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The Ubyssey Feb 18, 1977

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Pessimism ruins Merchant
By DICK BALE
Unfortunately, about the best
that can be said of the Westcoast
Actors' production of Shakespeare's Merchant of Venice at the
Vancouver East Cultural Centre is
that it would make a great cure for
insomnia.
The Merchant of Venice
By William Shakespeare
Directed by John Sichel
At the Vancouver East
Cultural Centre
Until March 5
Only an impressive performance
by Anthony Holland as Shylock
saves an insipid play from complete mediocrity.
Director John Sichel, imported
from Britain, gives us a consistent
interpretation of a puzzling play.
His interpretation, however, is a
cynical and depressing one. Such is
not the stuff of which great dramas
are made.
Sichel rarely plays it for laughs.
Neither are there any great
comedians in the cast. The
characters are all more or less
repulsive, even Portia and
Bassanio, the most attractive
figures in Shakespeare's play.
Portia, played by Trish Grange
in a rather lacklustre fashion, is an
aging spinster who is out to win a
husband and knows exactly what
she wants and how to get it.
Bassanio (Allan Gray) is an
opportunistic young gentleman
who wants a wealthy wife and uses
every trick in the book to make
sure he gets one. Ironically, they
profess an idealistic love for one
another. They each get what they
deserve.
They are surrounded by
hypocrites, backbiters and self-
seekers.     David     Diamond's
Gratiano is appropriately obnoxious and loudmouthed. Derek
Keurvorst's Lorenzo is unctuous
and repelling. These .could be
comic figures, but they are above
all discomforting.
Anthony Holland's Shylock,
however, is excellent. At times
cruelly abused, at times mercilessly revengeful, the Jew and
usurer is the butt of all the venom
the other characters can muster.
Shylock could coneivably be
raised to the level of tragic hero.
Similarly, he could be lowered to
the level of malcontent. Sichel
interpreted him as alternately
sympathetic and repulsive.
Holland's expression of these antithetical states is highly effective.
But one swallow doesn't make a
summer. Whereas this moribund
production comes to life with the
appearance of Shylock, Barney
O'Sullivan's Antonio can only be
described as soporific.
The set is simple. It is not the
kind of simplicity that expresses
more than the sum of its parts, but
is the kind which leaves the eye
wandering aimlessly around the
theatre in search of further
stimulation.
The lighting is subtle, understated, functional. It emphasizes
the greynessand the flatness of the
scenery and the characters. The
costumes, turn of the century drab
grey dullness, deaden the visual
effect even further.
The soft Mahler music actually
provides a nice transition from
scene to scene.
However, an audience presented
with such a cynical vision of life
can hardly be expected to go home
cheered. A director presenting
such a vision can hardly expect it
to be well received when it is
ANTHONY HOLLAND and ALLAN GRAY ... usurer Shylock and opportunist Bassanio
rendered    in    such    mediocre
dramatic terms.
With no sympathetic characters
in opposition to the cynics, it is
impossible to react against the
Portias and Bassanios of the play.
The feeling at the conclusion is of a
strange and disturbing dislocation
as Antonio and Jessica (Shylock's
daughter and Lorenzo's bride)
drift awkwardly from the stage.
Are we supposed to applaud such
an ending as this?
2 *&^\/lfx\(i \ •Jolhdance Keitat
<t ^£*/*/ I **^^iOPEN FOR LUNCH 11
"C- ,   J DINNER FROM 6:00
aurant \
:30
1251 HOWE ST.
6843043
Paganini sparhles
By ROBERT JORDAN
Four of Giovanni Gabrieli's
pieces for antiphonal brass opened
last Monday's Main Series Concert
of the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Kazuyoshi
Akiyama.
They were played solely by the
brass section and the sound clattered noisily around the all-but-
empty stage. The playing itself
was tight enough, but the trumpets
had a shrill bark rather than a
silvery sheen. The Occasional
Wagnerian bray of the horns and
trombones sounded a little too
hefty for such early music.
But these works have a grand-
ness of their own which gives great
effect even when they are interpreted in a stylistically inexact
fashion. An excellent concert
opener.
The program's obligatory
Canadian-content work, Pierre
Mercure's Lignes et Points (1964)
followed.
It would take a great deal of
analytical detective work to
illuminate the intellectual
processes which govern the order
of tones in Lignes et Points.
Without foreknowledge of these
technical processes, however, one
must rely on intuitive listening for
an appreciation. The work
presents an imaginative array of
varying textures.
In a work of such textural exploitations, superb acoustics and a
great deal of rehearsal are
required. Lignes et Points did not
sound as though it had received
either. Not that even a superb
performance would much have
affected the somewhat perplexed
audience response.
Guest artist Eugene Fodor's
rendition of the Paganini Violin
Concerto No. 1 was obviously the
reason most people attended the
concert. This work has an
emotional substance akin to a
Rossini opera aria and a technical
difficulty bordering on the perverse.
Fodor's performance, appreciated with fully justifiable
enthusiasm, simply sparkled. The
orchestra chugged its dutiful accompanying role with the dogged
tenacity of a five h.p.. Briggs and
Stratton fishing motor. That's all
that Paganini allows it to do.
Then, as it was Valentine's Day,
Fodor rendered . Paganini's
Caprice No. 14 for solo violin as an
encore.
The closing work on the
program, Schubert's Symphony
No. 9, is one of those works which is
anathema to the buttock. As the
London Philharmonic Society quite
correctly pointed out in 1829, it is
simply too long for the weight of its
musical substance.
There is a decided wealth of
lovely, Schubertian melody in it,
but there is also a colossal quantity
of musical padding, especially in
the first and final movements.
Wholehearted drive and commitment -can render a performance of this work a truly
exhilarating experience for the
listener.
The VSO's 1977 performance was
surprisingly good, though the drive
and commitment seemed more
borne out of duty than heart. The
performance was sprinkled with
embarrassing bloopers from all
quarters, signifying that inattention had occasionally gained the
better part of professional conscientiousness.
It was a long work concluding a
long program. Length was the
primary fault, not the quality of
orchestral performance. It showed
that the VSO can play extremely
well even when performing just
dutifully. If inspiration were ever
to strike as well, then Vancouver
Would have an Orchestra on its
hands.
tllC
centre
COFFEE
HOUSE
Fridays at 8:30
Feb. 18
DENISE LARSON
SINGER/SONGWRITER
and a band that "fitz"
FRIDAY, FEB. 25
JAZZ WITH GAVIN WALKER
COMING
Feb. 23rd to 26th
JESSIE
WINCHESTER
&
TIM WILLIAMS
Page Friday. 2
THE
UBYSSEY
Friday, February 18, 1977 \dance
Ballet bumbles and bores
By WILLIAM WHEELER
Heralded as a fusion of the European
classical tradition and Canadian vitality,
Les Grand Ballets Canadiens performed at
the Queen Elizabeth theatre last week.
The company presented a mixed bag of
choreographic work ranging from classical
to modern and contemporary. Although
entertaining, the performance proved to be
merely competent.	
Les Grands Ballets
Canadiens
February 10, 11, 12
Queen Elizabeth Theatre
Three pieces were presented on Friday
night: Diabelli Variations, The Firebird
Suite and Bawdy Variations.
The Diabelli Variations, choreographed
by Brian Macdonald, is based on the
Diabelli Variations written by Beethoven as
waltz music. Unfortunately, it was more
enjoyable to listen to the piano played by
Catherine Courvoisier (a refreshing break
from taped dance music) than to watch the
events on stage. The choreography was for
the most part awkward, boring and cliche,
in spite of small moments of virtuosity
shown by the dancers.
Styled as a romantic ballet, the Diabelli
Variations tells a story of romantic love: a
man is alone in the midst of the dancing
couples. He seeks- love but is continually
spurned. He finally finds it (clad in a white
dress) and then loses it. Once again he is
abnein the throes of romantic melancholy.
The costumes were also from the
romantic period. The ladies wore light
Grecian gowns with trailing ribbons and the
men wore doublebreasted jackets with tails.
The Firebird Suite, choreographed by
Maurice Bejart, was far more effective. It is
a stunning piece, showing more care and
better composition than the Diabelli
Variations. Based on the version originally
done by Les Ballets Russes, the story of the
Firebird is closely akin to the Prometheus
myth.
