
production."
As for her parents? They are more supportive than ever.
"The more they see how much I love
what I'm doing... [it] makes them happy,"
she said. "In spite of their own fears ...
watching them try and putting their effort
into it is what's really important to me."
As for her future plans, Azarbad plans to
go on a well-earned vacation in Europe,
and then audition to as many performance opportunities as possible. For those
following in her footsteps she simply had
this to say:
"Forgive yourself instantly and don't apologize for who you are. I know how cheesy
that sounds but [those] are the only things
you'll ever need." tJ
KATE DE LORME DESIGNED HER WAY INTO THE THEATRE WORLD
BYJOLIN LU
Shakespearean dialogues, flamboyant
gestures and makeshift stages backdropped
by the yellow-tinted auditorium walls mark
most people's experience with theatre
production. Kate De Lorme, a graduating
student in UBC's BFA theatre production
and design program, refines high school
theatre production and takes it into the
university arena.
Although De Lorme now devotes herself
into the audio engineering aspect of theatre
production, acting is what initially brought
her into theatre. "I was in an audition group
in high school. Then I started helping with
the tech side and did concerts for school.
Soon I became the go-to person for that sort
of thing... I found a way to merge technical
engineering with theatre and I got really
interested," said De Lorme.
After entering UBC, De Lorme was often
entangled in a dilemma over how to spend
her time: the constant struggle between
non-theatre curriculums and theatre pro
jects. Because participating in independent
theatre projects is her main motivation for
studying at UBC, the compromise she has
had to make manifested itself in emotional
burdens.
"The language requirement was a huge
thing for me. The [theatre production]
program is heavily dependent on what you
make of it and how much effort you're willing to put in. So I wanted to put my whole
self into the theatre and just be working on
shows. Many times I couldn't because I had
to work on my science or language courses ...
and they became a huge stress for me," said
De Lorme.
De Lorme finally decided to tackle the
challenges head-on, devoting her third year
to fulfilling the onerous non-theatre courses
and thus freeing up her fourth year for theatre production.
In her fourth year alone, Lorme was able
to participate in three ofthe UBC's major
shows as a sound designer. Currently, De
Lorme is working on a show called Inside/
Out directed by Stephen Malloy, a professor
in the theatre department, starring Patrick
Keating. The show is an autobiographical
work of Keating's 10 years in prison. "I did
things like the sound of an ambient room, a
car driving up, a cop siren and the sound of
a radio. I also made the sound surround the
space in a logical way," De Lorme said.
Many may find De Lorme's interest as a
sound designer slightly obscure. De Lorme
herself, in fact, hesitated when being asked
to define her role. "In a theatrical setting
it's kind of hard to describe what a sound
designer does ... it includes sound effects ...
for The Bacchae [2.1], which I did early at
UBC, I composed a bunch of music. For The
Triumph of Love ... I designed the speaker
setup. The tasks vary a lot," she said.
In the next 10 years, De Lorme still sees
herself in theatre production industry but
probably in a different city that would offer
her more opportunities. Xi JENICA MONTGOMERY
II Culture I
CLASS»
Cult cinema class a favourite among students
=HOTOCOURTESFIMDE
Examples of some cult classics covered in the Cult Cinema (FIST300) class.
Tisha Dasgupta
Contributor
The meaning of a film is not what's
in it but what we make of it. Cult
Cinema, or FIST 300, is a course
offered by the department of theatre
and film, which provides students
with an opportunity to study an
overview of cult cinema through
the ages. A popular favourite among
students, this course has one of
the highest enrollments in the film
studies department.
Cult Cinema is taught by professor Ernest Mathijs, who has been
teaching at UBC since 2006. Having
founded the course and written the
textbooks himself, Mathijs is well
versed on the topic. "It's a passion
for film, writing about it and sharing
with others the love [for cinema]
that made me become a teacher
in film," said Mathijs when asked
about his inspiration.
There's no one straight definition
of what a cult film is. It could be
marvellously made, out ofthe ordinary or could make you question
what you know. It might also be
celebrated in a way that goes beyond
the bounds of moderation. Teaching
assistant Adam Bagatavicius believes that the best attribute of cult
cinema is that it allows audiences
to define what makes a movie cult.
"Each student leaves the course
with their own definition and interpretation."
