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The Ubyssey Oct 4, 1985

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Array UBYSSEY
Vancouver, B.C. Friday, October 4,1985
228-2301
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Marcos stirs student dissent
By MURIEL DRAAISMA
t is the summer of unrest in the Philippines.
• University administrations around the
country bar 106 members of the most militant national student organization from
enrolling in school.
• Police in Mindanao arrest 21 students
during a meeting, drag them to a local detention centre and throw them in jail.
• Armed forces men in Manila and Davao
kill two students.
• Unidentified members of the military in
Cebu kidnap another student along with a
prominent Catholic priest; neither have been
heard of since.
These are the stories that 26-year-old
Clarissa Balan brings with her to Canada at
the summer's end. She is her country's
messenger, also bringing along letters, pamphlets, ready-made slogans and a well-
rehearsed view of the conflict between president Ferdinand E. Marcos and the Philippines' 54 million people.
A petite woman with short black hair and
imposing brown eyes, Balan speaks slowly
and carefully about attempts by Marcos and
more than 400,000 armed forces men to quell
student protest.
"Students are the most militant, most
organized sector of Filipino society. When
they speak at the huge rallies outside the
presidential palace in Manila, crowds begin
to wave their fists and shout," she says.
"Students are very, very active in the
people's movement."
Much of the crackdown centres on the
League of Filipino Students, an outspoken
national organization that represents more
than 200 schools. Since its birth in 1978, it
has been the main force rallying students opposed to the Marcos regime.
The League's main concerns are: spiralling
education costs, deteriorating quality of
education, growing U.S. influence on
academic policy and enforced military training for college and university students.
The League is also worried about the Marcos regime's human rights abuses and the increase in American military presence. The
Reagan administration maintains two large
military bases in the Philippines and plans to
give $25 million in military aid to Manila next
year, according to the New York Times. The
League actively advocates that the U.S. bring
an end to its economic and military support
of the Marcos government.
Balan says Marcos has hinted at outlawing
the League, a move that would set the Philippines back 13 years, when martial law was
declared and all student organizations were
banned. From 1972 to 1977, students faced
imprisonment for holding meetings, circulating petitions and leaflets and
demonstrating.
. Such a move would be a typical of the
Marcos regime. For nearly two decades, Marcos has single-handedly run the country, giving himself the power in 1976 to issue wide-
ranging presidential decrees. He finally lifted
martial law in 1981 but retained emergency
power to detain anyone suspected of being a
rebel.
Now students can legally protest government actions, but they do so in fear of police
harassment and arrest. Helmeted men with
riot sticks and shields continue to break up
student demonstrations. Government spies
pose as students on major campuses to
monitor political activity. And the military still
herds students into dark, crowded jail cells for
later interrogation under bright lights.
Some are released, Balan says; some never
reappear.
•
Balan is a student activist who decided six
years ago to join the fight for a new Philippines. Part of her month-long cross-Canada
mission, sponsored by the United Church of
Canada, is to give the Filipino student movement a human face.
Yet she tells her own story reluctantly. Her
eyes widen and her pupils dilate before she
begins. She leans forward, pauses, then says:
"How can I be open?"
It was at a small college in Manila where
she received her political education. Information presented during a special "social consciousness week" showed Marcos' education
system to be geared towards the interests of
Filipino and U.S. big business and the
military.
"I saw there were social issues that need to
be faced by students. That was the first time I
realized the education system does not serve
our interests, that education is becoming
more of a privilege than a right and more
commercialized all the time."
Balan — nicknamed Gigi — is now external affairs coordinator for the Student Christian Movement of the Philippines, a chapter
of an international group which says it
spreads the gospel of liberation to students.
She once worked for the League in 1981.
Like many student activists, Balan has not
yet graduated. Student politics is her full-
time occupation. She says Filipino student
radicals often graduate from the student
movement, not from university, and then
enter the world of the people's movement opposed to Marcos. Many continue to be militant.
MARCOS
These days, Balan finds herself primarily
informing students about the role of post-
secondary education in the Philippines.
Balan says the education system has
become a money-making operation, with
three of the country's largest universities now
considered to be among the Philippines' most
profitable corporations. As well, 90 per cent
of all students attend privately owned schools
which make a profit every year.
Balan is critical of Marcos' vision of the
ideal student. She says he prefers English
speaking, technically adept students to those
with a grounding in liberal arts.
"Marcos wants students who are not
critical and not analytical to fit into his model
of national development. Students, without
liberal arts and social sciences, will be less
able to see the need for social transformation."
•
Filipino national student organizations
focus on keeping tuition fees at an affordable
level, fighting for adequate and reasonably
priced housing and for satisfying student
jobs. Most of their energy now, however, is
concentrating on scrapping a new version of
Filipino conscription.
Balan searches through her briefcase and
digs up a copy of the League's official
publication, Commitment, which contains an
analysis of the government's program called
the National Service Law.
It reads: "If the NSL comes true to form,
students shall become eventual traffic controllers,  first aiders, firemen, criminal in-
See page 2: MILITARY Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 4, 1986
Military dictates curriculum
From page 1
vestigators, intelligence workers
(spies), and experts in arms self
defence.
"Inside campuses or demonstrations in the streets, college students
will be mobilized to 'control'
demonstrators. Rest assured, the
NSL shall ensure these students'
shall be experts in the formation of
'mob' and 'riot control units,' and
use of 'anti-riot' weapons,
equipment and techniques ..."
Under the program, all students
from grade four to college will be
forced to give "national service" in
three areas: civic welfare, law enforcement and the military.
College students, in particular,
will be asked to complete 240 lecture hours over an extended period
of time, learning loyalty, self-
discipline and patriotism, how to
combat foreign invaders as well as
"those who aim to bring the state
into ruin through aimlessness,
violence and misjudgement."
The National Defence Act of
1973 dictates that fourth year high
school and male college students
undergo defence training or
preparation for external aggression.
The service broadens the act to include training for internal conflict.
The national defence and education ministries implemented the law
in June 1985 in a few select schools
in the northern Philippines. The
law's masterminds are none other
than the Philippine constabulary/integrated national
police, whose main job is to ensure
Marcos opponents do not upset the
established order.
The service law represents
another attempt by Marcos to suppress student dissent, the organizations say; only this time he will
reach students before they become
involved in protest groups.
Balan says of the law: "It's
demonic. It's virtual indoctrination
of youth. It's the militarization of
Philipino education and will create
students who blindly obey the ruling powers."
The organizations are informing
students about the law by
distributing leaflets, arranging
speakers, organizing demonstrations and picketing the offices of
national defence and education
ministries.
The League and the SCM are
looking to Canadian students for
support. The Pacific region of the
Canadian Federation of Students,
the Student Christian Movement of
Canada and the North American
wing of the World Student Christian Federation are all writing letters of protest.
Says Terry Hunt, chair of CFS's
Pacific region: "We will be sending
letters to let the Marcos government
know the eyes of the world are upon
it. We will also be sending letters of
support to Filipino students. The
National Service Law is obviously
an attempt to divide and conquer
the student movement."
The Philippine consul-general in
Vancouver, however, says the
government will not heed the calls
of students. "We have always said
we will do our own fighting so it
follows that we will train our own
people to keep down insurgency,"
says Luz del Mundo.
"Students, as in other countries,
have their own ideas. They are not
necessarily very mature. In the
Philippines, students are restless
and tend to be inconoclasts, knocking down everything to do with the
administration but presenting no
constructive, positive alternatives."
Del Mundo says student leaders
would be as authoritarian as Marcos in running the country simply
because they would face the same
problems.
"When students have grown a bit
older, they'll mellow, they'll change
their perspective," Del Mundo
says.
Del Mundo admits the Marcos
government has committed a "few
errors" but attributes them to the
country's problems — its $26
billion  (U.S.)  foreign  debt,  high
unemployment rate, overcrowded
population, unequal land distribution and increasing lawlessness.
"Students blame this administration, but we have made some
strides."
Statistics tell the rest of the story:
from 1981 to April 1985, 10,613 activists have been arrested, 1,513
people killed and 393 people have
disappeared without a trace.
For the last 16 months, not a day
goes by in the Philippines without
one Filipino killed, another tortured, an average of 11 arrested and
detained. And every other day, one
more Filipino disappears.
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THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
$25,000 question
Anne Tayler will leave UBC this May
with a PhD and $25,000 in debt.
By ROBERT BEYNON
Anne Tayler is inexplicably buoyant after
"giving another lecture to her English 100
class. She jumps from foot to foot, her curly brown hair bouncing to the rhythm of
her feet.
"I love it. I'm always like this after
class," says Tayler, 34. "I've got such a
great English 100 section this year."
Tayler's happiness is contagious as she
flits from person to person in the Buchanan
tower English office. It is also remarkable.
Tayler should graduate this spring with a
PhD in English. With her doctorate comes
a debt of $25,000 — money she owes the
provincial and federal governments in student loans. She must pay more than $400 a
month for 10 years to pay back the debt and
its accumulated interest.
Tayler thinks she will not have the money
to pay the debt in that period but plans to
do it eventually.
"I'm a survivor," she explains. The debt
grew as Tayler, a single mother, supported
her children while going to school.
"The standard joke is 'What will you do?
Declare bankruptcy?' 1 hope I won't get
forced to do that," she says.
"But at some point there is a limit." She
says she is not the only student in such a
situation. She asks: "What will the government do if numerous people start declaring
bankruptcy?"
Tayler lives with her daughters, Cindy, 12
and Wendy, 14, in a house on Bowen Island
with one and a half bathrooms and a large
garden, because housing is less expensive
than in Vancouver. They do not eat meat,
and Tayler only goes out "on occasions".
She heats her house with a wood-fueled airtight stove — "wood's free," she says.
When she moved to Vancouver from
Whitehorse, Yukon Territories in 1978,
Tayler did not qualify for the B.C. student
grants then available because she was from
out of province. The grants were eliminated
in 1983 by the Social Credit government.
Tayler's debt began in her first vear at
UBC.
In the seven years since, Tayler has gone
to school all year, continuing through each
summer and working whenever she can.
"I've cleaned houses, I've been a tutor,
free-lanced edited, judged a limerick contest, tried being a filing clerk, gardened,
typed, taught grammar courses."
"Once I needed grocery money," Tayler
continues. "A wonderful older lady needed
her porch scrubbed so I went out with an
old-fashioned scrub brush and scrubbed it
for $5."
The work has never been enough and she
' has always needed loans. Tayler is applying for work study this year although she
is already instructing an English 100 course,
writing her dissertation and caring for her
children.
TAYLER . . . jokes with her English 100 students.
"There just isn't enough money," she
says.
Tayler begins her days at 6 a.m. and
often ends her days at midnight.