It starts with a tribe or group of partisans
abne, oppressed, in the dark. In their midst
arises the Firebird, who gives them the
power to struggle against tiie darkness, to
confront the audience. In taking the destiny
of the partisans upon himself, the Firebird
sickens and dies. A group of Firebirds come
for his body; the Firebird, like the Phoenix,
is reborn.
The Firebird is a powerful ballet in which
FIREBIRD ... demanding work shows limitations of Les Grands Ballets Canadiens
the predominant sense is one of exultation.
It celebrates the struggle of life and alludes
to a higher order of existence as represented
by the Firebirds. However, it is an extremely demanding work and it clearly
showed the limitations of the company: it
was competently done and nothing more.
Lawrence Rhodes as the Firebird was
technically accomplished, but lacked the
polish and physical presence required for
the role..
The concluding work, Bawdy Variations,
choreographed by Brian Macdonald, was
the most successful of the evening. It hinged
more on the comedy of the situation and on
amusing dances than on technical and artistic effect.
Set in a brothel, the madam and her girls
first appear as a landlady and her boarders
being blessed by a priest. When he leaves
the decks are cleared for action and the fun
begins.  The  madam  sets  up  her   cash
TAM Tl DELAM ... choreographer Macdonald lays the foundations of a strong identity in Canadian dance
register and the customers start arriving.
Of course, everyone dances: they dance in
the salon, then off to the bedrooms and
return some time later, with considerably
less attire. ITiey do the Toronto Rub, the
Charleston, the Turkey Trot.
Besides being amusing, Bawdy Variations
was a refreshing contrast to the syrupy
portrayal of love in Diabelli Variations.
John Stanzel put in a fine performance as an
old man who comes in a wheelchair, is
rejuvenated and subsequently dies of overexertion.
Bawdy Variations, which is fast becoming
the most well known of the works in the
company's repertoire, was undoubtedly the
high point of the evening.
Performed on Thursday night were Swan
Lake-Act 2 choreographed by Petipa and
Ivanov, Au Dela des Temps (Time out of
mind) and Tarn Ti Delam, both choreographed by Macdonald. On Saturday night it
was Concerto Barocco by Balanchine,
Lignes et Pointes (Lines and Points) by
Brydon Paige and Brian Macdonald,
Firebird and Tam Ti Delam.
The choreographic work of Macdonald,
which constitutes most of the company's
repertoire, is a subject of international
controversy. He has alternately bjen
praised for his freshness and sensitivity,
and lambasted as the world's worst
choreographer. He has done choreography
or worked as artistic director for a number
of companies around the world: the Royal
Winnipeg, the National Ballet of Cuba, the
Royal Danish, the Royal - Swedish and
Harkness Ballet of New York. In 1974, he
returned to Canada to' become artistic
director of Les Grands.
Macdonald deserves praise for his emphasis on Canadian content, using Canadian
dancers and other personnel wherever
possible. He insists that the Canadian
dancer has unique qualities of temperament
and physique which deserve to be
developed. Artistically, it seems uncertain
where this is leading the company, but it
would seem that Macdonald is laying the
foundations of a stronger identity for
Canadian dance.
In addition, the Montreal-based company -
asserts its Quebecois identity. For example,
Tam Ti Delam is based on the music of
Gilles Vigneault, Quebec's most important
folksinger, and tells the story of Quebec —
"its music, its poetry, its wide open spaces,
its ancestors and its children."
Friday, February 18, 1977
THE       UBYSSEY
Page Friday. 3 theatre
Three sisters in despair
By EVA FLYNN
"If only we knew . . . Why do we live?
Why do we suffer?"
This desperate cry is uttered by Olga, one
of the three sisters in Anton Chekhov's
frightfully real and often deadening play.
Posing the most common, yet most unanswerable, questions the playwright makes
no attempt to answer such emphatic cries as
that uttered by Olga. Instead Chekhov offers
an inescapably sordid and bleak reality.
Three Sisters
By Anton Chekhov
Directed by Svetlana Smith
At Studio 58
Until February 26
Olga, Masha and Irena Prozorov are the
three sisters. They live in a small north
Russian town and their lives revolve around
a desired goal: to go to Moscow. In turn,
each sister realizes the impossibility of her
dream and loses hope.
Olga, the eldest sister, consoles herself
through retrospection. She recalls the time
when the Czars seemed honorable, when
soldiers did not dominate the country and
her beloved father lived. Although she's lost
all hope for the future, she nevertheless
seems cheerful. Perhaps her facade is kept
up for the sake of others. It is however a
fleeting cheerfulness and is finally lost at
the end of the play.
Less cheerful and even embittered by her
life is Masha, the second sister. She has wed
without love. She falls in love and has an
affair with a married man, but her joy is
shortlived.
With a naivete common only to very young
children, Irena, the youngest sister remains
quite alone in her optimism for seeing
Moscow. In fact, she is so earnest in her
belief that one sincerely thinks she will
compensate for all her sisters' misery by
liberating herself from her dreary life and.
escaping to Moscow. Hoping to make her
dream a reality, she marries a man she does
not love, but who promises to take her to
Moscow.
The stark onstage action is much
enhanced by the numerous interpersonal
relationships which develop. They are all
problematic and happiness is peculiarly
shortlived. The marriages are all unhappy
MASHA, OLGA, IRENA ... Studio 58 cast portrays hopelessness of their dream.
and these relationships appear terribly
desperate when one realizes there is no
route of escape.
Bringing these many intense and
emotional relationships to life is a painful
and challenging procedure, but the Studio 58
cast have made some very ardent attempts.
The three Prozorov sisters, Jane Schoettle,
Lisa Trudel, Elizabeth Bartly maintain the
necessary aura of despair throughout the
course of the show. Unfortunately portraying age appeared a greater challenge to
a large part of the cast.
With the lack of stage action, much of the
first two acts lagged and bored a majority of
the audience, as the three and one half hour
play becomes engrossing only toward the
final two acts when the themes become
apparent.
As for the set, one had the feeling that the
house was not as shoddy as a house occupied
by the army would be. Nor were there any
references to scarcity of food caused by
feeding 12 persons or more each day. In fact,
the set was too polished, the attire not often
sad enough, and both seemed to detract
from the overall gloomy, inescapable
existence of the household's inhabitants.
On the other hand, the lighting was
suitably dim and subdued in keeping with
the depressing, dismal state of affairs.
PANGO PANGO (UNS) — Porn queen
Airly Robchild denied rumours today that it
was her back which appeared on last week's
cover of the Daily Blah.
"I'm getting sick and tired of stupid sexist
accusations against me whenever there is
anything blatantly sexual on this stupid
island," she said.
"Whoever it was that posed in the picture
sure was lucky though. Those hands look
delicious."
North Shore's Newfie captivates
By AMANDA KING
"I'se the b'y that builds the boat,
And I'se the b'y that sails her,
I'se the b'y that catches the fish
And takes 'em home to Lizer."
Ted Johns is the b'y who performs the best
one-man show in town, and you're the b'ys
who should go and see it. It's called Naked
on the North Shore.
Naked on the North Shore
Directed by Paul Thompson
At City Stage
Until Feb. 26
In one hour Ted Johns takes all you
southerners ("with yer asses up against the
American border") to the isolated village of
Old Fort Bay on the coast of Labrador.
Old Fort Bay is represented on the stage
by the simplest, sparsest scenery: two
chairs, a plank of wood, watercolor
drawings and an animal skin on the wall, a
map, and a rusty old oil drum.
Ted Johns emerges almost unnoticed
from theaisle and sits comfortably on the oil
drum until everybody stops talking. He
wears working clothes and a big disarming
smile.
Old Fort Bay, he says pointing at the map,
is on the north shore of the St. Lawrence
river, separated from Newfoundland by a
narrow little stretch of water. He tears the
map off the wall and tosses it backstage.
Then slowly, gradually, Ted Johns
becomes Old Fort. He takes on the
characteristics of individual residents right
down to their movements, favorite sayings,
and ripe Newfie accent (which Johns does
rather well, considering he's a Mainlander).
And Ted Johns weaves a subtler magic.
He portrays Aunt Mary (who keeps her
husband's tombstone in the kitchen), Irving,
Norm, Jarge, Howard, Marlene, and Basil
("Basil don't drink to get drunk, he drinks
for the taste!") At the same time he is
"outside" the character, telling the
audience directly what is happening. It is an
intricate and skillful performance.
Old Fort is a hotbed of small town action.
