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The Ubyssey Nov 7, 1978

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 Brandt warns arms race spells 1980s danger
By TOM HAWTHORN
The world will face serious
catastrophes in the 1980s if
detente fails between the U.S. and
the Soviet Union, Willy Brandt,
Socialist International president
and former West German
chancellor, said Friday.
"If mankind wants to survive in
the 1980s without serious
catastrophes, it cannot go on as it
has done in the past. Just imagine
what the outcome would be if
arms expenditures, which at the
moment stand at over $400 billion
.a year, were to double or even
triple in real terms," Brandt told
over 200 delegates to the Socialist
International gathering in
Vancouver on the weekend.
"The two nuclear world powers
carry a particular responsibility in
the field of armament policy.
They are called upon to be the
peacemakers of armament control
and arms limitation. They will
have to live up to this role more
adequately than they have done
up to the present."
Brandt said the coming of a
new cold war between East and
West could plunge the world into
a period of dangerous confrontation.
"Efforts which have been made
for years to reach agreement in
the field of strategic arms
limitation policy between these
two countries have so far met with
limited success," he said.
Brandt also called for the
ratification of SALT II (Strategic
Arms Limitation Talks)
agreements to stabliize the
military security situation in
Europe.
"A very critical fact is the
increasing development of arms
that are not included in either
the negotiations between the
nuclear world powers or in the
Vienna talks. This increases the
risk that, although we might reach
a certain amount of limitation of
troops and arms on the one hand,
there might be an increase in
armaments in other channels."
Peace must be the overriding
issue in the world because "the
consequences of a great war are
almost beyond imagination," he
said.
Brandt, 64, was unanimously
re-elected    president    of   the
Socialist International and will
serve until 1980. Bernt Carlsson
was reelected general secretary.
The three-day congress was
held at the Hyatt-Regency in
downtown Vancouver. The
congress was the social
democrats' 14th and the first
held outside of Europe in over a
century.
Brandt warned that the fate of
Third World nations depended on
the realization of peace and the
limitations of arms development
and expenditures.
See page 3: DETENTE       .
THC UBYSSEY
Vol. LXI, No. 24      VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 1978
228-2301
Timber baron
joins council
AH CANT BELIEVE we et the whole thang, drawls Atlanta Rhythm Section bassist Paul Goddard, left, to drummer Dean Daughtry. Good ol' boys
from deep in the land of Dixie enjoyed pig-out after foot-stompin' concert
of southern music Sunday night in War Memorial gym. Contrary to
—geof wheelwright photo
rumors, ARS' champagne jam was not benefit for weightwatchers
organization. Concert review and picture are inside, in special Page Tuesday extra on pages 6 and 7 and ARS interview follows in Thursday's
Ubyssey.
Teacher urges native-run ed. system
By PETER STOCKLAND
Canada's native people must take
their education out of the hands of
white society's vested interest
groups in order to survive, Bill
Thomas, superintendent of the
Peguis school board, said Monday.
"Indian education has always
been in the hands of other people.
First it was the missionaries. Now
it's the government. What does
some city dwelling civil, servant
know about Indian kinds living in
the bush?" he asked 100 people in
Scarfe 100.
Thomas, former Manitoba
regional education director, said he
returned to the Peguis Indian
reserve near Winnipeg because he
"couldn't stand the present system
any longer."
"In the provincial school system
resources are based on the
government's idea of a balanced
budget. There is no sound
organization at all. Selection of
personnel does not fit the native
child's needs," he said.
"There are no guidance
programs,   no   career   counselling
courses. After a while you get tired
of hammering politicians and civil
servants in the head and decide it
would be easier to run things
yourself."
When he arrived at the Peguis
reserve school, Thomas said he
discovered a child who had been in
grade one for four years without
receiving any help. He later found
this was a common occurrence and
continued through later grades.
"The government attitude
toward native education, especially
in remote areas, seemed to be that if
it was out of sight it was out of
mind," he said.
Thomas said there used to be 50
per cent attendance at the Peguis
school but since a program was
introduced to make the school more
responsive to native needs, attendance has risen to 80 per cent.
"We even have kids from other
schools in the area wanting to come
to Peguis now," he said.
Thomas traced the rise in concern
for native education to the overall
rise in interest shown by native
people for their own problems.
"I was an aculturated Indian. I
couldn't even speak the language of
my parents because we weren't
allowed to speak Cree in school,"
he said. "But I could never forget
that I was an Indian either because I
was always reminded damn soon
that I was."
He said it was older Indian
people who created an awareness
within the native community that
Indian
come.
problems could be  over-
"They pointed out to us that we
have been around as a culture for
40,000 years and that if we have
survived this long we should be able
to overcome the dilemmas we are
facing now. We have the inherent
ability to overcome our problems if
we use our wisdom and build on
our heritage," he said.
Former deputy education
minister Neil Perry and lumber
baron John Hetherington have
been appointed to the Universities
Council of B.C.
The appointment of Perry and
Hetherington is a positive step
towards greater university community involvement, according to
council chairman Bill Gibson.
"Up until now I've had no other
academics on the board. I'm very
glad to have these people on the
board, I'll tell you," Gibson said
Monday.
In a telephone interview from
Victoria, Perry gave a simple explanation of the functions of
UCBC.
"We will meet from time to time,
and the general plan is to be the
intermediary body between the
government and the university. We
discuss the budget planning which
goes to the provincial government," he said Monday.
Since he has spent so much tine
in higher education, Perry said he
thinks he will be a useful council
member.
Perry has a long track record in
education and economics involvement. He set up the University
of Victoria's school of public
administration, was dean cf
commerce and business at UBC,
acting vice president of UBC in
1963, an economist for the Bank of
Abyssinia and the Bank of International Settlements and served
in the federal treasury.
Hetherington, son-in-law of the
late John Buchanan, also has past
associations with the university. A
UBC engineering graduate, he is an
alumni association executive officer
and has been involved with many
fund-raising activities for students.
He is the current president of a
wholesale lumber company, Ralph
S. Plant limited. He is also former
president of the Canadian Forestry
Association, which promotes
student interest in forestry-related
jobs.
NDP heavy TKOs Regina Tory boss
REGINA (CUP) — Saskatchewan Conservative party leader Dick Collver, whose Tories
were knocked out by the NDP in last month's
elections, has been the recipient of a second, more
physical TKO.
According to reports, Collver was dropped to the
ground by a roundhouse punch from an NDP
cabinet minister after Collver allegedly called him a
"lying cunt."
Wes Robbins, the senior member of the Allan
Blakeney cabinet, was walking through the
legislature buildings in Regina last week when he
came upon Collver, who was allegedly berating a
commissionaire who works in the buildings.
According to reports Robbins told Collver that if
he could not deport himself in a more dignified
manner he should leave the building. Robbins and
his wife then left but Collver followed them out en
the steps of the legislature.
In the discussion that followed Collver called
Robbins a "lying cunt". Robbins, who is much older
than Collver, punched him in the face, knocking him
to the ground.
Collver has been noted in the past for his erratic
behavior and statements. He once told a group of
hecklers at the University of Saskatchewan that their
ideas were as "smelly as my shorts and that is pret :y
smelly." Pag* 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 7, 1978
Speed reading
Co. denies charges
BLACK & LEE
TUX SHOP
NOW AT
1110 Seymour St.
688-2481
The president of a controversial
speed reading company denied
charges Monday that his students
are left unsupervised and said they
gain 15 per cent better reading
comprehension after taking his
course.
"To say our students are unsupervised really hurts my head.
And for this fellow to say that
reading over 800 words per minute
is impossible is asinine," said
Excell-a-Read president Doug
Scott.
Scott was responding to a charge
by University of Manitoba official
Don Ebert that it is physiologically
impossible to read faster than 800
words per minute.