Tayler does her own studying, prepares
for the English 100 class and is on campus
by 2:30 p.m. Then there are office hours,
and Tayler returns home, makes Supper and
does homework and works until ittJdnight.
That is her Monday, Wednesday, Friday
schedule when she teaches English f<30i sec*
tion 07C in Buchanan. Other days she db&s
not drive her 1974 turquoise Datsun into
school but stays home and works.
She parks her Datsun in Horseshoe Bay
but worries it may take years to finish,
while her debt increases.
Tayler also spends one day a week working part-time teaching spelling. She spends
another day a week filling out job applications and sending out resumes, hoping
she'll find a full-time job before she
graduates.
"I send two to 10 letters a week, all of
which get politely rejected."
She says she applies mainly to universities
in Western Canada and along the U.S.
West Coast and to institutions around the
Pacific Rim, but expects to create her own
' job once she is graduated — freelance
editing, teaching.
to save money commuting to and from
Bowen Island on the small coastal ferry.
Taylor says her English section takes up a
lot of her time.
"We're not teaching assistants at all,
we're instructors," she says. "We are
responsible for an entire class. I'm supposed
to work 12 hours a week but if 1 did just
that I'd be letting my class down."
The classroom she teaches in is small and
cramped with dingy curtains, located on the
third floor of the Buchanan building's B
wing. She is lively in class, not your typical
professor. The students are relaxed and
laugh at her jokes.
"You didn't expect a normal class," she
tells them smiling.
Tuesday and Thursday Tayler works on
her dissertation, The Rhetoric of Quotation
in the Cantos of Ezra Pound. She says she
hopes she will finish by the end of this year
Tayer does not know, however, how she
will ever pay off her total student loan doing that. She expects to make 520,000 a year
at most when she graduates.
'Qo a budget for $20,000 a year for
•■'family with two kids," she says. "After
you take out groceries and rent there's not
much left."
Tayler finds hidden expenses supporting
children — medical coverage, transportation, tutors, dentists, school expenses, life
insurance on herself.
Tayler agrees she must pay back the loan
but says the repayment scheme has to be
made more realistic. She says she will not be
able to make the required payments of
more than $400 a month for 10 years to pay
off her loan.
A student loan should be an investment
by the government, says Tayler. She asks
why she cannot write it off her income tax
— Patrick michell photo
returns when she graduates like business
people write off business expenses.
The interest payment for students should
be fixed, Tayler argues, and people applying for repeat loans while finishing graduate
work should have their paperwork
streamlined. Currently former students pay
the prime interest rate at the time they consolidate on their loai on their entire loan.
Some students are paying almost 16 per
cent interest on their loans.
And Tayler doesn't understand why she
has to give the education ministry in Victoria the same information three times a
year when she fills out her loan applications.
She thinks the ministry does this to catch
cheaters but she says they're missing the
real fraud anyways, only catching people
who apply for more than one loan.
Ohe says whenever she waits for a reply
^*to her loan application her stomach
grinds for two months. There's no promise
that even now that she's on the dissertation
stage of her PhD they won't cut her off.
While she wonders about how she'll
repay her student lean, life goes on. She
chops wood for her stove every day and
tends her garden — Tayler is counting on
enormous Zucchinis until mid-December.
Because they cannot afford meat she
feeds her family a lot of Asian food. "Like
Chazuke. It's a Japanese dish with rice,
tuna, dried seaweed, spices and tea. It's
great because it gives complete protein."
Tayler is not worried, though. She just
wishes the system was more fair. "I guess
I'm a real survivor. . .yeah, I am." She says
she has "what a friend called stick-to-
itness."
Debt load and defaults on increase
By ROBERT BEYNON
The student aid program in B.C.is heading for a crisis.
Byron Hender, UBC's financial awards director, estimates
that by 1987 the average debt of a student graduating with student
loans will be more than $15,000, closer to $20,000.
Hender flips through the piles of files on his desk to find the one
he wants. The awards office has so many files they have a filing
cabinet in the hall.
"Here it is." He says this May the awards office surveyed 113
graduating students and 81 per cent had debts over $8,000. Last
year they surveyed 100 students graduating with debt and only 11
per cent had loans over $8,000.
"And these figures don't even cover student loans acquired
previous to UBC or private debts to banks, parents, or Visa or
Mastercard." He estimates the average student with debt has more
than the awards office can tell.
Hender says that as the debt load increases, so does the default
rate. "But no research is done into student debt, no study into what
debt load a student can be allowed to assume."
He says his office did a simplistic survey of debt payment potential for the student who found a job making $20,000 a year after
graduation. If that student paid 15 per cent of his or her gross income a single parent with one child could only support a debt load
of $12,000 over the repayment time period of 10 years.
"Even then there's no money left over for childcare or other
payments such as medical," says Hender.
Student debts are increasing in B.C. due to the elimination of the
B.C. grant program in 1983, the increase in the federal loan ceiling
from $1,800 to $3,300 a year and B.C.'s incredibly high youth
unemployment rate, Hender says, and the problem isn't going to go
away.
Hender, who is also president of the Canadian Association of
Student Financial Aid Administrators, says his organization will
ask the federal government to begin a joint federal-provincial study
into loan ceilings and repayments this fall.
He says even if this happens it could take years to implement a
new program, until a least 1987.
Henders adds, "We'll have to start looking at the ability of the
student to pay." Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 4, 1985
Child prostitutes working Mt. Pleasant
By ERIKA SIMPSON
Children are working as prostitutes on the streets of Mount
Pleasant, Vancouver city police inspector Ray Canuel said Tuesday.
"Twenty-five per cent of prostitutes in Mount Pleasant are
children under 16 years," Canuel
told a special city council session.
The council met to discuss complaints from Mount Pleasant
residents about prostitutes in the
area south of Broadway and west of
Main street.
Canuel estimated half the police
patrol members in Mount Pleasant
deal with juveniles although only
two are trained to do so. The police
have added 10 officers to the Mount
Pleasant patrol, Team 6, since a
prostitution task force was formed
August 7.
"We have an adequate law to
take them (juveniles) into care and
turn them over to the ministry of
human resources," said Canuel.
But Terry Piper, human
resources   regional   manager,   said
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family and health services does not
allow the ministry at 575 Drake
Street to contain teenagers who
have decided not to accept parental
discipline.
"A youngster may accept a group
home after being taken down to
Drake centre but we can't use
physical containment," Piper said.
Human resources has five case
workers who offer services and accomodation to 80 children, said
Piper. "When these children are
picked up they're zonked out on
drugs, their health is really bad and
most of them have been sexually
abused.
"Sometimes it takes two years to
repair psychological damage", he
said. He urged the children be taken
to a special hospital although he
estimated the ministry has a success
rate of 80 per cent with the children
who accept human resources'
"substitute parenthood".
Aid. Don Bellamy criticized the
"revolving door process" at human
resources. "When a juvenile is
brought under your care you have
to let him go" he said.
Bruce Johnstone, senior crown
counsel, said children could be contained under the provisions of the
Mental Health Act and some provisions of the criminal code such as
persistant soliciting or standing on
the  roadway  for the purpose of
soliciting business.
When asked why adults were not
arrested for soliciting sex with
children he said the offence of sexual assault applies to anyone who
has engaged in sex with a child
under 14 years.
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UNIQUE... ANY WAY YOU SERVE IT Friday, October 4, 1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Firings erode academic freedom
By DAVE PASIN
The Canadian Association of
University Teachers has established
an independent committee to probe
in mid October the dismissal of
twelve UBC faculty members.
The committee appointed by
CAUT's academic freedom and
tenure committee will feature A.E.
Malloch, Ursula Franklin from the
University of Toronto and Ken
Norman from the University of
Saskatchewan. All three members
have wide and varied university administrative experience.
UBC faculty association president Elmer Ogryzlo said CAUT
must become involved in the
dispute because "the very heart of
tenure and academic freedom is involved."
"The quicker the dispute is
resolved the better off everyone will
be," he said. But UBC vice-
president academic Dan Birch said
the CAUT probe is premature.
"The university and the faculty
association have already agreed to
go to arbitration," he said.
Ogryzlo, however, said the faculty administration arbitration and
the probe are both connected.
"Universities throughout
Canada, the United States and
Australia are shocked at the way the
university arbitrarily dismissed the
12 faculty members," he said.
"Obviously tenure and academic
freedom are not being protected.
And this could have profound implications in the academic community in the future." An adviser
to UBC administration president
David Strangway said the firings
could not have been avoided.
"This is simply a matter of the
university's right to reduce costs
and avoid redundancy in compliance with its budgetary
restraints," said Charles Bourne.
Orgryzlo said the faculty association's concern is mainly over the
university's refusal to negotiate an
agreement on firing faculty
members when the university faces
a financial emergency, or in absence
of a financial exigency.
"While the association and the
administration agreed to proceed to
establish criteria for layoffs in
absence of financial exigency, no
serious  negotiations  actually  ever
took place," said Ogryzlo.
Bruce Gellatly, UBC vice-
president administration and
finance said "the university needn't
state that there is condition of
financial exigency only one of
budgetary restraint and compliance."
He added the dismissals are part
of a five-year plan to simplify the
university system.
Council planned
By GORDANA RASIC
After unilaterally imposing a $32
athletic fee on students last Spring,
the UBC's board is expected to approve the terms of reference for a
new athletic council at their Oct. 17
meeting.
If the terms are passed, UBC will
have an athletic program combining
the four previous sub-headings of
intercollegiate sports, intramurals,
recreation UBC, and sports services.
Neil Risebrough, associate vice
president student services and
athletic council chair to be, said the
council will be made up of five
students, five university appointees,
and four alumni-two to be appointed by the students and two by
the university. That way 50 per cent
of the council will consist of student
representation, he claimed.
"There have been no real problems in developing the council
since we all want the same thing —
maximum student and community
participation," said Risebrough.
There was, however, talk by the
Alma Mater Society of suing the
board after they imposed the $32
fee without student approval.
Student representative Don
Holubitsky said, "I don't think the
situation was handled that well, but
regardless I think we should make
the best of it in order to benefit the
athletes."
"Risebrough suggested the fee
last year to guarantee a set amount
for funding needed, due to cutbacks which had greatly decreased
the athletic funding," he said.
The separate sports programs
would still retain their own
autonomy, but the athletic committee would tell them how much
money they get, said Holubitsky.
This council may organize construction of athletic facilities such
as an artificial field, more basketball gyms, and a weight-training
centre, he said.
"Right now the athletic budget is
in an ad hoc process because we
have to spend money," Holubitsky
said. "We can't wait for the council
— that would be financially irresponsible; though the budget will
be a basically agreed upon one."
He said next year the budget
would be presented to the board by
the proposed council.
"1 think it could work very well
and become a strong university program," he said.
AMS president Glenna Chestnutt
said that intramurals are used by
10,000 people at one time or
another so it is necessary to have a
good program."