FILM»
The three credit course is open
to third and fourth year students
but has no pre-requisite course
requirements. The course covers an
extensive array of 30-40 famous cult
films. These are eccentric, hilarious
and often provocative films that
normally one would not get the
opportunity to see. During class
hours, each ofthe films are screened
in a very interactive manner. Students are encouraged to immerse
themselves in the film by shouting at
the characters or throwing objects
at the screen.
"The pedagogical purpose is
to demonstrate to the students
that cinema is all about the social
experience of watching the film,"
said Mathijs. He believes that if
we can turn a terrible film into
a great experience, then there
must be some merit to it. And
that is the essence of a cult film.
One ofthe films in the course
is The Room which is described
as one ofthe worst movies ever.
However, it is also one ofthe best
viewing experiences. Mathijs describes the film to be so
poorly made, that over the years,
audiences have found different
ways to ridicule the movie, and
so watching it in a large social
group is always fun.
"It's like a manic sugar rush,
you never know what you're going to get each week," said Baga
tavicius. That is what he believes
makes students enjoy the course.
For a genre of film so chaotic,
the course is perfectly structured into modules. The films
are screened on Mondays during
class hours and discussions are
held on Fridays to discuss weekly
readings and assignments.
In the future Mathijs hopes to
be able to incorporate video essay
assessments into the course, so
that students get the opportunity to create film montages and
visually present their ideas.
Students are also encouraged
to watch cult films outside of
the classroom. Affiliating with
art-house cinemas in Vancouver
gives students the opportunity to
watch a midnight movie or watch
a horror movie on Halloween.
This provides the ideal setting
and mood to enjoy the film. Guest
lecturers also conduct workshops
a few times in the term to talk
about their experience working
with cult films.
"A film does not have to fit
into the ideal definition of a
good movie to be exceptional
or appreciated," said Mathijs.
The unusual interactive manner
ofthe classes and the freedom
students find to explore different
sub-genres in cult and work with
uncommon themes has made this
course popular and successful. Xi
LDOC»
Celebrating the end of term
Students celebrated the end of classes in ways other than Block Party.
Rochelle Walcott
Contributor
Well, we've practically made it,
almost an entire school year has
come and gone. Sure, finals are
here, but before them, all classes
came to a glorious end. Friday
April 10 was, officially, the last
day any student has to worry
about attending lectures — you
said goodbye to those unnecessarily stressful iClicker questions
and, most importantly, tutorials,
discussions and labs are now a
distant memory.
Last day of classes (LDOC), for
some, marks the day ofthe infamous annual AMS Block Party.
Early bird tickets sold out in a
matter of minutes and general
tickets sold out within a few days
— and many people planned on
skipping any and all their classes
for the day of Block Party.
Lindsey Baines, a first-year
Arts student, not only chose to
skip classes for the day, but said
she cancelled her plans for after
Block Party had ended. According to Baines, her change of heart
came from her friends who told
her that: "once you go to Block
Party, you won't make it out alive
if you want to go to a concert
after."
As for those who had not
gotten their tickets, what was
going on besides Block Party?
Yes, believe it or not, Block Party
wasn't the only thing students
had in mind for their last day of
classes. Well, that's if they even
had anything planned at all.
Katherine Poole, a first-year
Arts student stated that she was
still unsure about her plans, but
would likely be "studying or
going out with friends."
Students' plans for Friday
(besides Block Party) seemed to
be fairly low-key. Many people
mentioned studying, handing in assignments, sleeping,
more studying and even a bit
of sobbing.
"I guess I'll just be home
crying about finals," said Annu
Shrestha, first-year student of
international economics.
On the other hand, a member
ofthe Greek community planned
his last day of classes slightly different. He would not Block Party
— nor would he be doing much of
the prior things mentioned — he
would instead attend the Arts
County Fair (ACF).
"For the last day of classes,
I'm going to stay at the Sigma
Chi house the night before, and
wake up for ACF, which is a big
event in the Greek village," said
Matthew Gooding, a first-year
Arts student and a member of
Sigma Chi.
That said, members ofthe
Greek village are some ofthe
very few students who actually
have any pre-determined plans
for Friday. Everyone else seemed
to be 'going with the flow'.
