UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Mar 10, 2011

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0126760.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0126760.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0126760-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0126760-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0126760-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0126760-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0126760-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0126760-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0126760-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0126760.ris

Full Text

 Celebrating Uncle Grandpa SINCE 1918
I
Ii
MARCH 10,2011
VOLUME 92, NUMBER XL
ROOM 24, STUDENT UN30N BU3LD3NG
PUBL3SHED MONDAYS AND THURSDAYS
FEEDBACK@UBYSSEY.CA
3YSS
RY 2/UBYSSEY.CA/E VENTS/2011.03.10
MARCH 10,2011
VOLUME XCII,  N°XL
EDITORIAL
COORDINATING EDITOR
Justin McElroy: coordinating@uhyney.ca
NEWS EDITOR
Arshy Mann: news@ubyssey.ca
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR
Kalyeena Makortoff: kmakortoff@ubyssey.ca
SENIOR NEWS WRITER
Mich Cowan: mcowan@ubysseyca
CULTURE EDITORS
Jonny Wakefield & Bryce Warnes:
culture@ubyssey ca
SENIOR CULTURE WRITER
Ginny Monaco: gmonaco@ubyssey ca
CULTURE ILLUSTRATOR
Indiana Joel: ijoel@ubysseyca
SPORTS EDITOR
Marie Vondracek: sports@ubysseyca
FEATURES EDITOR
Trevor Record :features@ubyssey ca
PHOTO EDITOR
Geoff Lister: photos@ubysseyca
PRODUCTION MANAGER
Virginie Menard: production@ubysseyca
COPY EDITOR
Kai Green: copy@ubysseyca
MULTIMEDIA EDITOR
Tara Martellaro: multimedia@ubysseyca
ASSOCIATE MULTIMEDIA EDITOR
Stephanie Warren:
associate.multimedia@ubysseyca
VIDEO EDITOR
David Marino: video@ubysseyca
WEBMASTER
Jeff Blake: webmaster@ubysseyca
Room 24, Student Union Building
6138 Student Union Boulevard
Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1
tel: 604.822.2301
web: www.ubyssey.ca
e-mail: feedback@ubysseyca
BUSINESS
Room 23, Student Union Building
print advertising: 604.822.1654
business office: 604.822.6681
web advertising: 604.822.1658
e-mail: advertising@ubysseyca
BUSINESS MANAGER
FerniePereira: business@ubysseyca
PRINT AD SALES
Kathy Yan Li: advertising@ubysseyca
WEB AD SALES
Paul Bucci: webads@ubysseyca
ACCOUNTS
AlexHoopes: accounts@ubysseyca
CONTRIBUTORS
Hazel Hughes Drake Fenton
Karina Palmitesta Gordon Katie
Amelia Waiz Fabrizio Stendardo
Will McDonald Jon Chiang
Charles To Catherine Guam
Jocelyn Lau Sonia Renger
LEGAL
The Ubyssey is the official student newspaper of
the University of British Columbia. It is published
every Monday and Thursday by The Ubyssey Publications Society. We are an autonomous, democratically run student organization, and all students are
encouraged to participate.
Editorials are chosen and written by the Ubyssey staff. They are the expressed opinion of the
staff, and do not necessarily reflect the views of
The Ubyssey Publications Society or the University of British Columbia. All editorial content appear-
ng in The Ubyssey is the property of The Ubyssey
Publications Society. Stories, opinions, photographs
and artwork contained herein cannot be reproduced
without the expressed, written permission of The
Ubyssey Publications Society.
The Ubyssey is a founding member of Canadian
University Press (CUP) and adheres to CUP's guiding principles.
Letters to the editor must be under 300 words
Please include your phone number, student number
and signature (not for publication) as well as your
year and faculty with all submissions. ID will be
checked when submissions are dropped off at the
editorial office of The Ubyssey; otherwise verification will be done by phone. "Perspectives" are opinion pieces over 300 words but under 750 words and
are run according to space. "Freestyles" are opinion
pieces written by Ubyssey staff members. Priority
will be given to letters and perspectives over free-
styles unless the latter is time sensitive. Opinion
pieces will not be run until the identity of the writer has been verified. The Ubyssey reserves the right
to edit submissions for length and clarity. All letters
must be received by 12 noon the day before intended publication. Letters received after this point wil
be published in the following issue unless there is
an urgent time restriction or other matter deemed
relevant by the Ubyssey staff.
Itisagreed byall persons placing display or classified advertising that if the Ubyssey Publications
Society fails to publish an advertisement or if an
error in the ad occurs the liability of the UPS wil
not be greater than the price paid for the ad. The
UPS shall not be responsible for slight changes or
typographical errors that do not lessen the value or
the impact of the ad
7\V
^» %f^ Canadian
-_*■ qi *--■ University
roL        Press
W? Rainforest
Alliance
Canada Post
Sales Agreement
#0040878022
EVENTS
CORRECTION
In our March 3, 2011 issue, in our
story titled "Law school more
competitive during recession,"
two errors were made. The first
was the statement that UBC
Law will be admitting 200 students this year, when they are
only admitting 180. The second was that their applications
had increased by 20 per cent
this year, when they had actually increased in September 2010.
The Ubyssey regrets these errors.
CLASSIFIED
AVAILABLE    IMMEDIATELY.
2-bedroom garden suite. We're
located in a quiet, family-oriented
neighbourhood, one-half block
east of Dunbar Street. Close to
shops, public transit (#7 direct
to downtown and #25 direct to
UBC), community centre, public
library, and other amenities.
Carpets (installed May'05), big
kitchen, shared laundry, high
speed internet, cable, garden
(with 4 fruit trees, a vegetable
patch and a newly painted
sundeckthat is perfect for BBQs!)
and plenty of storage in a double
car garage. Non-smoking. No
pets. Thank you! Rent is $1100/
month plus share of utilities.
Please phone Aaron at 778-708-
3352 for appointment.
ONGOING EVENTS
UBYSSEY PRODUCTION • Come
help us create this baby! Learn
about layout and editing. Expect
to be fed. • Every Sunday and
Wednesday, 2pm.
RESOURCE GROUPS • Are you
working on a progressive project,
but need funding? Do you have
an idea, but can't get it off the
ground? Apply to the Resource
Groups for funding! Come in,
pitch your idea to us and we will
consider fully or partially funding
your project. • Every Monday,
11am in SUB 245 (second floor,
north-east corner). For more info
email resourcegroups.ams®
gmail.com.
POTTERY SALE AT SPROUTS • The
UBC Pottery club is now selling their work at Sprouts, and
have donated some pieces to
Sprouts in return for space. It
brings a new addition to the
Sprouts atmosphere and allows potters space to showcase their pieces. • Mon-Fri,
9:30am-4pm, Sprouts, SUB
basement.
THURSDAY, MAR. 10
HUNGRY4CHANGE* Oxfam UBC
presents Hungry 4 Change, an
annual dinner organized and
hosted by UBC students that
gathers together the community for a taste of the reality
of food distribution inequality.
Featuring speakers from Oxfam Canada as well as a special guest. • 6:30pm, Heritage
Hall, 3102 Main St, $25, $15 for
students. For tickets, visit ox-
famubcrezgo.com or email ox-
famubch4c@gmail.com.
ISSUES ON REFUGEE HEALTH •
STAND UBC is hosting an exciting upcoming event, "Issues
on Refugee Health," a presentation and discussion on the
health of refugees in Darfur.
This seminar will also feature
guest speaker and Sudanese
refugee Abit Adit Elizabeth. It
will open with an introduction
on the health situation in Darfur, followed by a case study
on the impact of the forced removal of humanitarian workers.
• 5-6pm, Global Lounge, Marine Drive Bldg 1, free.
C0ASTALFIRSTNATI0NS DANCE FESTIVAL »This festival highlights the
richness and diversity of traditional First Nations dance groups
from coastal BC through public
performances, ticketed events
and special school programs.
• Runs until Mar 13, 10am-
5pm, Museum of Anthropology $14/$12 + HST. For a full
schedule of events, please visit moa.ubc.ca/events or contact
(604) 822-5978 or programs®
moa.ubc.ca.
FRIDAY, MAR. 11
CULTURAL NIGHT* The Liu Institute will be hosting a cultural
night with the Africa Awareness
Initiative, showcasing cultures
from around the world with an
emphasis on Africa. Bring traditional dishes! Ifyou bring a dish
for 7-8 people, you get in free. •
6-8:30pm, Liu Institute for Global Issues, $10 non-members,
$7 members, $5 VIP members.
UBC FILM SOCIETY SCREENING:
CHRONICLES OF NARNIA: VOYAGE
OF THE DAWN TREADER* The UBC
Film Society will be showing The
Chronicles of Narnia: Voyage
of the Dawn Treader, the third
film in the Narnia series. Lucy
and Edmund Pevensie return
to Narnia with their cousin Eustace, where they meet up with
Prince Caspian for a trip across
the sea aboard the royal ship
The Dawn Treader. Along the
way they encounter dragons,
dwarves, merfolk and a band
of lost warriors before reaching
the edge of the world. • Runs
until Mar. 13, 9-11pm, Norm
Theatre, SUB. $2.50 members,
$5 non-members.
JUNGLE FEVER* The Canadian Network for International Surgery
(CNIS) is hosting a fundraiser at
UBC called "Jungle Fever," to
help African medical students
learn essential surgical skills. Featuring performances by Ubiquitous Rythm and DJ Paise, with
Lisa Christiansen as MC and a
short speech by Dr Robert Taylor. • 8pm-1am, Abdul Ladha
Centre, for information or tickets,
call (778) 899-2348 or email ubc-
junglefever@gmail.com.
SATURDAY, MAR. 12
AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL UBC
CONFERENCE* Amnesty International UBC is hosting their conference, "When is a Democracy
not a Democracy?" This small
scale conference provides the
perfect environment for discussion and networking amongst
students, professors, speakers
and other members of the community. Dress code is business
casual. • 1:30-6:30pm, Lillooet
Room (301), Chapman Learning Centre, Irving K Barber. Order tickets via eventbrite.com.
HUGH MASEKELA • The Independent legendary South African
trumpeter Hugh Masekela is an
innovator in the world music and
jazz scene and is active as a performer, composer, producer and
activist. His tour in support of his
latest album, Phola, brings him
(on flugelhorn) to UBC, where
he will combine with five other superb South African musicians to explore his incredible
musical history. • 8pm, Chan
Centre, $55.25-$73.25.