"Not a single person came to my
office to complain about the fee,"
she said.
JOGGER ALONG WRECK beach, undeterred by apparently cold weather and lack of
suit, nevertheless partakes of sun, wind and salt spray as he traverses grey, sandy su
tracksuit, or even bathing
rface
Parking limits handicapped students
By DEBBIE LO
Lack of marked, disabled parking spaces in faculty and staff parking lots has forced at least one UBC
student to miss classes.
"Spaces aren't numbered
everywhere . . . they are reserved in
general but it is not clear who the
spaces are reserved for," said
Elizabeth Hill, a graduate student
who has a mobility problem.
Made-to-order essays get failing mark
OTTAWA (CUP) — A private
U.S. company is attempting to sell
made-to-order essays on several
Canadian campuses, but some
students and faculty calling the service "immoral" are fighting against
it.
Research Assistance, a
California-based company, offers
more than 14,000 essays as well as
"custom research" service, in
which customers on "all levels" can
order essays on many subjects. The
firm has placed small advertisements in many campus
newspapers and other publications
aimed at a youth/college market.
But when the company placed an
order with the Charlatan, the student newspaper at Carleton University, the staff decided not to publish
the ad because of the inherent
plagiarism the service implies.
However, they ran an editorial, including the company's address and
phone number.
"The staff decided that the service the company was advertising
was basically immoral and was
leeching of the academic desperations of students," said editor Chris
Wattie. "Plagiarizing helps
nobody, except the people who sell
ready-made essays."
The Ubyssey received a copy of
the company's advertisement and a
request for advertising in late
August, said staffer David Ferman,
and Ubyssey staff voted at a September meeting to boycott the ad.
"From a legalistic standpoint the
ad promotes the breaking of a basic
academic law," said Ferman.
"Plagiarism can get you kicked out
of school, and paying for it doesn't
make it any better."
The Fulcrum, the student
newspaper at the University of Ottawa, did publish the ad, but not
before some debate on staff about
the ethics of the company. "Some
(staff members) said students
plagiarize anyway, and the company wasn't necessarily at fault,"
said editor Michelle Lalonde.
When the ad appeared in the
Fulcrum, though, it prompted complaint from the academic community, including a letter from Susan
Mann-Trofimenkoff, U of O vice
rector academic.
Mann-Trofimenkoff said the service could be used for no purpose
other than plagiarism, and compared promoting the service to
'strip joints.' "What's the difference, stripping yourself physically or stripping yourself academically?" she asked.
The essay company's sales director, Phil Posin, says papers sold by
the company could be used for
plagiarism, although students could
plagiarize other sources if they
wanted to.
"It's very possible that they'd
take the papers from your school
library as well and plagiarize
them," he said.
Posin also defended the hefty
cost of the service, which charges
$60 for a 10 page essay. "If you go
to the library and spend 10 hours
there, and if you get $10 an hour at
your job, that's $100 worth of
work," which made the company's
service a relative bargain, he said.
Research Assistance, which buys
its essays from independent writers
chiefly at the University of
Southern California and the
University of California Los
Angeles, has come under legal attack in the past. The company won
a court case nine years ago against
the State of California under the
First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution, which guarantees freedom
of the press.
Hill said many of the people who
park in the faculty parking spots do
not realize the spaces are also
reserved for disabled students. "If I
want to go to the pool or classes it is
impossible because it is too far to
walk if I can't find a parking
space," she said.
Supervisor of traffic and parking John Smithman said he has
heard of similar complaints "on oc-
cassion".
"The lots are never all full at the
same time. Some are popular and
fill up quicker," he said. "If they're
full go to the next one."
Smithman said there are about
105 spots marked on campus for
handicapped drivers and 20 are
presently occupied by severely handicapped drivers. Other less handicapped individuals are assigned
spaces in the faculty parking lots
with traffic and security's approval.
He added there has not been a
large enough demand for marked
handicapped spaces in the faculty
and staff parking lots to warrant
marking off separate handicapped
parking spaces.
Smithman encouraged those with
parking access problems to consult
the traffic office about their problem.
Hill said there was no student
handicapped organization on campus to go to with her problem.
There is currently a handicapped
students organization at SFU but
none at UBC. said Paul Thiele,
head of the Crane library for visually impaired students.
"The visually impaired students
on campus usually work on behalf
of other groups," he said.
Martin Cocking, student administrative commission secretary
said no handicapped student club
presently exists because there has
been no initiative taken by handicapped students to form a united
campus club. AMS clubs are entitled to apply for specific events funding.
There is no exact count of the
number of disabled students
presently on campus because handicapped students do not identify
their handicap. But, about 10
mobility handicapped students, 40
visually impaired students, and 10
deaf students are currently enrolled
at UBC according to pre-
registration statistics.
Everyday changes come slowly in Soviet Society
By EVA BUSZA
Everyday change comes slowly in
the Soviet Union, a political science
professor said Wednesday.
"The consumer sector has not
changed significantly (in years),"
Paul Marantz told approximately
200 people in Buchanan 102.
Comparing a visit this summer to
previous visits Marantz said
Moscow women dress more
modishly and there are more appliances in stores but basic goods
such as meat, fruit and vegetables
are still difficult to obtain.
Soviet officials also have more
private cars, he said.
Soviet citizens must be prepared
to join a queue and buy goods at
any time, he added, because goods
appear      unexpectedly      and
sporadically in shops.
"You don't shop when it is convenient," he said. "Every Soviet
citizen carries a string bag."
Marantz added it isn't considered
rude to ask someone where they
bought a commodity in their string
bag if you see them walking by.
Soviet clerks' duties are to "stand
and watch the goods, and be as
unhelpful as possible," Marantz
said, adding they received low
wages and were constantly harassed
by customers seeking unavailable
goods which customers often
thought the clerks kept for
themselves or friends. The latter "is
usually a good assumption," said
Marantz.
He added Soviet television is entirely state controlled. When it is
time for the evening news, it begins
simultaneously on all four Moscow
stations.
"Soviet authorities have decided
that news is good for you."
He said "TV ratings have no
significance" in the Soviet Union
and he had seen an hour and a
quarter program on Gorbachev
meeting natuial gas workers in
Siberia.
Marantz added communicating
with Soviet citizens is as difficult as
it's ever been. "If you go to meet
someone, you keep looking over
your shoulder," he said, adding
that wiretaps and letter openings
were a regular part of life.
"In this kind of atmosphere
friendships develop quickly,"
Marantz said. Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 4, 198E
GOOD EVENING 'I
HOW TOMORROW   THAT'S   THE
DEADLINE FOR OTTAWA RESIDENTS
TO EXCHANGE WITHOUT FEE
THEIR OLD LIBRARY CARDS FOR
THE NEW,MORE EFFICIENT COMPUTER   CARDS NOM IN USE AT
'HOST OF THAT CITY'S LIBRARIES, -
AND AS MARGUERITE    i,  ,d
MACDONALD REPORTS,  A-lj
Some people are angry.  S;
VERY ANGRY. /s/V-
that's right knowitcn..
U
... ELSEHHERE tonight, a FIRE IN
DOWNTOWN TORONTO HAS LEFT
DOZENS DEAD AND COUNTLESS HUNDREDS  INJURED. ONLY THE VICTIMS
ARENT  HUMANS- THEY'RE CHICKENS.
AS  JOE SLESINGER  REPORTS,
, THE TORONTO POULTRY CO-OP
' IS WW JUST A MEMORY. <	
PURE CARNAGE, KNOHLTOH.
CARNAGE ANC> UTTER     l„
DEVASTATION...        fJL
... AND IN PARLIAMENT TODAY,
A PREMIER'S MEET/Nd AT THE
HOUSE OF.COMMONS  HADTOBE
ADJOURNED WHEN A CROW SOMEHOW GAINED ENTRY INTO THE
ASSEMBLY THEATRE.  WORKMEN
ARE STILL  TRYING TO REMOVE
TH£ NOISY BIRD, BUT SO FAR
WITHOUT   SUCCESS. /      &'
TWO  REPORTS, THE   %    ,
FIRST FROM MIKE H
DUFFY.. .
AND FINALLY, WEST OF ONTARIO TODAY,
AN ACCIDENTAL DELAY IN THE COOLING
SYSTEM OF THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH
COLUMBIA'S   MESON FACILITY CAUSED
TWO POUNDS OF URANIUM 21S   TO COME
Wl THIN THREE SECONDS
OF NUCLEAR DETONATION.
V
tr
such an event would have
instantly destroyed van-
couver and victoria and
would have triggered the
Automatic launch Systems
controlling american
and soviet nuclear
arsenals
w
AND THAT'S IT FOR THE NATIONAL
JOIN US NOW FOR OUR SPECIAL
JOURNAL PRESENTATION OF
''TORONTO SEWAGE:
GARBAGE OR GOLDMINE >
GOOD NIGHT.
In
A
~h.
Letters
Debate not resolved
I seem to have struck a somewhat
sensitive nerve with my letter of Friday, Sept. 27, Gay student irate
with antics of "frat boys". Judging
from the response, 'Slanderous ac-
custions lack firm foundation,
Fraternities are slandered by "irate
student," and 'AMS vice raps unfairness towards greeks, fraternities
at UBC suffer from no lack of support on campus.
All three writers make a point of
distancing fraternities from the gaggle of gorillas who harrassed
patrons leaving the recent gays and
lesbians dance in SUB. In contrition, I must say that I am not 100
per cent sure that the cretins in
question were indeed members of
any of UBC's fraternities.
I guess my reasoning went
something like this: Last year, the
frats held a dance adjacent to a gays
and lesbians dance function. Gays
and lesbians were harassed. This
year the frats again held a dance adjacent to a gays and lesbians dance.
Again patrons were harassed.
I think it is more than curious
that the only time in recent memory
that gays and lesbians at UBC have
been harassed at a dance was when
frats held dances immediately adjacent.
One writer suggests that I come
to him and lay a formal complaint.
While I appreciate his open-
mindedness, I feel that my original
letter was my complaint. I am no
longer a student at UBC, having
graduated in 1980, and if any formal complaint is to be registered,
then gay and lesbian students will
have to pursue it.
I would also add that at a recent
gays and lesbians beer night (which
I did not attend), some fraternity
members sang a delightful song
something along the lines of "We
love you gays and lesbians, we love
. . ." It was some kind of travelling
fraternity minstrel troupe whose
tune was appreciated and applauded by those at the beer night. It's a
healthy sign indeed when heterosexual men can so confidently mingle
with gays and lesbians. No one
wants confrontation.
Kevin C. Griffin
Grad of 1980
Student rep seeks support
As a Board of Governors
representative, I believe my most
important function is to keep in
touch with students. I am very interested in hearing your input on
issues related to the university,
especially those in which we may be
able to see a change. The Board's
jurisdiction is over all the university's financial issues and although I
attend most Board committee
meetings, I am specifically appointed to the Academic & Property ones.