"I would love to have a debate
with this fellow who doesn't like to
put degrees behind his name," said
Scott.
Scott said one can theoretically
read as fast as one can see.
"Physically we talk 125 words
per minute and mentally 350 words.
We work on the amount of material
the student takes in during each eye
fixation."
He said the Excell-A-Read
program is having very good
results.
I've never had a student who read
less than 1,000 words per minute."
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YOU
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We'll be at this campus on the
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and are interested in talking with
COMMERCE (All Majors) & ARTS (Economics) STUDENTS
Please contact
CANADA MANPOWER ON CAMPUS TO ARRANGE AN INTERVIEW
Jk^L  The First Canadian Bank
Bank of Montreal Tuesday, November 7, 1978
THE      UBYSSEY
Pag* 3
Socialist solidarity stifles debate
By RALPH MAURER
The most striking aspect of the Socialist
International Congress which ended Sunday
at the Hyatt Regency was the almost total
lack of tension and heat. This was so not
because the political left has suddenly
become one big happy family, but because
the International's leadership simply wanted
to appear so.
The left has always been labeled as
fractious. Its history is one of deep
philosophical splits, of a plethora of parties
with almost identical names and, to non-
socialists, almost imperceptible differences in
political views.
The Socialist International, in fact, is a
product of the 1919 split of the world
socialist movement into the Communist
International and the social democratic
movement.
Actually, the left is no more disunited than
any other patch of the political spectrum, but
the media, by nature business ventures and
thus essentially antagonistic to the anti-
capitalist movement, have emphasized and
exploited the left's splits and downplayed the
differences of the political right.
But the fractured image has hurt the social
democratic movement, a situation which
International president Willy Brandt is
determined to remedy. Consequently, the
Congress was specifically designed as a
demonstration of solidarity among the
world's social democratic parties.
Rich nations
are hypocritical
- Olof Palme
By DICK BALE
Hypocritical western nations continue to
support South Africa's apartheid regime
financially while publically condemning the
country's racist policies, Olof Palme, leader
of the Swedish Social Democratic Party, said .
Saturday.
"There has always been great hypocrisy in
the rich industrialized countries between our
declared condemnation of apartheid and the
concrete relations that we still maintain with
Pretoria," said Palme.
Arms exports, capital investments and
loans, transferrals of technology and the flow
BRANDT ... SI president
of mercenaries into South Africa must be
stopped, he said.
Palme also said it was necessary to increase
the support to Angola, Zambia, Botswana,
Mozambique and Tanzania and to rebel
organizations in southern Africa.
The South West African People's
Organization made "far-reaching and
substantive concessions" in its recent
negotiations for an independent Namibia, he
added.
Palme condemned the "intransigence and
arrogance" of the Vorster government in its
rejection of the UN proposals, but pointed
out that the South African government's actions are defined in the context of what actions the Western powers will accept.
He charged that the "internal solution
adopted in Zimbabwe by the Ian Smith
regime was a "complete fiasco."
See page 9: BLACK
Apart from the congress's one blemish —
when Cypriot delegate Vassos Lyssarides
impassionately opposed the Turkish
Republican People's Party's membership
application — Brandt was successful. The
Vancouver congress, the first the
organization has held outside Europe, was
dull, dull, dull.
The congress officially had debates on the
world economy, multinational corporations,
human rights, terrorism and disarmament,
but the resolution that was to come out of
these discussions was written long before the
first delegate checked into the tasteless
opulent Hyatt. It was available in written
form from the first day of the congress.
The "debates" consisted of little more
than a long series of speeches that varied in
length and quality but hardly in content.
Brilliant in their identification of the world's
problems and the evils of capitalism, they all
refused to address the subject that would
have caused the only dissent at the congress:
how to bring about socialism.
In fact, the speeches were aimed less at the
other delegates than at the speaker's home
audience.
Peter O'Malley, assistant to NDP federal
leader Ed Broadbent, said the conference
helped weaker social democratic parties by
letting them associate with stronger, more
successful ones such as that of former
German Chancellor Brandt; Olof Palme,
whose party is sure to regain power in
SOCIALIST INTERNATIONAL LOGO . . . peace and development theme
'Detente essential'
From page 1
"If every industrialized nation, independent of its historic tradition and its
actual social constitution, were to feel itself
responsible for an equalization between
North and South and were it to have this
responsibility reflected in its policy, the
preconditions for a solution to the problems
we are facing would be improved."
Military despotism and the suppression of
liberty will not solve any of the problems
faced by Latin American countries, and there
has to be a respect for sovereign rights and an
elimination of international interference into
individual nation's domestic affairs, he
added.
"We wish to be useful companions in their
effort to open up their nation's ways towards
democracy and social stability.
"It is not inappropriate for me to remind
you that, to some extent, the way in which
Washington makes its influence felt is still
important," he said.
Brandt said the world's democratic
socialists supported African struggles for
independence and welcomed their efforts to
do so despite outside interventions. Africa
must be kept free of power-political rivalries,
he added.
"Up to now it has not been possible to free
Namibia and Zimbabwe from colonial
oppression and to provide them with access
to the community of independent states.
"In South Africa itself, a backward-looking
reglime is attempting to extend the system of
racial discrimination. Nobody who is
devoted to our common values can stand idly
by while human rights are disregarded openly
and in a systematic manner."
Brandt, a Nobel peace prize winner,
resigned as West German chancellor in 1974
in the midst of a spy scandal.
B.C. opposition leader Dave Barrett told
the opening session of the congress the NDP
planned to reorganize the welfare system and
to control the expenditures of big government in Canada.
"We look to more equitable taxation and
the more efficient and productive use of all
community resources, including the agencies
of government," he said.
"It is becoming increasingly evident that
big government is not democratic socialist
government.
See page 9: BARRETT
Sweden after a brief hiatus, and Francois
Mitterand, leader of France's powerful
Socialist party.
Finnish delegate Paavo Lipponen says the
International's highest priority is to widen its
membership and to establish strong ties
within the world's social democratic parties.
"It is not a movement that has a centralized policy on world questions, or
regional questions," he says. "It is a
movement of likeminded parties, which can
subscribe to certain principles." No
apologies for the fact that those principles
are breathtakingly broad.
"If you compare us to the Communist
world movement, they have very serious
problems," Lipponen continues. "Their
history has been a history of centralized
problems. This can lead to an alienation of
the parties from the movement, and today
the Communist movement is having difficulties."
Some delegates, such as British Labor MP
Ian Mikardo, think the movement would
benefit if a little heat were injected into the
congress proceedings.
"This is not a conference," Mikardo says.
"The object of a conference is to confer, and
• there has been no conferring, no differences
of opinion have been presented at this
congress." He criticized "this idiotic idea
that every party has to agree on everything,"
and said he is lobbying for a change in the
congress format so the next one, in 1980, can
be more of a working session than the public
relations excercise the Vancouver congress
turned out to be.
Lewis calls
for support
for guerillas
By KATHY FORD
Socialists should actively support freedom
fighters, even when they use terrorist tactics
to achieve that freedom, speakers at the 14th
Socialist International congress agreed.
Former federal NDP leader David Lewis
told the 250 delegates and observers Sunday
that the International could and should play
a role in educating people about atrocities
taking place in the world so they will be
roused to act against atrocious acts.
And an Italian socialist said terrorism in
the form of guerilla warfare is useful in
mobilizing people.
BROADBENT . . . defends guerillas
Lewis said that too often people turn a
blind eye on repression and injustice because
they are not personally involved.
"An effective call to arms by this International and coordinated campaigns of
education and of aid to those fighting for
freedom would be a signal for action in many
parts of the world," he said.