RED BULL & WEEKEND WARRIORS
TRIP TO WHISTLER • Sign up for
an exclusive Red Bull trip to
Whistler Blackcomb, with students from UBC, UBC-O and
UVic. The trip package includes a round trip transportation via snow bus, two-day
lift tickets (if required), ski in/
ski out accommodation at the
Coast Blackcomb Suites, exclusive access to Red Bull music
shows at Whistler's top nightlife venues, Red Bull welcome
package upon check-in, surprise giveaways en route to
Whistler and breakfast each
morning. Party with UBC-O
& UVic. Mar. 18-20, register by Mar. 12. $275 non-season passholders, $225 season
passholders, register at snowbus.com/weekendwarriors,
email rbsbmubc@gmail.com
for more info.
LSAT MCAT
GMAT GRE
Preparation Seminars
• Complete 30-Hour Seminars
• Convenient Weekend Schedule
• Proven Test-Taking Stiategies
• Experienced Course Instructors
• Comprehensive Study Materials
• Simulated Practice Exams
• limited Class Size
• Free Repeat Policy
• Personal Tutoring Available
• Thousands of Satisfied Students
OXFORD SEMINARS
604-683-3430
1-800-269-6719
www.oxfordseminars.ca
\Sl~Z<~)~=C3\-LJ~Z7~\t~:i
We offer:
• Compact and portable
Hydrogen Storage
■ WH Tank Refilling Services
• StarJtahle PFM Fuel Cells
wopowercell&com/stora
(!)
March is almost
halfway done! Send
us your events for this
month.
events@ubysseyca
tlT lEUBYSSEYca 2011.03.10/UBYSSEY.CA/NEWS/3
NEWS
EDITOR ARSHY MANN»news@ubyssey.ca
ASSISTANT EDITOR KALYEENA MAKORTOFF»kmakortoff@ubyssey.ca
SENIOR WRITER MICKI COWAN»mcowan@ubyssey.ca
St John s college to lose financial autonomy
UBC Housing to take over maintenance of building in deal
FABRIZIO STENDARDO
fstendardo@ubyssey.ca
An independent graduate college at UBC, St John's will be giving up some of its financial independence to UBC, along with
possible rent increases.
Due to their inability to afford
maintenance costs of their building, UBC Student Hospitality and
Housing Services (SHHS) will take
over the running ofthe building,
including maintenance. St John's
will still maintain control over its
academic program.
The college, which opened its
doors in 1997, is made up of 150
students and visiting professors
from over 50 countries. It is only
one of three residential graduate
colleges in Canada. Its roots can
be traced back to the original St
John's University in Shanghai,
China, which closed in 1952. St
John's is both academically and financially independent from UBC.
But according to Sandra Shepa-
rd, the operations manager for St
John's, maintenance costs have
increased substantially, necessitating the change.
"We're told that at around
this point in the building's life,
there is very likely to be somewhere around $2 million worth
of repairs."
Olav Slaymaker, Professor
Emeritus in the department of
geography at UBC and acting president of the college, admits that
when the college was opened, the
plan was for it to remain an independent entity. However, the reserves put aside for maintaining
the physical structure ofthe college are insufficient.
"There was a certain amount of
provision made, but it's not apparently adequate," said Slaymaker.
Some of St John's financial difficulties are due to a mortgage that
the college took out in 2002. The
mortgage payments account for
twenty per cent of their budget.
Located between Vanier and Marine residences, St John's college houses 150 students and professors. DAVID MARINO PH0T0/THE UBYSSEY
The administrationhadhoped
that fundraising would help offset the costs ofthe mortgage. But
it was not to be.
"Itwas anticipated there would
be a considerable amount of donation to the college and the donations haven't materialized to
the extent that was anticipated,"
said Slaymaker.
However, when asked why
there is not enough money in reserves to cover the maintenance
costs, Shepard replied, "Just because there is not."
"I don't have a reason to articulate on that one."
Slaymaker informed residents
about the college's financial troubles at a January 11 meeting,
where he proposed three options.
St John's could continue on
its current course. It could become an entirely dependent
wing of UBC. Or it could put the
university in charge of maintenance while retaining academic independence.
The first option would result in
a 15 per cent increase in rental
prices and was unpopular.
"If we carry on as [we do] at
present...we'd have to introduce
unacceptably high increases in
room and meal costs," Slaymaker told students.
The second option was never
seriously considered, according
to Slaymaker, as "it would mean
a loss of the community sense
and the central academic functions ofthe college."
At this point, the third option
is the most likely.
This option will also likely result in a rent increase, which, according to Slaymaker, will probably be less than ten per cent.
Originally, this plan would
have seen the dining society—the
college's food service provider-
replaced with UBC Food Services.
However, after a petition was
signed by 82 college residents in
favour of retaining the dining society, Slaymaker said that it will
remain in place.
"We've come to an understanding that the dining society will retain its autonomy and all the activities associated with meals."
Green College, the other graduate residence on campus,
experienced a similar situation
in 2006, when UBC Housing
went in and took the reins over
the day-to-day operations of
the building, which continues
to this day.
Despite the financial problems, Shepard believes the
management partnership with
SHHS could have a positive impact on the college's activities
and consequently place it in a
better position in the future.
"I think this has the potential to do a lot of great things
for the college. As a result of
this partnership with SHHS, we
envision additional programming money to be available for
our academic and social programming." tu
Arts and Engineering hope for smoother society elections
ARSHY MANN
news@ubyssey.ca
Undergraduate elections are just
on the horizon, and student leaders in Arts and Engineering are
expecting very different elections than lastyear.
The Arts, Science, Human
Kinetics and Engineering Undergraduate Societies are once
again coordinating this year's
elections for executives and AMS
representatives under the "UBC
Votes" banner.
Nominations for all ofthe faculties, excluding engineering,
close Friday, March 11. Campaigning has already begun for
the EUS elections.
"The four presidents have
been meeting for over a month
now," said AUS President Brian Piatt.
"We've had standardized voting posters made, so we'll all
have the same promotional materials and we're all using the UBC
Votes website. And in key positions like the VFM and website
person, we've shared responsibility from each faculty for getting one person in charge so everything is very streamlined
and efficient."
Engineering, the only constituency election already underway, has most races marked
with only one or two candidates.
This includes the presidency,
where Daniel Olson is running
against the apparent joke candidate "Fwat Love Gun," all but
ensuring Olson's victory.
EUS President Amanda Li said
she expects turnout to be lower
as well, in part because of calmness thus far.
"This will be like a normal
election for the EUS, whereas
lastyear was... a slightly unpleasant election and unusual one."
According to Li, a number of
students who knew each other last year and "were very angry at the EUS...decided that
they wanted to change things
collectively."
She said that the campaign
quickly turned dirty, but turnout skyrocketed as a result.
"Itwas the highest voter turnout I think ever," she said.
In contrast, Piatt said thathe
expects almost all ofthe AUS positions to be contested thisyear,
which would be a sharp contrast
from 2010, when joke candidate
Obi Wan-Kenobi won the VP Finance race.
"We are expecting to have a
very strongly contested election,
which is the sign of a healthy society, so we're excited."
He added that he was expecting especially strong competition for the six AMS representative positions.
Lastyear, the society was criticized for spending $30,000 on
an election that did little to improve turnout. This year, their
budget is $3300.
Piatt said that some ofthe criticism of lastyear's elections was
unfair.
"What happened lastyear was
Arts Week was close to non-existent," he said. "The pitch made
to Council was...that [we should]
make elections week our replacement Arts Week and...hold
some really big events.
"And in a way some of the criticism of it was unfair because...
nobody brought in that angle.
"But on the other hand, there
was no stronger critic than me.
I just thought it was crazy to
spend this much money during
an election, I just didn't think it
was a responsible thing to do."
He added that this year the AUS
is focused on smaller initiatives
to increase turnout such as giving
out hot chocolate at Buchanan and
having clear posters in MASS
with candidate information.
Piatt also expects many people to run for AMS representative. It's a position that often attracts candidates—including in
the EUS, where five candidates
are vying for two spots. Li was
unsurprised by the interest.
"We usually get people who
run for the AMS rep to learn
a little about the AMS but to
mainly represent engineers,"
Li said. "You see a lot ofthe [candidates] thisyear have a larger
agenda on the scale, so it's different," she said.
Nominations for Arts, Science
and Human Kinetics close on
March 11. The campaign will
begin on March 13, the voting
will begin on March 21 and all
results will be announced the
evening of March 25. tl 4/UBYSSEY.CA/NEWS/2011.0 3.10
Kenna putting away his badge
JUSTIN MCELROY
coordinating@ubyssey.ca
In a small unassuming building, sandwiched between the
students ofthe Fraternity Village
and the millionaires of Hampton Place, lies the RCMP building, where 20 or so officers who
are charged with keeping the
peace at UBC work every day.
On Saturday, they get a new
leader.
After sixyears at UBC and 37.5
years of active service across
Canada, Staff Sergeant Kevin
Kenna will be retiring Friday,
leaving the UBC department
without the man who has led it
since 2005.
"I've had a good career, a lot
of fun," he said in a wide-ranging interview last week. "This
place is probably the best place
I've been, so it's a good time to
leave.. you just reach that point
in life where it's time to move
on."
Kenna said the decision, formally made a couple months
ago, was hastened by the arrival of his first two grandchildren
within the last year.
Kenna leads a department of
close to 20 officers who oversee
UBC, Wreck Beach and the endowment lands. It's the most
densely populated area in Canada without a municipal government and has 30,000 students entering and leaving
each day.
When Kenna heard of the
opening at UBC in 2005, he leapt
at the opportunity to move from
the Surrey detachment he had
been stationed at for four years.
"It's something I always wanted to do before I retired. I wanted to manage a uniformed detachment," he said.
Did he ever imagine it would
be as unique as UBC?
"No," he said. "We're the only
RCMP detachment on a large
university in Canada...I didn't
Staff Sgt Kenna's office will soon be occupied by someone new. CHARLES TO PH0T0/THE UBYSSEY
realize how unique things were
untilyou start to deal with them
on a day-to-day basis.
"Governance is an issue,
there's no municipal government, so you deal with many different groups. But the crime rate
is not real high, we have a lot of
people here in the run ofthe day,
somewhere around 65-70 thousand people. And it's evolving
from being a kind of rural area
to being a city."
Most UBC students' only interaction with the RCMP comes
when they break up a party or
provide security at an event.
The vast majority of students
wouldn't recognize his friendly
smile or Maritime accent. His
job is to oversee his officers and
deal with both the larger and
broader enforcement issues.
But students who dealt with
Kenna over the years know
that whatever qualms they
might have with individual officers, the person at the top of
the branch was firm, fair and
respectful.