If you feel as though your program will be threatened, it is crucial
that you are active in recruiting
university and community support.
It is important that you are active
as early as possible. If you need
assistance organizing yourself or
need ideas to gain more support,
please contact me or any other active student reps.
I am also a representative on
students council and would be hap
py to bring any of your concerns to
them. If you are just simply interested in knowing more about the
AMS or how the university is run,
drop by or call my office
Nancy Bradshaw
Student Board Rep.
It is time for action
Bill Bennett loves the Philippines. He thinks their free trade
zones are just great. He'd even
like to see them in Vancouver.
Foreign investors who move
their companies to the Philippines can get cheap labour, the
lowest minimum wage in the
world in fact, just $2 a day
(U.S.) for fourteen hours of
work. Students in the Philippines live under a harsh dictator; disappearances and
murders are a fact of life. But
the students there are hopeful.
Suicide is rare because the
students have organized. They
work together. They have
created a sense of solidarity,
working together for a common
case.    As   the   repression   in
British Columbia grows, as the
quality of our education is being
eroded, students here would do
well to take a lesson from the
Philippines.  The only way we
can fight the Bill Bennetts and
Marcos of this world is if we
stand together and support one
another remembering that an
injury to one is an injury to all.
Join the Ubyssey
This is just a short note to remind our readers that
The Ubyssey is open to volunteers to help with producing a quality paper.
Remember, the more people who help out, the better
the quality of the paper and the closer to the university
community it gets.
So, come and help prove the pen is mightier than the
sword — Join The Ubyssey by dropping into the office,
SUB 241K.
Help change the system by reporting on it.
Grad disgusted with council
By HORACIO DE LA CUEVA
The A.M.S. executive and student council believe their best argument to not engage in a boycott of
goods produced by South Africa
linked companies is our freedom of
choice. An unsustainable argument.
There are two points to address.
The fact that whoever voted the student council empowered them to
make decisions, and second that
student council always makes
(political) decisions for the rest of
the students.
When the Student Council was
elected we entrusted them to make
decisions for us. That means they
have the power, and responsibility
to make decisions from their
political positions.
Everytime student council meets
and passes a motion they make a
political decision for us. Necessarily
those decisions are not to
everybody's liking. Let us examine
a couple of very important decisions made by them in the past.
Have  you  walked  through  the
S.U.B. Plaza? Do you know how it
came to be? Do you know why and
how you are paying for it?
Some years ago student council
asked through a referendum if we
wanted $15.00 levied in our student
fees to provide monies for capital
acquisition projects. At the same
time, and to motivate voting
amongst the students, they had a
ballot in which we could state our
preference as to where the monies
collected should go.
perspectives
The referendum passed, and the
two top preferences amonst
students were student housing and
daycare. What we, as students, got
was a plaza with a minimum cost of
$1.4 million. Why? Well, the council had not made the preference
ballot legally binding. I believe it
was a morally binding ballot,
nonetheless. If I had known that the
money was going to be used for one
of the lowest student preferences I
would have voted against it.
JLtetters
Controversy clarified
As President of Gays and Lesbians of UBC, 1 would like to address and clarify the unfortunate
controversy which has erupted over
events at the IFC and GLUBC
dances held next to each other on
Saturday, September 21.
Simply, a group of confused individuals attempted to gain entry to
our dance, which was already full to
capacity. When refused admission
they became belligerent.
I would like to compliment and
thank the AMS security staff, as
well as our own security team, for
exercising great restraint in the face
of provocation by fools, and the
RCMP who responded quickly to
the AMS request for assistance.
GLUBC has never suggested that
those involved were members of a
fraternity, nor are we interested in
THE UBYSSEY
October 4, 1985
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Friday throughout
the academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff
and are not necessarily those of the administrataion or the
AMS. Member Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey's
editorial office is SUB 241k. Editorial department,
228-2301/2305. Advertising 228-3977/3978.
Keith Stringer hopped over to Peggy Wright who was holding a rabbit belonging to horacio de la
cueva. "Cook the mushrooms for the rabbit", said Karin Conley to Michelle Tessler. Erika Simpson and
Muriel Draaisma lamented Robert Beynon's retreat to the Orient with Laura Lowden, or was it Patti
Flather? "Of course it was", said Camile Dionne and Ruth Gumpp agreed. Stephen Wisenthal, Sue
Mcllroy and Nicole Jean told Kenneth Sallitt, Charlie Fidelman and Mary mcAlister to say goodbye,
David Ferman and Carl Rosenberg were buying cough drops for Debbi Lo and missed the farewell par
ty given by Gordana Rasic and Martin West with help from Francis Chang and Chris Wong. David
Pasin and Steve Engler were unimpressed by it all.
which event they came from except
to say a repeat would not be
tolerated.
Traditionally, GLUBC as an
organization, and we as individual
students, have enjoyed an excellent
relationship with almost all campus
organizations. I would like to
believe that even those groups
which are not "gay positive" have
at least a grudging respect for our
organization and the extensive program of services which we provide.
It is a measure of the spirit of cooperation which I have always
observed in the AMS that we gave
the IFC dance the 50 beer glasses we
could spare that night.
It is a better measure that 20
members of the Phi Gamma Delta
fraternity put aside all differences
to drop in on out beer garden last
Friday during their tour of campus
beer-ups. They shared a beer with
us, entertained us, and completely
impressed us. This gesture of conciliation has given me a tremendous
respect for the members of this
fraternity in particular, and for the
frat system itself.
Along with the members of the
AMS Executive, and everyone else
concerned, I truly regret that the atmosphere of tolerance on campus
has been disturbed. However, this
small incident pales beside the traditional spirit of co-operation and
fraternity which generally governs
all behaviour on campus.
Sean T. Bickerton
President Gays & Lesbians of UBC
law 1
One of the excuses the Student
Council gave us as to why SUB
Plaza was built before daycare
facilities were built was that the architectural plans were already
finalized.
Student Council took an
economical and political decision
against the will, as proven by the
preference list, of the students who
supported the referendum.
Last year the University's administration decided that in order
for the athletics programs to continue at UBC a higher athletic fee
was needed. In theory the only way
that the athletic fee can be changed
is through a referendum amongst
the students. The administration
imposed the fee and invited student
council to participate with them in a
committee that will dispose of the
fees.
We, the students, should have
taken the University's administration to court for breaking the law.
The AMS executive decided, on the
advice of the University's administration, not to sue so as not to
lose a chance to participate in the
committee. Another expensive,
anti-democratic, and political decision that Student Council has taken
for you and me.
I'm sure I could find more examples of political decision making
by the Student Council, but I
believe the two previous examples
clearly illustrate the point.
The Student Council is making
only one type of decisions. They
can decide only when they will not
get their constituency offended, or
when they will only affect a population that does not have a strong
voice, as is the case in point of those
students whose children need day
care, or feels powerless, as in the
case of the students against the
University's administration and the
athletic fee.
Is the Student Council not
deciding on the South African issue
because they want, by some incredible change in policy, not to make a
decision for us?
Selling products of South African
owned or partially owned companies means that eventually some
of those profits will be used by the
South African government to maintain their inhuman apartheid
policy.
The Student Council cannot
decide because they lack the
courage to make a moral and
political decision that affects the
life of other humans, and might offend a vocal part of their constituencies.
I do not want South African products in this campus because I
abhor apartheid and other forms
of oppression. I want to see some
courage in the self-proclaimed student leaders of this University, and
I want to see it now.
Horacio de la Cueva is a graduate
student who does not believe in
leaders. Friday, October 4, 1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
AMS to inform on South Africa
By STEPHEN WISENTHAL
Posters will warn patrons of
Alma Mater Society businesses
which products sold there are
associated with South African interests, student council decided at
its meeting Wednesday.
The problems with South
Africa's Apartheid regime were not
at issue but during debate which
lasted over an hour, they decided
against banning the sale of
Rothman's and Carling O'Keefe
products from the Student Union
Building despite a 550 signature
petition presented by UBC Students
for a Free South Africa calling for
such a ban.
The information campaign motion from AMS external affairs
coordinator Duncan Stewart was
passed but debate revolved around
a proposed amendment, eventually
defeated, by graduate student
representative Phil Bennett to ban
the products entirely from SUB.
Engineering representative
Nelson Bourke, speaking against
the motion and amendment, said
Carling O'Keefe, which owns Jordan and St. Michelle wineries, was
50.1 per cent owned by Rothman's
Canada, which is 70 per cent owned
by Rothmans International which
in turn is 40 per cent owned by
Rembrandt Group of South Africa,
which owns the Johannesburg stock
exchange and is controlled by South
African citizen Dr. Anton Rupert.
Bourke said Rupert is "a prominent
opponent of Apartheid."
"The AMS should send this Dr.
Anton Rupert a letter thanking him
for his effort to fight apartheid,"
he said.
The AMS should not boycott the
products because that action would
remove freedom of choice, said
Bourke.
Several people present at the
meeting disputed Bourke's assertions about Rupert's actions against
apartheid and discussion continued
while several members said council
lacked adequate information.
The AMS also decided to add any
other South African suspect products found to the list, on the
poster following a survey of goods
sold.
"We should make an effort to
check everything that is sold by the
AMS," said Science representative
Don Mustard.
*    *    «
The three month ban on the use
of the student union building by
Inter-Fraternity Council events imposed by the student administative
commission will stand despite a motion to reduce it to a two month ban
on alcohol functions brought forward by AMS vice president
Jonathan Mercer.
Discussion opened with a presentation by AMS administration
director Simon Seshadri explaining
the IFC had broken a number of
AMS rules regarding liquor functions at an event last weekend in the
SUB ballroom.
The bar attendants at the event
had passed over 40 dozen bottles of
beer over the bar, out of 140 dozen
bottles sold, he said. The AMS has
a strictly enforced rule requiring all
beer at large functions to be poured
into cups because of the danger of
bottle fights, said Seshadri.
"Passing out bottles at a function
where there are a lot of people is
simply stupid," he said.
CUSTOMER AND VENDOR haggle over footwear at bazaar in front of Student Union Building. Customer
clearly looks pensive as she attempts to decide whether to close with vendor's final offer of shoes in exchange for
extremely rare, unobtainable political science papyri.
Work study fobs stiff unfilled
By SUE McILROY
Every year the work study program at UBC tries to accomplish
the impossible — finding interesting
jobs for students at near union
wages.
This year the work study program has a list of about five hundred jobs that students can apply
for. Although the program had only filled a small percentage of jobs
in early September, more than half
have now been assigned.