Lewis said that, although people often
react "with horror to racism rampant in
Africa, to the denial of rights to ... dissidents
in the Soviet Union, trade unionists and
others, to the inhuman treatment visited on
popular leaders in Chile, Nacaragua and
other dictatorships," it is difficult to rouse
them to action."
And it is definite action which is needed,
according to Lewis, not just another conference on human rights that ultimately
achieves nothing.
See page 12: TERROR Pag* 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 7, 1978
Wards the way for city
Although this year's mayoralty election promises to be a tight race all the
way to the wire and although the battle
for the remaining 10 seats on council
features many colorful politicians, the
most important aspect of this year's trek
to the polls will be the outcome of the
plebiscite on whether to institute a ward
system for the election of civic politicians.
Although the poll is merely of an advisory nature (council can ignore the
electorate's wishes in this issue if they
choose), the change from an at-large
system to a ward or area representation
set-up will have a profound effect on
civic government and experience in
other Canadian cities indicates the
change will be an improvement.
The principal advantage of course,
will be to return some sort of representation, the cornerstone of any democracy,
to the majority (66 per cent) of Vancouverites who live east of Cambie.
Although the western half of Vancouver
has a lower population, the mayor and
all but two aldermen live west of Cambie.
One of the reasons for the disparity in
representation is that west-side Vancouverites display a greater tendency to
vote. Coupled with this is the
predominance of professionals and
business people in civic politics who can
afford the expensive campaigns
necessary to be elected city-wide. They
seem to have a marked preference for
west-side living.
The ward proposal, which is nothing
more elaborate than the riding system
currently used by the federal, provincial
and most major city governments, will
also mean an end to the circuses Vancouver biennially suffers.
The large number of seats available on
city council, school board and the park
board ensures such a large number of
candidates that most voters are resigned
to vote on the basis of name recognition
rather than a solid analysis of the respective candidates' positions.
Well over 100 candidates will be vying
for civic posts in the Nov. 15 election.
The system ensures that a high
percentage of incumbent politicians will
be re-elected and may partly account for
the eagerness of mayor Jack Volrich and
aldermen Warnett Kennedy and
Marguerite Ford to preserve the status
quo.
The disparity in representation between west and east is very evident in
the quality of services provided to the
respective areas.
The park board is a perfect example.
According to former city planner William
Buholzer, the Point Grey community has
5.87 acres of park for every 1,000
residents while the Grandview-
Woodiand area in the eastern part of
Vancouver gets by with 0.91 acres per
1,000 residents. This is not including
major parts such as Jericho, the University Endowment Lands and Stanley
Park, which are all considered to be city-
wide parks by the park board.
The school board provides more examples. The cleanest and most well-
equipped schools with lower student-
teacher ratio are to be found on the west
side. This was no accident but the direct
result of the type of people elected to
the school board.
The current school board has one
representative from east Vancouver with
seven coming from the west side. The
ninth. Bill Brown, lives in North Vancouver.
A further advantage of the ward
system is that it will encourage a less expensive and more personal style of election campaigning. Experience in other
cities has shown that breaking the city
up into ridings encourages more door-
to-door campaigning and all-candidates'
meetings, rather than the expensive
media blitzes so common now.
Voters under a ward system, also
have a specific person to contact at city
hall when they are concerned or angry
about something. Under the current
system, which of 10 aldermen or the
mayor does one call?
A ward system will also encourage the
election of aldermen who live in the area
they want to represent and who thus
understand the particular interests and
concerns of their area.
Finally, charges have been made by
some opponents of a ward system, that
it will open the door to the socialist
hordes.
These comments, often made, again,
by alderman Kennedy, are falacious.
For example, alderman Harry Rankin,
a small-c communist, thrives well under
the current system often topping the
aldermanic polls.
Left-wing alderman Darlene Marzari
enjoys considerable support from the
west side and the right-wing Nonpartisan Association has traditionally
done well on the east side.
The move to introduce ward-based
elections is simply common sense.
Sense which Vancouver has been long
in coming to.
Letters
Prinshaw prances on poor people
I have never before been tempted
to write a letter to a paper, but
Elliot Prinshaw's letter of Nov. 2
and his previous one have really got
my hackles up.
First, family allowance cheques.
So he used them for beer money on
his yacht. Isn't that nice. He implies
that if he doesn't need the money,
no one else does. Has he ever
thought what it is like for those who
must save those cheques to buy a
winter coat (no, not a mink one;
more like Army and Navy surplus)
or just to have enough to eat? I
really doubt he has.
Next, let's consider government
subsidies for education. Please, go
ahead and pay an extra $2,000
tuition. That will leave all the more
money for those who can't afford
what we pay now. I don't suppose
Mr. Prinshaw has ever had to work
his ass off all summer just to pay
tuition and take a job all term to
pay room and board? No, he was
probably too busy drinking beer on
his yacht.
O.K. Let's now think about the
pursuit of money. Noble he says.
Sure, but I always thought the first
goal in life was to keep body and
THE UBYSSEY
NOVEMBER 7, 1978
Published Tuesdays. Thursdays and "Fridays throughout the
university year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of
B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and not of the
AMS or the university administration. Member, Canadian
University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial office is in
room 241K of the Student Union Building. Editorial departments. 228-2301; Advertising, 228-3977.
Editor: Mike Bocking
What a day at the derby! Alt the fly fishermen were there when Bo Diddley Bill Tieleman pulled red
snapper Ralph Maurer out of the pond. Fishermen Peter Stockland, Heather Conn, Tom Hawthorn
and old timer Tom Wayman all applauded his acumen as mermaid Vicki Booth lolled in the water pond-
side. She was soon joined by some other slimy creatures such as Peter the electric eel Menyasz, Glen
sharkie Shaefer, Dick fish Bale, Verne finnie McDonald and Kathy gilled Ford. Just then some PF'ers
floated by on a pale blue mattress. Kerry Regier and Mayo Moran paddled while Greg Strong just blew
big bubbles until a school of Beluga whales, Chris Bocking and Julie Wheelwright and their
mischievous spawn, little Mike and Geoffie overturned them all and dumped them into the ocean.
soul together. I'm envious of him to
have been born with his body and
soul neatly wrapped in a bank
account. Remember, poor is not
synonymous with lazy. The poor
work, usually at physical labor, not
at high-paying intellectual jobs.
Why? Because they didn't have the
money to get an education. Now
you ask, if they work so hard, why
couldn't they buy an education?
Simple, all that money went to
"necessities" like food, clothes,
medicine (Yah, when you can't
afford a decent winter coat, you
tend to get sick a lot) and other neat
stuff like that. So, where are all
these "aggressive, intelligent
minds?" They are laying roads,
fixing railways and doing other fun
jobs. Why? Some rich guy decided
that they didn't need extra money
from our dear government.
So, Mr. Prinshaw, you see it's
not that easy. You were born with
the silver spoon in your mouth.
Great, you were one of the lucky
ones and I'm not knocking you for
that. What I am knocking you for is
your narrowmindedness. You make
a comment about Jana Horn's
intelligence. At least give her credit
for seeing both sides of the
argument.   I,   personally,   suspect
you of "less than adequate intelligence" if you can't see this
simple fact. In today's society, the
"noble" pursuit of money needs a
good education and a good
education costs money, lots of it. If
you and others like yourself can
afford it, great! Others, the "lazy"
poor, need help.
If we followed your reasoning,
poor would get poorer, and the rich
would get richer, and somehow, I
don't think that is what our
Canadian society is all about.
Linda Bott
science 1
Filmsoc perverts repulse
It has come to my attention that
the film Everything You Always
Wanted to Know About Sex but
Were Afraid to Ask is being shown
on Tuesday and Wednesday nights.