"At the end of the day.. .1' d say
he was a good detachment commander," said Azim Wazeer, outgoing student representative on
the Board of Governors and former Inter-Fraternity Council
(IFC) president. "[He] didn't let
anything get too out of hand...
and was capable of having a conversation with you."
It's a common sentiment
among those who met with
Kenna.
Kenna has same respect for
the students he's seen.
"By the time I deal with [students], it's one or two people, the
leaders," he charitably admits.
"I don't think they're any different than dealing with anyone
else. The ones I've dealt with...
they're just trying to do best for
their constituents."
No discussion ofthe RCMP's
policing of campus can ignore
the "War on Fun," the catch-
phrase of choice for those lamenting the decline in concerts,
beer gardens and campus revelry over the past decade.
Kenna laughs when it's
brought up. "I kind of get a kick
out of it. I don't do policing differently here than I have anywhere else in the country. You
keep the community safe, and
that's all we're doing. We're doing our jobs. If I was lenient on
the students, and letting them
go and drink in public and all
those issues, then I have other people complaining...So if
they see that as a War on Fun...
I've never called it that, we just
need to be sure we have a safe
community."
While the RCMP has not announced a replacement for Kenna as of yet—Sergeant Brian
Decock will head the department on an interim basis—he
has some advice for whomever
will replace him in one of the
most unique policing positions
in Canada.
"They have to get out and be
part ofthe community. You can't
just sit inyour office and not talk
to the people thatyou're here to
work with," he said.
"The most interesting thing,
working here, is being part of
a team. You're going to a UNA
meeting, a UEL meeting, an
AMS meeting. And we pull
together."
He has his new set of golf
clubs and a fitness pass. But after starting on the force at the
age of 19 and having worked in
Vancouver, Ottawa, across Atlantic Canada and in Canadian
embassies around the world,
he's not quite sure what retirement means.
"I don't know what it is to
nothave a job. I might be back
as a student, you never know,"
he joked, before his voice
softened.
"I wanted to lead a detachment before I retired, and I got
to do that," he added.
"It's bittersweet to leave it,
but it's time to fade off into the
sunset." til
KENNA'S THOUGHTS ON....
Fraternities:
"I don't have any animosities against the fraternities or fraternity members.
They're all just young men making their way in life, and some are going to
have some stumbles....I think any time you get a group of young men together like that there's going to be some issues.. .1 think it has gotten better."
Special Occasion Licenses:
"It's certainly unique, because I've never dealt with it anywhere else...
the reality is we give out 500 SOLs in the run of a year.. .it's not as though
we've put a stop to them, we just try and manage that on any given
night we don't have thousands of people out at these sideline bars."
The Olympics:
"I'm not going to say it wasn't challenging, but it was a lot of fun.. .being at the pointy end of the stick for security here. This is a once-in-a-
lifetime opportunity for anyone involved. I'll never encounter it again.. .to
have a lot of say and a lot of input in what transpired, that brought a lot of
satisfaction to me, anyway."
KnollAid 2.0 (which resulted in the arrest of 20 students):
"I was happy how we dealt with it.. .we went in and moved the crowd and
dealt with them. In the end, they went to jail for a night, but none of them
got criminal records, alternate measures were used and life went on. And
nobody got hurt, that's the main thing. Other than a few people's pride."
Arts County Fair:
"It was a recipe for disaster in some ways. That many people there, a lot
of young people drinking. The first year I was here, we arrested 65 people. That's a lot in one day, though they weren't all from the stadium.
"After I looked at it after the first year, I thought, This can't go on. Someone is going to get killed or really hurt.'" 2 011.03.10/UBYSSEY.CA/SPORTS/5
Can the Birds avoid
being bridesmaids?
A T-Bird victory would result in a bigger manhug pile. JON CHIANG PHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
DRAKE FENTON
Contributor
On Friday at lpm (AST) the UBC
Thunderbirds, the No. 1-ranked
men's basketball team in the
country, will begin their quest
for a national championship. The
'Birds hope to make their third
consecutive appearance in the
championship game and, more
importantly, they hope to avoid
a third consecutive silver medal
performance.
In the championship final last
year, UBC lost to the University of Saskatchewan Huskies 91-
81; the previous year they were
defeated by the Carleton Ravens
87-77. UBC recently defeated the
Huskies in the Canada West finals 107-100 buthead coach Kevin Hanson doesn't believe the victory assures success in Halifax.
"There is a lot of parity [in our
league]. The top-ranked teams
have really won down the stretch
since Christmas time," he said.
"It's just a matter of the matchups; we have gone in before seeded number two through seven
and things have happened differently, winning the first game,
losing the first game. Honestly,
when you get to this time of the
year, there is not that much difference between any team there."
In order to be the first UBC
squad to win a championship
since 1972 the 'Birds will rely
heavily on fifth-year players Alex
Murphy, Josh Whyte and Brent
Malish.
For Murphy and Malish, this is
far from their first rodeo. In their
five years at UBC they have competed at nationals in each season. Whyte, a transfer student,
has been an integral component
of each ofthe last two silver medal teams. Last season he was the
MVP ofthe CIS.
Their experience and leadership will be essential for UBC to
make a run at the title.
"We didn'tplay our best basketball lastyear and we still ended
up in the final game. So our goal
this year is to play good basketball [the entire tournament], and
it has to come from having a veteran team," commented Hanson.
"We will probably be one of the
most veteran teams [in the tournament] and those guys will have
to perform when we get there."
UBC is entering nationals on a
tidal wave of momentum. Including playoffs, they finished the season 26-2 and have gone undefeated in their last 22 games. Their
last loss was all the way back on
November 6, against the University of Alberta. UBC's string of victories may provide them with a
mental edge. If all goes according
to plan and no substantial upsets
occur, UBC should once again face
either Saskatchewan or Carleton
in the finals, respectively ranked
second and third. By defeating
the Huskies in the Canada West
gold medal game, UBC got an aggressively large monkey off their
back—though gorilla would perhaps be a more apt jungle kingdom reference.
Saskatchewan not only beat the
'Birds in the CIS final lastyear, but
also in the Canada West semi-finals, forcing UBC to take the back
door into nationals as a wild card
team. During thisyear's regular
season the Huskies also dealt UBC
one of their two losses, a nail-biting 97-96 victory. Thisyear's Canada West championships proved
to UBC that the Huskies are beatable in marquee contests.
The Carleton Ravens, like the
Huskies, have also had their confidence taken down a notch in the
last week. Following an undefeated (22-0) regular season, the Ravens were handed an unexpected defeat in the Ontario Conference finals. The Lakehead Wolverines defeated the Ravens in
a resounding 77-62 victory. The
Ravens have won five of the last
seven national titles and are a
bona fide dynasty, thus the loss
to Lakehead has undoubtedly put
a dent in their swagger.
With no loss to dwell on, the
'Birds have turned their full attention to Friday's contest and are
by no means looking past their
eighth-ranked opponents, the Acadia Axemen.
"We are focusing on the process and not necessarily on winning the title. Obviously, it would
be nice to win it, but we know we
still have to get through Acadia.
We've got a bit of a road to go here,
so the focus is not yet the championship [final]," said Alex Murphy on Wednesday during a phone
interview.
One hurdle UBC will have to
overcome, and an issue that has
plagued UBC year in and year
out, is their lack of size. UBC's
big man, Kamar Burke, only measures in at 6'5".
Burke, though, has compensated for his stature with his superior athletic abilities, leading
the team in rebounds with 7.4 per
game. A lack of size is something
that, for once, doesn't have Coach
Hanson on edge.
"We have gone to nationals before and tried to adjust to other people and other things, and
this year has really been about
other teams having to adjust to
our quickness and athleticism.
We're not worried so much about
them; they have to worry about
us," he said.
Perhaps Hanson was unconsciously addressing the possibility of a championship showdown with Carleton. The Ravens
have yet to concede more than 80
points in a game this year. UBC
has scored less than 80 points
only once this year.
Only time will tell. tJ
UBC tips off at lpm AST (9am
Pacific) on Friday against the University of Acadia Axemen.
BONUS REFERENDUM LETTERS
FEE INCREASE A NECESSITY
Often, bad situations become an
impetus for change in an organisation. Difficult challenges not
only require creative solutions,
but also motivate structural reviews. In 2010,1 was elected as
the AMS VP Finance. We had a
big deficit and our goal was to
balance the budget. And that
we did. I presented the first balanced budget in several years.
We trimmed Safewalk, cut the
Equity and Diversity office, cut
the Safety office, cut the Ombudsperson office by two thirds, cut
executive assistants, cut down
Student Administrative Commission, cut down numerous
student commissioner positions
and reduced budgets for most
other areas. Like it or not, that
was fiscal responsibility. But the
problem was not solved.
In our businesses, we saw
weak numbers throughout summer and well into the school
year. I came back to Council with
a projection of a $141,000 deficit. It is closer to the year end
and after a few legal bills here
and there, we are projecting a
$271,000 deficit, which includes
our contingencies. This means
that we need to cut our spending by about $369,000 for the
next fiscal year.
THE SOLUTION
The fee restructuring proposed
has been in the works for months.
It will set the AMS, your student
society, up for long-term financial security and enable us to
keep our services available for
students. More importantly, it
will provide hundreds of thousands of dollars in direct funding to innovative student projects.
The AMS provides the most value for your money. We pay the
lowest wages in Canada ($8/hr
for most student staff); we get the
best deal for our student Health
and Dental plan in the country.
The AMS has had its share of financial problems. Help us fix this
once and for all. Help us pass this
fee referendum.
—Elin Tayyar
AMS VP Finance
LOUD, BUT LYING
A rule of thumb for radical
groups is to hide their small
numbers by creating a large
racket. By this measure, Nick
Frank and his friends who are
waging the campaign against
the AMS fee and bylaw referendum have done a very good job.
But my admiration for their tireless efforts is negated by my disgust at the smear job they are
conducting on the honest efforts
of AMS Council to provide our
student union with long-term financial stability.
Frank's claim thathe is operating on the principle of small
government and fiscal conservatism is comical. The AMS, which
has a fee barely half the size
of comparable student unions,
has not raised its basic fee since
1982—and most importantly,
that fee hasn't been tied to inflation. You don't have to be an
economist to understand what
happens to an organization
when its expenses are tied to
inflation but its income isn't.
Responding to the steady flow
of misinformation gets tedious.
It is not "undemocratic" to set a
500-person quorum for Annual
General Meetings; what's undemocratic is to have a student
union that is unable to address
its archaic constitution unless
it rents out the arena and draws
1000 students for an administrative meeting (in other words,
impossible). Meanwhile, in response to the AMS executives
who negotiated a smaller fee
for the same health and dental
plan coverage, Frank makes the
outright false claim that the reserve fund has been cut. He is
lying to you, shamelessly.
