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The Ubyssey Jan 20, 1984

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THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXVI, No. 29
Vancouver, B.C. Friday, January 20,1964
58sfc>48
228-2301
~*<rr. „>-..' -       ',J""'.'.*•
FUNERAL .  .  . mourners kiss education goodbye
Scnato imposes strut limitations
By CHRIS WONG
Qualified high school graduates
could be facing closed doors at
UBC next year as a result of stiff
enrolment restrictions approved by
senate Wednesday. A ceiling of
3,250 students in first year degree
programs was imposed — a sharp
decline from this year's level of
3,697.
Only the top high school students
will be accepted, and some students
who fulfill the entrance requirements will not be admitted.
A statement issued by the senate
admissions committee read:
"Without adequate funding the
university can no longer admit all
applicants to first year who meet
the minimum entrance requirements and at the same time
maintain the quality of education
that has been provided in the past."
The university expects to save
about $6 million from UBC's $18
million shortfall by implementing
the restrictions.
Arts dean Robert Will said enrolment limitations are necessary to
ensure quality students can still
enter the university. "If you've got
scarce resources they should go to
the people who can make the best
use of those resources," he said.
But law student representative
Peter Kendall said the limitations
are unfair because academic standards vary throughout the province. "You can't be sure that
students are of the same quality,"
Kendall said.
Graduate student representative
Penny Jones also expressed concern
for high school students who may
not have enough time to raise their
grades. A blanket enrolment limit
of 3,250 should not be chosen, said
Jones. "It would seem logical to
place estimates before imposing any
limits."
A motion calling for further
enrolment re-adjustment after more
in-depth study was defeated.
Jones stressed the importance of
cost analysis in implementing the
limitations. UBC could be turning
away a "profit-generating" situation by limiting enrolment, she said.
First year enrolment increased by
13.5 per cent this year.
But Robert Smith, vice-president
academic and an admissions committee member, said the new enrol
ment figure was based on previous
enrolment totals.
"It's pragmatic. We know
there'a a dam bursting ahead, we
know the water is coming," said
Smith.
Faculties have until Feb. 10 to inform the admissions committee of
the maximum number of first year
students that can be accomodaled
in their first year programs.
Board passes
hnge fee hike
By NEIL LUCENTE
The board of governors slammed an average 33 per cent tuition fee increase on students next year and introduced differential fees for foreign
students for the first time in UBC's history.
The 33 per cent increase will not take effect until next September, while
foreign students currently enrolled in UBC will not have to pay 1.5 times
the regular fee for two years.
The increase, which was recommended by the administration, will
generate an estimated $6 million to $6.5 million and will help the university
overcome next year's anticipated $18 million budget shortfall.
Tuition fees currently make up 11.7 per cent of UBC's operating budget
— this is expected to increase to 15 per cent next year.
About $1 million of the generated revenue from the increase will be used
as financial aid to students, while 25 per cent of the additional income
derived from differential fees will be available as aid to foreign students.
Administration president George Pedersen claimed that the increase will
not make UBC an "elitist school in the social sense.
"But it may become more elitist in an academic sense with tighter enrolment," he said shortly before the board made its decision.
Student board member Margaret Copping also justified the fee increase.
"This is a situation the university has not chosen to put itself in and it
hasn't brought it on itself through mismanagement or anything. The
board's action was necessitated by the shortfall in provincial funding," she
said.
Before several camera crews, Copping presented the board with an Alma
Mater Society petition containing 6,500 signatures of students and faculty
opposed to the fee increase and the introduction of differential fees.
Shortly afterwards, five students asked that a decision on fee increases be
postponed until an open debate including students could be arranged.
One of the delegates from the protest outside the old administration
building, Alicia Barsallo, told the board that students should have more input.
"We feel agitated when decisions come down and we don't participate in
debate," she said.
The board's chair David McLean said allowing students to debate the
issue with the board was rejected because the board "had adequate input
from student groups.
"We have not time for debate and we also do not want to mislead
students into thinking a debate would be all that effective," he added.
While many students at the protest said higher tuition fees and differential fees for foreign students will limit UBC's accessibility, Copping claimed
accessibility had to be limited to preserve the quality of education.
"While the decision to raise fees will affect accessibility, the other option
we have such as letting go of tenured faculty and crowding classrooms will
hurt the quality and integrity of education," she said.
Students mourn death of quality education at IIBC
•      By DOUG SCHMIDT
The death bell once again tolled
Thursday for quality and accessible
education at UBC.
Two years after mourning the
passing of "what used to be a great
university," students gathered this
time to mourn the death of wisdom.
"We did not expect more
deaths," campus chaplain George
Hermanson told almost 250
students in front of the old administration building as he tossed a
handful of dirt on a coffin representing wisdom.
Inside, the board of governors
was making its final decision on
next year's tuition fee levels.
The relatively small but enthusiastic crowd demanded they be
given an opportunity to address the
board.
'' Board of governors — come out
or we go in," they chanted, before
sending delegates upstairs to the
meeting room.
"The majority wants to occupy
this building if nobody addresses
the crowd," students against the
budget organizer Bill Coller told
board members.
"That's impossible . . . because
we haven't made a decision yet (on
next year's fee levels)," said university chancellor and board member
J. V. Clyne as he leaned over to
chairperson David McLean.
McLean and administration
president George Pedersen conferred briefly, and decided it was wiser
to address the assembled protestors
than risk an occupation of the
meeting room with half a dozen
camera crews present to record the
event.
They briefly addressed the
gathering outside, but neither of
them offered any real hope to the
anxious students.
"Public meetings are not realistic
— work through your representatives," said Pedersen.
"Jam tart!" an angry student
screamed at Pedersen as the two fled back into the building.
Student board representative
Margaret Copping was asked to
present a list of demands to the
board of governors, including a request that the board freeze tuition
fees until members of the campus
community are given an adequate
opportunity to present their case
(the final decision on the setting of
fee levels is made during an in-
camera session).
Copping was also asked to present a petition signed by 6,512
students demanding that fee hikes
not exceed the level of inflation.
Despite the grave threat to the
quality and accessibility of education at UBC 27,000 students failed
to show up at the rally organized by
Neil Lucente photos
students against the budget.
Jon Gareau, a fourth year science
student who marched in the funeral
procession, said it was unfortunate
that the campus was so apathetic.
"I can finance my way but 1 feel
that many people with intelligence
and the ability would not make it,"
he said.
"I guess individuals are scared to
shout out, some are simply not concerned about others."
"Students just don't give a shit,"
said a second year arts student who
supported the protest but who
wouldn't join the funeral procession as it marched to the rhythm of
a bell and a drum.
But some people were not only-
concerned about numbers.
"Getting rid of fees altogether
doesn't even seem to be on the
agenda anymore," said Resnick at a
pre-march rally on the SUB plaza.
The commercial media could not
help but notice the abysmal tour-
nout. As the procession wound its
way down East Mall towards the
old administration building, a TV
camera crew was taking a close-up
shot of a storm drain at the roadside — an apt metaphor for the
direction education in this province
is heading. Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, January 20, 1984
Candidates talk, students walk
By PATTI FLATHER
While students rallied to protest
the board of governors' decision to
increase tuition fees, Alma Mater
Society candidates barely mentioned UBC's financial crisis at an all-
candidate's meeting Thursday. But
the march was announced by
presidential candidate Margaret
Copping, who spoke first.
"I'm going to keep my talk really
short. I personally encourage you to
be on the march," she said.
Vice-presidential candidate Doug
Low dealt directly with the financial
crisis. "Hell, we might not even be
here if things keep happening the
way they are," he said.
Duncan Stewart, external affairs
coordinator candidate, said tuition
fee increases, and declining student
aid are issues which must be addressed.
"The quality of a degree will be
lessened because of the things the
government   is   doing."
Stewart also supports disarmament and the current campaign
against military research at UBC.
Peter Nishihama, another presidential candidate, briefly discussed his
main concerns of daycare, housing,
accessibility, and cutbacks, but
spent several minutes listing every
organization he was ever affiliated
with.