The program is designed to help
loan students supplement their income without sending them deeper
into debt. Students taking at least a
60 percent course load who pass the
B.C. Student Assistance Program
assessment are eligible to apply for
the work study program.
The program is funded by the
B.C. ministry of education and
UBC. This year the ministry contributed $110,000 and UBC will
contribute about $400,000 although
the exact amount has not yet been
decided.
Byron Hender, UBC awards and
financial aid director, said about
250 jobs have been filled so far and
$320,000 of the program's funds are
now committed. The number of
jobs that will be filled depends on
the final contribution from the
university and the amount of
money each student is allowed to
earn, he added.
Students work a maximum of ten
hours per week in the program at an
average wage of $8.30 an hour. The
rate of pay is established by personnel services who follow the rate paid
to other UBC employees.
Jobs begin as soon as the application has been processed and run until the end of March next year.
Total earnings for this period cannot exceed $2,000 and the amount
each student earns is assessed individually based on financial need.
There is a great variety in the
types of jobs that are offered. Some
of those posted include: observing
the moons of Jupiter and Halley's
comet, describing the UBC
sedimentary rock collection, helping with a new book on Buddhism
and Japanese literature and running
basic physiological experiment with
fish.
The awards office in the administration building offers a drop-
in session twice a week to help
students apply for the work study
program. Tuesdays and Fridays
help sessions are operated on a first
come, first served basis and are
limited to 30 students.
Any student who has applied for
a loan or is receiving assistance may
apply for the program.
"Anyone who has not already
filled out a BCSAP form will probably not get into the program this
year,"   Hender   said.   "However
anyone who has already received
the maximum loan and still needs
financial help should consider applying for the program," he added.
"We're very proud of this program", Hender said, adding
many students have found summer or permanent jobs because
of the experience gained or contacts
made through the program.
As students sink further and further into debt, more programs like
this ought to be encouraged, said
Hender.
The IFC also had no security for
part of the event, added Seshadri.
AMS finance director Jaimie
Collins, speaking against the penalty reducing motion, said he would
consider bringing a motion suspending the IFC priveleges for a year.
Mercer left the meeting after his
motion was defeated.
The AMS may spend $600,000
expanding the Pit pub in the Student Union Building.
Nancy Bradshaw, student
representative on the board of
governors, said the pub would
generate an extra $60,000 per year
in profits if the expansion went
ahead, enough to support a
$400,000 bank loan. Council tabled
a motion to have a referendum asking students to pay $1.50 each per
year to support the other $200,000
cost of the expansion.
Glass litters Gage
Rick Meade has had three flat tires on his wheelchair this year because of
beer bottles thrown out of the windows of Walter Gage residence on campus.
Meade, Special Education 4, who lives in Gage lowrise and can't get
around campus without a wheelchair, said broken glass on the ground
around the residence is common on Saturdays and Sunday? after weekend
parties and often isn't cleaned up until the Monday after.
"They (the people throwing bottles) don't really have an adequate
awareness of the danger involved," he said, adding the people who throw
the bottles are "three quarters drunk."
He said they are going to murder someone some day if they aren't careful
and should at least give someone else the bottles for the five cent deposit.
"Parties should have to have a permit from the residence advisors," he
said.
Senior residence attendant Tom Dukowski called Gage the "so called
mature residence" and said there had been a few isolated incidents of bottle
throwing from the windows.
"Once is too much as far as I'm concerned," he said. "If they throw
beer bottles out of the window we just evict them." But he added "someone would have to catch them. We've got to get the individual that is actually responsible."
He said in West End apartment buildings the penalty for throwing
something out of a window is $50 "and the second time he police come
and visit you."
Dukowski said a few years ago some chairs were thrown but there have
never been more than a few people involved. "It's a little depressing
because the majority of the people are really good," he said. "If you have
1380 people living in close quarters you're going to have problems."
Gage resident Nancy Bradshaw said she had heard of some incidents
resulting in residents getting points toward eviction including one case of a
phone torn from a wall and thrown out a window. But she said nobody had
been evicted yet this year for bottle throwing.
Deaf future vague
By MARY McALISTER
The provincial labor ministry's
announcement they will fund
interpreters for UBC's deaf
students has left the deaf community relieved but still anxious about
future students.
Audrey McEwen, education 5,
said she is worried the next generation of hearing-impaired students
will not be able to manage because
provincil funding is not permanent.
"What about next year and the
year after that? They can't plan for
the future. That bothers me a lot,"
she said.
Six post-secondary students will
be helped by the $161,000 grant,
said Doug Mowat, secretary to
labor minister Terry Segarty, Three
UBC, AMS funds safely banked
UBC and the Alma Mater Society did not suffer any losses due to
the recent failures of Canadian Commercial and Northlands banks.
Douglas College suffered losses of up to $16,000 due to uninsured
deposits at Northlands, but neither UBC or the AMS have dealings
with either bank and are not in any danger of losses.
UBC administration and Finance vice president, Bruce Gellatly
said, "We don't have any investments in those banks. Our bank is
the Bank of Montreal."
No part of the University invests in either of the failed banks. "I
haven't heard of any losses at UBC" said Gellatly.
AMS General Manager Charles Redden said, "We have no dealings with those banks." He added only short term deposits are made
at banks with the most competitive interest rates and that the AMS
chequing account is at the Bank of Montreal in the Student Union
Building.
"There's no problem," added James Collins, AMS Director of
Finance. "We keep our deposits in banks with the most secure in-
.   vestments."
people at UBC, one at Douglas College, one at BCIT, and one at SFU
will each receive an interpreter, he
added.
A ministry spokesperson refused
to say when meetings will be held to
plan for permanent funding in a
telephone interview Thursday.
Segarty was not available for comment.
Disabled students have been
mainstreamed for a number of
years and with that comes the expectation of the appropriate services for them, said Lynn Sid-
daway, director of Western Institute for the Deaf. She said she is
hoping for a coordinated effort
among the ministries to plan a
system of support for the disabled
student.
"Students should have the right,
if they meet the requirements of a
post-secondary institution, to have
the services prov ded that they
need," McEwan said.
McEwen had an interpreter while
she studied for an anthropology
degree three years ago. "She sits in
front of me and repeats everything
that everyone says. It's really nice. I
feel like I'm really participating."
But when McEwen returned to
UBC this fall, she found that an interpreter would nol be available to
help her earn her teaching certificate.
"A lot of times when I don't have
an interpreter I feel handicapped.
It's like living inside a glass booth,''
she said. McEwan said support of a
willing group of students and professors have helped her get by. Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 4,198E
Glassy-eyed crowd gets psychadelic Cure
By PETER BURNS
Vancouver's special fascination
for the Cure continued Wednesday
night despite an overzealous Coliseum security contingent and a new
staging system adapted especially
for the Cure's first Canadian date.
Robert Smith and the boys brought
their dreamy, sid-laced songs to a
new crowd of curables, obviously
younger this time round. Singing
about MDA and Asian philosophy
is not completely what the Cure's
about, but glassy eyes are recommended. A more psychadelic band
than the Furs or Echo and the Bun-
nymen, the Cure have nonetheless
been influenced by the Liverpool
scene, and they in turn have helped
significantly influence bands as
varied as Siouxie and the Banshees
and the Lucy Show.
The well-dressed teenage fashion
crowd who seemed to all come from
Point Grey, West Van and Deep
Cove, mostly dressed in black and
mostly being driven home by mum
or dad after the show. The many
giggly 15 and 16 year old girls and
their prebubescent sexuality were
intent on hearing Smith sing 'Let's
Go To Bed'. Their boy counter
parts with the furrowed eyebrows
and serious looks were there to
relive their first psychadelic experiences highlighted by songs from
their party-worn and coveted 'The
Cure Live' album.
The younger curables were
treated to the token dance numbers
The Walk and Let's Go To Bed
which Smith described as "pure
pop". That out of the way, the
Londoners treated the audience to a
snaky mixture of old and new.
Older material that hinted at acid
(sid for short) and the Cure's
mystical experiences came from the
Japanese Whispers album, and Killing An Arab which was definitely
an inspired piece.
Like a great trip this brought the
five-piece group to a tremendous
texture-thrashing climax which sustained itself in Boys Don't Cry and
One Hundred Years. Laurence
Tolhurst moved comfortably from
keyboards to percussion in order to
create the effects that complemented a strong tapestry of
voices by Robert Smith.
The only sour grapes that encouraged  wrath  were directed  at
Shah of Shahs details
anatomy of a revolution
By MICHELLE TESSLER
The revolution is over. You are in
Teheran, in the hotel room of
Polish journalist Ryszard Kapuscinski. On the table in the middle of
the room is a mass of papers,
photographs, and cassettes, each
comprising a piece of his puzzle that
is Iran.
You listen, sometimes in
disbelief, other times with laughter,
as Kapuscinski unfolds the story
behind the Shah of Shahs and his
masterpiece, the Great Civilization
of Iran.
The journalist shuffles through
his papers, reading to you from his
notes about the destructive power
of oil, the story behind the Shiite
Moslems, and an account from an
Iranian of what life in this country
is like. You shudder as he speaks of
the atrocities of Savak, the Iranian
police. This is the power of
Kapuscinki's writing ability, to
graphically reconstruct historical
events, with the force of a billy
club.
His animated style of story-telling
captures attention: the stories are
exciting and fascinating - all the
more so when you remind yourself
that this is history. This is real.
Kapuscinski pulls out the
photographs, defrosting each
frozen moment in time by revitalizing the story behind it. Here is a
group of people waiting for the bus,
a group of terrified, paranoid, emotionally deadened Iranians living
under the Shah's regime. And here
is the Shah in 1973 announcing the
new price of oil, this picture symbolizing one of the Shah's many
high-speed Westernization techniques which he placed on a country
that was neither technologically nor
emotionally prepared for such a
process.
Kapuscinski likens the Shah's
"Great Civilization" to a play, the
theatre of the Shah: "It was a one-
character play, and the actor was
also the director. Everyone else was
an extra" But the play does not
satisfy the audience - they blame the
director and when they can watch
no longer, they rise up against him,
steal the script, and deliver it to a
new man, the Ayatollah Khomeini.
The revolution confuses. You
thought the purpose of a revolution
was to move forward, not
backwards. Look at the Iranians
now. They are an anachronism in
the modern world, living in a
mystical past. Is this what they really wanted?
Kapuscinski reminds you that the
Iranians are not Westerners. He explains to you the importance of the
mosque to the Iranians, and the
respect that they feel for their
religious leaders, the only authority
which they will tolerate. Iran has
sought shelter from the reigning
despotism by migrating in time,
preserving its identity by recalling
old customs and beliefs, perhaps
even to spite the Shah's propulsion
to modernity.