The changes proposed in this
referendum are reasonable and
necessary. Frank and friends,
who by sheer coincidence are
the same people who flooded
Council Chambers to support
Bijan Ahmadian and his lawyer during the censure proceedings last month, are carrying
out a pathetic vendetta against
your student union. I know appealing to Frank's moral conscience is futile, but right now
he is doing more than anyone
else at this university to kill the
chance of having a vibrant student society and reclaiming our
campus as a fun place to be. If
this referendum fails, it means
the AMS will have to either stop
performing the basic functions
of a student union, or go bankrupt. The rest of us have to do
everything within our power to
stop the NO side from winning.
-Brian Piatt
AUS President
Wonder:
The Foundation of
Critical Thinking
Sundays March 20 and 27 & April 3 and 10
1:30-3:30 PM
Sandy Gillis is the author of
Thinking Woman and co-author of
Introducing Critical Thinking. She
will present a series of 4 free
Workshops exploring the human
quest for understanding,
influenced by the writings of the
Canadian philosopher Bernard
Lonergan. These Workshops are
open to everyone.
Knox United Church Fellowship Centre,
5600 Balaclava Street (&41st)
Vancouver, BC 604-261-3747
E-mail psalm119@telus.net
for more information
www.knoxunitedvancouver.org 6/UBYSSEY.C A/WOMEN/2010.11.22
WOMEN
EDITOR TREVOR RECORD»features@ubyssey.ca
GUEST EDITOR MICKI COWAN»mcowan@ubyssey.ca
Are women Wikipedia s missing pieces?
CATHERINE GUAM
Contributor
Ten years and countless failing term papers after its founding, Wikipedia has
marked a number of milestones. With
17 million articles in 250 languages, the
open-access encyclopedia is almost an
embarrassment of riches. The one thing
it is lacking? Women.
A recent Wikimedia survey revealed
that less than 15 per cent of its hundreds
of thousands of contributors are female.
The survey was followed by a whirlwind
of media commentators asking why there
aren't more women contributing to an
open-source encyclopedia that, allegedly, "anyone can edit"?
Even before the release of the survey,
Nicholas Arseau, a member of the Wikimedia foundation communications committee, observed the gender gap.
"Wikipedia has had more and more international conferences, at which there
have consistently been mainly men."
The lack of women has a real effect on
the transmission of public knowledge.
Despite the derision of many academics,
Wikipedia is used by over half of North
Americans of all genders. Gisele Baxter,
a UBC English professor who has been
active online since 1990, said that it's
time to start treating the internet source
more seriously.
"We need to stop treating Wikipedia as a sort of dirty secret," said Baxter. "[The gender disparity] is troubling
in its invisible lack of comprehensive
representation."
Although no interest in one topic is
weighted entirely to members of one
gender, the gender skew is sometimes
reflected in the emphasis given to certain pages which are more likely to be of
interest to women. The Wikipedia page
for fashion designer Manolo Blahnik,
for instance, is given a few paragraphs.
It is dwarfed by the length and detail
devoted to Niko Bellic, a character from
Grand Theft Auto IV.
Wikipedia's editing interface has been
blamed for deterring women by not being sufficiently user-friendly
"Well, I think you have to factor in the
fact that the computer world is more of
a guy thing. I mean, consider the internet subcultures of hacking and gaming -
how many female hackers do you know?"
said political science student Grace Lee.
However, Baxter said that she believes
that this has more to do with cultural expectations than ability to use the
interface.
"Frankly I don't think it's so much fear
of technology," she said. "There is a lingering stereotyped perception ofthe computer 'geek' as male: the young guy who has
a tremendous IQ, no social skills, lives
in his parents' basement, can hack into
military mainframes ... [but] girl geeks
are beginning to loudly proclaim themselves as such."
As for Baxter herself? "I don't contribute because I don't have time; I have other writing I want to do." She may not be
alone. Studies have consistently shown
that women have less free time than men.
Lee thought it may be a question of
female confidence. "Perhaps these numbers are the result of a world that makes
it uncomfortable for women to assert
their knowledge with confidence in
the public realm to the same extent
that men do."
When asked for his guess on the cause,
Arseau replied, "I would say the often hostile environment in some articles is likely."
This aggressive culture of Wikipedia
may be a reflection of the under-representation of women. Baxter noted some
of the features of a predominantly female discussion board for Harry Potter.
"[Itwas] very much like animated coffee shop conversation among people who
quickly bond over a shared interest."
In sharp contrast are the predominantly male Batman discussion boards.
"[They] could be analytical and very enjoyable, but also much more quickly became fractious, and there was much less
consideration of alternate points of view."
Arseau thought the hostility wasn't restrictive to women.
"Hostility doesn't just scare away women. It scares away smart people of
both genders. You want to write.
You don't want to get involved
in a petty edit war or talk page
dispute. They drain so much
time from actually compiling knowledge."
There has been immediate response on Wikipedia to this lack of female input with the creation of numerous mailing lists, such
as the NY Wiki Chics,
which attempts to
close the gap between male and female
contributors. The Wikimedia foundation
is also working to close this gap.
"One particularly interesting way we're
addressing the gender gap is by a new initiative to get Wikipedia editing into university curriculum. It's called the Public
Policy Initiative,"said LiAnne.
Davis, a communications associate
for the Wikimedia Foundation, said,
"women outnumber men in higher education, and so more than half of our
students who are editing are women."
The ones who have the power to change
this situation, according Baxter, are women themselves.
"Instead of grousing about the lack of
information on women-friendly topics,
broadcast it and try to find writers for it,
blog about it, tweet about
it.- ta
o
I-
<
OC
I-
E/3
BOOK REVIEW
WHY BEAUTIFUL PEOPLE HA VE MORE DAUGHTERS
BY ALAN MILLER AND SATOSHI KANAZAWA
A question of evolution?
AMELIA WAIZ
Contributor
Attracting partners and passing on genes
are what life's all about in Why Beautiful
People Have More Daughters.
Authors Alan Miller and Satoshi Kanaza-
wa claim that what's really behind everything, from gender gaps in income to the
chance that you'll have daughters, is simply due to how humankind has evolved.
They also present an answer to why men
tend to be more represented in fields
which influence public opinion.
But why do they claim thatbeautifulpeo-
ple have more daughters?
Miller and Kanazawa claim that due to
evolutionary history, beauty has been an
important method for women to attract
high quality partners. Genes for beauty
benefit both girls and boys, but they are
especially helpful for girls. Beauty was the
sign of health, youth and fertility that men
looked for in mates. Beautiful people who
had more daughters were able to pass on
their genes more successfully, leading to
the proliferation of certain traits.
As for the men, Miller and Kanazawa look
for the genetic aspect ofthe importance that
social status has played in the past. The authors say thatin the game of attracting mates,
high status was more important for men than
it was for women. A man who was really motivated to attain status had more mating opportunities than a man who was not. These
men, like the beautiful women, successfully passed on more genes.
Ultimately, the great success of these
genes led to a world where men are, on average, more interested in working to attain
social status. Simply put, they claim that it
is due to these evolutionary realities that
men dominate high-status positions—including those influencing public opinion.
The book has attracted a fair share of criticism, much of which has been that their science may be flawed. One letter to Columbia University's Journal of Theoretical Biology in response to Kanazawa claimed that
his analysis may be wrong. Others have
claimed that Kanazawa and Miller fundamentally misinterpret evolutionary function.
VIRGINIE MENARD ILLUSTRATION/THE UBYSSEY
While controversial, the authors' credentials do lend them a certain validity. Miller has a PhD in philosophy from
Cambridge University, and Kanazawa
has a PhD in evolutionary psychology.
Ultimately, we do not have to accept
evolutionary psychology findings as an
excuse for inequity. However, perhaps
we should look at their claims as potentially useful in the search for a broader understanding of these issues. If we
understand the possibility of evolution
being one of the roots of this current
social issue, we may be in a better position to find solutions, tl
Girls aloud: Welcome to
the Women's Supplement
MICKI COWAN
mcowan@ubyssey.ca
International Women's Day celebrated its
100th anniversary on Tuesday, March 7.
The day was originally designed to encourage women in the workplace. One
hundred years later, women are still incredibly under-represented in certain
fields. Perhaps one of the most glaring
disparities is in positions in which public opinion is expressed and interpreted.
Ahead are some shocking stories and
numbers on women's under-representa-
tion in the formation of Wikipedia pages,
within politics, and even the hopeful domains of blogging and Twitter. The editorial pages of newspapers are also low on female voices, something thattheOpEdProj-
ect hopes to address. A book review provides an alternative view of what women
are up against genetically and a final story on Oprah shows a woman who's done it
all, and what it amounts to.
Welcome, ladies and gents, to the women's supplement. We may have come 100
years, but the work is far from over. v3 2011.03.10/UBYSSEY.CA/WOMEN/7
Understanding the awesome power and influence of "O"
MICKI COWAN
mcowan@ubyssey.ca
Time and CNN have called her
"arguably the world's most powerful woman." Vanity Fair went
so far as to say she has more
cultural influence than anyone
in the world, save perhaps the
Pope. And for the past 25 years,
you could catch her on daytime
ABC television. Who else could it
be but talk show host and media
mogul Oprah Winfrey?
"When a celebrity connects
with people on a wide basis
and people believe that celebrity shares their values, that person can have a great impact on
public opinion," said Joe Cutbirth, an assistant professor of
journalism at UBC. "The most
important thing about someone
shaping public opinion is that
people have to believe that they
share their values."
Cutbirth said Oprah's perceived integrity helps to shape
her influence in what people are
talking about and what they decide is important to discuss. Her
audience, trusting her judgement,
takes her opinion seriously.
So seriously that what she says
on her show often has a tangible
impact in the real world. After
claiming she would temporarily not eat meat during the Bovine spongiform encephalopath
crisis, commonly known as mad
cow disease, she was sued by Texas Cattlemen for hurting their industry. Products listed on her 'favourite things' frequently sell out
of a year's worth of stock in a few
months. Books in her book club
can become New York Times bestsellers overnight.
It is apparent what a few words
from Oprah can do. Her word is
not just limited to the commercial
sphere, either. During Obama's
The most influential woman? Like it or not, some believe it's the case. COURTESY OF BILL EBBSEN/FLICKR
2008 campaign, she supported
him on her show, delving into politics for what may have been the
first time. Many credited Oprah
with delivering him his win in
the primaries, and possibly the
election. University of Maryland
economists Craig Garthwaite and
Tim Moore claimed she delivered
over one million votes in the primaries alone.