Director of finance hopeful
James Hollis, director of administration candidate Glenna
Chestnutt, and vice-presidential
runner Peter Roosen had little to
say about UBC's financial crisis.
Hollis, who has served twice in the
position he is running for, focused
on his experience managing AMS
finances.
Hollis' competitors, Doug
Dowdswell and Frank Frigon, were
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not present.
Chestnutt's talk was brief, and
focused on her qualifications as a
former member of the student administrative commission.
Ian Weniger, Chestnutt's co-
runner, and vice-presidential candidate Barbara Waldern, went to
the march instead of the meeting.
Vice-presidential candidate Peter
Roosen was a sharp contrast to
Low. Roosen said he was concerned
about issues but did not think they
were relevant to the job.
Joke presidential candidate Sean
Williams vowed, with beer and
cigarette in hand, "I bring you terror and death squads."
GAYS AND LESBIANS AT U.B.C.
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"DISCOVERING SUPPORT IN
YOURSELF AND OTHERS"
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Providing a context to explore issues affecting self esteem
and self confidence: relationships, effective communication, intimacy, rejection, loneliness, "coming out", belonging, lifestyles, etc.
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION,
CALL 224-0945
(Leave message for Randy)
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
THE CECIL H. AND IDA GREEN
VISITING PROFESSORSHIPS
1984 SPRING LECTURES
WANG GUNGWU
Professor Wang Gungwu is a leading authority in the fields of Chinese studies, Southeast
Asian studies and China-Southeast Asian relations. He taught at the University of Kuala
Lumpur before joining the Australian National University in 1968 as a professor of far
eastern history, and director of the university's Research School of Pacific Studies. He is a
past president of the Australian Association of Asian Studies. Among his publications China
and the World Since 1949 is a widely-used text. Professor Wang travels and lectures broadly.
Friday, January 20, 1984 — 12:30-2:00 p.m.
EDUCATING THE CHINESE IN SOUTHEAST ASIA:
Formation of Ethnic Identity
In Seminar Room 604 of the Asian Centre
Monday, January 23, 1984 — 12:30 p.m.
EXTERNAL CHINA:
Some Reflections on Recent Chinese Policies
In Room A-100 of the Buchanan Building
Tuesday, January 24, 1984 — 12:30 p.m.
SOME HISTORICAL REFLECTIONS ON
REVOLUTION IN CHINA
In Room A-100 of the Buchanan Building
TAKE ACTION 0
OVER
DRINKING
/ like the taste of a cold beer on a hot day,
but I certainly don't tivnk you have to get tlie gang
together with a couple of cases of beer just to celebrate
the fact you've had
a bit of exercise"
Canada
I* Friday, January 20, 1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Geers' parents to receive letters
By MURIEL DRAAISMA
The engineering undergraduate
society is planning conciliatory
moves towards the provincial
government for more applied
science funding.
Neil Smith, EUS vice-president
academic, told student council
Wednesday the EUS will mail letters of concern to parents of
engineering students and professional engineers. The letters explain
the effects of underfunding on
UBC's engineering program and
urge those involved to voice concerns to the Social Credit government.
The letters will grab the attention
of parents and professionals
because they convey the fact that
accreditation of UBC engineering
graduates will be threatened if the
program deteriorates further, Smith
said.
The EUS wants the government,
in cooperation with the Association
of Professional Engineers in B.C.,
to review reports about the funding
problem, said Smith.
The government has indicated it
may cut UBC's budget for engineering from $8.6 million to $8.1
million, he added. The EUS is concerned   about   this   because   some
students wishing to enrol in the program may encounter difficulty and
the province may have to import
professional engineers instead.
Council decided to give the EUS
$450 for postage of the letters, in
the hope that other faculties will
write and send similar ones.
*    «    *
In other money matters, council
passed a motion directing Charles
Redden, Alma Mater society
general manager, to investigate the
possibility of forming an AMS
owned and operated credit union.
Council Briefs
Unhappy with the Bank of Montreal's decision not to process student loans on campus, many council members felt the AMS could
provide this service to UBC
students.
"1 envision this as a service for
students, not necessarily to make
money," said recently re-elected
student board representative Dave
Frank.
"But credit unions can make
money, even if they're student
run," said commerce representative
Christine Ong, as council members
snickered at the thought of yet
another AMS money-making
scheme.
Alan Pinkney, AMS director of
administration said: "This is one
step towards the Chartered Bank of
the AMS . . ."
»    *    *
Although petition organizers of
the campaign to halt military
research on campus failed to hand
in their signatures to the AMS on
Institution cheats
By ROBERT BEYNON
Vancouver welfare recipients are
being cheated by a local financial
institution, charges a local coalition.
Legislation should be enacted by
both the federal and provincial
governments to prohibit the practice of levying charges for cashing
social assistance cheques at Money
Mart, the Vancouver Unemployment Action Centre says.
The centre, assisted by other local
groups, has written both provincial
human resources minister Grace
McCarthy and the federal minister
of employment and immigration
demanding change.
Centre spokesperson Peter Royce
said Thursday the letters, which he
hopes will be followed by more action, were sent because Money Mart
charges people more to cash social
assistance cheques than to cash
payroll cheques.
"After   an   initial   transaction,
to cash additional paycheques, but
six percent to cash additional social
assistance or Unemployment Insurance cheques," Royce said.
These people are easy prey for
such discrimination because they
have difficulty cashing cheques at
banks and credit unions, he added.
"We think they're actually directing themselves at poor people,"
Royce said.
But John Telford, manager of
the East Broadway Money Mart,
denied these charges.
"We don't discriminate.
Whenever a cheque comes from any
government it takes so long to get
payment on it that it holds up other
money of ours," said Telford.
The problem stems from government inefficiency, he claimed.
Human resources ministry
spokesperson Elizabeth Bonner said
she has seen the centre's letter, but
she doubted a reply would be sent
for approximately four weeks due
Money Mart charges three per cent    to work overload.
Disarmament pacts
need more thought
The chemistry is missing from
current disarmament negotiations,
a UBC zoology professor said
Thursday.
Future disarmament treaties will
be profoundly affected by today's
controversy over alleged Soviet use
of poisonous gas in Afghanistan
and alleged Vietnamese biological
warfare in Laos and Cambodia,
said Dr. H. E. Kasinsky.
"If the U.S. and Russia cannot
agree to work out a chemical warfare convention, then it will be that
much harder for the cause of
nuclear disarmament," Kasinsky
said.
The intellectual dynamics in
nuclear weaponry are repeated in
chemical and biological weapons,
he said. Research and development
in both areas are made under the
guise of defensive measures —
"nobody makes war, everybody
makes defense," said Kasinsky.
"If the 1972 convention banning
the use and development of
biological weapons has been
violated then we cannot put our
trust in it," he said. "If the alleged
use of gas by the Soviets in
Afghanistan is true, then it is a
violation of the 1925 Geneva Pro
tocol, the longest disarmament treaty still in effect. The question then
arises: how can we trust these
treaties or make further treaties?"
The problem with treaties is they
leave many areas untouched, said
Kasinsky. The Geneva Protocol
called for no first use of weapons,
but not for the halting of their
development and production, he
added.
The U.S. developed the binary
weapon, which mixes two separate
chemicals in mid-flight to form
nerve gas, Kasinsky said. "It is a
technical way of getting around the
(Geneva) convention," he said.
"Treaties put in place often lead to
technical advances.
"Treaties are not the end of the
problem. It just makes it easier to
shame countries and get them to
live up to their committments.
Nobody wants to be seen badly in
world opinion."
Kasinsky advocated support for
the Canadian government's attempt
to persuade the world superpowers
to adopt a chemical warfare treaty.
While it is a two-track policy to get
"armament going and then
negotiate, it would be wise to support it and have a treaty in place,"
he said.
time, council voted almost
unanimously to allow a referendum
on the issue during the AMS general
election.
According to the AMS by-laws
the AMS must advertise referen-
dums at least seven days in advance.