(Having eyes, it was hard for me to
miss the several thousand posters
around campus). As a morally
concerned student citizen, I must
protest the showing of this trash at
the university. Although I have
been here only a few months, I have
been astounded by the kind of
degradative film put before the
student body by the Film Society
and other clubs. In efforts to raise
funds, these people bring in such
crassly commercial films as Reefer
Madness and Flesh Gordon, where
the baring of nipples and very
large breasts is carried out to such
excess that 30 minutes into the film
one eventually regards them as part
of the furniture. One would have
thought that exposure to higher
culture at a university would have
raised the tastes of these people
above the gutter, but no. This
exploitation of the well-rounded
female figure and man's second
most powerful drive has no artistically or socially redeeming
value at all. Indeed, in a university
such as this, where whole departments consist of puerile minds at
impressionable ages (i.e. civil
engineering), such material can
even prove to be socially destructive
in the future. It seems to me that
the only one profiting from such a
tasteless movie as EYWTKASB-
WATA are its mercenary sponsors,
who redirect the flow of the
economy from the pockets of
perverts to the coffers of such
cretins as themselves, creating such
short term financial benefit as they
see necessary. I sincerely hope that
the projectionists from the
mushroom cellar that masquerades
as a film society will refuse to show
this film, but on the basis of past
performance, that is highly
unlikely. Perhaps a boycott of SUB
Theatre at 7:00 on Tuesday and
Wednesday is in order, but again
judging from the past behaviour
rather (ajpathetic student body,
that, too, is improbable.
Is there no decency left in this
black hole? M. Pickelman
artsl Tuesday, November 7, 1978
THE      UBYSSEY
Page i>
Letters
Silver spoon missed poor mouths
After reading the letter from a
Mr. "Elliot Prinshaw"
(engineering 4) last week on your
newspaper, I felt I must heartily
express my admiration for his
opinions. I am glad he does not
want to abolish student grants and
loans. I can understand his need for
these funds because after all, even
the "rich," as he stated he was,
need some handy cash. "To make
money is one of the most noble
aspirations to strive for," Mr.
Prinshaw so eloquently stated.
"Try to think of ways to organize
your energies in order to make
money       get   out   there   and
work," he advised. And such good
advice from a person who worked
hard during the summer, spending
family allowance cheques to buy
beer while he drifted idly on his
Frats are 'gutter life9
Ink-stained closet misanthropes
(a plural address, since the UBC
newspaper, hereinafter referred to
as The Ubyssey is, I believe, run by
a revolutionary committee of like-
minded dirty-laundry maunderers,
each incapable of leadership or
original thought, but together,
capable of much opinion).
Thank you for your in-depth
front page report on campus
fraternity activities (The Ubyssey of
Nov. 3). Thank God there are
objective reporters such as yourselves in a campus oriented
newspaper such as The Ubyssey
willing to take the time and effort
to participate in fraternity activities
such as pledging, in order to
discover the essence of the Greek
system, without the assignation of a
reporter of neanderthal sensitivity
and intelligence to such a case
merely to substantiate an editor's
heartfelt prejudice.
Once again you have gone
beyond the shoddy realm of cheap
sensationalism into the pure and
Playing this week—8:30 p.m.:
Tuesday—
Jam Night with Don Ogilvie
Wednesday—
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Thursday—
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Friday-
PhOeniX Jazzers
Saturday—
Kansas City Five
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With
OSBORNE and TEAM
easy kingdom of discerning
journalism. Once agaui you have
bypassed irrelevant facts and
focussed instead on the gutter life
of juvenile fraternal associations.
Without the publication of The
Ubyssey (our moral and social on-
campus guide), all of us might well
sink into the mire of fascist reactionary running-dogism and perish
in the landslide of backsliding
backsidism. p.Truema^Esq.
yacht, as Mr. Prinshaw reported.
He must have worked hard to be
in such a fortunate social position
at so youthful an age. We should
respect the struggle young Elliot
must have had, to receive from his
father funds and provisions to
render him financially and socially
secure through all his young years,
and then to somehow extract $2,000
per year from public funds for
student loans.
I applaud Mr. Prinshaw in
sneering at the "poor" students out
here at UBC, especially the ones
who think they have a right to that
money.
Of course! Poorer students should
indeed "quit whining" and get to
work at competing with the 100,000
unemployed in B.C. (Statistics
Canada), the severely limited
apprenticeship openings, the 85 per
cent failure rate of small business
hopefuls (B.C. dept. of economic
development),    and    the    market
domination of directors of
multinational corporations in all
areas of the economy. "No jobs" is
no excuse, wouldn't you agree, Mr.
Prinshaw? At 21, if a student hasn't
got a firm foot in business
management or some money-
making enterprise, he's just not
"aggressive" or "intelligent"
enough, as Mr. Prinshaw so intelligently inferred. Even if the
parents of poor students are
truckers or laborers or
stenographers or waitresses, or
unemployed craftsmen, and usually
have absolutely no business connections, that's no excuse
either! You less endowed
students, listen to the likes of Mr.
Jumbly-Rich Elliot Prinshaw; you
have no right to government funds
for a loan and therefore no right to
a chance of further education. The
obvious implication is that you
should quit worrying about
sustenance funding and accept the
fact   that   universities   are   the
privilege of persons from well-off
middle and upper classes. So what
if you can eventually pay back the
loan — you have no right to public
funds in the first place! This is what
the likes of Elliot Prinshaw are
telling you. Let him have free beer
with unneeded funding, and let u:>
eat shit!
Ruth Lowtheir
education 4
UBC
Graduation
Portraits
since 1969
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TOM McBEATH . . . DJ with disco madness
"City Sugar" warns of
an unscrupulous media
By PETER MENYASZ
City Sugar is not an average comedy. As a
matter of fact it is difficult to call it a comedy
at all. It has plenty of humorous points, but
there is an underlying theme that is deadly
serious.
The plot centres around two areas. The
primary focus of attention is Leonard Brazil,
a disc jockey in the English city of Leicester.
Brazil is portrayed as the musical guru of the
city, with an audience spread across all age
groups. He is tough, biting, hard on his
subordinates and flashy on the air.
"City Sugar"
Written by Stephen Poliakoff.
Directed by Ray Michel.
At Citystage until Nov. 18.
The other focus of attention is on two young
British girls and how they follow Brazil's program and the ridiculous "contest of the century" that he invents. Nicola and Susan are
employees in a supermarket where their every
move is observed by cameras. They are
typical young people of limited ambition and
ability.
From the beginning of the play, it is easy to
see that Leonard Brazil is not an average
happy-go-lucky D.J. A bitter side of his
nature begins to surface. He abuses his sound
engineer, Rex, for trying to imitate the
famous Brazil style and seems to fear Rex's
ambitions toward his own job.
Conflict occurs between Brazil and "big
John" the news announcer. Brazil finds the
news constantly depressing, and does his best
to disrupt "big John's" newscasts.
Brazil is dissatisfied with today's world,
and today's music in particular. He prefers to
play music from the late sixties, and shows
his disgust for the new music that he is required to play by throwing the records and
verbally abusing them.
The focal point of the play is the "contest
of the century" that Brazil invents as a hype
for a rock band. The grand prize is a
weekend in London with a member of the
band.
The contest provides a platform from
which Brazil can ridicule the music that he
hates and abuse the people that listen to it.
Angela Davies becomes obsessed by the
contest. She has already won a record in a
previous contest and while she was on the air,
a relationship began between her and
Leonard Brazil.
Brazil divides the contest into three stages,
making each stage more ridiculous, and he is
amazed that his listeners comply with his
demands. He helps Angela through the contest up to the grand finale that takes place in
the studio.
The D.J. has an ulterior motive for
Angela's presence in the contest. Fantasizing
her as his "average devotee" he is determined to abuse her as much as is possible to see if
she is as mindless as he suspects that all of his
listeners are.