Johns laments the decline of trapping and
complains about the welfare and the
unemployment. In a happier vein he tells us
about the bible of the North Shore (Eaton's
catalogue), and about sports:  skidooing,
shooting, hockey — "You plays hockey till
ya win, that's how ya plays hockey!"
The highlight of Johns' performance,
though, is the Saturday night bash. Songs —
"Coat of Many Colors", "I'se the B'y" —
dancing — "Married women — dancing!"
Gangling young men leaning against the
wall. One nudges the oher, who pokes
another, who punches another, and then it's
a "racket". Everybody's in on it; hit, dart
away, hit again, dart away — "They've been
wanting to hit each other for weeks!"
Naked on The North Shore is warm,
funny, and peppered with Ted Johns'
irresistible charm. It's Canadiana at its best
about a small town at its colorful worst.
"All ready to pack yer bags fer Old
Fort, b'ys?"
i-:^-^
TED JOHNS ... laments and celebrates life in a small Newfoundland town.
Page Friday. 4
THE
UBYSSEY
Friday, February 18, 1977 movies
Kramer films compromised
By GRAY KYLES
Stanley Kramer has been active in the
American film industry for more than 30
years as an editor, writer, producer and
director. This year he is releasing his thirty-,
fourth film production.
The Domino Principle is based on the
novel by Adam Kennedy and stars Gene
Hackman, Candice Bergen, Richard Wid-
mark and Eli Wallach.
Kramer has been an independent
producer from the beginning in 1948 when he
released So This is New York through
United Artists. To remain independent in
the movie business for that long a producer
must create a number of commercial hits.
Pictures such as High Noon, Judgment at
Nuremburg, It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad
STANLEY KRAMER ...
deals with forbidden subjects
World, The Wild One and Guess Who's
Coming to Dinner have been successful
enough to allow Kramer to remain
autonomous from any major studio.
Because of his independence he was able
to initiate projects dealing with subjects
which were previously considered taboo for
the screen.
He was the first to comment on racial
hatred with The Defiant Ones and made the
anti-war film The Men. When Kramer
released On the Beach in 1959 he was laying
the foundation for a number of subsequent
films about "the bomb."
Kramer has been criticized as much as he
has been praised by people who consider his
films to be liberal whitewashes of serious
issues. Although several of his pictures have
been rather superficial treatments of social
problems, they must be seen in the context
of time.
Most of his "comment" movies were firsts
in their field and Kramer had to tone down a
little if he wanted them to reach people. He
made a path for others to follow.
Page Friday conducted a telephone interview with Kramer in Los Angeles as he
was completing the post production of the
Domino Principle. He talked about his
career, his excursion into television drama
and his new picture which will open in
March.
Page Friday: First of all, what is the
Domino Principle basically about?
Kramer: Well, I think it is about the
"they" which exists in our society today.
The "they" can be a combination of many
things or any one of them.
Here in the United States it can be the
Secret Service, the FBI, the CIA or the
military industrial complex which Eisenhower warned us about. Or it can be a
combination of all of those things, corporate
pressure and control. Manipulation of our
lives through the corporate entity, whether
through advertising, lobbying.or pressuring.
What we've done is take a single man, a
born loser, and put pressure upon him in the
total sense of the word. We confront him
with a situation of manipulation to see how
far he can be puSfied before he'll take a
stand. We're looking for the saturation point
in society and we want to see if an audience
is willing to take a stand with him.
It proceeds to the ultimate. The deed
whichthe "they" wish him to perform is the
erasure, the assassination of a president.
PF: Lately there have been several films
with similar themes; Network, The Godfather, and Night Moves to name a few.
What made you decide to do this one now?
Have things reached a crisis point in the
U.S.?
Kramer: Well, that's an easily dramatic
way of putting it. I don't know'. I've been
dealing with issues all my life so it seems the
natural thing to do.
It's not purposeful, I'm not trying to tell
anybody what to think.* I'm not even trying
to reflect society because I think that's the
wrong approach. I try to presuppose what
could be certain thought processes in the
future.
Through the years I've made films that
people have said had "content." But really
that was incidental. It was just that was
what interested me at the time, as entertainment. So I gravitated to that kind of
material.
I grew up in the Roosevelt era, an age of
great social change. It's affected all parts of
my life and is reflected in my work.
PF: You've been operating as an independent for several years now. .. .
Kramer: All my life!
PF: Obviously you find it's worth the
extra effort you have to go to. . . .
Kramer: Not so much the effort as the
suspense and heartache. You never know if
you'll be in business the next day. That's the
difference.
PF: Have you done this so that you could
be your own man and make the films you
want to make?
Kramer: Well, you never make the film
you want to make. That's a nice phrase and I
hear young filmmakers say it all the time.
They say they'll never compromise and
they'll stick with the truth. But in a complex
society it's very hard to find the whole truth.
At best you can find part of the truth.
What you have to do is find your own truth
and be prepared to make a stand against
those who disagree.
My feeling is that compromise is the order
of the day, it's part of everyday life. But you
musn't compromise the basic principles of
what you're doing. I might have to compromise in order to get financing to make a
film. It's very difficult sometimes.
In my past I had to use Gregory Peck and
Ava Gardner in On the Beach because the
distributors didn't want to make a film
about the end of the world, about the atom
bomb.
They said I'd have to put some stars in it,
FILMMAKER . .. just look for a good story
GENE HACKMAN.. .
Domino Principle star
you know. I think the picture would have
been nearer my concept of it if two
unknowns had played the roles. It would
have been much more realistic.
The same is true of Judgment at
Nuremburg, Ship of Fools. There have been
a great many films that I have produced
where it just happens to be true that I would
have to compromise.
I wanted to make the films so I had to
compromise to a point. I don't have a feeling
of guilt about it but I do have a sense of
frustration.
PF: Okay, is it tougher today to make
movies than in the past?
Kramer: It's very tough. We're making
fewer films but there are more people trying
to get started. Also more young people than
when I started.
PF: Who are some of your favorite
directors?
Kramer: Ahh! My difficulty, with that
question is that I'll never give you a complete answer. I could reel off many people I
like. Let's see, I like Fellini, Lumet, I like a
few of the things Coppola's done, William
Wyler. But what about all those I'm not
mentioning that I can'.t remember right
now? There's so many.
I don't have any idols. I don't think that's
the kind of profession it is. I think each film
has the chemistry of the people involved.
Sometimes it turns out to be "one thing,
another time it will fall short.
PF: How about the younger directors?
Kramer: It's difficult to judge some of the
younger filmmakers yet because one can
look great and then disappear.
Take Dennis Hopper; he just ran out of
gas and disappeared. Easy Rider was
supposed to be the earth-shattering film of
the age and would completely change the
industry. But he didn't have the staying
power.
You know, is Bogdanovich going to return.
as a superior filmmaker, was he already or
what? I don't know, you just have to give the
young ones time to develop or disappear!
There's a certain staying power you have
to have but no one knows what it is.
PF: Do you think you'll become more
involved with television now after your
experience with the Judgement Specials on
ABC?
Kramer: No, I'm not becoming more
involved with television. What happened
• was I was at the Lt. Calley court martial and
I wanted to do a film of it. But I couldn't get
it financed as a film but I could do it for
television on tape.
I'm not thinking of any more television
because the fight I had to go through about
censorship was just a little too much for me.
But I still think the show was about as
truthful a revelation about Vietnam as has
been put on film. It's right out of the transcripts.
PF: What was the censorship problem?
Kramer: I said, as the narrator, that we
all had to share some of the responsibility.
Sure he's guilty but we sent him there, that's
the atmosphere we put him into. He wasn't
equipped to deal with it.
But the censor said, "we don't share any
guilt for that at all. The show doesn't go on if
that's left in." So we had to cut it.
Still I'm not completely unhappy with it, I
thought it made some good points.
PF: One last question, is there anything in
particular we should look for in The Domino
Principle?
Kramer: As far as I'm concerned just look
for a good story. Don't look for what it's
saying, a meaning. I mean it either reveals
itself or it doesn't. Obviously I think it does.
The last line which comes on in small print
over the man, who is doomed, is from
Kafka. It's important because basically it's
a Kafka piece, you know, who are these
people? What do they want?
Smiling sex a waste of time
By VERNE McDONALD
Perhaps the best thing about this movie is
that it is aptly named. There's sex, and here
or there a smile. There's even one or two
laughs. But that's as far as it goes.