Cutbirth said this was a move
governed by her desire to do
what she believes in, rather than
a commercial move. "Oprah has
a history of not always trying
to pacify or do the right thing."
During that election, many
thought she would support Hilary Clinton. Her ratings suffered
in the weeks following her decision to support Obama, but she
carried through and came out
on top once more.
However, does her power to
change public opinion carry
through to public policy? Tiffany Potter, a professor in UBC's
English department, said that
while Oprah certainly affects
public opinion, this does not
translate into political agency.
"She certainly can be influential, but it's a very specific demographic and it's not a particularly
powerful demographic," she said.
"It's a demographic of women
of lower socio-economic status.
Let's be blunt. That's not a powerful demographic, and it's not
a demographic that determines
public policy."
While admitting that she does
watch the show, Potter thinks
there are better examples of influential women in others.
"I would rather have Christie
Blatchford [columnist for The
Globe and Mail] being our symbol of women in popular media
commenting on public policy.
Regardless of whether your politics align or not with hers, she's
looking at problems of justice
and problems of race and problems of economy, which are occasionally personalized and occasionally feminized."
Christopher Schneider, assistant professor of sociology at the UBC Okanagan campus, said that Oprah does have
relevance.
"It's not that Oprah necessarily
affects public opinion or even individuals, but she has a powerful
stance, which ties into the institutional-based approach, because when you look at it, half
the population are women," he
said. "She had a very small start
in Chicago and now she's become this powerful celebrity
that has an impact on how people perceive the social world."
"When a celebrity
connects with
people on a wide
basis and people
believe that
celebrity shares
their values, that
person can have
a great impact on
public opinion."
JOE CUTBIRTH
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR,
UBCJOURNAUSM
Although her real power over
public policy can be debated, he
believes that perhaps her presence can be seen as a positive
step towards greater female representation in shaping public
opinion.
"Her work promotes the presence of women in the public
sphere," said Schneider. "I think
we are moving in the direction
to eradicate sexism and racism
and all of these horrible things
that we are still dealing with
as a society—and I think people like Oprah helpus to move
away from them." XJ
PERSPECTIVE
Media smears can't keep able women from politics
INDIANA JOEL ILLUSTRATION/THE UBYSSEY
ALEXANDRIA MITCHELL
Contributor
Women are changing the face
of politics within all orders of
government. From the most recent American federal election,
to the evolving face of BC politics, it's a new game.
Women in politics—whose
face appears inyour mind first?
Many would say Hilary Clinton.
While Clinton remains an important figure in politics, the
image of women in government
has matured from the old equivocation of what the female politician must be. Gone are the
days ofthe glass-ceiling-shattering trailblazer for whom beauty
was a significant handicap and
femininity meant a lack of chutzpah to deal with global issues.
The American election in
2008 saw women ranging from
Tina Fey to Katie Couric and
^Ji\
Q UMed career info
c^
^MM'Th?
Acceptance lo health professional schools {Medical. Dental. Pharmacy.
Nursing) is becoming more competitive every year. Taking lhe wrong
path early on may mean never being accepted into the program that you
have always dreamt about.
Whether you are in high school undecided on the career path you want
to take or at University and want to apply to a health career program,
we can help
Website :www.medcareerinforcom   Email: info@medcareehnfo.com
Call   :   778-865-4020
We are a group of health professionals all graduated from Canadian
Universities in active in different areas of healthcare. We have experienced
the bumpy ride from application to admission lo lhe major health disciplines
including Medical. Dental, Pharmacy and Nursing schools. We can give
you the right tools to maximize your chances of acceptance.
What we do?
• One-on-one counseling with high school students on career planning
• Introducing students to exciting health related careers and programs
• Individualized counseling for admission to Health Professional Schools
• Individualized career planning based on students' interest and ab litics
• Advising on course selection and extracurricular aclivities
Rachel Maddow holding consequential influence over public
discourse. It also saw a great
deal of harsh criticism of female candidates. Republican
vice presidential candidate Sarah Palin was heavily criticized,
for everything from her physical appearance to her personal
life and vocabulary. In the spirit of the former Alaskan governor, we can create a new word:
Palinization.
The difficult media attacks
on the VP candidate are a
type of victimization of women that isn't new. It's a process that women have endured
for years—whether fighting
for women's rights like Emily Murphy, or being attacked
for choice in men like Belinda
Stronach. Regardless of political stripe, female politicians
have been subject to character attacks of this nature. The
key media talking heads in the
2008 election of this type were
particularly pro-Obama and
distinctly critical of Palin.
The question is whether this
influences the low participation levels of women in politics.
Do women fear being made
into a Sarah Palin, especially
by other women? While there
may be "a special place in hell
for women who don't help other
women," according to former
US Secretary of State Madeleine Albright, this female cooperation must come from a
place of common understanding and shared values. When
women refuse to support another woman, it has to come
down to an incompatibility of
political beliefs, not a distaste
of trivial matters.
I believe that women shouldn't
have to fear becoming another
Palin when engaging in politics,
as long as they are prepared and
knowledgeable about the task
they are embarking on. Take
Premier-Designate Christy Clark
as a counter-example. She is a
hockey mom, too, a woman who
left government and pursued
media as a camera savvy-brunette. No one is criticizing her
for not knowing enough or having a lack of qualifications because she wears heels. British
Columbians might not like her
policies, but as her campaign
priorities reflected a more 'traditionally feminine' set of values, she is all the more successful in politics.
Women continue to make
vast contributions to politics
around the world. The old model
of male-dominated caucuses is
changing and politics are making room for traditionally feminine modes of collaboration,
discussion and priorities. But
gaps in female involvement in
government are not completely ameliorated upon election.
There is still more distance to
travel in thejourney of women
in politics. W 8/UBYSSEY.CA/WOMEN/2011.03.10
Social media: Public opinions new platform
But some ask whether it continues to exclude women
JOCELYN LAU
Contributor
Participation in influencing
public opinion has often been
seen as an activity that is predominately exclusive to white
males. For women, the struggle to influence is an intricate
venture. However, the development of social media agents
such as blogs, Facebook and
Twitter has some asking if the
long-anticipated shift for women has arrived.
A 2005 Pew Research Center study found that the gap
in blogs is close—43 per cent
of bloggers are female. According to a 2009 Harvard Business
Review report by Bill Heil, 55
per cent of Twitter users are
female. However, does that
mean women's voices are being equally represented?
Michelle Stack, from the department of educational studies at UBC, researches a number of media and policy issues.
Among her interests is how media and gender instigate an effect on public policy. She said
that women do have a voice, but
that blogs do not supplement
the missing voice so much as
augment the opportunity to
influence like-minded people.
"I cannot say
that social media
is empowering
women, but
women can have
influence through
social media and
blogs only if they
are strategic and
collective."
MICHELLE STACK
UBC EDUCATION PROFESSOR
"I cannot say that social
media is empowering women, but women can have influence through social media and
blogs only if they are strategic and collective," said Stack.
A Technorati political blog
search shows that the actors
behind the top 100 political
blogs are still overwhelmingly male. Even among the top
blogs where a woman's name
is sighted, it usually links to
an established news site and
not to an independent blog. The
2009 Harvard Business Review
report said that despite both
genders tweeting at roughly
the same rate, male Twitter
users are likely to have more
followers than women—despite
some evidence suggesting that
most unique content originates
from female posters.
Whether participating online or offline, the gender difference in blogging in order to
express an opinion is still in
its elemental stage. Given the
tools, born with a voice and
equally gifted with a capacity to
have knowledge, women need
to remain vigilant in their endeavors—to be influential and
not just heard.
"Women have a
presence, and when
they do blog, etc.
their approach and
style strikes me as
more Web 2.0—
friendly and more
engaging."
TRISHHENNESY
WRITER, FRAMED IN CANADA
Trish Hennesy, a writer
from the blog Framed
in Canada and a
contributor
to Rabble,
said she feels that social media still seems to be more
male-dominated.
"I haven't seen the data
[on] gender breakdown but I
do sense the blogosphere has
been a male-dominated universe. Women have a presence, and when they do blog,
etc. their approach and style
strikes me as more Web 2.0—
friendly and more engaging—
but it still seems like men dominate the medium."
It seems that although blogs
and new forms of social media are beginning to be used
by women, breaking through
the invisible restraints of society will still take some time, tl
A more vibrant opinions page
The OpEd Project puts women in the editorial
section of male-heavy papers and magazines
SONIA RENGER
Contributor
"Part of a democracy is vibrant
public conversation about public issues" said Mary Lynn
Young, director of the UBC
Graduate School ofjournalism. She said that without a diversity of contributors, it isn't a
true conversation at all. "[It's]
not possible with one section
ofthe population dominating."
Consider, then, that 80 to 90
per cent of newspaper opinion pieces are written by men.
The OpEd Project is an initiative that aims to change this
by training female academics and other women experts
to write opinion journalism.
A study at Rutgers
University found
that 96 per cent
of Wall Street
Journal's op-
eds written by
academics were
written by men.
The OpEd Project does presentations and conducts seminars at a range of major universities such as Yale, Stanford and NYU, as well as at
non-profits, corporations and
women's organizations across
the US. These presentations
and seminars teach techniques
of persuasion and argument
and help women understand
how to use their expertise.
Then they show women how
to most effectively showcase
their ideas, especially in terms
of opinion journalism.
"Part of a
democracy is
vibrant public
conversation about
public issues...
It's] not possible
with one section
ofthe population
dominating.
MARY LYNN YOUNG
DIRECTOR, UBC JOURNALISM
This program is addressing
a real problem. At some publications, female opinion contributors are virtually invisible. A study at Rutgers University found that 96 per cent of Wall
Street Journal's op-eds written
by academics were written by
men. With a larger pool of women interested in opinion journalism and submitting op-eds,
there will be more representation for women in public forums, which will help politicians and policy-makers make
informed decisions. After all,
women constitute half the
population.
The OpEd Project's web site
explains that female experts
who go through the OpEd Project's workshops and seminars
are "connected with [a] community of writers and mentors"
and "go into a feeder system
for op-ed, radio, television and
other media venues."
The mentor-editor program
is another of the OpEd Project's initiatives. Experienced
journalists volunteer to read
and provide feedback for at
least one op-ed a month (normally) by a woman who has
gone through the OpEd program and has written an oped with potential.
Joanna Chiu, a former
writer for The Ubyssey, is
the current coordinator
of WAM! Vancouver. WAM!
(Women, Action and the Media) promotes gender equality and strives to connect
those who work in the media, academics activists and
funders with similar goals.
Like the OpEd Project, it organizes conferences and seminars to foster collaboration
and share knowledge.