The acting is superb throughout with standout performances by Tom McBeath as
Leonard Brazil and Kim Seary as Nicola
Davies. There are many complicated passages
in the script, but under the direction of Ray
Michal, the whole play moves smoothly from
scene to scene.
Combined with the informal surroundings
of the Citystage theatre, the skill of the actors
draw the audience into the play and making
its message unmistakably noticed and strongly felt.
It is not difficult to understand playwright
Stephen Poliakoff's disillusionment with
today's music and the generation of
teenagers that listen to it in a semmingly
mindless state. City Sugar serves as a warning of what the media is capable of doing to
our minds if it is unscrupulous and we are
unknowing.
PAGE 1
Art Society shares
By MAYO MORAN
In the studio below the Helen Pitt Gallery
nine of more than sixty members of the
Women's Inter-Art Society share a working
and creating space. In spite of the pipes, low
ceilings and derelict hotel above, the studio is
anything but depressing. The walls are
covered with everything from huge canvasses
to lilc colored jute. Sketches, sculptures and
puppets abound.
If a person's surroundings are any
reflection of their personality, then the
women of the Inter-Art Society are lively and
inventive.
The Society which is currently having its
third show at the Helen Pitt Gallery, has
been in existence for just over three years.
Visual art is the predominant genre, although
almost every form of art enjoys some
representation. Included in the Inter-Art
society's membership are film makers,
musicians, poets and writers, as well as
painters, photographers, weavers, and other
visual artists.
However, despite the diverse mediums, all
of the artists share a serious dedication to
their art. The Women's Inter-Art Society is a
place for devoted artists, not occasional
dabblers.
In the words of the artists themselves, "It
provides a support community". This is
especially essential for female artists for a
number of reasons.
One of the primary reasons is that a very
large percentage of the female artists are not
able to devote the majority of their time or
energy to their art. Frequently they have
other demanding roles to fulfill, such as
worker, mother, wife, waitress, etc. As a
result, the people with whom they regularly
interact have neither understanding nor
guidance for these women as artists.
Other problems that arise for women
artists are the difficulties in finding a place to
exhibit their work and the much
mythologized artist's chronic lack of funds.
In many ways this economic problem is
more severe for the female artist, since
women lack access to many occupations
where substantial amounts of money can be
earned in a short period of time. The female
artist gets jobs which are often time-
consuming and poorly paid.
The support community which the
Women's Inter-Art Society provides relates
specifically to these and other problems
experienced by the female artists. Interaction
with group members in the studio and the
informal critique sessions provide many
artists with guidance which they would
otherwise lack. Another very important
aspect of the society both in artistic and
economic terms, is the annual art show at the
Helen Pitt Gallery.
At this show, every member is permitted to
exhibit at least one piece of their work.
However, as a result of limited space, it is
necessary to make a choice as to which
secondary pieces will be entere in the show.
This choice is made by a panel of judges who
are independent of the society.
Each artist is allowed to enter a maximum
HELEN PITT GALLERY ... the s
Zindel play survive
By KERRY REGIER
It is a tribute to Paul Zindel's ability as a
playwright that despite last week's shoddy
production at Studio 58, the depth and
power of Man in the Moon Marigolds shone
through.
-   Marigolds is a  play  concerned  with  a
depraved   mother   who   hates   everything
MAN IN THE MOON MARIGOLDS
around her and ruins the lives of her twc
daughters and the nanny who lives with
them.
The youngest daughter is Tillie, a
promising young high-school scientist who
eventually wins a science fair with the project
from which the play derives its title.
Her sister Ruth is an unstable person who
in the past has had a nervous breakdown and
fits, and is driven again into another fit by
her hateful and self-seeking mother, Beatrice
who cares nothing for her daughters.
"The Effect of Gamma Rays on Man in thi
Moon Marigolds"
written by Paul Zindel
Directed by Allan Gray
At Langara Studio 58 until November 18
Tillie is to present her science project at the
school fair and the principal invites her to
attend. And Beatrice decides to attend
although she has never been interested in hei
children.
Ruth wants to go to the fair too, yet
someone must stay home to look after theii
nanny. So Ruth threatens to reveal that
Beatrice was called "Betty the Loon" while
she was in school. With this weapon, she
Page Tuesday, 1
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 7, 1978 UE5DBY
•eative work space
' three pieces 'of work, and the judges then
lect the most effective or most suitable
eces of work for the show.
It is almost immediately apparent upon
ewing this gear's show that the art has a
male perspective. This is not to suggest that
e show is predominantly feminist. The
ter-Art Society is for female artists in
neral, rather than an exclusive haven
minists who use their art as a medium for
)litical or social commentary.
Most of the genres of visual art were
presented, along with some examples of
eativity in traditionally female sectors such
textile crafts, which have all too often
:en ignored as art forms.
The female body was one of the most
equent subjects of the artists. Sometimes
iked,     but     never    displayed    por-
—geof  wheelwright photo
iteness of female consciousness
nographically, women were shown giving
birth, playing baseball and just generally
radiating.
It is interesting to note that the only exhibit
which was predominantly male was a pottery
scenario which made a powerful comment on
the forces of fascism, sexism and capitalism
in situations such as the one in Chile.
As a whole, the show maintained a high
level of quality throughout. Some of the
more unusual pieces in the show were the
multi-media works, fabric art and pottery
scenarios.
One question which comes to mind in
considering a show such as the Women's
Inter-Art Society show is, "Why women's
art? Isn't art, art?" It seems possible to make
the case that art should go beyond the
physical barriers of sex. So, why not just art
in general, why differentiate?
The current show of the society makes it
quite clear just why that distinction is so
necessary. One of the striking features of the
show is the unusual occurrence of the female
body in the art as something other than a
sexual or maternal symbol.
Perhaps then we will be lead to wonder
just what "art in general" means. It seems
that all too often it has been art by, for and
about, men. So, "art in general" is actually
much closer to being men's art than people's
art. Therefore, perhaps work by the female
artist is more aptly called women's art.
Another important aspect of this issue, is
that the distinction between "men's" and
"women's" art often goes much deeper than
a mere question of semantics. "Women's"
art as the show illustrates, has its own subtle
breed of humor, in many cases, its own
distinctive beauty.
It shouldn't be amazing that "women's"
art is different. Such a large part of the whole
struggle for the liberation of women has been
focussed on the liberation and assertion of
the female consciousness. Women's art is a
reflection of that different consciousness, a
perspective from the other side of human
existence.
The Women's Inter-Art Society and their
show is a celebration of that consciousness,
not always feminist, but in some basic way,
always female.
)rces her mother to take her place and stay
ome.
Beatrice is bitter and while she is at home,
ie kills Ruth's pet rabbit and the death
rings about Ruth's final collapse.
Despite some enormous cuts in the
ialogue, the play hung together reasonably
ell.
The cast was headed by a convincing Tillie,
layed by Elinor Stobbs. This difficult role
dth few lines is a problem in terms of
haracter development, but Stobbs's subtle
estures and strong stage presence succeeded
lore than adequately.
In one memorable moment, Ruth insults
eatrice, and Tillie's reproachful stare
ansfixes her with a power rarely seen even
mong the greatest actors.
But from here it (is mostly downhill,
labrielle Jones as Ruth was sloppy and
npracticed. At no time was she convincing
s a high school student.
Maggie Bellmaine's portrayal of Nanny
'as ridiculous, though this is a role that
ould be played with great power and
ignity, despite Beatrice's continual jibes,
ellmaine's quick jerky motions were more
haracteristic of a young college student than
decrepit old hag.
Carol Byron failed completely as Beatrice
to convince one that she was the distracted
mother of two children. What she did convey
was a lack of rehearsal, and a lack of study
of her character. Several times she stumbled
over her lines and rushed through her part as
if she had just been given it at the last
moment.
The entire production seemed rushed. It
often seemed that the cast was trying to end
the play as soon as possible so they could get
home to watch Mary Tyler Moore.