Students' plans for this year's
LDOC, more or less, felt laid-
back and exuded a 'whatever
happens, happens' vibe, so it was
a struggle trying to find at least
one student with some huge, life-
changing and exciting plans for
day. Akash Sharma, a first-year
Science student, changed all
of that.
"I'm probably going to the
beach — Wreck Beach — with my
dog," said Sharma, and if that's
not the best plan you have ever
heard, then what is? Xi
Lucas Hrubizna brings dark sensations with Big Brother
Jessica Yang
Contributor
What if, one day, you feel like you're
being followed?
Lucas Hrubizna, a fourth-year
film production student, felt as
though he was being followed when
he drove down a darkened Marine
Drive one night. This sensation
became the inspiration for his final
film at UBC, Big Brother.
Hrubizna, along with his producer David Findlay, his other producer and production designer Patty
Facy and his cinematographer and
editor Blake Davey, began his five
day shoot in late January at mostly
on-campus locations, such as Totem
Park and the highways near the
university.
Now, moving into post-production, they've recently held a very
successful Kickstarter campaign,
reaching their goal of $3,000,
which will go toward professional
sound mixing, colour grading and
promotion.
Big Brother is a surrealist and
dark drama about Troy, a youth
pastor and former Christian rocker,
who obsessively follows his favourite youth group member, Michael,
off to college in order to secure
Michael's devotion to God and Troy.
Based partially on Hrubizna's own
experience at a biblical skateboard
camp, the film explores the potential disconnect between ideology
and behaviour. Havingboth to
illustrate this surrealist grey area
between ideals and reality and to
create a heavy and suspenseful
aesthetic, Hrubizna and his team
realized early on that professional
post-production development would
be crucial to their vision.
"The film has a lot of focus in
terms of design and colour, so we
really wanted to make sure we could
bring that to life," said Hrubizna.
Though the film production
program does not provide funding
to students for their films, many
students like Hrubizna and his
team have become quite resourceful
and innovative, refusing to let the
lack of funding stand as an obstacle
to making their film the way they
would like to. Money from students' own pockets and alternative
funding options such as the online
platform, Kickstarter, have helped
students make their visions come
true.
"There's not a lot of places you
can sell [short films].... For us, our
major goal is to just get [BigBrother]
into the world through festivals."
Fortunately, Hrubizna has
experience in the Canadian festival
circuit. His short film from 2014,
Hard Card, was featured at the
Montreal Film Festival and became
a part ofthe omnibus film, We
Both Go Down Together, which was
screened at the Vancouver International Film Festival. Being ready
to fund new ideas and attract an
audience dedicated to quality filmmaking, festivals have recently become ideal spots for up-and-coming
filmmakers, innovative filmmaking
techniques and unique stories.
"There's a tone and a feeling that
sort of grabbed me with this [film]
... [at biblical skateboard camp] they
pull up these little pocket bibles so
you can take them with you when
you were skateboarding and stuff....
I think that religion adapts itself to
the modern world, and sometimes
those ways just happen to feel really
incongruous and amusing to me,"
said Hrubizna when asked about
his motivations behind making the
particular story of Big Brother.
Hrubizna often develops his projects by starting with an image or
sensation from a real life experience
and building the story around that.
Though Big Brother is a fictional
narrative, Hrubizna's long term
goals for post post-secondary are
to make documentaries, which, for
him, reveal a spectrum of eccentricities, motivations and character
traits, all found in our real world.
"The world has all the characters that don't need to be written."
In that case, there are potentially seven billion individual stories
in this world just waiting to be
transcribed to film along with all
the stories our imaginations have
to offer. This would make the
tremendous work of filmmakers,
with all its funding networks and
technical advances and complex
storytelling, seem impressive but
daunting. For filmmakers like
Hrubizna, however, passion might
be a lot simpler.
"For me, films are about feeling
and images, that's how I enjoy them
and that's how I make them." Xi // Opinions
LAST WORDS »
ADVICE »
Ask Natalie: On long-gone love
LAST WORDS//
SPARE SOME CHANGE FOR
THE HUMANITIES?
Philosophy professor Paul Russell received $12 million from a
Swedish research group to study
questions of morality and ethics.
While there is nothing particularly
unusual about scientific or medical
researchers receiving large sums of
money for their work, it raises eyebrows to see a philosophy professor
(or any Arts professor) receiving
a grant of this size. Oh wait — this
is because this is Canada and not
Sweden.