AMS vice-president Rene Comesotti said legally this referendum
should only be held on the last day
of the election because council was
unable  to   place   an   ad   in  The
Ubyssey until today's issue. AMS
general elections take place Jan. 25
to 27.
The petition calls for an end to all
military research on campus that
promotes chemical, biological and
space warfare. It demands public
disclosure of the funding and
nature of UBC research projects
and the establishment of an ethics
committee to evaluate and approve
all UBC research.
LASER BEAM developed through military research at UBC zaps torso off unidentified KGB agent. Vapourized
head and shoulders recondensed as involuntarily formed sculpture next to newly orphaned left foot. Later legs
walked off and joined circus. They appeared in a cameo shot in Charlie's Angles.
Selkirk board condemns closure
By STEPHEN WISENTHAL
Selkirk College's board in
Castlegar voted Tuesday to support
opposition to the closure of David
Thompson University Centre in
nearby Nelson.
"We are elated," said DTUC student council president Gary Shaw.
"It is an indication that the
(Selkirk) board's primary concern is
for the students," he said.
The board's request that the provincial government rescind its decision to close the center boosted
DTUC student morale, said Shaw.
The motion requested the board
to send telegrams and letters to
premier Bill Bennett, education
minister Jack Heinrich and universities minister Pat McGeer.
It cited the economic problems
which would be caused by the
closure. With 500 students and 100
faculty and staff, DTUC is currently the second largest employer in
Nelson.
Possible legal implications of
repealing the Notre Dame University Act were also indicated by the
motion.
"When the provincial government closed down Notre Dame
University in 1977 they said (in the
NDU Act) the Nelson campus of
NDU would be available as a facility for post-secondary education
under the name of David Thompson University Centre," said Tom
Wayman, a spokesperson for
organizers against the closure.
At the time, the government
agreed to the concept of third and
fourth year programs at Nelson,
implying they intended to keep
DTUC as a four year University, he
said.
"There is still a NDU board and
they are raising funds for a legal
challenge to the shutting down of
DTUC," said Wayman.
Dick Melville, information services director for the education
ministry, said the government
wasn't affected by the protest motion.
"The plans at the present time
are to go ahead with the closure as
announced."
DTUC   faculty   member   Mark
Mealing said in a presentation to
the board meeting that cabinet decisions are not irreversible.
He pointed to the Dec. 28 closure
of the Justice Institute of B.C.
which was rescinded three days
later. He also referred to the bailout
of Whistler when $8 million was
spent for the ski resort.
Members of the DTUC arts
faculty have asked the wide range
of writers, artists, musicians and actors who have performed or taught
at DTUC since 1979 to write to Bill
Bennett on behalf of the centre.
The writers include Margaret At-
wood and 13 recipients of the
governor general's award. Artist
Jack Shadbolt is one of the others,
he said.
The text of the petition against
the closure concludes that "in
September 1983 the government
said that David Thompson University Centre was a viable institution
and should continue. We the undersigned hold the premier to this
statement and ask him to continue
funding DTUC." Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, January 20, 1984
Our reps?
The whole thing is a cruel joke.
As candidates scramble around with oh-so-serious looks on their faces,
making campaign speeches, putting up loud posters, and generally getting
all ruffled like roosters in mating season, students should keep in mind that
as important as the titles of AMS president, vice-president, or finance
director sound, they no longer are.
Only seven per cent of eligible voters at UBC take the time to cast a
ballot and with such low turn-outs how can any candidate claim to represent UBC students.
Many people on campus are now asking: why do students no longer
care about campus politics? And more importantly, why do so many
students feel alienated from their own student society?
That problem has a long history with one main theme — the AMS's
primary functions have switched from providing the students with services, to providing a network for a few eager politicos to enjoy positions of
apparent importance. Eventually the AMS will turn the Student Union
Building into the Blanca Mall.
We are not saying everyone who runs for AMS positions is hopeless, but
only suggest that as students have become disillusioned with the AMS and
expressed this by refusing to vote, the society has become weaker and
open to the selfish ambitions of inferior representatives.
One does not have to dredge very deep in the channel of political mud to
see that most candidates themselves do not take the AMS structure
seriously. UBC's student politicians are half hearted, ignorant, and
disinterested — let's face it.
At the all-candidates meeting in SUB Thursday, eight of 15 candidates
showed up. Some of the others understandably went to the funeral march
and tuition fee increase protest instead. The fact that the AMS scheduled
the meeting during an important student protest illustrates how out of
touch with students and issues it is.
Some candidates blathered on about wanting to help students and
listening to their concerns. Accessibility seemed to be a popular buzz
word. Why didn't they ignore the meeting and do something useful, like
joining the march? Ambition seems again to be the answer.
Students don't need a long diatribe on the merits (or lack) of student
politicians. What should change is the AMS's structure because it is clearly
open to individual power mongering.
The AMS must become decentralized and allow more people to become
involved.
If as a group students were to recognize we have more in common than
we realize and worked together to solve our collective problems, we could
build a climate of cooperation on campu= where people would feel less
alienated. This sort of an arrangement would give students a stronger
voice. It is worth considering.
Letters
Apathy 'depressing'
There is a petition circulating the
campus against unnecessary tuition
fee hikes. One would think that this
would prove to be a popular petition to sign. It seems not.
Today's apathic student can no
longer sign their name and student
number in their self interest. You
would think it was their death warrant or something important like
that. Granted it was very
fashionable in the '60's to make
grand proposals, sign anything and
everything and be generally defiant.
With hindsight, the '80s student is
so much more sophisticated. It is
easily recognizable that it is now
very fashionable not to care; but
they want to double tuition in three
years and the student body apparently has nothing to say about it.
Very impressive.
Silence is agreement. The people
running the administration can
count on the student body. The
students have given them the ticket
to do whatever they please to their
advantage because they can count
on the students not to take an active
interest. By not saying anything, the
powers to be will take it as a yes.
Let's see, what's a common excuse? It won't do any good. Well,
to use an old cliche, "Nothing
comes of nothing." Many students
may retort that the administration
has no other choices. They have
other choices. (If you want to know
them, take an active interest and go
to the AMS office and ask.) Well,
why don't they use them? Because
it's natural to take the path of least
resistance and there is no
measureable resistance in this student community.
I respect any student who makes
an effort to look at the issues and
makes a decision based on those
issues, but what frustrates me the
most are the students who will not
take the time to even concern
themselves with the issues that have
a direct influence on them or those
who side step them because they are
afraid of the consequences if they
get involved.
Joan Fields
arts 1
THE UBYSSEY
January 20, 1984
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Fridays throughout the
academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of British
Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and are not
necessarily those of the university administration or the AMS.
Member Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey's editorial office is
SUB 241k. Editorial department, 228-2301/2305. Advertising
228-3977/3978.
"Bruise the state and nibble on the richlll" proclaimed Muriel Draaisma and Stephen Wisenthal upon
entering the pearly gates at 241K." "Here come the wishy washy liberals," chorused Brian Jones and
Neil Lucente staring aimlessly their own ways. "Better a liberal than a dogmatist," yelled Robert Beynon at Doug Schmidt and Sarah Cox, the only people in the whole world to know the true meaning of
"radical chic." With that Victor Wong sweated over another sexist ad and Gordon Clark pondered (yet
again) the outcome of future elections. Jack Tieleman, Holly Nathan and Patti Flather worried about
Thor Anderson's drinking problem (the beer was gone) as Corinna Sundararajan stared at Charlie
Fidelman who looked funny. Peter Berlin, everybody's favorite Brit on the staff, commented on everyone's writing. And lovesick Chris Wong, liberal backbencher again asked himself, "Does he really love
Becky?"
^JJiouqkt± on  tuition.  Lnczeaizi jxom  ths boaxa. of gousxnozs:
What's a million,
right pal?
I navar thought
about It at all
Letters
Researchers reveal nuclear
and military projects
Petitions are circulating on campus to stop military research at
UBC, and a number of letters and
articles on the subject have appeared in The Ubyssey.