The movie is made up of four or five skits,
or to be more accurate, dirty jokes. One of
them is clever, well constructed, and has an
excellent punch line. Another is boring, but
has a good aiding. The rest are a waste of
time.
Sex Witii a Smile
Directed by Sergio Martino
Fine Arts Cinema
One that is a waste of time is the one in
which Marty Feldman plays a bodyguard
for a poor little rich girl.
Feldman himself would be funny reading
a math book aloud, but his talents are
wasted here. Surrounded by some of the
worst actors in Italy, and saddled with
dialogue more inane than conversation with
a bus driver, he mugs his way through a
pointless shaggy dog story full of hoary sight
gags.
For this he receives top billing and his
face on all the ads for the movie. Is it cynical
to suggest that his drawing power is being
used to sell a mediocre movie in which he
plays a minor role? No, it is not.
A more mediocre movie is hard to
imagine. It gives the impression that it was
made up from rejected scripts from Love
American Style, the television series that
nauseated millions. The style is very much
the same, and Sex With a Smile is not much
more explicit.
Perhaps something was lost in the translation. When the poor little rich girl admonishes her boy friend for bopping Marty
Feldman on the head, he deadpans, "I'm
Sicilian." That probably had them rolling in
the aisles in Florence and Venice, but it
doesn't have that kind of impact on a North
American audience.
The trans-Atlantic communication gap
unfortunately cannot explain the respectful
silence that filled the theatre for most of the
film. The dialogue is so banal it becomes
irritating to listen to it, and several of the
actors belong outside of stores, holding
bundles of cigars.
There is good reason to believe that there
never was an intention on the part of the
producer and director, Martino and Martino, to make an hilarious film. Rather they
were perhaps thinking of something light
and amusing. If so, they did not set their
sights quite low enough.
If the cleverness of the first story had been
carried consistently through the film, and
Marty Feldman put to better use, there
would have been a chance. As it is, the
audience is grateful for the end, what little
audience there is left.
Sex With a Smile is being inflicted on the
projectionist and occasionally a few other
people at the Fine Arts Cinema on Georgia
Street.
Friday, February 18, 1977
THE
UBYSSEY
Page Friday. 5 VIST A
By TERRY ADES
The Newest Advance Mattress
Cultural Social Centre is also the
newest place to meet people, talk
and socialize. It is open every night
and different programs such as
movies, speakers, and poetry
nights are planned. The centre is
held at 1520 West Sixth (off the side
aDey). Admission is 50 cents to $1,
just enough to pay its own rent.
For people interested in dance,
the Anna Wyman Dancers are
having a presentation on Feb. 23 at
the Vancouver Music Centre, 1270
Chestnut. Student tickets are $1
and the show starts at 11 a.m.
Toronto dance artist Elizabeth
Chitty will perform Lap with video
artist Terry McGlade. Performance is at the Western Front,
303 East eighth, at 9 p.m. Admission for members is $1, for non-
members, $2.
At the Vancouver East Cultural
Centre, Westcoast Actors present
the Merchant of Venice, Shakespeare's classic comedy. It is on
Feb. 17-19, 22-26 and March 1, 2, 3.
Tickets are $3.50 and $4 and curtain
time is 8:30p.m. The Saturday 2:30
matinee Feb. 19 is 'pay what you
can' day. Also at the VECC, Valri
Bromfield is playing a one-woman
show in You're Eating Out of the
Dog's Dish. Ms. Bromfield creates
characters out of the assorted men,
women and dogs she has known.
Theshow is on Sunday, Feb. 20 at 7
and 9:15 p.m. Tickets are $3.50 and
reservations are advised. On
Monday night, 8 p.m. movies at the
VEEC, My Man Godfrey starring
William Powell and Carole
Lombard is playing. Tickets are
$1.25.
For children on Feb. 20 at 2:30
p.m., Green Thumb players
present Winter's Tales. This is
being held at the Renfrew Park
Community Centre, 2929 East
Twenty-second.
The Echo poetry readings held at
the West End Community Centre
are free. On Feb. 20, perk Wynand,
Eric Ivan Berg and Charles Lillard
are reading.
Kits Neighborhood House is
having a poetry night Feb. 25 at 8
p.m. Local poets and musicians
are invited to read and perform
their works. The evening is free.
Also free, and at the Kits Neighborhood House on Feb. 18 at 8:30
p.m. is a variety evening of dance,
music and skits.
At the Burnaby Arts Gallery,
Sunday, Feb. 20 The Famous
Farren Gainer and The Flying
Seath Downy are presenting a
program of minute plays and
music. This should be novel entertainment. Still at the Burnaby
Art Gallery Feb. 21 at 8 p.m.,
poems by Thomas Hardy, D. H.
Lawrence, Charles Olson, Robert
Cr eely and Jack Spicer will be read
by Ellen Tallman, Robin Blaser
and Warren Tallman. Admission is
free.
Pied Pumpkin will be playing at
a benefit dance to help raise funds
for the Japanese Canadian Centennial. Featured the same night is
Yakeo Yamashiro playing the
shakuhachi, the Japanese flute.
TTie dance is being held on Feb. 18
at the Ukrainian Hall, 805 West
Pender at 8 p.m.
An entertaining way to spend
Sunday morning is to go to the
coffee concerts at the Queen
Elizabeth Playhouse. Admission is
$1. They start at 11 a.m. and go for
an hour. On Feb. 20 the Foestrouo
trio is playing.
For jazz buffs, Dave Brubeck
and three of his sons are playing at
the David Y. H. Lui Theatre March
3. Tickets are from $4.50 to $7.50.
' Don't forget the Page Friday
*Veatiye Arts issue coining up this
3$u-cti 4. Written material and
pWturis should be submitted to Ihe
Ubyssey office, or in boxes in
department offices of English
Creative Writing, or Fine Arts.
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Page Friday. 6
THE        UBYSSEY
Friday, February 18, 1977 >-..*..
boohs
Birney's bad book now okay
By MERRILEE ROBSON
McClelland and Stewart have
just published a new edition of
Earle Birney's Turvey, with all the
dirty words left in.
When the novel was originally
published in 1949 the language was
considered unprintable. The novel
went to print full of euphemisms
and blanks, and with the expletives
deleted.
Turvey
By Earle Birney
Published by
McClelland and Stewart
288 pages, $8.95 hardcover.	
Our language and morals have
changed since then and we are now
ready for the unexpurgated edition
of Turvey. Now one can read the
novel and scarcely notice the
vulgarisms. In fact, the substitutions for this language in
the earlier editions stands out
more because the dialogue seems
so unnatural. The characters are
soldiers, after all.
The language in Turvey is very
important. The fact that Birney is
a poet is obvious. Birney plays with
his  character's  dialogue.  The
conversations demonstrate the;
individuality of each character's
accent and vocabulary.
Birney's characters reflect the
differences in dialect of various
parts of Canada. One character's
adenoidal speech is described
hilariously. At times however this
faithful reproduction of the vernacular works adversely, as the
reader is sometimes distracted by
the use of outmoded slang.
Birney's poetic insight is visible
elsewhere in the novel. His
description of the effects of the war
New poets neglected
By SHEILA BURNS
After the initial surge of public
enthusiasm for Canadian
Literature in the mid 1960s, the
excitement seems to have
stagnated. The public has become
complacent with those who have
become 'standard' writers.
Canadian publishers, once
depriving their public of its own
literature, are now swamping the
market with many volumes of
anthologies and textbooks, each
claiming tbbe the definitive edition
of its field.
Canadian Poetry^-The Modern
Era
Edited by John Newlove
McClelland and Stewart
Paperback, $5.95, 270 pp.
And McClelland and Stewart
have done it again. Their latest
offering is a book entitled
Canadian Poetry — The Modern
Era. It is labelled as 'compact and
authoritative ... the definitive
anthology   of   Canadian   poetry.'
Edited by John Newlove, winner of
the 1972 Governor-General's
Award, the anthology is just what
it claims to be, only it is too
compact and too authoritative.
The book is nicely bound and
attractive enough but one would
have hoped for more imagination
in the selection of material. It is to
be hoped that selection of poets and
poems reflects the tastes of the
publishers and what they anticipate to be the interests of the
reading public, rather than on
Newlove himself.
All the biggies are here: Atwood,
Birney, Bowering, Layton,
Livesay, Purdy and Reaney. There
are no new poets, and no new
poems from the old ones.