While some fine ideas were presented
under Gray's direction, there was sloppiness
and failure. One example was when a
flashlight was used in a scene in the darkened
house. Ruth wakes up screaming from a
nightmare and Beatrice tries to comfort her.
But the flashlight was allowed to blind the
audience and it did.
The production came across as a high-
school play with a big budget, a nice theatre,
and a gum-chewing, giggling audience to
complete the scenario. Again, it is one facet
of Paul Zindel's genius that despite Gray's
radical surgery and thorough drubbing,
Marigolds still left one with a sense of having
participated in a profound and rich
experience.
Atlanta Rhythm Section
scores success at UBC
By GLEN SCHAEFFER
Rhett Butler would have loved it.
Atlanta Rhythm Section's southern charm
warmed their War Memorial Gym audience
Sunday as they delivered a short but well-
received set of their own kind of rock and
roll alternative.
Their southern roots are hard to trace in
singles like "So Into You" and "Imaginary
Lover", as in the studio their Georgia boogie
is often superseded by a cool sophistication.
However, on stage ARS is like a night in
Macon county.
The show started with two genuine
southern rockers, the first was a cut from the
Rock and Roll Alternative album and the
second, a song called Large Time, from their
latest album.
The influence of southern bands like
Lynard Skynard and the Allman Brothers is
clearly evident in these songs, but that influence also made itself felt in the renditions
of ARS's technically polished singles.
The normally subdued "I'm Not Gonna
Let It Bother Me Tonight" was punched up
with smoking lead guitar licks which turned
song into the quintessence of Georgia
raunch.
Tha band's stage energy is no accident. It's
the result of a lesson learned through seven
years of relative obscurity. As guitarist J.R.
Cobb puts it, "You gotta take the music to
the people."
Their stage show emphasises the earthy
qualities of their songs. By way of introduction for So Into You, lead singer
Ronnie Hammond shouts, "Y'all better take
your honey and hold her tight 'cause this
song's about luhv."
However, Sunday's concert had several
flaws. It was disappointingly brief. Atlanta
Rhythm Section is trying too hard to sell
themselves. Their UBC date was in the
middle of a gruelling touring schedule that
has had them on the road for over a month.
The night before their War Memorial Gym
show they played in Medford, Oregon. On
Sunday they drove up from Seattle, and did
four interviews before the concert. After the
concert, they did two or three more interviews. It almost seems as though the
concert itself was just something to kill time
between interviews.
The brevity of the concert was certainly
not due to a shortage of material as ARS
have seven albums to their credit. It is also
RONNIE HAMMOND
bewildering that for an encore they did two
songs that weren't their own material, Rocky
Raccoon and Long Tall Sally.
While they did a competent job of both
songs, it would have been to their benefit to
have played more of their own material.
Some confusion arose before the concert
as to the back-up band. Originally the
concert promoter Isle of Man productions
had arranged to have Paul Davis play.
Davis currently has a single out called
Sweet Life and was described by Isle of Man
as an "up and coming" artist.
Davis cancelled at the last minute,
however, and the promoter replaced him
with Mose Jones, who are doing the
American leg of the tour with ARS.
Mose Jones are best described as an "out
and going" band. They played a set that
seemed excruciatingly long and their
departure was greeted with relief. Needless to
say they did not do an encore.
The main fault with the evening, then, was
that Mose Jones played too long and Atlanta
Rhythm Section did not play long enough.
ARS showed a side of themselves that is
not heard on AM radio and a side listeners
would like to hear more of. On their singles
they sometimes bear a favorable resemblence
to Steely Dan while their live sound has a
more potent flavor.
Their next album may bring this sound to
ARS fans. Drummer Robert Nix said the
band hopes to take advantage of their live
appeal be recording one side of the next
album in concert and doing the other side live
in the studio. Judging from audience reation
at Sunday's concert, this next album may be
their most successful effort yet.
sloppy production
ATLANTA RHYTHM SECTION
—geof wheelwright photo
bold band with a big beat
Tuesday, November 7, 1978
THE      UBYSSEY
Page Tuesday, 2 Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 7, 1978
Hot flashes
The thrill oi a
toga party?
Bruce Jenner, eat your heart out.
Any UBC shlocky jocks with blatant Animal House tendencies can
strut their stuff in a battle of brawn
on Wednesday at 11 a.m., west of
SUB. BCTV is hosting western
preliminaries on campus for CTV's
Wide World of Sports national
university competition. Toga party
'Tween classes
TODAY
WOMEN'S CENTRE
General   meeting   with   guest   speakers   from
women's studies department, noon, SUB 130.
DISTINGUISHED SPEAKER SERIES
Dr.  Arthur More speaks on A Comparison of
B.C.'s Native Indian and Australia's Aboriginal
Education Programs, noon, Scarfe auditorium.
CENTRE FOR
HUMAN SETTLEMENTS
Dr. Harry Anthony speaks on Moscow: Setting
Limits to its Growth, noon, Lasserre 102.
BAHA'I CLUB
Informal discussion, noon, SUB 113.
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Supper, Know Your Campus scavenger hunt, 6
p.m., Lutheran Campus Centre.
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
General meeting, noon, SUB 130.
CSA
Sports night, 7:30 p.m., T-bird Sports Complex,
gym A.
DARLENE MARZARI
Alderman speaks on  Equal Opportunities, the
ward system, noon. Law Building room 102.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
ORGANIZATION
General meeting, noon, SUB 224.
SF CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 216-
UBC PROGRESSIVE
CONSERVATIVE CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 205-
CHARISMATIC CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Prayer and sharing, noon, SUB 213.
WEDNESDAY
INTEGRITY
Dale Maranda speaks on Wholistic Living: You
are More Than Your Body Mind and Emotions,
noon, Buchanan 217.
AMNESTY UBC
General meeting for constitutional amendments,
noon, SUB 212.
AMS
Civic all-candidates meeting, parks board, noon,
SUB conversation pit.
AIKIDO CLUB
Practice, 7 p.m., John Owen Pavilion.
VARSITY OUTDOOR CLUB
Slide show, noon, Chemistry building room 250.
TRUTCHKEY DOUBLET ASSOCIATION
Trutchkey   Truism   training   session,   7   p.m.,
Trutch house.
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
Lesbian drop-in, noon, SUB 130.
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ll=H=H=IIs=il=li=ii=J|=li=li=SIBg Tuesday, November 7, 1978
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 9
Barrett hits big government
From page 3
Rather, big government is
capitalist government desperately
trying to patch together the inconsistencies and failings of an
economic system which no longer
works.
Barrett, who was NDP premier
of B.C. from 1972-1975, also told
the delegates that Canada's current
welfare system is not working.
"One of our immediate tasks is
to bring into perspective the many
social programs and welfare
schemes that together make up the
welfare system. Born of necessity
and/or political expediency, these
programs in themselves do not
answer the needs of the people.
They have failed to bring about any
real redistribution of wealth.
"In some cases, they have helped
to create a sub-class of idle and
dependent workers as well as an
acceptance of unemployment that is
entirely consistent with the most
cynical    goals    of    monopoly
capitalism," he said.
Federal NDP leader Ed
Broadbent said multinational
corporations were responsible for
Canada's poof employment and
research record.
"Foreign direct investment in
Canada has been growing for
decades, it isn't a passing phase,"
he said. "Foreign multinational
ownership is the central reality of
the Canadian economy.
"The result has been increasing
problems and a reduced capacity to
respond to them. Perhaps for more
than any other industrial nation in
the world, economic decisions
central to our future are made
outside of our borders."
Broadbent said the influx of
multinationals has also retarded the
expansion of research and
development facilities in Canada.