While Chiu recognizes it can
be discouraging when women submit op-eds that do not
get published, she encourages women to get involved
with groups like WAM! and the
OpEd Project and "to harness
the power ofthe media to promote social equity." tl
The WAM! Vancouver conference is happening on Sunday,
March 27 at Irving K. Barber
Learning Center. 2011.03.10/UBYSSEY.CA/WOMEN/9
Female directors tell their story
Women succeeding in a largely-male dominated film industry
TARA MARTELLARO
multimedia@uyssey.ca
"Why aren't there more female
filmmakers?" asked mediator
Carol Whiteman at an October
11 "Meet the Filmmakers" event
in VanCity Theatre.
According to studies done
by the Motion Picture Association of America and Telefilm
Canada, 52 per cent of movie goers are female. Yet only
approximately 20 per cent of
key roles—directors, producers, writers, etc. are female.
And then there's cinematography, where only one per cent
of directors of photography are
female.
Both speakers, Katrin Bowen,
director oi Amazon Falls, and
Halima Ouardiri, director of
the short Moukhtar and winner
of Most Promising Director of a
Canadian Short Film, felt they
could only speak from their own
experience.
"[As a female] I had to decide
myself that I wanted to do this...
nobody will push you," said Ouardiri. She added later that, honestly, she doesn't "pay attention
to gender."
"Regardless of who you are,
it's difficult to make a film," Bowen said.
"You're always troubleshooting the whole way through," added Whiteman, who co-created
the Women In the Director's
Chair, an international organization that exhibits, educates
and promotes media made by
women.
Bowen and Ouardiri nodded
and laughed in agreement;
they've learned a thing or two
about troubleshooting.
Bowen was originally working on a big budget film when
all but $50,000 of her financing
fell through. The result: Amazon
Falls, a completely different fea-
"Regardless of who
you are, it's difficult
to make a film."
KATRIN BOWEN
DIRECTOR, AMAZON FALLS
ture shot in 12 days.
"You have to trust.. .there are so
many variables," Bowen said of
the difficulties making the film,
which included losing her production designer the day before shooting. "But when I saw the rough
assembly, I knew I had a film."
Ouardiri'sMoufe/rtarwas shot
in Morocco with amateur actors,
communicating through translators. Her lead—Abdallah Ichi-
ki, a young boy whose life had
been herding goats and going to
school in his village—was found
the day before filming began. Yet
Ichiki received the majority of her
praise. Ouardiri created a grading system similar to those used
in his school to communicate the
need for improvement. Ichiki's
acting, she said, was natural, and
the two experienced the whole
spectrum of emotion together to
get him into character.
"We laughed and even cried
together," she added.
As a woman directing a crew
in a remote area of Morocco, she
was faced with difficult crew-
members and gender bias on
a daily basis. Both filmmakers
stressed the need for obsession
and headstrong will, saying that
filmmakers have to be willing
to stake a lot on their films and
ride out difficulties.
"How far are you willing to go
for a film... are you willing to do
it ifyou don't make anything?"
said Bowen. "You have to ask the
hard questions before you marry your film."
It may be that women are
not as willing to take that step
as men or societal pressures
keep them from doing so, but
the question still stands: why
aren't there more women in
the film industry?
Whiteman said "having a
willingness to shine," was
the key ingredient, a sentiment shared by the
female directors on
stage.
"When I doubt,
I just think, 'This
will take me no-
where,'"   said
Ouardiri.
"Our greatest
fear is not that
we are inadequate,
but that we are powerful beyond measure," Bowen added, tl
o
5
o
—3
<
2
MAKE A
DIFFERENCE WITH
BCIT SCHOOL OF HEALTH SCIENCES
it
■
Health sciences professionals are in demand. Get the applied skills
you need to join the workforce sooner. You're not just getting a job.
you're making a difference to the future.
For more information or to register for a full-time, part-time
or distance education program, visit:
C~ _\_W~=z~-~*     It's your ca
^^J|Z - v     Gel it right.
Your campus radio station
with online streaming
and podcasts
CiTR
1Q1.9fm/CITR.ca
OWN YOUR  FREQUENCY
and
publisher
of
H*«#HI = H
Do you want to see more women's
voices on the editorial page? Tell us
why you should be The Ubyssey s
new columnist!
Justin mcelroy | coordinating@ubyssey.ca
U THEUBYSSEYc UBYSSEY.CA/ADVERTISEMENT/2011.03.10
kNTED:
SOCIAL WORKERS
"The morale and mental fitness of our soldiers
are my primary concern. I joined to make a
difference in their lives. But the thanks I get from
them, well, that's made a difference in my life."
Captain CARRA WATSON
RECHERCHONS:
TRAVAILLEURS SOCIAUX
«Ma premiere preoccupation va au moral et
a la sante de nos militaires. C'est pour faire une
difference dans leur vie que je me suis enrolee.
Pourtant, ce sont souvent leurs remerciements
qui font une difference dans la mienne.»
Capitaine CARRA WATSON
FORCESCA
FIGHT WITH THE CANADIAN FORCES
1-800-856-8488
Canada GAMES & COMICS
2011.03.10/UBYSSEY.CA/G AMES/11
SAZAEMON, BY MEIKI SHU
COMICMASTER, BY MARIA CIRSTEA
BLUNDERGRADS, BY PHIL FLICKINGER {BLUNDERGRADS.COM]
PUPI-T...TMS |S AN UPSCALE"
STRIP CLUB WE'RE" GOING-
To.  WM ARE YOU WFARIN&
A V£LtoR. TRACK 5UIT?!?
THINK
ABOUT IT.
LAST DITCH EFFORT, BY JOHN KROES UDE-0NLINE.COM]
SUDOKU (VERY EASY)
2
6
9
7
5
6
2
4
9
1191
3
5 3
4
2
8
7
9
5
6
7
3
8
1
4
3
8
1
2
9
5
4
8
6
1
7
SOLUTIONS
3
5
5
I
N
V
1
V
'
|
*
A
0
*.
\
')
V
J-
J
S
V
a
J.
5
V
1
V
0
N
)J
*
a
3
i
I
5.
3
5
a
I.
a
0
1
1
i:_JI
X
3
3
1
V
4
3
1
V
a
iiijTls
¥
"
()
1
| 3
9.U
_kH
^PL
a
1
d
3
i.
a
V
1 Is.
j
v\9.
1,
V
S
N
■i.
0
s
■
3
<L\°\ '
i
■ V
N
V
H
1
V
3
a
1
iP
3
Z I.
X
H.
s
1
■?
3
»
■ Y
3J.I V
ab
|;
3
H
;
3 | V)r__ i
V
3
H
?-
3
1
V
a
4
B
V
1 irs
3
1
1
v
5
H
a
I
1
»
3
i
i
N
3
V
M
V.
1
V
V
*
*
a
V
3
S-
1
U
0
s.
1
a
1,
*
1
V
1
V
1
V
>
N
',
© 2008 PageFiller Ltd and Associates www.pagefiller.com
L Z 6
8   L 9
8 9 P
t S 9
8  Z  6
Z\ MS
8 e i.
t? 2 S
6 Z 9
L  8 9
9 8 2
Z fr 6
9 f£
9 6 Z
MS 8
6 Z 2
L P 8
9 8 9
2 9 8
Z 9 8
P 6   L
e 6 t7
38  l-
9 9 Z
9   L  Z
6 9 i?
8 8 2
CROSSWORD
1
2
1
'
l
'
6
7
S
•
1
"
ii
12
13
14
"
"
17
"
"
20
21
■
2}
24
25
■ 26
IT
^P'
28
i'i
30
11
11
11
34
J5
.It
IS
fi
40
1
1
42
43
44
■ 45
"
47
4B
43
^^^|
10
SI
52
53
#
"
55
56
57
s«
S3
GO
62
1
"
64
1
"
e«
"
'■•>;
69
"
"
PUZZLE PROVIDED BY BESTCR0SSW0RDS.COM. USED WITH PERMISSION.
ACROSS
DOWN
1. Member of a great Peruvi
1. Sir Newton was an English
an people
mathematician
5. Religion ofthe Muslims
2. Compass point
10. Shoppe adjective
3. Jalopy
14. Category
4. In any case
15. Fearsome
5. ". _She Lovely?"
16. South African river
6. Biol., e.g.
17. Asian sea
7. Starbucks order
18. Saltpeter
8. Neighborhoods
19. Goes astray
9. Incense gum
20. Bear witness
10. Supervise
22. Salt of tartaric acid
11. Zhivago's love
24. Inexpensive
12. Move suddenly
25. Interlocks
13. Additional
26. Franklin D.'s mother
21. Health haven
28. Protection
23. Drop of water expelled by
32. Mature male European red
the eye
deer
25. Former French colony of
35. Mischievous person
north-western Africa
37. Circular band of flowers
27. Comic Foxx
38. Gasteyer of "Saturday Night
29. London jail
Live"
30. _        _boy!
39. Part of LED
31. Boutique
41. Barcelona bear
32. monde
42. Unstated
33. Actress Heche
45. Bumbler
34. Coarse file
46. Hit with an open hand
36. Rock's Fighters
47. Lukewarm
37. Woven fabric
48. Let
40. Raised platform
50. Bog
43. Purposeless
54.  Component of organic
44. Billy had a hit song with
fertilizer
"White Wedding"
58. Caudal
46. Arranged in order
61. Newspaper executive
49. Partially opened flower
62. Gaelic language of Ireland
51. Ascends
or Scotland
52. Director Kurosawa
63. Located
53. Attack
65. Florence's river
55. Gillette razors
66. Exclamation to express
56. Forceps
sorrow
57. Uneven
67. Clear the board
58. Milk source
68. License plates
59. He sang about Alice
69. Playthings
60. Brit's exclamation
70. Old Nick
61. Biblical garden
71." quamvideri" (North Car
64. Conductor     -Pekka Salonen
olina's motto)
Submit your comics to our website at
ubyssey.ca/volunteer/submit-a-comic.
VIRGINIE MENARD |
production@ubyssey.ca
•31    THEUBYSSEYca 12/UBYSSEY.CA/ADVERTISEMENT/2011.03.10
V
^s0'
NAME HERE
NAME HERE
Want to show your
appreciation for your
graduating students?
The Ubyssey is offering
a special discounted
rate for our new annual
Congratulations to our
Grads supplement,
running on April 4, 2011.
Starting at $20, you get
a photo of your grad and
a three-line message,
and we throw in the
colour for free! You
also get an unlimited
message and photo on
Ubyssey.ca absolutely
free. Call Paul now
at 604-822-1658, or
e-mail him at webads®
ubyssey.ca to book
yours today!