Canadian Poetry — The Modern
Era would serve as an excellent
introduction to anyone unfamiliar
with Canadian poetry. But to those
who have already read or studied
Canadian poetry, it would read like
a textbook — very standard, and
rather dull.
The publication of this anthology
reveals the clear need for a 'new'
age of discovery in Canadian
literature. For across the country
there are many talented young
poets hidden in the shadows of the
giants.
The 'standard' Canadian poets —
the Atwoods, Laytons and Birneys
have been accepted by their
countrymen. They have received
their due, and without a doubt,
6verdue, recognition.
But it is time for the unveiling of
new talent — new works by new
poets. The uncovering and
publication of these poets would
make a new anthology by McClelland and Stewart, or any other
Canadian publishing house, an
exciting event.
McClelland and Stewart and
John Newlove should perhaps
extend an apology to the poets left
ouf of this anthology. Let's hope
they will be discovered and
published, and soon, before once
again that famous Canadian indifference sets in.
somewhere to go
after class
after the show
... after anything!
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in Holland is practically identical
to his description of the same scene
in his poem The Road to Nijmegen.
The poem is more concise and
more moving.
Birney's poetry has more impact
than his novel. But his objective in
Turvey is different. He is not
writing about the horrors of war;
in fact, Turvey is really never in
the war. Birney describes the
absurdity of the army and does this
very well.
The novel is about Turvey's
career in the army. He progresses
through his training and through a
series of complications which keep
him from getting to the front. When
he finally gets near the war he is
sent immediately back, first to
England and then to Canada.
The novel is described as a
military picaresque and it is the
progression of incidents that is
important. We do not get much
insight into the psychology of the
characters.
Turvey does not really change or
come to any understanding of his
situation. He is given a number of
IQ tests in the army and he does
better with each one. He proceeds
from a moron to a genius level of
intelligence because of his
familiarity with the test but he
doesn't really learn anything.
Turvey and the other characters
in the novel have no depth. They
border on the caricature and one
does not really sympathize with
them. One only laughs at the
problems caused by the military
machine in which they are caught.
But the caricatures are amusing
and colorful.
Women, however, are never
particularly well described. This
seems to be a problem with many
war novels.
Turvey, however, is not
necessarily a war novel. The army
is the setting but Turvey could
easily be about the absurd complexities of any large organization.
Perhaps there are too many incidents describing Turvey's
mishaps, as one gets frustrated by
the continuation of Turvey's
problems. But Turvey's
bewilderment and his attempts to
survive the army are still
hilarious.
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Friday, February 18, 1977
THE       UBYSSEY
Page Friday. 7 booksym*
j&Z*
<  Mia*.*
Rape: a crime of power
By AMANDA KING
I was eleven and my sister was
seven. Looking back now I'm
amazed I was so naive. I was
coming home from the dentist with
my sister at four in the afternoon,
and I was aware that a man was
behind me. He followed us into the
building. We were scared. I said to
my sister, "Julie, he's behind us,
don't get into the elevator with
him, run, let's run up the stairs. He
caught us on the third floor stair
well and put a knife at my sister's
throat. He said to me, "Pull up
your dress and pull down your
pants and I won't hurt the little
one."
Against Our Will by Susan
Brownmiller is a book about rape:
the history, the psychology, and
the victims of rape. Her book attempts to prove rape is not a crime
of lust but of violence and power.
Against Our Will
By Susan Brownmiller
Bantam Books
Paper $2.75, 458 pages
Brownmiller first traces the
history of rape and the law from
primitive man, when men first
equated rape with the ruination of
their wholly owned property, up to
the 20th century.
The most vivid examples of the
penalties for rape come from the
Food
By TERRY ADES
More people are becoming
aware of the Falafel, the middle
eastern answer to the hamburger.
The Israeli's have set up Falafel
fast-food stands. The Egyptians
call them Ta'mia and sell them at
the movies instead of popcorn.
North American vegetarians eat
them for their high protein content.
There are two kinds of Falafel.
One variety is made of chick peas
ground with spices and deep fried
and the other is made in the same
way but with fava beans instead of
chick peas. A true Falafel/Ta'mia
afficionado is able to discriminate
clearly between the two. North
Americans are more familiar with
the chick pea Falafel.
An authentic Falafel burger is
made with Pita (a flat pocket
bread) and stuffed with Falafel,
tomaties, cucumber and scallions,
and a Tahina sauce. The Tahina
sauce is made from sesame seed
paste beaten with lemon juice and
makes for a wet sandwich.
Delicious.
The Caravan restaurant, newly
opened, specializes in Middle
Eastern and Israeli foods. The
menu is varied and reasonably
priced. At $1.20, the Falafel sandwich makes the restaurant well
worth visiting.
The decor of the Caravan is not
pleasing. Wallpaper with a mock
Spanish motif adorns some pillars
set on one side of the room. There
is a large number of (ugh) plastic
plants. Plastered to the ceiling is a
red maple leaf. And an alcove
imbedded in one wall is furnished
with a table and chairs. For
private parties, perhaps?
But the food is the attraction.
The specialties feature stuffed
Grape Leaves, cooked in wine,
Stuffed Green Peppers, and
Stuffed Zuchinni. These are
casserole dishes served with rice.
From amongst the entrees, the
steak sandwich, kabob, or
shishlick, all appealing, are served
in Pita with salad.
The Caravan restaurant has
been opened for less than a month.
The menu offers promise. The
Falafel sandwich is definitely
recommended.
Caravan Restaurant
675Smythe
Bible and the Talmud: the earliest
penalties, drowning and being
stoned to death, applied not only to
the rapist but to the victim as well.
In some cases, for the price of 50
pieces of silver, the rapist was
allowed to marry the virgin he had
defiled.
Centuries later the victim herself
was able to claim 50 pieces of silver
from the rapist.
Brownmiller tells us of the
"chivalrous and gentle" knights of
medieval times who habitually
looted, tortured, and raped
maidens in distress. She cites
examples of the slowly-changing
penalties for rape in the civilized
world — penalties which from the
13th to the 20th century, have
changed very little.
The most horrifying evidence
that rape is a crime of violence and
power is contained in Brown-
miller's examples of rape in war.
She takes us from the warriors of
ancient Greece to American troops
in Vietnam, from the German and
Japanese atrocities of World Wars
I and II to Bangladesh. The most
striking thing in each situation is
that the winning side does the most
raping.
Brownmiller's most convincing
illustration of this is the Russian-
German conflict of World War II.
When the Nazis swept into Russia
they raped and killed Russian
women. When Germany fell back
in defeat the Russians abused any
women they could find in the ruins
of Berlin. Rape is the conqueror's
way, says Brownmiller, of
terrorizing and demoralizing the
loser.
Brownmiller presents case
histories of rape victims. The
women range from children to the
elderly. They are married or unmarried, black or white, beautiful
or homely. Each case history
reflects feelings of helplessness,
terror, humiliation and eventually
rage. Many victims seek the aid of
police and the courts only to be
scoffed at and their stories
discredited.
Brownmiller's solution  is that
women fight back through feminist
groups   and   through   organized^
protest to achieve legal reform.
Women must also learn to defend
SUB FILMS
presents
WalterMatthau
George Burns
n Neil Simon's
"The
Sunshine Boys"
Richard Benjamin
Screenplay by Neil SitTIOn
prooucea by Ray Stark
Direcieo by Herbert Ross
This Thurs. & Sun. - 7:00
Fri. & Sat. -7:00,9:30
CEORCE      JAHE
SECAL     FOHOA
i
*****
'a»n<~-**"«•>
This is {he
"Bank they
tri<Mtbr„b
L—
~S>Gr\<r\\~e. and Gkjde "they 3.in6
DICK AHD JANE
//;/
.[EDMcMAHONj
MATURE
SHOWS AT: 12:25, 2:15,4:10,
6:05,8:05, 10
SUNDAY: 2:15,4:10,6:05,8:05, 10
T MA I
! SHOWS AT: V<
6:05, J
SUNDAY: 2:15,4
OQEON
881  GRANVILLE
682-7468
themselves physically, to outgrow
the concept that only men are
capable of inflicting real damage.
Brownmiller's ultimate stand is
hopeful. "Rape can be
eradicated," she says "not merely
controlled or avoided on an individual basis, but the approach
must    be    long    range    and
cooperative and must have the
understanding and good will of
many men as well as women."
Against Our Will is well
researched, well organized, and
relentlessly truthful. It is an indignant book. It is not to be taken
lightly, and it cannot be easily
forgotten.