Evening approaches. Kapuscinski
ends his story with a monologue
about the actual sparking of the
revolution, its fire and then the inevitable dying flame of helplessness
and monotony. For the country to
revive itself, Kapuscinski feels that
development must begin in the
village wherein lies the key to
modernity, if indeed development is
what the Iranians want.
It is time to leave. The customary
nine o'clock gunfire is over but you
want to leave before midnight,
when various combat squads roam
the streets "protecting" the city.
You depart feeling that it was a day
well spent. You have heard a
fascinating account of history told
in an exciting manner by a man interested in many different perspectives of the story. You are convinced that a visit to the world of
Kapuscinski's Shah of Shah is well
worth the effort.
Cure
before the lipstick
-   sreve englr.
PNE guards who thwarted any attempts by the 2500 plus crowd to
get closer to the band. The Cure
stage was set behind the South goal
so that they played up to a Q.E.
type concert bowl. Unfortunately
when Smith beckoned the crowd
down to the ice, an army of red-
shirts made it clear that nobody
would get through and physically
harassed the crowd throughout the
show. Smith closed the set to confer
with Coliseum management and
sort out a solution, but word came
back that people having fun in the
aisles is a fire hazard . . . but the
chaos continued.
A familiar edition of Hanging
Garden and a wonderful version of
Charlotte Sometime was topped by
a great Gary Glitter cover and an
exhausted Cure had earned their
backstage lines ... the Real Thing.
Followng their fourth and final
encore, Smith spoke backstage,
carefully wiping smudged lipstick
painted around his mouth sipping
from his Heinekin Smith said, "I
was sorry security but we've got to
go with the place the promoter gives
us", Next time he would like to try
the Queen Elizabeth Theatre, he added.
The first stop on an extensive
North American tour, Tolhurst added his own displeasure, "we'd
have liked to have begun the tour
with a somewhat less stringent atmosphere and more freedom for the
crowd to do what they want."
Fortunately the venue proved to
be no great handicap to the Cure's
ability to communicate their visions
and imaginative songwriting skills.
Although the paying concert goer
supports the cure's ventures into
mind altering substances, the experience is more than returned in
their music.
Woodcock and Onley go to India
By FRANCIS CHANG
In recent years, the history of India under British rule has been the
subject for many popular works.
Examples include the best selling
novel-turned-mini-series "The Far
Pavillions", the public television
series "A Jewel in the Crown", and
the films "A Passage to India" and
"Gandhi".
In the introduction to "The
Walls of India", it seems that
George Woodcock aims to examine
". . . the changing India of the present with all its political confusions
and its obstinate social
anachronisms, its many faces and
many walls." In reality, the reader
is presented with a sophisticated
travel guide of an India still lodged
in the past.
George Woodcock has been
described as an "Old India Hand",
having visited there five times. The
reader gets a sense of this familiarity in the introduction, when he
drops the names of various prominent Indians as his long time
associates. In 1982, he helped to
found the Canada India Village Aid
Association. Its purpose is to assist
Indian groups in improving living
conditions. During one of the
groups meetings Woodcock met
painter Toni Onley, who suggested
an idea about raising funds through
a book and some paintings to be
done on a trip to India. Thus, a
concept was born.
The book is a chronicle of a
1982-83 expedition through nearly
the entire subcontinent. Woodcock
and Onley, along with their wives,
went through with the intention of
capturing the essence of a culture
often misunderstood by
Westerners. It is not an analysis of
the economic, political or social
systems of modern India.
The trip itself wasn't terribly
eventful, save for the decrepit conditions of most of their living and
travel accommodations. What
makes the book interesting is the
historical   background   Woodcock
Sun Temple in Orissa by Toni Onley
tells about each place they visited.
He brings to life the past glory of a
richly embellished history. What he
fails to do, though, is acknowledge
the role history plays in modern India.
The prose style reflects the paintings illustraed in the book: serene,
mature and beautiful. Chapter 8,
"The Jewel of the Desert", with
gorgeous description of the remote
Rajput town of Bikaner, stands out
as a lyrical passage itself. It is
worthwhile to read that particular
section alone. There are some other
poignant passages to be found in
the book.
On occasion, though, one might
be disgruntled at the disdain Woodcock has for the poor of India. For
example, in "The Apes of Amber",
he describes how sacred monkeys
atack a peasant woman, and,
among other things, throw around
the "pathetic contents" of her
purse. What does he consider to be
pathetic? A purse devoid of
makeup and credit cards?
The Onley water colours are the
outstanding feature of this book.
Supporters of his artwork will note
his subtle presentation of the vivid
colours encountered in the settings
he captures. It is an interesting
outstretch from the traditional west
coast shades often used in his work.
At the same time, he continues to
present us with interpretations of
the unique shapes and forms of the
sites described in the book. The
paintings capture a mystique, which
is intriguing against the undercurrent of familiarity.
Overall, this is a relaxing book to
read. There are no attempts to
challenge any philosophies or pertinent social issues. Rather, the
reader is being asked to share an insight of the" beauty of a faraway
land, through the observations of
some of Vancouver's most accomplished artists. Friday, October 4, 1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 9
Chocolate, less moral than hash
By EVELYN JACOB
To say that Hashisch, a Spicy
Adventure Story, is a sophisticated
tale of decadence, set in the Paris
underworld of the 1920's, is to present a neat summation of Gordon
Armstrong's play from the surface.
But underneath the decadence, the
art for art's sake mentality of the
play, lies a much larger question of
the nature of human conduct and
the validity of religious and moral
values of society.
Evil plays an important role in
the play, and thus one would expect
to find evil's arch-enemy in the
form of a good character, or in an
ending in which good triumphs over
infamous evil. But we are met with
quite the contrary in Armstrong's
play: there are no virtuous
characters, no heroes or heroines —
just different degrees of immorality
which are personified in each of the
characters.
The plot of Hashisch revolves
around murder as Wolfgang (Layne
Kriwoken), the epitome of
decadence, and his sensual wife
Simone (Lisa Klingspon), plot and
eventually murder three young
women: but not before they beguile
them into signing the notorious "in
surance policy," which leaves all of
the victim's earthly remnants in the
hands of the villainous couple.
The most colourful character in
the play is Wolfgang, a young dandy who appears garbed in ankle-
length fur coats and red silk smoking jackets. He is the prototype of
Wilde's Dorian Gray, the figure
whose beauty led him down the
path of immorality to death. But
unlike Dorian Gray, the bell does
not toll for Wolfgang for the value
of his own mortality exceeds any
notion of morality. "Happiness,"
Wolfgang says, "must be pursued
with a bit of despair."
Wolfgang is indeed a complex
character; he believes he is Christ, a
kind of anti-Christ who offers his
victims redemption not by his own
death, but rather by theirs. He is indulgent, narcisstic and has a
peculiar, rather humorous obsession with chocolate.
Simone, Wolfgang's counterpart
in evil, is luring and provocative in
her disguise as a nun, but her immorality is made obvious to the audience who are able to glimpse her
tacky green nail polish and the great
glitter of her diamonds. She, like
Eve, is beguiled by the serpent (in
the case Wolfgang), but is not
always convinced of the morality of
murder. But in the end, she, like all
of the characters, falls into the clutches of greed and sin. She cannot
detach herself from Wolfgang, who
is "immorality in her blood."
One cannot help wondering how
and when the title of the play fits into Gordon's work, and it turns out
that we must wait almost until the
end of the play to find out. The last
of the victims, Lucy, is a "free intellectual" who ironically reads
Zola, but is as immoral as the other
Hashisch, a Spicy Adventure
Story, by Gordon Armstrong,
directed by Craig Duffy until Oct. 5
at the Firehall Theatre.
sense, the title is not quite appropriate:
I would have preferred something
like "Chocolate" instead.
On the whole, the quality of acting in Hashisch is commendable,
particularly on the part of Layne
Kriwoken and Lisa Klingspon, who
are recent grads from UBC's
Theatre and English departments.
Given difficult parts to play, both
appear surprisingly relaxed in the
roles of the character; and human
characteristics they portray.
Armstrong's play is exciting,
humorous and vivid. We are able,
thanks to the director and actors, to
see ourselves in the great mirror of
the stage. On my way out of the
play, I spent my left-over change on
a rather decadeni piece of
chocolate.
characters: instead of chocolate,
she is obsessed with hashisch, which
Wolfgang feeds her nightly. But
hashisch is not enough, and just as
her immorality grows, so does her
habit change from hashisch to
opium.
Reflecting on the play, the title
"Hashisch" does not immediately
spring to mind, nor does it pull any
strings of the imagination. In this
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Arts '20 has historical significance
By PEGGY WRIGHT
The Arts '20 Relay Race — one
of Intramurals' biggest and most
exciting events has grown to be the
largest campus community relay in
Canada, last year, this race drew
close to 200, 8-member teams consisting of students, staff, faculty
members and teams from the community at large.
The race dates back to Feb., 1920
when UBC when UBC was temporarily located at Fairview (now
the site of the Vancouver General
Hospital). At that time, construction of the new university campus at
Point Grey had been halted due to
financial pressures and other effects
of World War I. To increase
political pressure and create public
AT A GLANCE... ©
UPCOMING EVENTS REGISTRATION DEADLINES
SPECIAL EVENTS
Oct. 12-Nov. 3
B.C. Place:   Nov. 12-14
Oct. 24
Oct. 18-20
Oct. 26, 27
Oct. 5-6
Fri., Oct. 4
Sat., Oct. 5
Fri., Oct. 11
Handley Cup Soccer League Sept. 30-Oct  4
UBC Fields
Arts '20 Relay Race Oct. 7-18
SUB PLAZA - race centre
12:30 — Opening Ceremonies
RACQUET SPORTS
Sutherland Tennis Grand Prix Oct. 7-11
French Open
Armoury & tennis bubble
Alpine Squash Grand Prix Oct. 14-18
Round 1
Thunderbird winter sports centre
TOURNAMENTS
Touch football tournament Sept. 30-Oct. 2
Osborne Centre Field
9 a.m.-6 p.m. (men only)
NOON RUNS
Run the United Way Drop-in
SUB Plaza — race centre
3.0 km, 5.0 km — noon
Halley's % Marathon Oct. 1-4
SUB PLAZA - race centre
22.0 km - 10 a.m.
Turkey Trot Road Run Drop-in
SUB PLAZA - race centre
3.0 km, 5.0 km — noon
awareness, the senior Arts '20 class
of 1920 challenged all other classes
and faculties to a 7.5 mile relay race
from the new site at Point Grey to
Fairview.
The UBC campus was completed
in 1925 and the relay race continued
every year to remind students of the
need for their participation in
university affairs. In 1940,
however, the race was halted
because of war efforts in W.W. II.
This great event was reborn in 1969
with the discovery of the original
Arts '20 trophy and has since
become the largest Intramural event
in Canada.
The race is about 10.5 km long
and follows the original route from
VGH to UBC. Last year, a
documentary was filmed on the race
and may be shown at this year's
event.