Looking at both federal and university budget trends for humanities research paints a grim picture;
there is still some money to go
around, of course, but the numbers
are much smaller than they are
for health, science and engineering research while these types of
grants are usually the most likely
to get cut.
This makes one thing crystal
clear: neither the Canadian government nor Canadian academia
prioritizes the humanities and this
is, quite frankly, a crying shame.
While we admit that medical and
scientific research is often able
to provide more tangible and
easily calculated results and often
requires more expensive equipment, this doesn't mean that the
humanities should always get the
short end ofthe stick — and then
only if there is "some money left
over." By fostering and supporting
the study of people, arts, culture,
philosophy, morality, literature and
languages, we are able to develop
a more profound understanding
of people and the world we live
in that can go hand in hand with
scientific discoveries.
VOTE YES TO MORE AND
BETTER TRANSIT
"Do you support a one half
percentage point (0.5 per cent)
increase to the Provincial Sales
Tax in Metro Vancouver, dedicated to the Mayors' Transportation
and Transit Plan, with independent audits and public reporting?"
That is the question on
everyone's mind this month.
If you go to UBC, you've been
bombarded by advertisements
and approached by petitioners
and promoters urging you to
vote one way or another on the
now-ongoing transit referendum
(officially, "Metro Vancouver's
Transit and Transportation
Referendum"). It may be the case
that you're not so much deciding
whether to vote 'yes' or 'no' as
deciding if you want to vote at
all. Fundamental principles of
democracy aside, it's an understandable stance: maybe you
don't know enough to make an
informed choice; or maybe you
really just don't care. We're going
to give you some reasons why you
should care, and ultimately, reasons that you should vote 'yes'.
If it passes and is ratified by the
government, the 'transit tax' will
bring in an estimated $250 million
per year in additional funding
for TransLink. The campaign
promises range from light rail in
Surrey, to more buses, to a Broadway subway line — terminating
at Arbutus, but still cutting down
the student commute considerably.
The breadth, scope and magnitude
of these promises are enough to
entice any frequent transit-user,
though it is also in this that we
(and many 'no-side proponents')
LLUSTRATIONJULIANYU/THE UBYSSEY
see the biggest flaw: the proposals are, as Burnaby mayor Derek
Corrigan phrased it, a "wish list."
Maybe, with sufficient public support, funding and governmental
assistance all of these things can
be accomplished, but it seems a
little bit too ambitious, to us. That
said, in our view, regardless of
how many ofthe projects actually
come to fruition, more funding for
transit is a good thing.
Estimates for the cost to the
average student that a 0.5 per cent
sales tax increase would bring
range from $30-60 per year. That
certainly isn't chump change, but
it's also something that you probably wouldn't even notice disappearing out of your wallet over the
course of a year. If money is your
main concern, though, consider
the time that you'll save with improved transit, either from having
to wait less time for a bus or Sky-
Train, or by having fewer cars on
the road causing traffic congestion
if more people are taking transit —
time that could be spent working
to earn back that $60.
Overall, though, we do
have some doubts regarding
TransLink's corporate efficiency
(we're looking at you, Compass
Card and fare gates) and the
ambitiousness of some ofthe plans
ofthe Mayors' Council is questionable, the relatively small amount
of risk compared to the potential
reward of a massively improved
(and constantly improving) transit
system makes our decision easy.
The environmental, economic and
time-saving benefits are clear.
Take 10 minutes out of your day
to order and/or fill out a ballot,
and vote 'yes' for more and better
transit. Xi
NATALIE MORRIS
Advice Columnist
"Dear Natalie,
I've had a crush on this guy since
last September. I immediately
fell for his exuberant personality but the problem is he was an
exchange student and now he is
back to his country which is far,
far away from Canada. We were
just friends but I really liked
him. I know that things cannot
work out between us, but since
I'm still keeping in touch with
him it's so hard to forget about
him. There is not a single day
that I didn't miss him ever since
he left Vancouver....
Since I still stay in touch with
him I feel like he is still in Canada and I can see him whenever I
want to. But the reality is I don't
even know when I'll be able see
him again. I try to keep myself
busy so that I miss him less but
I cannot deny that he is always
on my mind nevertheless.... How
do I wake up from this dream?"