GENE WILDER
JILL CLAYBURGH
RICHARD PRYOR
PATRICK MCGOOHAN
Coronet Shows At: 12:50, 3,
5:10, 7:25, 9:35 (Sunday 3 Etc.)f
Broadway 7:00, 9:00
> SILVER
STRERN)
MATURE
Occasional
coarse
language.
-B.C. Dir.
bROAQ WAV 1
70 7   W. BROADWAY
874-1927
CORONET 2
8S1   GRANVILLE
685-6828
Frank satirical com
some coarse language,
completely concerned
with sex — B.C. Dir.
edy,
CORONET  I
891   GRANVILLE
685-6828
^       THERE MUST FOREVER DE A SHOWS AT:  12:05, 1:40, 3:40,
5:40. 7:40, 9:40
GUARDIAN AT THE GATE FROM HELL... Sunday: 2:00, 3:40,
5:40, 7:40, 9:40
sentinel
Many gory and
frightening scenes
—B.C. Director
voquE
918  GRANVILLE
685-5434
A   DELIGHTFUL   CLASSY  AND  UNBELIEVABLY  HONEST
PIECE OF FUN
«i
COUSIN, COUSINE
MATURE — English Sub-Titles
SHOWS AT: 7:30, 9:30
II
dlJNbAR
DUNBAR  at 30th
224-7252
ALAN ARKIN • VANESSA REDGRAVE • and NICOL WILLIAMSON
us Siy;nund Freud u* U.lu De'veau* "s Sherio^ k Ho/mes
THE SEVEN-PERCENT
SOLUTION
MATURE—Shows at 7:30, 9:40
DARK
CAMBIE at 18th
876-2747
Jack Nicholson   ONE FLEW OVER THE
Show Times: 7:20, 9:40 CUCKOO'S  NEST
Violence & coarse language,
could be frightening to 	
R.'w^McDonald, /^T^jM^.        70 7 W. BROADWAY |
B.C. Dir. .?:.t..S;,.~»«5.. 874-1927
bROAQ WAV 2
And Now... after four years of
preparation and production
A UNIVERSAL RELEASE
ALBERTO GRIMALDI
tasmiova
HIS FIRST ENGLISH LANGUAGE FILM
A Film by FEDERICO FELLINI
starring DONALD SUTHERLAND
Produced by ALBERTO GRIMALDI
A CLASSICAL SEX STORY
- B.C. DIRECTOR
STARTS TODAY
ONE SHOWING NIGHTLY
8 P.M.
VARSITy
224-3730
4375  W. 10th
Page Friday, 8
THE
UBYSSEY
Friday, February 18,  1977 Friday, February 18, 1977
THE
UBYSSEY
Page 13
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Highly efficient 10-inch
bass and 1.4-inch treble
components in a compact
enclosure make the L26 an
outstanding performer.
TOGETHER
ONLY
64988^-l
aX*
£•
SX-750    AM/FM STEREO RECEIVER
50 + 50 Watts RMS per channel, T.H.D. 0.1%
n
■Wy!*.
Together with a
pair of JBL L36
three-way speakers
Identical to the L26 in
concept, the L36 shares its
low frequency loudspeaker
and high frequency direct
radiator with the L26, but
features the addition of a
midrange transducer.
Finished in Natural Oak
Veneer with choice of
Grille covers.
TOGETHER
ONLY
869s8 £-
SA-9500
STEREO INTEGRATED   AMPLIFIER
80 + 80 Watts
*J
"ill   ~   *
The
L100 Century
by JBL
The same highly efficient
three-component system as
our professional JBL 4311
Control Monitor. Its oiled
walnut finish contrasts
with a Sculptured Air foam
grille in your choice of
blue, orange or brown.
TOGETHER
ONLY
los^ej
'"rsri-'
IWj
%>J\ Page 14
THE
UBYSSEY
Friday, February 18, 1977
Hands off
Af Soroka
Librarian Al Soroka has been
threatened with dismissal for
protesting the October visit of
South Africa MP Harry Schwarz.
There will be a Hands Off Al
Soroka. demonstration today at
noon in front of the old
administration building.
Volunteers
The Children's Place is a
non-profit pre-school program
which needs volunteer drivers to
help children with special needs.
The program needs drivers
Tuesday and Thursday mornings
to take children to the school at
Grandview Calvary Baptist
Church, at 1803 E. First Ave.
If you can help, call Enid Elliot
at 732-5105 or call 251-2633 on
Tuesday and Thursday mornings.
They also want donations of
bicycles and play equipment.
Prisoners
Amnesty International has
designated 1977 as 'Prisoners of
Conscience Year'.
The group is circulating a
worldwide petition to ask the
United Nations general assembly
Hot flashes
to ensure strict observance of the
Universal Declaration of Human
Rights in all countries and to act
for the immediate release of all
prisoners of conscience.
To support this international
petition. Amnesty International is
co-sponsoring a seminar to
examine the nature of
governments which are
responsible for violations of
human rights and for acts of
torture.
The seminar is on Feb. 24 at 6
p.m. in the Canadian Memorial
Church, 16th and Burrard.
There is no fee, but
contributions will be appreciated.
Call 224-0803 or 224-1607.
self-defence for women led by Dr.
Sara David, clinical psychologist
at Douglas College and Simon
Fraser University.
The course is on Feb. 18, 19
and 20 in the Mildred Brock room
in Brock Hall. The fee is $30.
For information and
pre-registration, call 228-2163 or
go to SUB 228 or 224.
BLACK & LEE
TUX SHOP
NOW AT
1110 Seymour St.
688-2481
If you don't register your bike,
it won't get towed away, but it
will be hard to trace if it gets
stolen.
Bicycle registration only costs
$1, and can save you a lot of
hassle if your bike gets ripped off.
You can register a bike by
going to your local RCMP, filling
out a form and handing over your
$1.
Self-defence
The UBC women's centre will
give a workshop about emotional
'Tween classes
TODAY
SATURDAY
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
S o m e t h I n go r o t M er, noon,
International House Lounge.
BAHA'I CLUB
Informal discussion on Baha'i faith,
noon, SUB 211.
CHINESE STUDENTS'
ASSOCIATION AND
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Free Cantonese class, noon, Bu
100.
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Chinese New Year dinner and
dance, 6 p.m., Mandarin Garden.
SOUTHEAST ASIA OHOU
Kyaw Than of the University of
Rangoon on Religion In Burma and
Southeast Asia, noon, International
House 402.
INSTITUTE OF ASIAN RESEARCH
Chinese New Year's Celebration:
Dinner, 6:30 p.m. to 1 a.m.,
Klngsland; seminar on current
Japanese-Phllllplne trade relations,
4:30 p.m., old mech engineering
annex A room 209.
SKYDIVING
General  meeting,  noon,  SUB 215.
PSYCHOLOGY STUDENTS'
ASSOCIATION
Guest lecture, noon, Angus 223.
THE CENTRE COFFEEHOUSE
Denise, Lauch, Dan and Bruce;
cover charge $1; 8:30 p.m.,
Lutheran Campus Centre.
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Documentary film show, 2:30 p.m.,
SUB auditorium.
INSTITUTE OF ASIAN RESEARCH
Chinese New Year's Celebration:
slide show, 1 to 3 p.m., Strathcona
School; Cantonese Opera, 3:30 to 6
p.m., Strathcona School; food
market, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m., Chinese
Community Centre, 431Vz Columbia
Street; Chinese chess, 2 to 5 p.m.
and 7 p.m. to midnight, Chinese
Community Centre, 431V2 Columbia
Street.
PSFG KUNG FU
Meet for Lion Dance, 12 noon, 499
East Pender.
VANCOUVER INSTITUTE
J. Tuzo Wilson on earthquakes In
China and elsewhere, 8:15 p.m.,
IRC 2.
SUNDAY
INSTITUTE FOR ASIAN RESEARCH
Chinese New Year's Celebration:
Lion Dance parade, 12 noon to 5
p.m., Pender Street.
TUESDAY
*■
MOVING & TRANSFER
Reasonable
Rates
Big or Small Jobs
ALSO GARAGES
BASEMENTS
8. YARDS
732-9898
CLEAN-UP
VANCOUVER
INSTITUTE
lectures
DR. J. TUZO WILSON
Director
Ontario Science Centre
EARTHQUAKES IN CHINA
AND ELSEWHERE
Dr. Wilson is a world renowned
earth scientist who has been in
the forefront of research on
continental drift and earthquakes.