About 2,000 research projects
have been funded at UBC since
April 1983. Of those, twelve are
from military agencies or the
nuclear industry. The names of the
twelve projects are:
• modelling of structural response
to air blast
(Department    of    National
Defence),
• dynamic    stability    of    low
length/breadth ratio ships
(Department    of   National
Defence: DREA),
• multi-ship XBT surveys
(Department    of   National
Defence),
• subsurface temperature inversions in the North Pacific, their
mean distribution, seasonal
variations and areas of origin
(US Navy: Office of Naval
Research),
• thermodynamic data required
for the assessment of nuclear
fuel waste disposal in a vault in a
granitic pluton
(Atomic    Energy   of    Canada
Ltd.),
graded    composition    joint
technology
(Department    of    National
Defence),
electronically excited molecular
oxygen
(US Air Force),
ocean microstructure acceleration
(US Navy: Office of Naval
Research),
laser profilometry in the evaluation   of   terrain    for   mobility
modelling purposes
(Department    of   National
Defence),
A continuum model for flow
and transport in fractured
porous media
(Atomic Energy of Canada
Ltd.),
Design and feasibility of rotary
desalination units
(Department    of    National
Defence),
International
strategic studies
(Department
Defence),
security   and
of    National
Many of ihese titles are hardly
what would conventionally be considered military research. For example, the study of subsurface
temperature inversions in the North
Pacific is of interest to the U.S.
Navy, but the research results
would be valuable also to many
other agencies, including those interested in the weather.
The university's policy is to reject
all secret research. The Faculty
Handbook specifically states,
"university facilities may not be used for classified research." A condition of all research taking place
on campus is that the researcher is
free to publish the results.
The findings of the twelve projects listed above will become public
knowledge, available to anyone
who cares to read the literature.
Moreover, details of research projects and funding sources, and of
UBC policies on research, are
always available from the Office of
Research Services.
P. A. l.arkin
associate vice president, research
R. D. Spratley
office of research services director
Poor candidates cause low turnout
I am getting sick and tired of being told that I am apathetic when it
comes to voting for student
representatives. Has anyone ever
thought that the problem might not
be the voting students themselves
but the student representatives?
All I ever see around campus are
ineffective posters with the reps
name, picture and position for
which he or she is running. So
what? Anyone can print up a
poster, but few people are willing to
stand up and speak publicly about
their views.
The people running for these
positions are supposed to be leaders
and decision-makers. If they (the
reps) think that I am going to vote
for just a smile and a name, then
they can think again. The students
at UBC are docile and in need of
leadership; like sheep, they need to
be provoked into action instead of
being left alone to roam the halls
staring blankly at useless campaign
posters.
Where are the lunch-time rallies?
Where are the open forums? Where
are the debates? Where is there excitement and interest in what's going on? Voting for something at
UBC is like getting a tooth pulled;
not only is it an effort, it is also
painful.
Next think I'll hear said is that
the reps don't have the time for
these things. If that's the case, then
they won't have the time to do a
good job even if they do get elected.
If you want us to vote, get off of
your asses and give us something to
vote for besides a poster! You say
that's not the issue. That there are
real social issues involved like fees.
You say that it's the cause that
counts and not the fanfare. Open
your eyes! You can't change the
world until you get people's attention. Generate some excitement, get
students involved in rallies, give
some speeches and then when
you've got people's attention tell
them the real issues at hand.
So stop blaming the so called
"apathetic students" and get some
proper reps that know how to move
the people into action. Without
proper representation, there is nc
true action. Without propei
representation, there is no true
justice.
Mark Fenton
sociology 2
Student agrees with Ubyssey
In response to your plea in the
Jan. 13 editorial, I must say that I
agree; you do seem to need help. I
was somewhat surprised by simple
errors in earlier issues, such as seeing CITR referred to as the other
media on campus.
This issue floors me. On page one
I am told that almost half of the
population of Japan (40 percent) is
currently attending post-secondary
institutions (New students to be
denied . . . )    After    making    an
allowance for a similar percentage
of children and secondary school
students one wonders how they
manage to build all those Toyotas.
Turning to page 3 (Thefts may
raise . . . ) I find that only one student has been executed for stealing
a sandwich. And this in the country
the world perceives to have the most
freedom.
Yes, I agree, you need help.
Kevin Caskey
grad studies Friday, January 20, 1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Letters
Socreds apply metaphor of magic
In a recent fifth year education
class, at UBC, my classmates and I
were given a handout to read, which
briefly detailed a number of
metaphors for curriculum design,
and subsequently requested to individually create a metaphor that
would reflect our personal views or
philosophy about curriculum
design. The handout presented four
metaphors for curriculum design:
"The Metaphor of Production —
the student will grow and develop;
The Metaphor of Travel — a route
over which the students will travel;
and "The Metaphor of Process —
the process or means through which
the students encounters the world.''
Having read the handout, I formulated the following metaphor for
curriculum design.
The Metaphor of Magic.
The curriculum in its present
form, can only be considered a
magic   show.   A   show   in   which
teachers who are receiving increased
work loads and decreased monetary
benefits (including diminished job
security), must mystically produce,
not out of a hat, but instead out of
a classroom, students who are ready
to take their place in a society which
hasn't a place for them. Nevertheless, the government is still considering the feasibility of replacing
classrooms with hats in much the
same way an old lady with many
children replaced a house with a
shoe. It is unlikely, however, that a
classroom could ever be replaced by
a shoe since, as everyone surely
knows, with the exception of the
government's new education policy,
absolutely nothing smells worse
than an old shoe.
Magnanimously, our government
has enabled the teaching profession
to make the trick of educating the
next generation even more spectacular  with  the  introduction  of
Consider daycare costs
Regarding the proposed new
daycare facility, may I add a relevant comment. The present
facilities at UBC are operated as
parent co-operatives. The costs to
parents in terms of money and time
are (for a child 18 months to 3
years):
• $440 per month (maximum subsidy $303),
• 2 hours duty time per week during operating hours, or cost of a
substitute at $6 an hour,
• cleaning the daycare one evening per month,
• mandatory attendance of monthly meetings,
• one of a variety of administrative duties.
In daycares off-campus, the cost
is approximately $380 per month,
with no parent duties.
The result is that few full-time
students can afford the money and
time required for present UBC
daycare. UBC faculty and staff,
and parents employed off-campus
can easier afford to keep their
children at UBC.
My point is that students are
financing a new facility, and is it intended for their children? If it is,
then considerations of economic
viability for students must be considered. What is the purpose in
spending a huge amount of money
on wonderful, new facilities if the
present cost and administration
form is grossly inappropriate for
those student and/or parents who
need the local care the most? Subsidised care and a private mode of
administration would be more effective avenues for Alma Mater
Society student funding and involvement.
Dorte Pittaway
education 5
enormous cutbacks in education
budgets and the reintroduction of
expensive provincial examinations
which serve no recognizable purpose other than to score political
points with the public. Therefore, it
is imperative that the metaphorical
roots of a curriculum design include
a healthy helping of hocuspocus
and an abundance of abracadabras.
Tracey Hallam
education S
FILM
THE GOD MAKERS
THE MORMOM QUEST
FOR GODHOOD
Followed by discussion.
ANGUS 104
January 27th
at 7:30 p.m.
MARANATHA
CHRISTIAN CLUB
NOTICE OF REFERENDUM
Referendum to be held Wednesday, January 25th
to Friday, January 27th.
The question to be placed to all students is:
"That the A.M.S. request the U.B.C. administration to introduce
the following measures:
1) An unequivocal ban on campus research which is
directly applicable to conducting nuclear, biological,
chemical, or outer space warfare.
2) Full public disclosure of the sources of funding and the
nature of all research projects connected with the
University.
3) Establishment of an ethics committee to evaluate and
approve all research conducted at U.B.C. with the
potential mlitary aplications as an essential part of
the criteria for screening proposed research."
YES    □ NO    □
POLLS 10 A.M. - 4 P.M.