The overall winning team of 1984
was UBC's Track Team "A" —
29:47:0. The top women's team —
UBC's Cross Country Team —
came in with a time of 37:47:6 to
place 45th. This year, the Phi Delts,
Fijis and Betas, fraternity rivals,
will be fighting for top spot among
fraternities. The Rowing Crews
should also be strong — men and
women.
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ASSERTIVENESS
WORKSHOPS FOR WOMEN
—Learn to express yourself directly and without apology
—Overcome your own obstacles to assertive behaviour
—Practice through role-playing and discussion with other
women
ASSERTIVENESS—BASIC
DATES: Tuesdays, October 22nd, 29th & November
5th, 1985
TIME:    12:30-2:20 p.m.
PLACE: Brock Hall, Room 106A
ASSERTIVENESS—SOCIAL SITUATIONS
DATES: Tuesdays, October 15th, 22nd & 29th, 1985
TIME:     12:30-2:20 p.m.
PLACE: Brock Hall, Room 106C
Pre-Registration Required at
Off ice for Women Students, Brock 203
Equiries: 228-2415
CYNTHIA   WAS   BEGINNING   TO   SUSPECT
THAT  ROBERT   HAD   NO INTENTION  OF
SHARING  HIS DIET PEPSI WITH HER
ADVENTURES IN NEW DIET PEPSI    NO. 56 ©Glen Baxter   1985
Suitable lot carbohydrate andcalofie-reduced d«ets' Diet Petisr' and  Diel Peps> Cola  are registered trademarks ol PepsiCo Page 10
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 4, 198E
('itf#tl
TODAY
UBYSSEY SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM
Screenings and voting for WRCUP conference
delegates, 1:30-3:30 p.m.; CUP 48 meeting, 3:30
p.m., SUB 241k.
INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS STUDENT
ASSOCIATION
Beer garden/nachos ta'killya shooters, 4 p.m. to
midnight, International House.
MUSSOC
General auditorium and sign-up, 11:30 a.m. to
2:30 p.m., Old Auditorium clubroom.
MUSSOC
Fiddler on the Roof auditions, 6:30 p.m., SUB
212.
UBC STUDENTS FOR PEACE AND MUTUAL
DISARMAMENT
Dr. Neil Kyle, professor of psychology speaks on
Apathy, Activist or Survivalist: the psychology
of adult reactions to the threat of nuclear war,
everyone welcome, noon, SUB 205.
EAST INDIAN STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Co-ed soccer match vs. Chinese Students
Association, 4:30 p.m., Mclnnes Field.
THUNDERBIRD VOLLEYBALL
Boys' Senior High School Tournament, come
out and see your old high school in action, all
day  War Memorial Gym, Osborne Centre.
AIESEC - UBC
General meeting, noon, Angus 226.
UBC DANCE CLUB
Dance practice, noon, SUB partyroom.
INTER-VARSITY CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP/
CAMPUS CRUSADE
Guest speaker David Bryant, noon. BUCH A100.
UBC WINDSURFING
Join windsurfin'  and  get blown away,   noon,'
SUB 57.
SUBFILMS
Ghostbusters,    7
Auditorium.
and   9:30   p.m.,    $2,    SUB
PRE-MEDICAL SOCIETY
Pre-med mixer, 6:30 p.m., SUB 207/209.
SATURDAY
SUBFILMS
Ghostbusters, 7 and 9:30 p.m., $2, SUB
Auditorium.
UBC JAPAN EXCHANGE CLUB
Annual welcome party, non-members welcome,
7:30-11:30 p.m., SUB 207/209.
SPEAKEASY
Bzzr garden, 6 p.m., SUB 212.
ROCKERS
Social night, new members welcome, bring instruments/amps if possible. 5 p.m., SUB party
room.
SUNDAY
SUBFILMS
Ghostbusters, $2, 7 p.m., SUB auditorium.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Worship service, 10 a.m., UBC Day Care Gym,
Acadia Road.
UBC SCHOOL OF SOCCER
Game, 11:30 a.m., 25th and Crown.
MONDAY
WORLD UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF CANADA
Film: "I am a refugee" and discussion with AMS
student refugees, noon, BUCH B212.
UBC WOMEN'S CENTRE
General meeting, all interested women welcome,
noon, SUB 130.
UBC WINDSURFING CLUB
General meeting, noon, bzzr garden, 3:30-6:30
p.m., SUB 212.
MAHL ZEIT GERMAN CLUB
Meeting, noon, BUCH B224.
UBC DANCE CLUB
Practice, noon, SUB party room.
TUESDAY
GRADUATE STUDENT SOCIETY
Self defence lessons, 5:45-6:45 p.m., Graduate
student centre cafeteria.
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IL CAFFE, ITALIAN STUDENTS CLUB
Conversation,   new  members welcome,   noon,
BUCH D121.
ANARCHIST CLUB
General    meeting,    bring    ideas,    everyone
welcome, noon, SUB 224.
UNDERWATER HOCKEY
General    introductory    practice.     Everyone
welcome, 7 p.m., UBC Aquatic Centre.
SCIENCE FICTION SOCIETY
General meeting and nominations for treasurer.
New members welcome, noon, SUB 249A.
UBC DANCE CLUB
Practice, noon, SUB party room.
WEDNESDAY
POLITICAL SCIENCE STUDENTS
ASSOCIATION
General meeting, noon, BUCH B323.
THURSDAY
CHRISTIANS ON CAMPUS
Jubilee meeting, noon, Angus 328.
TEACHING ASSISTANTS UNION
Professor Steve Foster speaks on how to get the
most out of lectures and discussion groups,
1-2:15 p.m., Graduate Centre, 2nd floor lounge.
The UBC Law Students' Legal
Advice Program is conducting free
legal aid clinics on Tuesdays, 12:30
p.m. to 2:00 p.m. in the Student
Union Building, Room 211. Clinics
are conducted on a drop-in basis.
FASHiONWORKS!
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5 - COMING EVENTS
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Free Public Lecture
Saturday, Oct. 5
Or. Michael Gottlieb
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AIDS: MEDICAL SCIENCE
IN ACTION
lecture Hall 2. Woodward Budding.
at 8:15 p.m.
FAST, EFFICIENT, professional writing/
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Reas. rates. 734-0154.
PIANO LESSONS by Judy Alexander,
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321-4809.
30 - JOBS
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ing couple with one child. Mon.-Thurs.
3 30-5:30 p.m. Phone 263-0535.
ADVENTUROUS? Two buddies meet two
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MAJOR SKIN CARE COMPANY offers a
free facial (at no obligation) Please call
Jean at 224-4706.
80 - TUTORING
EARN   $$$.    Sell   Canada   Savings   Bonds.
It's    easy1    Call    me,    Richard    Dvkman,
682 3311    Merrill Lynch Canada
SPEAKEASY TUTORIAL CENTRE. Find a
tutor or register as a tutor. SUB Concourse.
M-F 9:30 a m. to 9:30 p.m.
35 - LOST
11 - FOR SALE- Private
SANYO 560-2 DOS2.11 128K Exp. 256, incl.
Basic/Wordstar/Calcstar Et monitor. $900
obo. 266-1741 aft. 6 p.m.
'80 FIAT X-19, Met. black/gold. Exc cond
Targa top, snows, fogs, new Pirellis, $6000
obo. 738-7188 days, 734-0263 eves.,
687 1985 pager 2168.
IBM    CORRECTING    SELECTRIC    II    Ex
cond. $500 obo. 738-7183.
WAYLER CLIPPER sail bd., footstraps, 5.4
sq. m. sail, fully retractable daggar, mint
cond. Used one summer, $600. 733-2181.
LOST — Off-white Odllover sweater wi'h pink
ct blue design or: Fn., Sept. 20 between
Sedge Et MacMillan libraries Return SUB
(Proctor) or call 734-5187. Reward.
GLASSES IN GREY SUEDE case. Buch. B
Wed., Sept. 25. Reward. Phone Maggie,
875-6917.
85 - TYPING
WORD    PROCESSING    SPECIALIST.    U
write we 'VP- theses, resumes, letters,
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turns, letters '^scpts, resumes, theses
IBM Sel i! Reas. rates Rose 731-9857,
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hardtop, vinyl roof, p. steer., brakes, auto,
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WAYLER B. CROSSER sailboard, 5.2sq. m.
sport sail, fully retractable daggar. Mint
cond. Ex. beg. pkg. $600. 733-2181.
SHEEPSKIN COAT worn 5x. Immaculate %
length fully lined quality cut. $375. Size 40.
Ph. Lance, 263-7151.
ANY UBC STUDENT, staff, faculty wishing
to write about peace, disarmament for The
Ubyssey please call James at 734-4128.
EVER BEEN HIT by a golf ball on University
Blvd? We have and want to talk to you.
Reply to Uyssey, Box 1000, SUB Business
Office.
THE MYSTERY DANCE partner contest is
over. DONNA BARTEL won the trip for
two to Apex Alpine ski resort. She asked
our mystery man to dance. ROBERT
CREESE won the trip for two to San Francisco by asking our mystery woman to
dance THE PIT & CITR-FM 102 remind to
watch for our next promotion. Special
thanks to Trenor Tilley of TRAVEL CUTS
for his generosity.
WORD    WEAVERS Word    Processing
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perience Student rates. Photocopier
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TYPIST WILL TYPE essays, reports, theses
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'83 HONDA CBX550 11,000 k., ex. cond.
runs perfectly. $1200. Ph. 430-1275.
1976 PLYMOUTH ARROW excellent
condition, $1800. Ph. Fay, 224-9459.
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CLASSIFIEDS Friday, October 4, 1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 11
Cheap Sentiment, a musical tour de farce, a
production of Tamanhous Theatre, at the
Vancouver East Cultural Centre 11895
Venables, 254-9578) September 20-October
12 at 8:30 p.m.
Goodnight  Disgrace by  Michael   Mercer,
produced by the Vancouver Playhouse at the
Queen Elizabeth Playhouse (872-6622), until October 19, at 8:00 p.m.
Hashisch, a spicy adventure story, at the
Firehall Theatre (280 E. Cordova, 689-0926)
ends October 5th, at 8:30 p.m.
Arms and the Man, a comedy by George
Bernard Shaw, by the Arts Club Theatre at
Granville Island (687-5315) from October 7 until November 9, at 8:30 p.m.
I'll Be Back Before Midnight, a popular
thriller, at the Richmond Gateway Theatre
(270-1812) from Oct. 2nd until 20th, Tues.-Fri.
at 8:00, Sat. at 5:30 and 9:00 p.m.
Dear   Liar   at   the   Arts   Club   Theatre
(687-1644) Oct. 13, 20 and 27th at 8:00 p.m.