He's also been a frequent visitor
to China.
SATURDAY, FEB. 19
8:15 P.M.
Lecture Hall 2
Woodward IRC
ADMISSION IS FREE
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Chinese Instrumental group
practice, 7:30 p.m., International
House.
IS SI ggEIElEjggEjgEl EjEjEjBjEjg ggggggrggggggggEjgrggggiJi,
1       CANDIA TAVERNA        1
IS ........... yjj
13 FAST FREE PIZZA DELIVERY IS
Up Call 228-9512/9513 IS
Irl |S
Jj 4510 W. 10th Ave., Open 7 Days a Week 4 p.m. - 2 a.m. j|
'IS.IslsIsSlaSSSIsIslalsSSIalslsSSSIslalsIa (sIstEJIstEilsIsIsIslglslsIs |tn
(?|epR*je Tie
*[  -rrye
GiAle^e
(§A&0 6peCf^L
odiy *i.5o
luea. ffe&. i5** Ti^ouc^j Fri . fe&. 18"
IIart. -   Z"*-
OMPliMs/TTaRt- ^Mede lea
HILLEL HOUSE
PRESENTS
AMOS GILBOA,
Shaliach for the J.N.F. in Montreal
,will give a lunchtime talk on the work of the J.N.F.,
the importance of Golah and Israel Today. The talk
will be accompanied by a slide show.
WEDNESDAY February 23rd
12:30 to 1:30 p.m.
Lunch will be available
MENNONITE CENTRAL COMMITTEE -
A CHRISTIAN RESOURCE TO
MEET HUMAN NEEDS
M.C.C. needs people committed to the Christian Faith to work in
third world Countries. Areas of service are in medical,
agricultural, nutritional, educational and social services.
The funding base of M.C.C. is the Christian Church and our
service depends on a high degree of voluntarism.
Wally Kroeker, Director of Mennonite Central Committee, will be
available to interview those interested on February 23.
Please make an appointment NOW at the Campus Placement
Office (Office of Student Services).
A WESTERN MBA?
Professor David A. Peach, MBA Program Chairman,
and Robert C. Malanchuk, MBA Program Manager, of
the University of Western Ontario will be on campus
to provide information about Western's MBA
program on
Thursday, February 24.1977
For   further   information   contact   the   Office   of
Student Services.
CLASS OF
1977
GENERAL MEETING
Friday, February 25th, 1977
12:30
SUB Theatre
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES:   Campus - 3 lines, 1 day $1.50; additional lines 35c.
Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; additional lines
50c. Additional days $2.25 and 45c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications Office, Room 241, S.U.B., UBC, Vancouver.
5 — Coming Events
ECKANKAR
Th. Path of Total AwarcMN
"The Sun that never sets is visible
to the naked soul and my music is
audible to the spiritual ears only."
Paul  Twitchell,   Ttie   Tiger's   Fans:
INTRODUCTORY   LECTURE
7:30 p.m. Wed., Feb. 23rd SUB 213
20 — Housing
AN EVENIN6 OF FOLK MUSIC featuring Canadian artists. Saturday,
Feb. 19th, 8:00 p.m. Ukranian Ball,
80S EL Fender. Admission $2.50. Refreshments. Sponsored by Vancouver
Young Communist League.
THE CENTRE COFFEEHOUSE Denise,
Lauch Dan, and Bruce. Lutheran
Campus Centre. Friday, 8:30 p.m.
cover $1.00.
10 — For Sale — Commercial
COMMUNITY SPORTS
RACQUET STRINGING
Very low rates. Excellent workmanship. 24-hour service, plus exceptional prices for racquets. Call 733-
1612.  3016 West 4th Ave.  Open 10
THE GRIN BIN. Largest selection of
prints and posters in B.C. 3209 West
Broadway (opposite Super Valu)
Vancouver, B.C. 738-2311.
11 — For Sale — Private
1971 VEGA, 4 speed, H-B., one owner,
34,000 miles, positraetion, Michelins,
Rally Pack. $1,000 OBO. 988-4582,
Sunday night thru Friday night.
1974 MAZDA, stand., 4 dr., well main.,
must sell, 2nd car, can't afford insur.
$2,200 OBO. 34,000 mi. 581-2374 after
five.
BOOKS — Prof, relocating, must sell,
psychology books, great opportunity
to build your library. Call 943-2902.
1965 AUSTIN 1800. New brakes, faculty
parking   sticker.  $295  OBO.   734-1980.
15 —Found
QUIET NONSMOKING PERSON, female
preferred to share base, with 2
others. $100. 32&-O280.
65 — Scandals
THE CENTRE COFFEEHOUSE, Denise,
Lauch, Dan, and Bruce. Lutheran
Campus Centre, Friday, 8:30 p.m.
cover $1.00.
70 — Services
PIANO TUNING — Expert tuning and
repairs to all makes. Reduced rates
to students. Call Dallas Hinton 286-
8123 anytime.
WEDDINGS, THREE MINUTE passports.
Adams Photography, 731-2101, 1459
West Broadway at Granville Street.
80 — Tutoring
BOGGLED MINDS and wisdom heads
call The Tutorial Centre, 228-4557
anytime or see Lim at Speakeasy,
12:30-2:30 p.m. $1.00 to register.
85 — Typing
CAMPUS DROP-OFF for fast aocurate
typing. Reasonable rates. Call 731-
1807 after  12:00.
YEAR ROUND expert essay and thesis
typing from legible work. Phone 738-
6829. 10:00 a.m.-9:00 p.m.
99 — Miscellaneous
SKI WHISTLER
Rent cabin day/week.  732-0174 area
ir=ar=i[==it='r=Jr=ir=it=J[='r=ir=l
USE
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED
if=»i=ii=ii=ii=n=ii=ii=ii=n=ii= Friday, February 18, 1977
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 15
'Birds play Vikings for playoff spot
By PAUL WILSON
The UBC Thunderbird basketball team is up against the wall this
weekend when they take on the
University of Victoria Vikings in
Victoria.
The 'Birds and the Vikings are
tied at 22 points with just two
games remaining in the Canada
West basketball league schedule.
They have identical 11-7 league
records and are in second place.
Feb. 11 the University of Alberta
, Golden Bears wrapped up first
place and one of the two playoff
spots by defeating the 'Birds 83-77.
The other berth will be decided in
Victoria.
Should one of the teams win both
games they will meet the Bears
Feb. 25-27 for a best two out of
three playoff in Edmonton.
If the two teams split their two-
game series, as they did in their
last meeting at UBC, the second
berth will be decided on the basis of
points for and against in the four
games. The 'Birds currently hold a
slim one-point lead by virtue of
their last meeting.
Leading the Vikings this
weekend will be Lee Edmondson
and Jim Dudderidge. Edmondson
is currently in third place in league
scoring, third in  field goal  ac
curacy and second in rebounding.
Dudderidge is fifth in scoring and
fifth in accuracy.
One plus the 'Birds will have
going for them is the return of 6'11"
centre Mike McKay.
Last week in the series against
Alberta, McKay came off the UBC
bench to score 14 points Friday and
led (he 'Birds Saturday with 22
points. McKay was sidelined since
Jan. 5 with a recurring knee injury.
But he appears to be getting his
form back and could be fully
recovered by this weekend.
In other league play the
University of Calgary Dinosaurs
are at Saskatoon for a pair of
games against the University of
Saskatchewan Huskies. The
University of Lethbridge
Pronghorns visit the University of
Alberta for their final games of the
year against the Bears.
The only game that really counts
though is between the Vikings and
the 'Birds in what could amount to
a two-game total point series.
Last year the 'Birds lost the
playoffs in two straight games to
the Calgary Dinos. But two years
ago they came from second place
to defeat the Vikings in the playoffs
and won the berth in the Canadian
finals.
Nordic and alpine ski teams
place second at Oregon meet
The UBC ski team came second
among northern conference teams
in a combined Pacific Northwest
Ski conference meet held Feb. 8-10
at Mt. Hood, Ore.
The meet consisted of two alpine
and one cross country event. Ten
colleges and universities competed
in the meet. Both the UBC alpine
and cross country teams suffered
from a lack of training because of
local snow conditions. The weather
also had a big effect on the races. It
rained two of the three race days
so all the times were slower than
usual.