Gets you a name,
a half-column by
VA inch photo and
12 words.
Gets you a name, a full-column by VA
inch photo and 30 words.
NAME HERE
NEED A
LARGER
SIZE?
Gets you a name, a full-column by 2%
inch photo and 50 words.
We're happy
to accomodate
Prices do not include HST. Actual size not depicted. 2011.03.10/UBYSSEY.CA/CULTURE/13
CULTURE
EDITORS BRYCE WARNES & JONNY WAKEFIELD »culture@ubyssey.ca
SENIOR WRITER GINNY MONACO »gmonaco@ubyssey.ca
ILLUSTRATOR INDIANA JOEL»ijoel@ubyssey.ca
NEWS
UBC smartphoning it in
iPhone app aims to draw new students, inform old
GINNY MONACO
gmonaco@ubyssey.ca
Move over, Angry Birds —
there's a new app on campus.
Earlier this month, UBC released an iPhone application designed to recruit prospective students and help current students
navigate the UBC commu
nity. It includes pro
gram information,
ways to connect to
UBC social media
outlets and maps
and events for both
the Vancouver and
Okanagan campuses.
"Most of the material is
available on the website," said
We knew we
wanted our app
to be, like the
university, among
the best in the
world.
GRAEME MENZIES
MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS
MANAGER
Graeme Menzies, Manager of       student will want to imagine
Marketing Communications
and Indirect Recruitment for
the project. "We just wanted to
make
it
what their life is going to be
like. 'I want to see what events
are going on, where the residences are, I want to check out
the news.' It's just a holistic
experience."
UBC is not the first uni-
versity to launch
a   mobile-
based
more
available.
I think it's
kindofanexpecta- '^f.
tion. Everyone we talked to was just waiting for
it. It was a question of when."
By including information
relevant to current students,
Menzies is hoping the application will help provide newcomers with a "seamless transition"
into the campus community.
"Any legitimate prospective
recruiting
campaign. However, Menzies and the development team were looking to improve upon the work of other
schools to create a more user-
friendly product. "We looked at
apps by other schools and we
knew we wanted our app to be,
like the university, among the
best in the world," he says.
iPad and Android versions
will be available in the coming months. As to the less
app-friendly BlackBerry, the
development team is considering whether to release an
application or simply make
the UBC website more
mobile-accessible.
The application is by
no means
complete
and the
developers are already looking at ways to
improve it, including the addition of a sports feature, making course
schedules available and a
cost calculator for potential
students. According to Menzies, "We didn't do everything
we wanted to do, but we wanted to get started on a good solid platform. It takes the pressure off." til
Student writer makes CBC shortlist   PR0FILE
BRYCE WARNES
culture@ubyssey.ca
Until she learned about UBC's
program, Meredith Hambrock
had never considered creative
writing as a viable post-secondary option.
"My parents were always really big on me getting a degree, and I always loved writing," said Hambrock, who was
short-listed last week for a CBC
Literary Award. "I didn't really know that I could study creative writing at university."
After high school, Hambrock
attended a summer seminar at
the Humber School for Writers in Toronto. Under the tutelage of Joseph Boyden, whose
novel Through Black Spruce
won the Giller Prize in 2008,
she was encouraged to pursue
writing seriously. A friend was
also planning to attend UBC,
so Hambrock visited the campus and made the decision to
join her.
Her choice has paid off. Currently earning a MFA in her final year of UBC's creative writing program, Hambrock's short
story "Why All the Girls Love
Jesus" is in competition for the
CBC's prestigious award.
"It's basically about two girls
who go to Catholic school, and
they have a crush on the quarterback, whose name isjesus,"
said Hambrock. "Well, it's 'Hay-
zoose.' But they call him Jesus."
Vying for the award in the
short fiction category are four
other authors, one of whom—
Shay Wilson, of Vancouver—is
a former Creative Writing MFA
from UBC. The winning work
will be published in EnRoute
magazine. The contest's other
categories are poetry and creative non-fiction. On average,
the annual contest receives
5000 submissions. This year,
15 were short-listed, 5 in each
category.
For her undergrad degree,
Hambrock studied fiction,
screenplay and children's literature. The latter has become
a focus for her.
"I'm kind of drawn to a lot
of the stuff that's happening
in young adult fiction. It's a
cool genre. You can take a lot of
risks, but still write entertaining, literary novels," she said.
"And I think I just like teenagers. They're kind of funny.
You can have a lot of fun. I'm
only 23, and I'm maybe not the
most mature person in the entire world, either. So, I don't
feel like I have enough insight
into adults to be...writing about
35-year-old men snorting coke
and getting divorces."
Hambrock's master's thesis
is a science fiction novel aimed
at young adults.
"It's about a girl who wakes
up in the woods and she has no
notion of her identity," she said,
"And she spends 400 days looking for a brother that she only
knows exists through dreams."
Hambrock has completed
and abandoned two first drafts
of novels—one of which she
wrote at age fifteen, and described as "really awful"—but it
wasn't until she began her thesis that she was able to commit
to a project. Working one-on-
one with a professor to write
and edit a marketable piece
of fiction has forced her to undertake the revision process
in earnest.
She described writing the
first draft of a novel as "easy,"
explaining, "I think it's because you're excited, and you
really get to create. You get to
tell this really fun, awesome
story. You get to go on a journey. Once you've got to go back
and other people read it, you
GEOFF LISTER PH0T0/THE UBYSSEY
realize how flawed it is, how
much work you've got to do.
Then the lazy people, like me,
get scared and they go hide."
Hambrock said that once she
had "gotten past the hurdle of
second draft," she began, once
more, to enjoy working on the
novel. Her main concern right
now is the results of the CBC
Literary Awards, which will be
announced March 25. She said
that regardless of who wins,
everyone who is nominated
benefits.
"You have a better chance of
getting your work placed somewhere else [even] ifyou don't
win," she said. "It's alleoodfor
everybody, I think." vl
Q&A HUGH
MASEKELA
JONNY WAKEFIELD
culture@ubysseyca
He's released close to 30 albums,
played with Paul Simon on Grace-
land and is widely credited with
providing the soundtrack for the
Free Nelson Mandela movement.
Hugh Masekela, the prolific South
African jazzman, will perform on
his trumpet and flugelhorn at the
Chan Centre on Saturday, March
12. The Ubyssey got in touch with
Mr. Masekela for a look at his decades-long career.
The Ubyssey: Do you ever wonder
where you would be right now if it
wasn't for the trumpet?
Hugh Masekela: If it was not the
trumpetitwould have been another instrument. I had music only on
my mind.
U: Many people knowyour music
because of "Bring Him Back Home."
When did you start thinking about
using jazz as protest music?
HM: I never thought of usingjazz as
protest. I was raised under colonial
oppression, then apartheid. Raised
on boycotts, strikes, rallies, marches, demonstrations and police brutality. If I'd been a garbage man, I
would still have stood against injustice, justlike the millions of people I come from who opposed it for
centuries... With most societies
of African origin, music has historically always served as a catalyst to resistance and liberation.
South Africa's freedom had music as a major instrument of resistance and liberation. The question
should rather be, 'How do you see
activism fitting in with music?'
U: Which musicians have influenced your music?
HM: When I was born, I found music on earth. Itwas not mine. I was
inspired by all lands of musicians,
from Louis Armstrong, Louis Jordan, Ma Rainer, Billie Holiday,
Miles, Duke, Ella, Sarah, Brownie, Makeba Belafonte, Fela, Mar-
ley Franco Street music, Children's
music, pop rock, township, Congo,
Brazil, India—the list is fathomless.
U: I sawyou played a few times during the World Cup this summer.
What was the atmosphere like in
the cities leading up to and during
the games?
HM: The audiences and fans totally eclipsedpolitics. I have never seen people so happy in South
Africa since liberation in 1994.
Ordinary South Africans and visiting fans were the very essence
of joy. Pity it was not sustainable,
nor could we bottle it. That would
have kept the world happy in perpetuity, tu
Hugh Masekela will perform at the
Chan Centre on March 12. Student
tickets start at $59. 14/UBYSSEY.CA/CULTURE/2011.03.10
Free drama at Dorothy Somerset
Laundry and Bourbon fueled by passion for the stage
iTHEATRE
HAZEL HUGHES
Contributor
The Dorothy Somerset Studio
at UBC will soon be showcasing
Laundry and Bourbon, a one-act
play written by the late James
McClure.
The show features three actresses in their senioryear ofthe
BFA Acting program at UBC: Sarah Dyer, Meaghan Chenosky and
Barbara Ella. Directed by MFA
student Patrick New, Laundry
and Bourbon is a comedy about
three women in Maynard, Texas.
The setting is a hot summer
afternoon on a front porch where
the three friends share laundry,
gossip and bourbon.
New said, "It's really just sort
of a slice of life for these three
women on a summer's day in
Texas. The three actresses in
the show are in their final year
of their BFA, and when I found
out that these three women were
not acting in anything yet, I really wanted to find a show that I
could really tailor just for them."
New has worked in the US for
more than ten years, but came
to UBC to pursue his dream of
becoming a director.
"I love directing because I
love telling stories, and when
I was acting it occurred to me
that I didn't have the opportunity to tell the stories the way I
really wanted to tell them. And
so that's why I'm here."
He does have one concern,
however. While New lauds the
Dorothy Somerset for its quality as a black box venue, he notes
These ladies take their whiskey with twelve ounces of off-brand Cola. PHOTO COURTESY OF THE ARTIST
that students often either have
trouble finding it, or assume
that every show that occurs on
campus is staged at the Freddy
Wood Theatre.
"There's usually people who
show up [to Dorothy Somerset]
five or ten minutes late, because
they were waiting for the show
to start at Freddy Wood," he said.
While New understands the
reality that TV and film are more
lucrative, he is passionate about
theatre.
"There is nothing like live theatre," he said. "Theatre is a conversation, theatre is audience
and actors, a story and an interaction. The audience is another character in a way, and you
really feel their response. Live
theatre is just so special that
way, and ... it will always be my
number one love." tl
Laundry and Bourbon runs
fromMarch 10-13 at Dorothy Somerset Studios. Admission is free.
^ = fl
° c 2
H"
SJ!
Is3
III
£_\ fc
- ^ %
_\jc_
ill
o __ S
01S 4
SJtf*
= Eg*
3  c  c   c
3   UJ   W   UJ
=U Ernst &Young
Quality In Everything We Do
This year, Ernst & Young has 25 reasons to celebrate.
Thank you University of British of Columbia.