I'm so so sorry that this happened to you. Being stuck in love
with someone who you know you
can't have is a rough feeling. But
you can't let him hold you back
from what's out there now and,
you know, actually in the same
country.
I'm not saying forget about this
guy because you clearly care for
him and anyone who's really cared
about someone knows how hard
it is to just "let them go." That's
bullshit. But, you do need some time
emotionally apart. You need to come
to terms with the fact you aren't in
the same country and you aren't in
a situation where a super long distance relationship would work.
When you see and talk to someone every day, in person, through
texting or video calls, you allow
them to become a big part of your
everyday life, which is why even
after your friend has left you still
think about him, send him silly
jokes and wonder how his day is
going. You have to force that to
stop. That sounds really harsh and
I know how little you probably
want to hear it, but it's necessary.
You can't just continue on, and
you know that I'm right, because
you'll end up just liking him more
and it will hurt every day; every
thought you have of him will be
touched with less happiness and
more sadness. It's not a path you
want to continue on.
You pretty much need to break
up with him.
While I'm not an expert on
breaking your own heart, I can
give you some ideas on how to get
through this.
Tell your friend honestly why
you need time apart. It may seem
like a weird time to talk about your
feelings, but you have to let them
know why you need this so when
you do arrive in a better place they
will be more willing to accept you
back. It's a lot easier to understand
'I know this might be coming out
of left field, but I have feelings for
you and I think we need some time
apart so I can cool my own jets'
than radio silence for what seems
like no real reason.
Then, you have to commit to
some good old fashioned no-contact. You know yourself better
than anyone so decide on a minimum time period where there's
no texting, chatting or video-calling. None. Even if you think you've
moved on and want to reach out
to him, continue your no-contact. You can reassess after your
no-contact period is over.
In the meantime, focus on anything and everything else. Throw
yourself into studying, but also
keep yourself busy outside school
work. Actively do not think about
him. Every time his name pops
up into your head, acknowledge
that you thought about him, tell
yourself he is only a friend, remind
yourself of something you don't
like about them, and continue on
your way. You have to stop your
own feelings, which is way harder
than getting new ones.
You have to take stock in yourself. How am I feeling today? What
are my plans for today? How often
will I think about him? Do I need
to be around other people to take
my mind off him?
When you are ready, when your
heart stops hurting, and when you
have accepted that he is not physically, and cannot be romantically,
there, then reach out to him again.
But you cannot go into a friendship
hoping for a relationship. That's
just a roundabout way to the path
you need to leave now.
You CAN do this. I know it
seems hard but you have to do this.
You're young and beautiful and
wonderful and you should be able
to live your life without someone
dragging you down.
If you need more tough love, let
me know.
Need advice? Write to Natalie at
asknatalie@ubyssey.ca and have
your questions answered. 13
ARE YOU A
Social
Worker?
Are you aware the
Licensure Exam comes
into effect Sept 1st?
Change is coming
to the profession of
social work in BC
FIND OUT MORE: bccollegeofsocialworkers.ca
BCifrCSW
British Columbia College of Social Workers // Sports + Rec
EDITOR JACKHAUEN
Squamish's
Smoke Bluffs
Words and photos by Koby Michaels
^fc
Burgers and Fries
The sharp rock digs into my two fingers, wedged into a
small crevasse in the rock. The skin threatens to tear as all
of my weight dangles from the muscles of just two digits. I
take a deep break as rain hits my face, pushing my contacts
out of focus. With all the strength left in me after a full day
of climbing, I swing my legs up, shouting with exertion as I
struggle to stay on the wall. My toes, crushed into my tiny,
rubber-soled climbing shoes, fight to find grip on the wind
and rainswept granite. By some miracle, my big toe finds a
groove big enough for me to balance on. With a shaking leg, I
stand, relieving the strain on my now crushed fingers. I grab
the crack over my head with my other hand, shaking out the
lactic acid and adrenaline that has filled my right arm. The
hard part is over; I've bridged the gap between the sets of
easily-climbed cracks.
To get to the gap, I climbed up two
successive cracks and up onto a ledge.
There lays the gap, the crux ofthe
climb. Three metres separate the ledge,
the end ofthe first two cracks, from the
second set. In between are only three
small holes in the rock with almost nowhere two place your legs, the basis for
most ofthe power and balance in climbing. With my left hand firmly crammed
into the the top crack, I've bridged the
gap. To do so, I used the tiny handholds
to pull myself up, my feet slipping on the
slick slab.