Talking Dirty, the record breaking comedy
hit   by   the   Arts   Club   Granville   Island
Theatre at James Cowan (280-4444) October 1st until 7th, Tues.-Fri., 8:00 p.m. Sat.
and Sun. 2:00, 6:00 and 9:00 p.m.
Period    of    Adjustment    by    Tennessee
Williams presented by the United Players of
Vancouver    at    St.    James    Church
Auditorium   (3214  W.   10th)   this   Friday,
Saturday and Sunday at 8:00 p.m.
«
Ghostbusters, at the SUB auditorium, Oct.
3-6th, Fri. and Sat. 7:00 and 9:30 p.m.
Canadian Disasters of War at the Vancouver Art Gallery (682-5621) Thursday at
12:10 and Emily Carr Fri., Oct. 4th at 12:10
p.m.
Inventor's Fair at the Arts Sciences and
Technology Centre (687-8414) Oct. 12th to
14th.
Color — Theme of New Children's Gallery
Exhibition at the Vancouver Art Gallery
(682-5621) until Oct. 20th.
David Sloan at the Surrey Art Gallery
(596-15151 until Oct. 20th.
Selkirk Weavers "Wearable Art" a different type of fashion show at Heritage Hall
(3102 Main St., North Vancouver, 988-6844)
October 16 at 2 and 7:30 p.m.
Arthur Erickson lecture at the Vancouver
Art Gallery Meeting Room #3 (750 Hornby,
682-5621) Friday, October 11 at 7:00 p.m.
Archaeological Society of B.C., Dr. A.C.B.
Roberts on October 9, fluted point
regionalization and the ice-free corridor at the
Auditorium of the Vancouver Museum
(1100 Chestnut St., 321-3127) October 9 at
8:00 p.m.
Wttfi
'(£
Shannon Gunn at the Landmark Jazz Bar
until Oct. 5th.
Deep Cove Chamber Soloists at the
Presentation House Gallery (929-1117)
Sunday, Oct. 6th at 8:00 p.m.
Everything Old is New Again at the Surrey
Art Center (254-9249) Oct. 16th to 25th at
8:00 p.m.
Meg   Walker   at   the    Classical    Joint
(689-0669) Fri. and Sat. Air Space Sun.
Martin Franklin and the Grand Dominion
Band at the Hot Jazz Society (873-4131) Fri.
and Sat. night.
John Sawyer, Ray Nurse at the UBC
Recital Hall, 12:30 p.m. Vancouver Baroque Ensemble and Paul Douglas at the
UBC Recital Hall, 8:00 p.m.
Bach, Telemann and Handel Performances at the East Van Cultural Centre
(254-9578) Oct. 6th at 8 p.m.
Music of the Spheres, a concert of 17th and
18th century Italian chamber music, consisting of recorders, harpsichords and viola de
gamba, the emsemble will perform works by
Froscobaldi, Corelli, Vivaldi and others at the
Museum of Anthropology (6393 NW
Marine Drive) October 13 at 2:30 p.m.
The Vancouver Society for Early Music
celebrates its fifteenth anniversary with a program of contatas and concertos by Bach,
Handel and Vivaldi at the Orpheum
November 7th at 8:30 p.m.
The Questionnaires are in town!
Vancouver's liveliest R&B Dance-
music band will be playing a benefit
this weekend. The dance is at the
Indian Centre, 1607 E. Hastings
(near Commercial) this Saturday,
October 5 at 8 p.m. All proceeds go
to The World Festival of Students
and Youth. Tickets at the door, $3
unemployed and $5 employed.
%&, Jiyvmrnoan Caf6, (iTrvrmMuc unfa plaa,
&■ "     — Q
0? 0pm 3Aovdj0i\j tt> Scti&LYdOA/ &iO am-500 pm
8CP Air Musically Speaking
THE
VANCOUVER SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
Rudolf Barshai, Music Director and Principal Conductor-
presents
KAZUYOSHI AKIYAMA,
Conductor Laureate
LYNN HARRELL,
Host and Cellist
Sat. Oct. 5 Mon. Oct. 7
8:30 p.m. 7:30 p.m.
THE ORPHEUM Programme:
Valses Nobles et Sentimentales        Ravel
Sinfonietta       Poulenc
Cello Concerto in A Minor      Faure
Elegy for Cello and Orchestra      Faurr5
Tickets NOW! at all VTC and CBO Outlets, Eaton's
Woodward's  (VTC and Orpheum service charges applicable)
$8    $12    $14    $19    $28
- ]A off for students and seniors -
TO CHARGE BY PHONE: 280-4444 i*„, ,u,u-« ,,<< m„
,NEXT concert by the vso
THE JUBILEE SERIES
Sun, Oct. 20        ,  Mon. Oct. 21 : Tues. Oct. 22
2:30p.m. 8:30p.m. 7:-0 p.m.
Cunter Neuhold, ConrJ,"~tor
Yuli Turovsky, Cellist
Music by Mozart, Dvorak, Janacek
Tickets at all VTC Outlets
$8    $10    $13.50    $15.50    $18.75    $27.50
CURLERS!
HOUSE
SUNDAY OCT. 6 TH.
ros' 'hosj   niN'olci.kr.c jiuning a :iak to cum . '■■■'"
niRLifii; ci iibs wm   PRoviui   i:iini'»Ai inn
U.B.C. WINTER
SPORTS CENTER
new > curlers welcome
10AM. TO 4PM.
YOUR CHANCE TO
TRY CURLING-FREE! Page 12
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 4, 1985
Question swirl over recent Israeli bombing
By MICHELLE TESSLER
An 'earthquake' shook world
opinion when the Israelis bombed
the PLO Headquarters in Tunis on
October 1st.
The reactions were mixed, most
countries condemning the attack
because civilians were killed and the
United Nations charter was
violated: Some, however, (notably
the United States) felt that Israel's
retaliation was a warranted form of
self-defense against terrorism.
Can we be so quick to condemn
Israel's actions as morally wrong,
or at least as too strong a response
to the Cyprus killings?
There appears to be much more
underlying this issue than a brief
overview of events would suggest.
Namely, that Israel and the PLO
are playing a different game in a
foreign arena, with rules which we
can neither comprehend nor justify.
The game is terrorism and there
are no rules. The offense is played
by Islamic Fundamentalists who are
both prepared and willing to die for
their  cause.   Israel   plays   defense
Visa students in limbo
Visa students are still in the dark
about whether their medical
coverage will be extended after October 31 despite a provincial court
judge's promise to hand down a
judgement within the week.
"We have had no response," said
Lynne Hissey coordinator of the
Simon Fraser University teaching
and support staff union who
spearheaded the campaign against
the provincial government
unilateral decision to remove
medical service plan coverage from
visa students and workers.
The TSSU filed a petition for a
. ourt injunction against the
ninistry's decision late August and
presented their court case
September 20, and 23. "They told
us (the decision) would be no longer
than one week," said Hissey. She
said the union is still very optimistic.
"We think we have an extremely
strong case," said Hissey.
horacio do la cueva, UBC
teaching assistants union president
who is also a visa student, said he
was applying for private medical insurance coverage Thursday because
his MSP ended September 30.
"We all have to get some sort of
coverage" he said.
About 4,000 visa students and
workers are now forced to seek
coverage under private plans
because of the ministry's decision.
against a faceless opponent who is
everywhere and nowhere, now
threatening to strike and now striking unexpectedly.
Can we, with our Western mentality, living in our ordered world,
be so bold as to pass judgment over
what occurs during this game when
we can't even imagine what it would
mean to be players?
Canadians have no conception of
what life is like with terrorism
hiding in their backyard. They cannot understand the mentality of
citizens who are always threatened,
always watching for bombs or guns
which appear in the wrong hands.
(freestyle)
This is not to say that one should
expect Candians to feel this way,
because Canada is not situated in
the Middle East surrounded by people whose religion it is to conquer
the world and convert it to Islam.
Why, then, did the United States
support Israel? Aside from any
political reasons, the U.S. was in a
better position to sympathize with
the threat of terrorism, having just
experienced the summer TWA hijacking. People remember that feeling of anger and humiliation, and
the consequent desire for retaliation. And the frustration that in the
game of terrorism, one is never sure
exactly who the enemy is. In this
case, the Israelis were sure; hence,
the U.S. support.
Israel was faced with an important choice: let the murders in
Cyprus pass without response,
thereby reinforcing the terrorists'
conviction that they can strike
whenever and wherever they please;
or, stop this flow of violence at its
source, and expect vengeance to be
impending.
Those wary of Israel's motives
question if the bombing was really
meant to revenge the deaths at all.
Perhaps opportunity knocked in
the guise of the Cyprus incident and
the Israelis used this as a pretext for
striking the PLO headquarters.
Such action would dissolve any
possible negotiations that were in
the air, and would wipe out a major
center of terrorist organization
(with its leader, it was hoped) at the
same time.
The Vancouver Svmpl
presents
EVENING OF CHAMBE
with
ION KIMURA PARKER
ot the  1M84 Internjtio!   i:  Pi.inr
and the internationally-acclaimed
ORFORD STRING QUARTET
Thursday, October
THE ORPHEUM One performance only!
Tickets: At all VTC and CBO outlets, Eaton's
and Woodward's $20 $16 $12
CHARGE BY PHONE: 280-4444
6,000 Miles
Minimum
WE
ALSO
DO BODY
Very Competitive Rates
WORK
ERIC'S BUG STOP
150S West 3rd 731-8171
(UNI
•■ANVILLI ST. BBJMI)
Motives aside, the fact remains
that the terrorist problem exists and
is growing day by day. Yet, is the
cost of innocent lives too high a
price to pay for its solution? Much
depends on the intent of the aggressor. In this case, Israel directed
the bombs at a particular target for
a legitimate reason. The attack was
as precise as it could be. This was
not a reaction of blind terrorism,
whereas the bombing of a civilian
bus in Jerusalem was.
The Middle East is a world of
wars, terrorism, hatred, and
religious   and   political    tension,
much farther away from North
America than a map indicates. It is
foreign, so foreign that we find
ourselves in a precarious position to
pass judgment over what occurs
there.
Even after considering different
sides of the issue, it is difficult for
us to place ourselves in Israeli combat boots and imagine how we
would react, how we would contend
with such a chameleon-like enemy.
It is my belief that if Canada was
placed in this situation, her reaction
would not be very different from
that of Israel.
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\\\ Oh What A Fun III
%%% PLACE TO BE ///
■ ■■■■■■■a
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Thru' Oct. 5th —David Domino
Oct. 7th-12th-Richard Stepp
(Home of the Frosted Mug)
jA*-rr fit, -,
oz Burger on a
(Share it with a friend)
10   Bun
$575
Overlooking English Bay
xr   Corner Davie & Denman
(Valet Parking)

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