We can't wait to welcome our brightest new colleagues. From the moment you walk through the doors,
you'll hit the ground running. Look forward to a career that challenges you, offers diverse global opportunities and
on-the-job training that will help you realize your true potential. Congratulations on moving forward with the
organization named to Universum's IDEAL'' Employers in Canada list.
Jasdeep Baidwan
Jonathan Chao
Junaid Islam
Jessica Louie
Bill Smith
Sean Butler
Grace Cheung
Emily Joy
Lucy Peng
Chris Tarn
Winnie Cao
Dylan Easterbrook
Cathy Law
Shuru Qu
Chris Tarling
Michelle Chan
Carman Fang
Vanessa Lee
Dhiren Sarwal
Lisa Tham
Catherine Chandler
Vicky Fang
James Lin
Lilian Sin
Carrie Wong
To launch your career, check out ey.com/ca/careers. 2011.03.10/UBYSSEY.CA/OPINIONS/15
OPINIONS
DO YOU CARE? WRITE US A LETTER»feedback@ubyssey.ca
EDITORIAL
UBC APP LACKS SLINGSHOTS (AMONG OTHER
THINGS)
We have to admit, when we first saw that UBC had
developed an iPhone App (soon to be available on
all smartphones), we were pretty impressed. It's
an example of how UBC can communicate to students on their level and it's slickly designed with
wonderful visuals.
Unfortunately it probably came out three
months too early.
To start with, when you enter the application,
the top button is 'Future Students: Learn about
UBC There, you find high-quality videos, photos
and clear ways to connect with the university.
Below it is 'Current Students,' which is filled with
high-quality data. Lots and lots of data. Ifyou want
events, some phone numbers and the location of
places, it's all there. The actual usability and audio-visual aspects are somewhat lacking, though.
All of which gives the impression that this was
quickly fast-tracked by UBC to use as a recruiting tool for future students, without fully thinking through the things which would be tremendously helpful to those of us who presently pay
tuition. That's too bad, because the potential benefits to students are tremendous.
Imagine an app that immediately connected with
your SSC, allowingyouto check your schedule and
pay off library fines. Or one which could quickly
find your professor's phone number, followed by
podcasts he put online for your class. The opportunities are there and UBC has the resources.
But like much of what UBC does to reach out to
students, the smartphone application is a solid
idea which hasn't fully come together quite yet.
Still, we'll wait until September to fully evaluate it, because we hope for and expect improvements by then. A university app will never become Angry Birds, but it still whets our app-etites.
WHERE'S YOUR TUITION MONEY GOING?
The tuition debate is one of the most contentious
amongst students at UBC. The question of whether
the AMS should be lobbying for lower tuition has
become a litmus test for whether you fall into the
left or right on the spectrum of student politics.
Those on the left argue that the growing cost of
higher education, even though it is only increasing
incrementally, is a barrier for lower-income students to access a university diploma.
The other side, including the university, retorts
that the tuition rate is necessary to sustain the
quality of education provided by UBC. They instead
point to the student loan program as a place that is
in need of improvements.
What both sides often miss, however, is the question of what our tuition is being used for.
Since Campbell thawed the NDP-instituted tuition freeze in 2002, UBC students have come to
pay double what they used to.
But has the quality of education increased substantially in that time frame?
UBC still falls near at the bottom of rankings for
undergraduate education. And despite high profile projects such as the Carl Wieman Science Education Initiative, the money devoted to improving
teaching remains modest.
Instead, a significant proportion ofthe money is
going towards funding activities such as research
and graduate education that improve UBC's global rankings.
Many administrators will insist that the university isn't concerned with outside rankings and then
in the same breath extol UBC's top-40 position and
discuss how to bring that ranking higher.
And in some ways there's nothing wrong with
that. Rankings such as the Times Higher Education Ranking essentially demonstrate how valuable
a specific university is to broader society as both a
hub for research and repository of knowledge.
However, undergraduate students are not the
primary beneficiaries of research activities—society is. And society should be the one paying for it
through taxes.
What undergraduates pay for is an education. And
although nowadays many students do come to UBC
solely for its reputation, it's still no substitute for actual learning. If the university continues to increase
tuition fees, students need to see much more si
nificant returns with regards to our education.
tforl   UBC
JONNY WAKEFIELD GRAPHIC/THE UBYSSEY
OPINIONS
Katie: Women's issues are universal issues
GORDON KATIC
Columnist
To mark International Women's Day,
this issue of The Ubyssey features a
women's supplement. It's important
to recognize the courageous women
who have worked tirelessly to create
a more just and equitable world. In
nearly every respect, women find
themselves in a better position today than just decades ago. These tremendous strides are not the gift of a
benevolent patriarchy, but the result
of decades of struggle.
However, we have a tendency to label these feminist struggles as merely "women's issues," giving men an excuse not to pay attention. In reality, issues of feminism—from pay equality,
to reproductive rights, to gendered violence—are inextricably linked with
men and masculinity.
Approximately 98 per cent of rape
is committed by men, yet the focus
of rape prevention programs are on
women. We tell women to be careful
what they wear, where they go, what
they drink, who they go out with, where
they walk, who they give their number
to, what they carry to protect themselves—the list goes on and on. Inevitably, if a woman is raped (and an estimated one-fifth of women worldwide
will be a victim of rape or attempted
rape in their lifetimes) we often blame
her for being careless and not following the many rules. The focus is on the
victim, but the perpetrator ofthe assault
is conspicuous in his absence.
It's time for all of us to recognize
that rape is not the result of "careless
women," but violent men.
In our society, violent masculinity
is the cultural norm. Misogyny is institutionalized, from the locker room
to the workplace. Boys are forced to
put on a macho guise, lest they be labeled a 'fag,' 'sissy' or not a 'real man.'
We're bombarded by images of brutish men in movies, television, pornography, professional wrestling and the
UFC Physical strength, independence
and stoicism are idealized, while anything resembling emotional sensitivity receives derision.
Given the idealization of violent
masculinity, it shouldbe no surprise
that in addition to the vast majority
of rapes, 90 per cent of assaults, 85
per cent of murders and 95 per cent
of cases of domestic violence are committed by men. Clearly, it's time to rethink manhood.
Allies at UBC is a pro-feminist resource group on campus (I happen to
be the vice president) engaging men
to do just that, but it's going to take a
lot more work. I invite other men-
no, implore them—to recognize their
responsibility to reevaluate manhood. Men need to hold other men
accountable for brutish, degenerative
and oppressive misogynistbehaviour;
men need to critique destructive gender norms taught to them in the locker-room, workplace, classroom and
frat house; men need to challenge
the prevailing images of masculinity offered by popular culture.
Critically evaluating masculinity
will not only make this world a safer
place for women, but it will free men
from the burden of conforming to oppressive cultural standards. Not only
do we owe it to women, but we owe it
to ourselves. «3
LETTERS
QUORUM CHANGE IS NECESSARY
The AMS is the largest society in BC
governed by the Society Act. We are not
like strata councils, baseball leagues,
Girl Guides or the Variety Club. We
have 48,000 active members, operate more like a government than a
society and have at least 25 per cent
of our membership change annually.
This makes it exceptionally difficult
to operate like other societies, where
it is easy to get a quorate AGM of ten
people together, or to change their
bylaws by a show of hands. We don't
fit into the legislation that governs
us and our current quorum of 1000
is not feasible. That is two per cent of
the student population and, outside
ofthe Chan Centre, there is no space
big enough to hold them.
Additionally, only bylaws can be
amended at a General Meeting. No fees,
no appointments, no crazy business-
just bylaws. We are asking that the 1000
student quorum be reduced to 500 students, a number that can actually be
achieved. For those of you who think
500 is a small number, it is the equivalent of four fully loaded B-Line buses,
or twice the entire SUB cafeteria, or Buchanan A100, 102, 201 and 203 added
together. It's a large enough number to
protect against tyranny of the minority but small enough to actually fit in a
room together. Just for context, UVic has
a quorum of around 80 people, BCIT is
about 50 and UFV is about 30. These
schools are smaller than UBC, yes, but
hardly one hundredth the size.
—Jeremy McElroy
AMS President
UBYSSEY'S FRONT COVER
UNPROFESSIONAL
Dear Ubyssey,
You are the voice and media of the
campus, therefore students expect
you to give us a neutral perspective
on matters that concern us, including
that of the AMS. To see a front page
advertisement in support of the 'fee
question' for the AMS is unprofessional, disgraceful and represents your
writer's opinions—which belong in
the editorial section.
Perhaps I was willing to give up my
money for clubs (that I'm not personally interested in joining) or even the
sustainability fund (which I do support), but this article or "advertisement" has me in such disbelief that
I, and I would think others ofthe student body, may change our minds.
I read The Ubyssey to read news ofthe
campus, and not simply opinions ofthe
newspaper. I would suggest perhaps
next time, there could be a story with
both sides of the story; a pro and con
representation that would better help
the students reflect on why sayingyes on
the fee question is a necessity and not
merely a method of gaining easy money.
—Alex Chan 16/UBYSSEY.CA/OURCAMPUS/2011.03.10
Mr
Real Experience.
Real Results.
ADVANCED PLACEMENT AT BCIT
If you tiave a university degree in any field, you may be able to earn a BCIT diploma in one
year. Chech out our diploma and post-diploma business programs and fast-track your career.
Financial Management
> Accounting
> Taxation
> Financial Planning
> Genera) Insurance
and Risk Management
Call 604.432.8898
Operations Management
and Information Technology
> International Business Management
> Business Information Technology
Management
> Business Operations Management
Call 604.432.8385
Business Administration
> Business Administration.
Post-Diploma
> Human Resource Management.
Post-Diploma
Call 604.451.7019
Marketing Management
> Professional Real Estate
> Entrepreneurship
> Marketing Communications
> Professional Sales
> Tourism Management
Call 604.432.8293
Teach English
Abroad
Apply now for Fall 2011
bcit.ca, search 'advanced placement'
SCHOOL OF
BUSINESS
TESOL/TESL Teacher Training
Certification Courses
* Intensive 60-Hour Program
* Classroom Management Techniques
* Detailed Lesson Planning
• ESL Skills Development
• Comprehensive Teaching Materials
• Interactive Teaching Practicum
• Internationally Recognized Certificate
* Teacher Placement Service
* Money-Back Guarantee Included
• Thousands of Satisfied Students
OXFORD SEMINARS
604-683-3430/1-800-269-6719
www.oxfordseminars.ca
Ifyou have
a photo of
something
mighty
fantabulous
happening on
campus, send it to
us; it might make
it as part of Our
Campus.
GEOFF LISTER
photos@ubysseyca
tlTHEUBYSSEYca

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0126760/manifest

Comment

Related Items