ANGUS
BUCHANAN
CEME
CPSC
HEBB THEATRE
LAW
MACLEOD
MACMILLAN
SCARFE
SEDGEWICK LIBRARY
SUB
WAR MEMORIAL GYM
WOODWARD LIBRARY
Poll locations and times subject to the availability of Poll Clerks.
lu
The Society of Management Accountants of
British Columbia Congratulates
University of British Columbia Graduates
who earned the professional designation R.I.A. on completion ot the presc ribed
c nurse of studies and prac lie al experieni e during I'W i.
Lac h R.I.A. is a specialist trained to develop, select, analvse and interim t qu mutative
and other information essential to know ledgeable planning, i ont roll 11:4 'epniting .11
management ot information and other assets.
Douglas Sidney Eield
B.Comm., R.I.A.
Donald Cameron
Niquidet, B.A., R.I.A.
|ohn Edwin Hanbury,
B.Comm., R.I.A.
Randolph Hoist,
B.A., R.I.A.
Leo Hung F-ac I ok,
B ( omm    R I A
jushn Chun Jew Mah,
M A , R I A
Stephen O. Mavety,
B.Comm., R.I.A.
Douglas B   Pontile*,
B.C omm., R.I.A.
Alan Oeorge Saville,
B.C omm., R.I.A.
Albert M.C.Tam,
B.Comm., R.I.A.
frier W   tamilin
II  \   Si    \1 B \
P. EnS.  R.I.A.
H. Kendall turner,
B.Ed , Dipt T., R.I.A.
James Wing Kee Wong,
B.Comm., R.I.A.
Not Pic tiitcd <irt>: Maria Krystyna Hession, M.Ec, R.I.A.; Thomas Martinson, M.B.A., R.I.A.; Alan Lawrence Osborne, B.Comm., R.I.A.;
Henry Y. Tanaka, B.Comm., R.I.A.; Donald G. Walzak, B.A., R.I.A.; David Michael Whitlock, B.Comm., R.I.A. Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, January 20, 1984
Letters
Geers to
get Black
plague?
To the editors and publishers of
The Black Plague:
Hey — you guys are swell. You
really know how to have fun. I liked
the way you socked it to all those
bleeding heart liberals. You are well
aware of the fact that the basic problem in our society is all those
useless humanists. What parasites
they are! I am so glad you let them
have it. Kube, Andre the hunger
striker — who needs them anyway!
What we really need is some good
tough guys like yourselves who will
let those jerks have it.
Now to my point — I know of
some guys you'll just have to get
together with! They call themselves
the UBC engineers, and they're just
like you! You have so much in common! You are not alone! Isn't that
great!? These UBC engineers really
hate useless human rights issues also
(one of them had a good idea — he
threw a candy bar to Andre! Ha Ha
Ha!). They also understand how
important it is to be big, strong,
macho and very right wing. UBC
engineers really get things done.
And the fun they have! They have
great parties where they drink 40
beer! They hate women's rights
issues too. Every year they have this
swell party they call the 'Lady
Godiva ride', where they hire a
drunk prostitute to ride nude on a
horse — and guess what!! —
nobody even stops them! The administration at UBC lets them have
a great old time, and as long as they
are in a group, UBC engineers can
be just as obnoxious and sexist and
dirty and perverted as they want!
The old boys are really together out
there in engineering.
Anyway you should really get
together with the UBC engineers.
They are easy to find — they all
wear these real neat red jackets so
you can spot them quickly. Just
think — you could sing a few songs,
drink a few dozen beer, or
whatever. With your writing talent
and with the engineer's unquestioned ability to organize — you could
easily put together another Red Rag
or two, and really let those women's
libbers have it! By the way — if you
want to read some terrific literature
I've been saving up for a few
decades, just send me a note!
Take it easy, your buddy and pal
forever,
Adolf Hitler
society for the preservation
of hate and sexism
the twilight zone
postal code R-A-C-I-S-T
Staff note: The author of this letter
is  Michael.   His   last   name   was
withheld on request.
Time for one
more question
Paraphrasing Pastor Bonhoeffer:
When foreign student fees were
raised I didn't question it. I'm not a
foreign student.
When the groundskeepers were
laid off, I didn't complain. I'm not
a groundskeeper.
When secretarial services were
cut back, I didn't resist. I'm not a
secretary.
When teaching assistants were
threatened, I didn't object. I'm not
a T.A.
So when they came for me, there
was no one left to object.
Perhaps it is time at least to ask a
few questions.
S.F. Foster
education faculh
GETA
ON TRAVELCOSTS.
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Winter is a slow period. Particularly
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PRI8400 Friday, January 20, 1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
Money man seeks record fourth term
Special to The Ubyssey
Three years at the helm of
Canada's second largest student
society is not enough for James
Hollis.
Hollis is running for an unprecedented fourth term as an Alma
Mater Society executive member —
his third as finance director.
For the past two years, Hollis has
overseen the AMS's multi-million
dollar budget as the AMS's most
powerful executive member. But in
doing so, he provoked severe
criticism from several campus
groups.
ANALYSIS
AMS revenues have grown during his term to the point where the
$12.50 per student AMS fee
represents less than 40 per cent of
the society's revenue. Hollis' additional revenue sources include the
Pit, where the profit this year will
be just short of $100,000, and SUB
films, which had to pay $5,000 to
the AMS. This resulted in a film admission increase of 50 cents.
Members of campus groups
charge that Hollis does not care
about their opinions, and often bypasses normal democratic channels.
And while student council members
sometimes   spent   time   debating
GRADUATION
PORTRAITS
by
Phone   now   for   your   complimentary sitting, choose from
18 previews I proofs)
732-7446
3343 WEST BROADWA Y
Resume photos as low as 75c in
colour.
UBC FREDERIC
WOOD THEATRE
HELD OVER TO
MON., JAN. 23rd
and
TUES., JAN. 24th
THE IMPORTANCE
OF BEING
EARNEST
By Oscar Wilde
Directed by John Brockington
JANUARY 13-21
Curtain 8:00 p.m.
Thursday Matinee
January 19 — 12:30 p.m.
STUDENT TICKETS
$4.50
Box Office      Frederic Wood Theatre      Rm 207
which faculty would bring the
donuts to the next council meeting,
Hollis often helped spend
thousands of dollars without council input.
For example, the 1979 student
council debated purchasing a computer for office accounting, but this
years' council did not even discuss
spending thousands of dollars on an
improved printer. Nor did they
discuss spending $15,000 to purchase a word processor, or purchasing the faulty satellite dish on
SUB's roof. Hollis went ahead and
bought them.
The AMS finance director is
responsible for drawing up the
society's annual budget, and
distributing about $700,000 for
society expenses and campus
groups. Hollis sometimes gave his
favorite groups — often those he is
personally involved in — hefty
allocations.
The aquatic society and the Video
club — both of which Hollis is actively involved in — received grants
specifically included in the AMS
budget. Student council would have
had to defeat the entire budget to
remove those grants — so they passed. And to make things more convenient, Hollis served as Aqua
Soc's treasurer when he was also
AMS finance director.
Running in 1982 against current
presidential candidate Margaret
Copping for the position, Hollis
said he felt the need for "well
rounded expertise in this position."
He said he was in favor of dropping
a recently imposed AMS fee levy
for SUB films . "The money could
be made up by more efficiency in
other business." When elected,
Hollis removed the fee and implemented his own higher one.
Hollis "railroaded" the SUB
film increase as well as a massive
restructuring of The Ubyssey's
budget according to both groups.
The AMS budget committee, which
must pass budget amendments
before they are brought to council,
met the day before a council
meeting. Representatives from The
Ubyssey and Filmsoc were not invited. At the council meeting,
amendment proposals still hot from
the photocopier were distributed
and passed. Before the groups
realized it, the AMS changed their
budgets.
Meanwhile, the AMS doubled
the budget of the campus radio station CITR, on whose board of
directors Hollis has been a member.
Hollis' attitude to campus unions
is also questionable.