And multinationals exercise
decisive bargaining advantage with
national governments, because of
their   ability   to   make   major
'Black Africans might revolt'
From page 3
"It came in a form designed to
guarantee continued white
dominance of the country," he
said.
As a result of the exclusion of the
Patriotic Front, the war has not
ended but escalated, he added.
Palme expressed fear that the
backtracking of the cornered white
minority leaders and the
deteriorating conditions for the
black majorities will force a violent
revolution.
But he expressed hope that the
imposition of stricter international
sanctions and pressure from the
West will leave room for negotiations.
The discussion on South Africa
was a special sub-theme of the conference, related to the areas of
human rights ai\d the world
economy. Multinational corporations were singled out for their
cynical bottom line policies in
southern Africa and their lack of
regard for the more human dimensions of economics.
Lionel Jospin, speaking for the
French Parti Socialiste, described
racial segregation as "an extreme
form of capitalistic exploitation of
man by man in perfectly preserved
colonial structures."
He blamed rich mining resources
and large profit margins from the
highly exploited labor force for the
increasing and irresistable flow of
investment   capital   to   Africa.
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IN THE BIG CITYI
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economic decisions, he said.
"If Canada tries to increase its
tax take and employment from
nickel extraction, INCO (International Nickel) simply threatens
to expand elsewhere. Third World
governments are even more
vulnerable to these threats.
"The result is that a private
company, by playing off country
against country, can considerably
increase its share of the overall
benefits that should in fact belong
to the people of the countries in
which the resources are located."
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Applications close 4:00 p.m. on Friday, November 17th, 1978.
Application may be picked up at Rooms 246 & 266 S.U.B.
PAM ROSENGREN
Secretary-Treasurer
228-2050
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THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 7, 1978
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THE      UBYSSEY
Pag* 11
UBC makes national semis
By PAUL WILSON
A superior team effort and solid
punting lifted the UBC Thunderbird football team to its sixth
consecutive win Saturday, downing
the University of Calgary Dinosaurs
26-8 at Thunderbird Stadium.
The win gave the 'Birds the
Western Intercollegiate Football
league title for the second time in
just three years and improved their
season record to 8-2. That makes
this season UBC's best since 1939.
The victory also puts the 'Birds in
the Western Bowl at 8 p.m., Friday
at Empire Stadium against Sir
Wilfred Laurier University from
Waterloo, Ont.
Scoring opened in the first
quarter of Saturday's game when
Gary Metz kicked wide on a 37-yard
attempt and Calgary conceded the
single. Five minutes later Calgary's
Tony Kuchara booted a 21-yarder
wide but scored the single. Then,
with two minutes to go in the
quarter, the wind again carried
Metz's 37-yard field goal attempt
wide for yet another single.
UBC set up its first major with a
10-play drive early in the second
quarter. After five passing and
three rushing plays 'Bird quarterback Dan Smith hit end Barry Muis
on the one-yard line with a 19-yard
pass. This set up halfback John
—peter stockland photo
RUNNING BACK JOHN MacKAY shows form in 26-8 win over Calgary
Saturday. MacKay, with two touchdowns, had 23 carries for 116 yards.
'Birds meet Laurier at 8 p.m., Friday at Empire Stadium.
Women's Sports
Joan Carruthers scored the only
goal as the UBC field hockey team
defended its title with a 1-0 win over
the host Bules at the Canadian
Intercollegiate finals in Toronto
over the weekend. Goalie Janis
Carroll had a perfect record in the
round-robin tourney, in which
UBC beat the Univerisities of New
Brunswick, Manitoba and Toronto
1-0, York University 2-0 and
McGill University 10-0.
The tour of Japan was a
cakewalk for the ice hockey
Thunderettes, who won the
tournament with 10-0, 6-0 and 11-0
wins over Kokudo, Silber Seals and
Isetan respectively. Clinics and
mass practices with the Japanese
filled out the tour.
*    *    *
The UBC soccer Thunderettes
lost 3-0 to a strong Edmonds side
Sunday on the P.E. centre field.
League games this weekend are
cancelled.
Jock Shorts
The Basketbirds split their
weekend games, winning 77-61 over
the Alumni Friday and losing 91-69
in Dogwood league action to the
Good Times.
John Doughty, a transfer student
from Vancouver Community
College, led the 'Birds Friday with
20 points. On Saturday Rob Cholyk
was the high man with 15.
The 'Birds start their Canada
West conference schedule with a
pair of games this weekend at the
home of the defending champion
University of Victoria Vikings.
Based on performances in seven
weeks of training, 14 women and 15
women will head to Seattle this
weekend to compete in the Husky
Relays, hosted by the University of
Washington.
MacKay for his first touchdown on
a quick dive across the line.
Calgary's only touchdown of the
game came two minutes later after a
quick 89-yard drive consisting of
four passing plays. Dino Grant
Newell caught a 40-yard pass from
Darrell Moir and ran for five more
before being tackled by safety Eric
Ford. Two plays later John Tietzen
got behind UBC defender Jack
Hirose and grabbed a 14-yard pass
from Paul Colbourne to score.
Moir failed on an attempt at a two-
point conversion.
At the half UBC went into the
dressing room with a 9-7 lead,
although they trailed 213-174 in
total offence, including only 63
yards rushing to Calgary's 106.
In the third quarter the 'Birds
broke the game wide open. After
getting an excellent field position on
a short Calgary punt, Smith connected with end Chris Davies on a
46-yard pass-and-run play for pay
dirt.
Later UBC got the ball after
another short Calgary punt and a
no-yards penalty, too. Mackay, the
game's leading rusher with 116
yards, ran around the right end for
17 yards. Then he went in on a
10-yard romp for the major. Metz
converted both touchdowns.
SPORTS
Later Kuchera attempted a
28-yard field goal, but was again
wide.
Metz kicked a 28-yard field goal
early in the fourth quarter.
The wind and punting were both
big factors. Calgary's Gordon Elser
managed only 218 yards in nine
punts. Chorney had a more respectable 34-yard average in nine punts,
but this was much less than his
41-yard season average.
"Punting was a big factor,"
Chorney said Saturday. "Elser
might have put the ball up too high.
You have to keep the ball down low
and line drive it. Then, it'll carry into the wind."
Calgary assistant coach Bill Em-
sick attributed Elser's problem to
inexperience.
"This is his first year punting,"
he said. "Gordon had an up-and-
down game here and the last few
haven't been at all good."
But Emsick also gave a lot of
credit   to   UBC's   offensive   and
UBC beats Dinos
as season starts
The UBC hockey 'Birds struck
for two goals in the first period,
then went on to defeat the
University of Calgary Dinosaurs 4-
2 Friday at the Winter Sports centre.
Veteran winger Rob Jones, with
a hat-trick performance, led the
UBC offence. The heavier Dinos
tried to use their strength to
dominate the "Birds, but UBC's
defencemen were able to keep the
crease clear of reptiles and stand up
to the visitors at the blue line.
UBC completed a sweep of its
Canada West University Athletic
Association season-openers with a
5-3 win Saturday night.
Friday's game started slowly,
UBC goalie Ron Patterson keeping
the match scoreless. Defencemen
Terry Shykora and hard-hitting
newcomer Paul Carson kept the
Calgary forwards at bay.
With five minutes to go in the
period Jones slapped in a rebound
from a shot from the point, and
minutes later UBC's Derek
Williams poked in a loose puck.
Constant- forechecking by the
'Birds  during  the  second period
netted Jones his second goal, and
the visitors scored when Mike
Mclver deflected a shot from the
point past Patterson.
The 'Birds controlled the second-
period faceoffs and the frame was
filled with end-to-end rushes.
Calgary pulled up its socks in the
final period, but red-hot
goaltending kept the Dinos to one
tally on an unassisted marker by
Jerry Orban. But UBC's Jones had
already picked up an insurance
goal.