From here, I use a move called a
lieback to climb the final crack. The
lieback is a climbing move that use
tension to help you stick to the roc
do one, you need a crack where you can
wrap the fingers of both hands into.
Then you lie back, parallel to the wall
with your feet, placed below your hands,
pushing you away from the crack. This
tension keeps you firmly stuck to the
rock and by sliding your hands and feet
up the crack, you can easily gain height.
Lieback Flake
It's a little after 11 a.m., and after being
awake for four and a half hours already,
I'm ready to start climbing. After all
ofthe pre-climbing checks with my
belayer (everyone is tied in properly,
harnesses are strapped and all carabin-
ers are locked), my fingers finally find
rock. The first few moves are simple
but I'm quickly at a loss for my next
move. The big toes of both of my feet
are balanced on a ledge, but above them
is a smooth slab of granite. The only
handhold is well above my head and
seemingly out of reach.
I have no choice but to jump for it.
I go through the move in my head,
visualizing it in perfection. And then   |
I go for it. Or, rather, I try to but fear
freezes me up and I do little more than
bend my knees stupidly. Again and
again I convince myself to go for it and
fail to move a muscle.
One of the best (and worst) parts
about rock climbing is that as phys- \
ically demanding as a sport as it is, it
is more mentally demanding. Every
move is a puzzle to be solved and once '
it is, you have to execute it. Something
that is more simply said than done.
I'm pumped full of adrenaline and it
has short circuited my frontal cortex,
the logic centre of the brain. (Thanks
Artem, for the physiology lesson). I
know the rope will catch me. I know
I'm tall enough to reach the handhold. there are no handholds. I yell down to
I know my feet will find grip when I the group below for suggestions. "Jam
go for the reach. But my brain refuses your arm into the hole," I hear. Okay,
to believe and trust my body. To beat let's try it.
my brain, I let my muscles go loose, I stick my arm, up to my elbow,
take a second to collect myself and between the two outcroppings and
then explode upwards. The tips of my twist it until it's stuck. Then, I move
fingers reach the elusive handhold and one foot off of the ledge, out onto a tiny
a foot finds a tiny indent to stick to. I've foothold. Then I move my second foot
done it. off the ledge, my weight resting on my
From here I complete a few more wedged arm. My arm is screaming, but
moves before I get to the namesake my new foot positions allow my right
lieback. But in the rainy conditions, it side to grab a ledge and pull my other
is above my ability and I am belayed arm out of its crevasse. But I'm not
down, slightly disappointed. clear yet. Now, I have both feet on a
outcropping but the only handholds are
f^g-\-n-fLjT*-T  AT7""CC? half a metre to my left. I grab a vertical
V>O.K.JN.r IjAlvJliiS crack with my right hand and slowly
inch my arm, and body weight, over my
Cornflakes, the line next to Lieback feet to my left until my longest finger
Flake, is the most rewarding climb of reaches the handhold. I have enough
the day. More successful than its broth- of a grip to swing my feet onto a step
er Lieback, but more challenging than
Burgers and Fries. Most ofthe climbing
has chunky handholds, tight cracks
to wedge feet and hands into and'"
slabs of granite. The most excitin_
and difficult — problem is presentee
by two rocks that stick out from the
main wall, creating an upside-down
triangle-shaped hole above a tiny ledge.
I manage to get my feet to the ledge but
stuck between two layers of rock and
I'm home free. Only a few more moves
to the top.
At the top, I take a second to
turn around and see the entirety of
Squamish, outlined in front ofthe giant
granite Chief. At the top I soak in the
view a*s it should be seen, from the top
of a climb, and reflect on a successful _
day of climbing, ta
MEET THE REAL'PIPER CHAPMAN'      ^
PIPER KERMAN
author of ORANGE h. BLACK
LIVE AT THE
ORPHEUM THEATRE
TUESDAY, MAY 5
FOR TICKETS
1-866-449-8118
www.uniquelives.com
UNIQUE   LIVES
S3
EXPERIENCES
pand6ra*
The VancouverSun
SERIOUSLY WESTCOAST
AM980      Waterfront      ■ -~-
Canadian Societt
Cancer      canadienne
Society     du cancer
EFry THURSDAY, APRIL 16,2015    I    SPORTS    I   11
THUNDERBIRDS »
T-BIRDS 5-ON-5
COMPLETE CHAMPIONS
1. What would be your team's theme song
this year?