"The (university) administration's union smashing tactics are
one/     6{e 	
the $*"
N
besides
N
unconscionable," Hollis said during a 1982 teaching assistants dispute. Last year, Hollis took decisive
steps to prevent certain AMS employees from joining a union, and
walked out of an office union negotiating meeting, saying there was
not enough "yelling back and forth
to make it interesting."
Despite popular belief, the volunteer job does in fact pay quite well.
This summer he received $1,700 per
month. And during the school year,
the AMS pays for all of his tuition.
CONCORDIA
UNIVERSITY
Concordia University Graduate Fellowships
Master's level $6500 Doctoral level $7500
David J. Azrieli Graduate Fellowship $8000
application deadline: February 1, 1984
announcement of winners: April 1, 1984
commencement ot tenure. September 1984 or
January 1985
For details and application forms, contact the Graduate Awards
Officer. S-202, Concordia University. 1455 de Maisonneuve B^vd  W
Montreal. Quebec. H3G 1M8. Tel.: (514) 879-7317.
Last year, Hollis ran alone, polling 65 per cent support against the
word "No." But this year he
managed to alienate more campus
groups and students. This time,
with opponents, Hollis may be running for his political life.
This analysis is by a former Ubyssey staffer and AMS executive
member who wishes to remain
anonymous. It does not necessarily
reflect the opinions of other Ubyssey staffers or of the paper.
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COURSES BEGIN THE
WEEK OF JANUARY 23rd
PHONE 222-5245
Centre for Continuing Education
FOR THEATRE INFORMATION CALL 687-1515
(jSm^SB^^
918 GRANVIUE
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WARNING:
Frequent gory violence and very coarse
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VOGUE: 2:15. 5 40. 9:00
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At 2 45, 4:45, 7:30, 9:45
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MICHAEL CAINE
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WARNING: Somci very coarse language; occasional
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At 7:00, 9:00
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73o    SUNDAY 2 P.M. "OTHELLO Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, J.
The AMS president coordinates the day-
to-day activities of the society, chairs student
council meetings, acts as a liaison between
council and the AMS full-time staff, and is a
non-voting member of every AMS committee. She or he sits on the Alumni
Association's board of directors*
C\a\,(Xo 'PI
David Bulman
Two other candidates for the position of
AMS president are Sean Williams, who likes
beer, and David Bulman, who enjoys playing
with numbers.
Both of these candidates are running on
the hope of maximizing on student apathy on
campus.
Williams, who is the president of the in- "
famous 40 beer club, appears the ultimate
red-neck. "My platform is terror and oppression," he says.
Williams says he is only concerned about
the fact that UBC has become too liberal.
And by quadrupling fees, increasing the participation of the military on campus, and inviting the U.S. Air Force to deploy cruise
missiles in SUB, he says he hopes to eliminate
the "riff raff" of pinkos lounging on campus.
"I'm associated with B.O.S.S., Sorko, and
the C.I.A.," he says. Seriously though, his
main purpose for running for president is to
encourage students to get involved with the
AMS elections. If Williams can draw the
1,800 engineers he says support him, his term
as Herr presidente may be only an election
away.
The other candidate, who sould be running on a slate with Williams for vice-
president, has not been able to launch an early campaign because of the flu.
Crawling to the phone yesterday he was
only able to answer a few short questions.
A self proclaimed "twit and fool," David
Thomas Bulman says he knows nothing
about the AMS, or the role of the president,
but that in itself would hardly be historic.
Bulman, says he knows the president's office is important and that he would like to
have it for naps between classes and as a
place to entertain his friends at lunch time.
He managed, even with his illness, to announce that he didn't like seeing the AMS
making money. "They should be breaking
even." And Bulman promises to lower food
costs in SUB and pour money into daycare.
Margaret Copping
If Margaret Copping wins in the upcoming
election, she expects she will have to "jump
through hoops" as AMS president.
Copping says she is concerned that the
AMS is inaccessible to students and she feels
her main responsibilities as president would
be to maintain a high profile and be open to
students' concerns.
"The real work now is to deal with the
changing problems of students in a changing
university."
A formidable figure, Copping says the important issues students must grapple with are
primarily financial.
According to one of two serious candidates
for the presidency, they are: higher tuition
fees; escalating housing costs, because the
provincial legislation has cancelled rent controls; high summer unemployment for
students between the ages of 18 and 25,
women and parents who are students;
government plans to abolish its grant program and decrease its contribution to
Canada's student aid program.
Increasing academic pressure on students is
also a major concern, says Copping.
To carry out her role as president if
elected, she says she must deal with problems
as they arise.
"There is no way to predict how things will
manifest themselves. One must be responsive."
Copping says she is also concerned the
AMS has become a money-making venture
whose profits have become more important
than student services.
My policy has always been that the AMS
should make money and spend it on
services."
Copping says the best service the AMS
could provide at UBC is a network of clubs.
On such a large campus, Copping says she
feels students must have access to smaller
groups.
"We have to be around to support each
other."
Peter Nishihama
Peter Nishihama is a slight, confident
agriculture student who professes to have lots
of energy and who introduces all his ideas
with "obviously."
A student senator and active in several
agriculture organizations, Nishihama is trying for a bigger political plum this time — the
AMS presidency.
If elected president Nishihama says he
would focus on student aid, daycare and
housing. He declined to give specifics or
elaborate on priorities.
"If we can find money in the AMS, we
could us it," he says.
Nishihama says UBC is facing some of its
toughest years ahead because of funding
shortfalls and high student unemployment.
But the provincial government is not to
blame, he says.
"Obviously, restraint is everywhere, not
just here. The government definitely does not
have a bad attitude towards post-secondary
education."
Student protests against the government
may be "dangerous" because they might
prompt it to cut more funding, he says.
"The AMS should not be an initiator. I'm
not going to lead these demonstrations," he
says. "But there's a chance I'm going to be
there."
Instead, Nishihama proposes that student
groups draw up proposals to present to the
AMS for its possible support.
And other than a few ideas offered in a
general way, Nishihama says his political
philosophy rests on the Protestant work
ethic.
"The basic work ethic — you're there for
the students."
Beyond the work ethic and the fact that
he's "definitely not a communist," Nishihama declined to describe his political leanings.
But he says if elected he will ensure the
AMS runs without any hitches.
7i.A"
Pola
car
goest
Stor
Peter Berlin
Gordon Clark
Muriel Draaisma
Photos b
The AMS general elections will be heli
Ballot boxes will be located throughout t
Wednesday, from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. in
residences.
tammim
mi
The AMS director of administration chairs
and directs the student administrative commission, which is responsible for SUB
maintenance and administers campus clubs.
The DoA sits on the management boards of
the Aquatic Centre and Thunderbird Winter
Sports Centre.
Glenna Chestnutt
Glenna Chestnutt is up the wrong tree.
Although she has experience as a member
of the student administrative commission,
she comes across as a little naive and new to
student politics.
Sean Williams
The AMS external affairs coordinator informs council of UBC's relationship with
other organizations, such as CFS, and about
government policy changes affecting students.
Bulging out his eyes and drawing in his
cheeks, Duncan Stewart makes an amusing
impersonation of Pierre Trudeau. But unlike
P.E.T. and James Hollis, the youthful
Stewart is a bright light among the ageing
politicos.
Stewart is just entering his political prime.
A second year arts student who's been UBC
debating club president, he is armed with
platforms on all the right issues.
"If I can speak for my poster," he says
while munching casually on a chocolate bar,
"I'm not opposed to tuition fee increases —
they have to happen."
He says students should be given more
notice though about increases and these
should be implemented slowly. As for student aid, an all loan program as is being
recommended by the provincial government
is completely unacceptable, he says.
"I think even the Tories would oppose
something that would decrease accessibility
by that much."
The AMS external affairs coordinator acts
as a link between UBC, other post secondary
institutions   in   B.C.   and   the   Canadian
Federation of Students, he says.
"I view UBC as an island, and the external
affairs coordinator provides the bridge."