The UBC team placed first in the
northern conference in the men's
slalom and giant slalom. They
placed second in the cross country
event. The women's team came
first in the slalom and second in the
giant slalom but failed to place in
the cross country event.
In the men's slalom Randy Davis
placed fourth, Ron Ozanne came
tenth and Bruce Harland managed
fifteenth.
Fred Gook came up with a great
effort in the cross country placing
eleventh among a strong field. Don
Andrews and Steve Vajda placed
far back in the race.
In the women's slalom event
Cathy O'Sullivan recorded a very
impressive second place. Peri
Mehling finished tenth despite
problems in her second run. Miana
Koch came in twentieth place.
Mehling did much better in the
giant slalom coming in third.
O'Sullivan finished eighth. The
women's cross country team did
poorly, but Debbie Attenborough
managed a good performance.
A race is tentatively scheduled
for the end of February at Mt.
Baker, Wash, if snow conditions
permit.
ATTENTION
Paul Taylor's last minute goal
breaks soccer losing streak
The UBC Thunderbird soccer
team defeated the Firefighters 3-2,
Saturday in Thunderbird Stadium
when Paul Taylor scored with less
than a minute remaining.
The win broke a three game
losing streak for UBC in first
division B.C. Senior league play.
Bob Rose opened the scoring for
the Firefighters at the 10 minute
mark. Bob Baker tied it up for the
'Birds with five minutes to go
before halftime. Ken Garrett gave
the 'Birds a 2-1 lead four minutes
into fee second half when he converted a penalty kick. Reg
Newmark tied the score for the
Firefighters at the 79 minute
mark to set the stage for Taylor's
last minute effort.
In other league games the New
Westminster Blues continued their
seven game winning streak with a
victory over the Dover Olympics
by a score of 2-0. The game was the
first of a doubleheader played at
Empire Stadium Sunday. The
Blues are now in second place with
an 8-4-2 record.
In the second match at Empire
Stadium, third place Pegasus
edged the Wesburn Kejacs 2-1. The
win keeps Pegasus in third place
with a 7-5-3 record.
At Hugh Boyd field, Richmond
Inn blanked the Eldorado
Glenavons 1-0. Richmond is in
fourth place with a 5-5-6 record.
The  first  place   team   is   the
Italian-Columbus club with a 9-1-4
record. The rest of the clubs are
bunched up around the 13 point
mark including UBC with a 5-5-3
record
Feb. 5 the 'Birds tied the
Eldorado Glens by a score of 1-1 in
Thunderbird Stadium. It was an
exhibition game held during the
league's break for cup play.
This weekend the 'Birds will pick
up on games they missed earlier in
the schedule. They play the second
place New West Blues at 2 p.m.,
Saturday in Thunderbird Stadium.
Sunday, the 'Birds play the first
game of a doubleheader against
the Firefighters at 12:30 p.m. in
Empire Stadium.
Golden Bears play Thunderbirds
in CWUAA playoffwarmup
INTRAMURAL POSITIONS
OPEN FOR 1977-78
The Intramural Program is seeking applicants for the
following positions:
MENS PROGRAM
DIRECTOR
ASSOCIATE DIRECTORS (4)
WOMENS PROGRAM
DIRECTOR
ASSOCIATE DIRECTORS (3)
CO-REC PROGRAM
DIRECTOR
ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR (1)
PUBLICITY
DIRECTOR
Apply in writing to the following by Friday, 4 March
1977 — Nestor N. Korchinsky, Intramural Co-ordinator, School of Phys. Ed. and Recreation, War
Memorial Gym.
The University of Alberta Golden
Bears will be attempting to extend
their winning streak this weekend
at the expense of the UBC Thunderbird hockey team.
The Bears have won sixteen
consecutive games on their way to
a league-leading 18-2 record. UBC
is 11-9 with just four games left.
During their last visit, Feb. 4-5,
the Bears clinched first place by
defeating the Huskies 4-2 and 7-3.
The 'Birds will travel to Edmonton March 11-13 to play the
Bears for the league championship.
ihe series this weekend will be
more than just a warm-up, the
'Birds must win at least once to
gain the confidence they, will need
in Edmonton.
The 'Birds have lacked consistency throughout the year, but
could be peaking at the right
moment.
Goaltending has been a major
factor all season. Ron Lefebvre has
kept the 'Birds close during the
early going in many games while
the offence got going.
The UBC offence will be led by
Marty Matthews, playing left wing
on a line with Bill Ennos and Jim
Stuart. Matthews has four goals in
his last three games.
Game times are 8 p.m. Friday
and Saturday in the winter sports
centre.
Match box
FRIDAY
HOCKEY
University of Alberta at UBC, 8
p.m., winter sports centre.
GYMNASTICS
Canada West Athletic Association
charnplonsnlp, all day, War
Memorial Gym.
BADMINTON
B.C. Sr. Open Championships, all
day, various clubs in Vancuver
SATURDAY
SOCCER
New Westminster Blues at UBC
(men's), 2 p.m., Thunderbird
Stadium.
HOCKEY
University of Alberta at UBC, 8
p.m., winter sports centre.
GYMNASTICS
Canada   West   Athletic   Association
Championship,     all     day.     War
Memorial Gym.
BADMINTON
B.C.     Sr.     Open     Championships
(women's), all day, varlpus clubs In
Vancouver.
FIELD HOCKEY
UBC varsity vs Lomas I (women's),
1 p.m., Lord Byng.
UBC   jv's   vs.   Tigers   (women's),   1
p.m., Balaclava Park.
SUNDAY
SOCCER
Firefighters' "A"    at   UBC,   12:30
p.m., Empire Stadium.
HOCKEY
Norwest   Caps   at   UBC   (jv),   3:15
p.m., winter sports centre.
BADMINTON
B.C.   Sr.   Open   Championships,  all
day, various clubs in Vancouver.
-    THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA N
1977 SPRING LECTURES
BY VISITING PROFESSORS
Eberhard Bethge
Dr. Bethge studied theology at the universities of Berlin, Tubingen and Halle before joining
Dietrich Bonhoeffer's newly-opened seminary in 1935. He was arrested in 1944 in connection
with the plot to kill Hitler and in connection with which Bonhoeffer was himself executed. He
is now known throughout the world as Bonhoeffer's biographer, and is thoroughly acquainted
with the atmosphere of Berlin in the 1920s and 1930s and how it spawned the terrors of
Nazism. Eberhard Bethge is currently a historian at the City University of New York.
THE WORK OF DIETRICH BONHOEFFER-PART I
Thursday,-February 24 In Lecture Hall 2, Woodward Instructional Resources Centre, at 12:30 p.m.
DIETRICH BONHOEFFER AND THE TOTALITARIAN STATE
Saturday, February 26 In Lecture Hall 2, Woodward Instructional Resources Centre, at 8:15 p.m.
(A Vancouver Institute lecture)
THE WORK OF DIETRICH BONHOEFFER-PART II
Monday, February 28 In Lecture Hall 2, Woodward Instructional Resources Centre, at 12:30 p.m.
ALL LECTURES ARE FREE
sponsored by
, The Cecil K and Ida Green Visiting Professorship Fund Page 16
THE        UBYSSEY
Friday, February 18, 1977
CO
E
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BIG NAMES
tOW PRICES
^7!5T?T^"
The Winning Pair
YP-450 Beautiful styling goes hand in hand with top performance
in this thin-line belt drive turntable. A proven smooth motor and
efficient vibration damping means noise free music.
CR-200* Simply elegant in its design, this AM/FM stereo receiver
has top performance to match. 15 watts RMS per channel at low
distortion is enough to drive most speakers to room-filling volume.
This two-part package is a very special offer from Yamaha and
A&B Sound.
©YAMAHA
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One of the most popular headphones from the
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design is well worth hearing.
L
A-25
FACTORY AUTHORIZED
SEMI-ANNUAL
FLOOR MODEL
CLEARANCE SALE
An excellent opportunity to acquire the most
respected loudspeakers at very reasonable prices.
Every JBL Loudspeaker component has a Full
Five Year Warranty.
FEB. 15-28
WHILE STOCK
LASTS
J  V.
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DYNACO A-25
RETURNS!
An all-time favourite returns! The world renowned
model A-25 is back for a very limited time. If
you've been waiting for this, act now. This is
probably the Cast time we will be able to offer this
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A&B PRICE
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Open Thursday and Friday
until 9 P.M.
682-6144

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