POONAM
SANDHU
Field Hockey
Our theme songs for this
year would definitely have
to be a combination of
"Birds Flying High" by
Doughboy and "Trophies"
by Drake.
ERIKA
SELTENREICH-
HODGSON
Swimming
"I'm Too Sexy" by Right
Said Fred.
Yuri "the missile" Kisil
would want metosay
"Hips Don't Lie." And
his hips don't.
KIRSTEN
LEE
Tracks
Cross-country
"Years" by Alesso feat.
Matthew Koma. I remember blasting it in the
vans before warm-up
at nationals in Kansas.
Gave me goose bumps!
Vivaldi's "FourSeasons."
2. Besides champion, what other C-word
would describe you?
3. Other than the titles you've won in your
sport, what 'championship' or 'trophy' is most
important to you?
4. What's your favourite way to procrastinate
during exams?
Otherthanchampthe
other "C" word that best
describes me is convivial. I went on thesaurus,
comforthis — I promise
it's a real word.
The India Club junior
tournament [final]. We
[won] that game and I'm
pretty sure I discouraged
a few boys to continue
on with the sport.
Have to go with wrapped
in a blanket, tea in hand
with Netflixon all day/
onlineshopping.l'mnot
proud of it but it helps
me cope.
Callipygous.
One time at swim camp
there was an ugly face
competition, which I
won and got tons of
points for, so yeah, I'm
pretty proud of that.
By having anemotiona
and/or nervous breakdown about thefact that
I'm procrastinating my
studying.
Definitely chaotic.
I'mfroman Oilers family
so the Stanley Cup has
great significance in
ourhousehold.My
parents were married
the day the Oilers won
in 1984.
Cleaning my whole
house, getting food then
making an elaborate
meal before I can do
anything.
CRAZY! Everybody
knows it's true. I'm just
gonna own it.
Oh definitely ourStorm
theWalltrophyfrom
last year with Devan,
Tamara, Mike and Jake.
It is proudly displayed in
ourliving room.
Looking for new music
instead of studying. I'm a
huge basshead. I'm sure
my roommates really
appreciate the constant
dubstep.
Callous.
The Religion Award
in fourth grade, orthe
Weather Award for
responsible and appropriate dress atsummer
camp.
Wine.
5. If you could spend a day in the life of an
Spencer Latu from the
100 percent Quidditch,
Definitely Conor
Evan Eldersothatl
Devan Wiebeso that 1
athlete on another UBC team, who would it be
men's football team. He's
because I'm an absolute
Lillis-White. 1 always
could perfectly lip sync
can hang out with Jack
and why?
a natural athlete, has
Harry Potterfanatic
thought my lankwould
Hilary Duff.
Williams more often
amazing school spirit
but also... 1 think I'd be
workwellforpitching
and he will eventually
and plays the recorder
really good at riding a
and an ERA of 0.45 is
wantto be my boy
likean angel.
broomstick.
legen-waitforit-dary.
friend.
FRISBEE »
Baseball
Apr 12
vs. Menlo
W 6-2,L 2-1
Baseball
April
Rugby
April
Track
April
vs. Menlo      vs. Castaway RFC  Emilie Mondon AxAZZ^Jeam
IflV. 4x800m Relay Team
W 2-1, W 4-1                 T 25-25                (1st place finishes) «"
" * ~ * Andmore!Fullresults:aoo.al/Ac24BN
Date:
Place:
Inesday, April 29,2015 4:00 - 6:00PM
- Concourse, 6138 Student Union Boulevard
Iona
Building
West
Point
Gage
Residence
Argyll
House sorT1ervj||e
West
St. Andrew's Walk
Stirling
House
D
North
Parkade
Subject
Site
Hillel
House
Brock
Hall
Meeting
Location
East Mall
*e
This event is wheelchair accessible.
Plans will be displayed for a new 14,040m2,
18-storey student residence with 408 beds. The
building will comprise 17-storeys of dormitory
rooms over student amenity areas at ground level.
Representatives from the project team and Campus +
Community Planning will be available to provide
information and respond to inquiries about this
project.