Nancy Bradshaw
Duncan Stewart jary20,1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 9
rized
lpus
o polls
s by:
Patti Flather
Victor Wong
Chris Wong
Stuart Dee
Ian. 25, 26 and 27, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
npus. Evening polls will take place only on
dgewick library, Gage, Totem and Vanier
3»&£^&^
iSi-. %'i>>
ATION
But she is sincere, saying she wants to help
students and to become more active.
Chestnutt says she won't promote student
awareness of UBC's financial crisis or encourage students to take action on important
issues affecting them because that is not part
of the job.
But she admits that the crucial issues facing
UBC students are tuition fee increases, the
declining quality of education and the $18
million shortfall — a result of Social Credit
underfunding, she says.
"I'm concerned about these but there's not
much I can do about it as director of administration. I see these issues as a problem.
I'll see what the external affairs coordinator's
or the president's proposals about these
issues are, and the alternatives, before I
decide."
Chestnutt plans to increase student
awareness of the AMS and encourage student
participation, but her proposed methods are
a little unimaginative. She says she will erect
signs outside SUB explaining AMS services
— something she is doing as a SAC member
now — and will only take four courses next
year if elected. She proudly says she will keep
regular office hours next year too.
Current DoA Alan Pinkney is doing a
"wonderful job," she says. Pinkney recently
overspent students' money by $1,000, when
he arranged for professionals to prepare eight
graphs for a board of governors presentation. He claimed he forgot to ask the price.
Stewart promises to continue current external affairs coordinator Lisa Hebert's tradition of keeping close contact with CFS
representatives.
"I will work as closely as possible with
CFS on the referendum to join the organization next year. Personally, I believe we
should endorse CFS because united advocacy
gives students a stronger voice."
Unfortunately, Stewart's opponent —
Nancy Bradshaw — was unable to be interviewed because of a family emergency.
But with the help of a friend, Bradshaw
managed to hand in a position paper outlining her ideas for the job.
Her qualifications include work with
.several volunteer organizations, and she promises to approach the federal government
about Social Credit underfunding of universities if elected.
"I am staunchly opposed to UBC becoming inaccessible and elitist and will do
(everything to prevent this from happening."
And she says she would work personally
with students affected by any changes to
B.C.'s student aid program.
The AMS finance director draws up the
society's annual budget and manages the
cash flow. She or he monitors and assists
AMS subsidiaries with their budgets, and
often assists the AMS business office with
club and undergraduate enquiries.
*H$r -""jr*
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Doug Dosdall
F. Ian Weniger
His hair is long and wild, roughly hacked
into a mohawk. With all the sweetness of an
Ottawa born punk rocker, he says he has
never been a student politician before.
But fed up with Alma Mater Society
bureaucracy, F. Ian Weniger has decided to
give it a try. He's running for AMS director
of administration and plans to make the position more accessible to students, as well as
more political.
'' Instead of sitting on top of a bureaucratic
pyramid and handing out judgements I
would rather be someone who would help
people learn the rules than someone who says
what the rules are and wishes them good
luck."
The AMS's obsession with rules has
dampened student enthusiasm and hindered
campus activism, says Weniger.
Weniger is actively involved in Students
Against the Budget and the campaign to halt
military research on campus. He says he is
concerned about the effects of higher tuition
fees at UBC, especially their impact on accessibility.
The AMS should drum up student opinion
about cutbacks in education and develop effective channels to deal with students' concerns, he says.
"Many of my fellow students have noticed
their courses are being cut back. The amount
of course material is being decreased almost
arbitrarily. This is unacceptable — we're here
to learn something, not just to get our
credits."
The AMS could become more actively involved in protests such as those against the
government, he says. "I will support the
AMS and support actions to have the AMS
officially join protests — relevant protests,
that is."
A member of UBC's Progressive Conservative party, Doug Dosdall claims he would
represent students and not Brian Mulroney if
elected.
"But I do agree with the economic principles of conservatism," he says.
Running on a platform to combat apathy,
Dosdall says: "I think the job involves
setting the budget for the AMS and
allocating resources to clubs — which all
comes down to being able to tell everybody
else what the possibilities are.
"There's only so much money and only so
many things we can do," he insightfully
adds.
Dosdall is keen on increasing student
participation in clubs. "Students are very
apathetic. The AMS should get more people
involved. As finance director I would try to
encourage smaller clubs and having a larger
variety of them."
But he has a few suggestions for those who
are selective about their membership. "I
don't think the AMS should finance clubs
which discriminate on the grounds of race or
religion like, the Chinese Christian
Fellowship or the Gays and Lesbians of
UBC. They don't give an opportunity for
everyone to get involved," says the young
P.C.er.
But he says political parties should be exempt from this restriction because "all
political views are represented."
He says it would be a waste of monev to
have clubs for every religious belief or sexual
orientation.
"I doubt there'd be much of a need for an
atheist club."
Dosdall unabashedly says he wants the
job because he thinks it would provide "good
career experience."
Show us your chin, kid.
Frank Frigon
Frank Frigon is even older than James
Hollis, which makes him by some distance
the oldest candidate in this year's election.
A UBC student in the 60's and later a
school teacher in the Interior, Frigon once
taught current director of administration
Alan Pinkney, a fact he is rightly modest
about.
His list of political, activities is almost as
big as his ambitions — he's a member of the
NDP, the students against the budget, the environmental interest group, the peace movement and the nearest thing UBC has to a
roller derby rink — the graduate student
society.
Frigon repeatedly says the similarity between his private, academic and political lives
is the reason behind his candidacy.
"I feel I owe the university something and
my values are such that I cannot stand idly by
when I see a situation developing and a lack
of leadership.
"I see myself as a catalyst, a medium to bringing students and AMS staff together,
developing a whole concept of the university
as a community."
This remark illustrates his tendency to talk
as if he was already elected. Throughout his
interview he constantly talked of what he
"will do", instead of what he "would do."
Frigon says he clearly believes his main
strength lies in his community work experience. He claims he wants everybody to
take part in the AMS decision making process.
"It is not a question of technical leadership, because the AMS professional staff
provides that, but must involve the student
body as expressed by groups and constituencies, linking up broader issues with the Canadian Federation of Students, etc."
Frigon says he would make an effort to
stick to the priorities decided by students during the $20 fee referendum. And he says that
he would be in favor of a campus wide
referendum on disarmament.
As finance director, he says he would ensure AMS services would be provided at cost,
even if this means price reductions.
But then his opponent Hollis claims he's
already done that.
James Hollis
If James Hollis wins this election he will
enter his third consecutive term as AMS
finance director and his fourth term as a
powerful AMS official — an event unprecedented in recent memory.
For Hollis it is all part of a revised version
of his master plan.
The plan's original blueprint had him
receiving his bachelor of science in 1983 and
entering UBC's business administration
masters program the same year. But he lost a
year because of a back operation, so he's one
year behind. He says as a result his first year
as finance director was a write-off, and he
argues that this year counts as his first real
year on the job.
Hollis says he believes the AMS runs more
efficiently now because he has cleared up
much of the "waste" that existed before he
became finance director.
"But maybe that's just vanity."
Not surprisingly, Hollis is running because
of his experience. "I have an intricate
understanding of all AMS operations and
some accounting training so I can react intelligently to the numbers."
He believes his record is good, saying
repeatedly he can get maximum "leverage"
for students' dollars.
Hollis is also quite proud of his ability to
purchase items cheaply, especially electrical
equipment which he sold during his six year
sabbatical from UBC in the '70s. A good example is the satellite dish he bought for the
Pit. The fact that it has never worked properly is due to its technology and physical plant's
poor installation, he says.
Hollis adds the recent AMS office workers
strike deeply distressed him. "I found it very
difficult. We were in an adverserial relation
with people we worked with as friends every
day.
"It could be that some people on council
had an axe to grind and wanted to go union
bashing. I felt a serious responsibility to lever
the dollars as far as possible. There was no
attempt from me to damage them (the office
workers) or their organization (the union).
It's called cost control. The wages are a large
part of our yearly expense."