Conditioning was a factor during
the final minutes, both teams
playing sloppily. But Calgary
defenceman Jess Neufeld's two-
way play and skating ability stood
out.
On Saturday two rookies, Jay
Rumley and Giles Grenier, each
netted one. For the returnees, Jim
McLaughlin had a pair and captain
Williams had one.
UBC hosts the powerful
University of Alberta Golden Bears
at 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday at
the winter sports centre.
Rugby Birds eat Meralomas
as gusting winds catch ball
A strong team effort and a
deadly kicking game led the
Thunderbird rugby team to a 25-13
win over the Meralomas at Connaught Park Saturday.
The Meralomas scored a try early
in the Vancouver Rugby Union
match and controlled the game for
the first quarter. But after a
Preston Wiley penalty goal
narrowed the margin to 4-3, the
'Birds played what Coach Donn
Spence later termed "our best game
as a team this year."
Late in the first half the UBC
backs twice got the ball out to Rob
Greig, who was alone along the
sideline, and Greig scored almost
identical tries, both converted by
Wiley. UBC led 15-4 at the half.
In the second half John Oleson
scored a try for the 'Birds on a 20-
metre run,  but  the  convert  was
missed and after three 'Lorna
penalty goals, UBC's lead was slim.
The Meralomas moved the ball to
within centimetres of the goal line
before the 'Birds won a lineout and
got the ball out of trouble.
Wily finished the scoring with
two late penalty goals.
A strong cross wind throughout
the game sent kicked balls into the
paths of passing cars, but UBC
fullback Graham Taylor tamed the
gusts and kept the 'Lomas in their
own end.
But Taylor said teamwork, and
especially the forwards' play,
produced the win.
"We have to get the ball to our
backs constantly to win, and we did
that today," said Taylor.
UBC plays the Fraser Valley
Reps at 2:30 p.m. Sunday at
Queen's Park.
defensive units, describing the
defence as the league's best.
"The punts and no-yards
penalties were a critical factor,"
said Emsick. "But they executed
well on offence and their defence
completely contained us. Smith
came to life when he needed to and
picked us apart underneath."
Smith completed 12 of 20 passes
for 157 yards. Calgary, which uses
an alternating quarterback system,
passed 28 times and completed only
13.
Wilfred Laurier won the Ontario-
Quebec League Western Division
title Saturday by upsetting the
number-one ranked University of
Western Ontario Mustangs 19-14 at
London. The Golden Hawks closed
out their league schedule with a 6-2
record, losing only to Western. But
they came out on top Saturday.
Friday's winner here goes to the
national final, the College Bowl, at
Toronto Nov. 18, against the winner of Saturday's Atlantic Bowl,
which pits Queen's University of
Kingston, Ont. against the St. Francis Xavier.
Xavier upset Acadia 12-9 and
Queen's downed McGill 23-1 at
Kingston.
Tickets for Friday's UBC-Sir
Wilfred Laurier game are available
from the athletic office in War
Memorial Gym for $5 regular admission and $3 for students. All
seats are reserved.
Intramurals
sees a future
in inner tubes
What do you think about the
Alma Mater Society and the administration jointly buying 47 inner
tubes?
It sounds like a new scheme to
brings us all in from B-lot, but
actually the inner tubes are for
intramurals' latest activity, inner
tube water polo, which is held
Tuesday evenings at the Aquatic
Centre.
What do the administration and
the AMS have to do with this, you
ask? They share the expense of
administering intramurals, says
physical education professor Nestor
Korchinsky, who has coordinated
intramurals for 10 years.
He says intramurals has grown so
much that it now involves between
4,000 to 5,000 students at least once
a year.
The growth has been obvious this
year. The Arts 20 race, a tradition
that involves relay teams running
from the former Fairview campus,
near the current Vancouver General
Hospital site, to the cairn on Main
Mall, had 63 entries this year, up
from 25 last year. Men's soccer has
blossomed to 60 teams.
The growth has led to problems,
the largest of which is, money.
"The AMS and the administration have been great with
their support," says Korchinsky.
"Intramurals was the only program
the AMS didn't cut back this year,
and the administration gave us the
money to hire the support staff."
But the grants cover only the
administrative costs and operating
costs must be covered by charging
fees.
Korchinsky expressed disappointment at the failure of the
recent fee referendum, which
promised some support for intramurals. Page 12
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 7, 1978
'Terror aids liberation'
From page 3
"Few, very few representatives at
Helsinki or Belgrade could speak
with a clear conscience. The main
powers therefore played a
depressing game of meaningless
taunts and brazen hypocrisy.
"No wonder the result was not
very exciting. This distressing
situation places an added
responsibility on socialist parties
and on this International."
The Helsinki Accord, which is a
charter of international human
rights, has been criticized as little
more than a token attempt to give
people basic human rights because
such countries as the Soviet Union,
which was among the many
countries which agreed to abide by
the terms, have consistently
violated those terms.
Lewis was speaking at the start of
the conference's human rights
session.
Among the many speakers who
followed him was Mauro Ferri, a
delegate from Italy's Social
Democratic Party. Although Ferri
denounced international terrorism
he came out in support of terrorism
when it is used in wars of liberation.
"The recourse to terrorism has
the role of triggering the awakening
of the people and a first gathering
of the forces," he said.
"Terrorist practice takes on a
'demonstrative' value which
generally favors the regrouping of
men available for struggle in small
teams.
"Terrorism in this case reaches
beyond ideological limits and
constitutes on the one hand the first
element of contact with the masses,
and on the other develops a
deterrent power against the enemy
which it demoralizes."
In a press conference following
the session, executive members of
the International defended their
support of freedom fighters who
use violent tactics.
Federal NDP leader Ed
Broadbent said violence by socialist
forces in Namibia and Rhodesia is
justified because the fighters have
had violence done to them and are
only reacting to that.
Another delegate said the
recognition of the courage of
people fighting for freedom is not
the same as supporting the idea of
violence.
During the session, Ernesto
Cardenal, a member of the Frente
Sandinista, the group that is
currently fighting a civil war in
Nicaragua, drew a standing ovation
from the delegates after his plea for
support of his party.
HILLEL   HOUSE
"Know Your Jewish Community"
Vancouver Beneficiaries of the
Combined Jewish Appeal
THURSDAY, 9 NOVEMBER
12:30 at Hillel House
Discussant: MORRIS SALTZMAN
Executive Director Jewish Community Fund
& Council; Canadian Jewish Congress
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IN A LITTLE MORE THAN ONE YEAR THE PACK &
BOOTS SHOP HAS MORE THAN DOUBLED IN EQUIPMENT SALES & STAFF MEMBERS. THE SUCCESS OF
THE STORE CAN BE ATTRIBUTED TO EXCELLENT
SERVICE, LOW HOSTEL PRICES (NOW AVAILABLE
TO THE PUBLIC) AND A LARGE SELECTION OF EXCLUSIVE OUTDOOR EQUIPMENT. THE STORE STAFF
INVITE HOSTEL MEMBERS AND THE PUBLIC TO IN-
SP1CT THE NEW STORE.
>i
Choose   from
many   moving
specials   and
our    regular
stock  of  one
of the largest
inventories  in
the city.
REMEMBER:
Hostel
member
prices are now
extended   to
the public.
Moving Special
BUGABOO MONTAR a low priced internal
frame  travel./XC  Country  Ski   Pack ...
>95
$22<
DAY PACKS
from $6.95
OUR OWN QUALITY
PACK & BOOTS
DAY PACK
$10.95
PACK & BOOTS SHOP
"Owned and operated by  THE CANADIAN  HOSTELLING ASSOCIATION,  B.C. REGION"
3425 W. BROADWAY phone 738-3128
When in Victoria, visit our Pack and Boots shop at 720 Yates Mall.       phone 383-2144.

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