For more information or to comment on this project,
please visit:
planning.ubc.ca/vancouver/proiects-consultations
For further information:
Please direct questions to Karen Russel
Manager Development Services
karen.russell@ubc.ca   604-822-1586
This notice contains important information which may affect you. Please ask someone to translate it for you.
0| S*lfe Str« n|S ^ alfe S3-?} SS7f SOf 5U£L-|Cr.
if£!S flsH =l #9 ti^sfe M&9 Sfi|5fA|7| HhSNck
a place of mind
THE  UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
campus+community planning
Ciaran goes clubbing:
Ubyssey editor tries Ultimate
Notice of Development Permit Application - DP 15011
Public Open House
Brock Commons Student Residence
You are invited to attend an Open House on Wednesday, April 29 to view and comment on a
proposed new 18-storey student residence on Walter Gage Road, to house upper year and
graduate students.
Ciaran Dougherty
Copy Editor
It took approximately 13 seconds
for me, and everyone in attendance, to discover that I had no
natural ability at Ultimate. After
repeatedly dropping easy catches
and frequently hucking unstable,
wayward passes which my teammates had no chance of catching;
my pre-session visions of innate
Ultimate talent were cruelly
dashed on Jericho turf field.
Fortunately, the UBC Ultimate
club members were thoroughly
accommodating. They accepted
my many shortcomings and made
me feel very welcome. The players' response to my performance
was, in many ways, the antithesis
of that of our Video Editor, Tim
Hoggan, who found my attempts
to play Ultimate relentlessly
entertaining. I, with my limited
knowledge ofthe sport, was
incredibly impressed by the level
ofthe men's team that I practiced with, yet I was surprised to
discover that this was only the
B team.
"We have two parts: a competitive "A Team" for both men
and women that compete against
US schools for a place in the US
Ultimate Association National
Championships," said club secretary Alex Hackney.
"The second part ofthe club is
a less competitive "B Team" that
attends tournaments in the Pacific Northwest."
The A team is well-ranked, but
costs more than the B team as
players have to cover travel, hotel
and tournament costs. However, to
join the club itself costs only $15 so
practice and expertise are accessible to almost anyone that wants to
try their hand at the game.
=HOTO TIMOTHY HOGGANfTHE UBYSSEY
Check outthevideo atyoutube.com/
theubyssey.
This structure allows anyone
to play, even someone as terrible
as myself, and gain skills. Players
who develop well then have the
option to commit themselves yet
further and play at a higher level.
The session that I attended
consisted of a gentle warm-up,
before several drills, mainly
focused on beating you 'check'
to pass to a teammate. After
several other technical drills
that I embarrassed myself in
with alarming regularity, we
moved into some small-sided
games. Here the talent of those
at the session were very visible.
Fantastically accurate passes,
as well as well-timed catches
were all the rage. I did manage to
ruin an excellent move from my
team by fumbling an easy catch
in the end zone, but, in my mind
at least, I redeemed myself by
catching a later one. Ten points
to Gryffindor.
The evening was thoroughly
enjoyable. Despite not having any
skill, I felt welcome: the players that I trained with had an
excellent sense of humour and I
got the impression that any new
player would be given a good
chance to play and improve. Xi 12    I    GAMES    I    THURSDAY, APRIL 16,2015
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Universite d'Ottawa     I     University of Ottawa
La medecine, un choix d'avenir
■■L        Etudier a TUniversite d'Ottawa
places reservees au programme francophone de medecine
des places reservees pour les etudiants de
I'Atlantique, de I'Ouest et desTerritoires
un appui financier pour retourner faire certains
stages pratiques chez-vous
• un programme francophone de medecine
• un environnement bilingue
• un programme innovateur ou la technologie fait
partie integrante de la formation
A TUniversite d'Ottawa, le Consortium national de formation en sante (CNFS) contibue a offrir un acces
accru a des programmes d'etudes dans le domaine de la sante, aux francophones issus des collectivites
en situation minoritaire. www.cnfs.ca
www.medecine.uOttawa.ca
B Consortium national
™ de formation en sante
volet Universite d'Ottawa
mn
Cette initiative est finances par Same" Canada dans le cadre de la
Feuille de route pour les langues officielles du Canada 2013-2018:
Education, immigration, communautes.
u Ottawa
Faculte de medecine
Faculty of Medicine

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