Hollis says as finance director he should be
a resource person for campus clubs. "I provide expertise for any project that involves
money. A lot of clubs have little idea of how
to organize their finances. I have spent a lot
of time showing them how to run a tight
ship."
-J&lO.!-  ' Page 10
Friday, January 20, 1984
The AMS vice-president chairs
the AMS budget committee, acts as
signing officer and as the liaison
between council and undergraduate
societies. She or he is responsible
for maintenance of the AMS code
of procedure.
Doug Low
Although he's not exactly a
hardened veteran of campus
politics, Doug Low is quickly learning the tricks of the campaign trail.
In his third attempt at landing a
position as a student politician, he
has shed the low profile image that
hurt his chances in last year's AMS
election.
Low has come out from under his
paper bag and is ready to take on
the job of AMS vice-president — a
job he says revolves around communication with students.
"The vice-president should be
communicating and making every
opportunity to be available to talk
about student affairs," he says.
Low says his main duty as vice-
president would be to keep students
informed on serious issues such as
government funding cutbacks and
tuition increases. He disputes any
claims that work on these issues
should be left to student board and
senate members only.
"We as students have to be conscious of the academic standings of
this university — and we have to
fight for them," says Low. "We
should be looking at making
presentations to the provincial
government," he adds.
While Low is enthusiastic about
raising student awareness, he is
hesistant about his plans for approaching the mundane, day-to-day
duties of the vice-president.
But lack of knowledge about
these duties and a low budget campaign are not stopping Low. He can
rely on his experience from serving
in administrative positions with
UBC men's athletics and student
housing — an area Low says should
be a priority in the AMS.
"There are 2,000-3,000 students
on waiting lists for housing. There
is a great need for student housing
to facilitate students from out of
town."
The tenacious Low, who claims
to have no ties to political parties,
will show just how high he can go
when the votes are counted after
next week's election. Remember
Doug, paper bags are for lunches.
Notice of A.M.S. Executive Election
Evening Polls: Wed., Jan. 25 — 4-7 p.m.
Totem Park — Common Block
Place Vanier — Common Block
Walter H. Gage — Common Block
Sedgewick Library
25th to Fri., Jan. 27th — 10 a.m.-4:00 p.m.
Day Polls: Wed., Jan
S.U.B.
Law
C.E.M.E.
Scarfe
Angus
Buchanan
Hebb Theatre
Computer Science
Sedgewick Library
Woodward Library
War Memorial Gym
MacLeod
MacMillan
Poll locations and times are subject to the availability of poll clerks.
BALLOT:
A.M.S. PRESIDENT
BULMAN, David
COPPING, Margaret
NISHIHAMA, Peter
WILLIAMS, Sean
A.M.S. DIRECTOR OF
ADMINISTRATION
CHESTNUTT, Glenna
WENIGER, F. Ian
A.M
DOSDALL, Doug
A.M.S. VICE-PRESIDENT
LOW, Doug
ROOSEN, Peter
WALDERN, Barbara
A.M.S. COORDINATOR OF
EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
BRADSHAW, Nancy
STEWART, Duncan
S. DIRECTOR OF FINANCE
FRIGON, Frank HOLLIS, James
STUDENTS REQUIRE THEIR A.M.S. CARDS TO VOTE
MOLSON MALT
When you've got
Molson Malt
you've got it all! Friday, January 20, 1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 11
Peter Roosen
Conducting an interview with Peter
Roosen over lunch is an experience not easily
forgotten.
The sight of Roosen gulping down a plateful of fries and an enormous cheeseburger,
while nervously spewing out his plans for the
job of AMS vice-president, makes for an interesting half hour.
But in between chomps, swallows and the
occasional burp, Roosen manages to make
some astute comments about the AMS and
the position he is hoping to win.
The vice-president's role is mainly service
oriented, says Roosen. Some services he considers important for students include the
AMS bookstore, organizing an activities calendar and compiling a student directory.
But more importantly, the vice-president
must work as a liaison between council and
the constituencies, he says.
Roosen says he is disturbed by the AMS'
growing obsession with business. More
money is turning the AMS into a business rather than a student organization, he says.
If elected vice-president, Roosen says he
would use constituency support to ensure the
interests of clubs and constituencies are not
lost in AMS money-making schemes.
"It's the role of the vice-president to ensure constituencies and clubs have good input
in what's going on," he says.
Tight budget monitoring will be necessary
to stop any attempts by those in positions of
financial power to bypass council, says
Roosen.
Experience may be the key for his success
in these endeavors. Roosen feels his time
spent with the infamous science undergraduate society gives him the necessary qualifications.
Barbara Waldern
Barbara Waldern put her megaphone aside
and began an interview in The Ubyssey's
cluttered surroundings. Sitting next to walls
covered with sayings such as "Long live the
glorious cockroach revolution," Waldern expressed her opinion of the AMS.
"The AMS as it is now tends to act in interests compatible to the university — which
are in the interests of the rich," she says.
Waldern sees contradictions with this ac
tion and she inteilHs to fight for a change in
attitude if elected vice-president.
Waldern said social issues should be examined — such as militarism, anti-
democracy and the future of youth. "I will
work towards raising the consciousness of
students, particularly politically.
She says she is also well aware of the vice-
president's duties which include keeping
regular contact with constituencies in
developing beneficial services and programs.
Waldern admits she has no executive experience to help her fulfill these duties, but
she cites her experience with students against
the budget and other organizations as good
background for the job.
"I have been very active on student issues
since my arrival here."
She has also been active in politics —
specifically with the Communist Party of
Canada (Marxist-Leninist).
"It's generally known on campus that I'm
a supporter of the CPC-ML.
In her role as vice-president, Waldern said
some Marxist-Leninist principles could be applicable to the job.
Waldern adds she is ready to get involved
in heated debates that occasionally occur in
council. "I'm a fighter, and I will fight."
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THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, January 20, 1984
Vancouver
W
THE KEG
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Introduces
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Enjoy Caesar's for Dinner
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GET A FREE TACO
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THE    UBYSSEY
Page 13
Local artists revive Surrey turkeys
By HOLLY NATHAN
Quintessential Canada: a
rhinoceros storming the salal
bushes of Stanley Park; a junk heap
in White Rock, melting back into
the bush; a reflective hockey player
amidst balloons and banners.
Three Figurative Painters
Collette  French,  Wendy  Hamlin,
and Leonard Brett
January 12 - February 5
Surrey Art Gallery
Not quite Maple Leafs perhaps,
although the three artists who
painted them have captured
something familiar, bright and
refreshingly Canadian. But for all
three figurative painters, Wendy
Hamlin, Collette French and Leonard Brett, learning to "see local"
was a challenge.
Wendy Hamlin is an artist who
works through obsessions. Her first
was a rhinocerous. She was a UBC
zoology student when she painted a
gestural drawing of a large,
savanna-sunlit rhinoceros. Not
satisfied, she took the rhino canvass
and introduced it to telephone
booths, the Sylvia Hotel, Stanley
Park peacocks and Vancouver
bridges. From photographs, she
rendered replicas of her painting in
various settings until she exhausted
the rhino's interest in local tourism.
Hamlin developed an obsession
for turkeys. She took photographs
of old turkeys with wrinkled necks,
young turkeys with beady eyes, and
barnfuls of sunlit "Lady" turkeys.
She haunted a local turkey farm
and watched them hatch, grow, and
die.
While Hamlin may be the closest
observer a turkey ever had, her
paintings of soft, flowing clouds of
feathers, amidst the hysterical flapping of a naked turkey, reveal a fine
technique, and more than inspiring
affinity between the viewer and the
subject. If one can overlook the
subject matter or at least view it
with a humorous eye, the subtlety
of texture, shadow and feathery
diminsions is masterful.
Collette French used to torment
herself as a student with everything
the great artists of the world had
done. She splattered paint a la
Pollock and sketched meticulously
in the manner of Duhrer. "An
original idea never crossed my
mind," she says. But when her eyes
strayed to her kitchen cupboard,
she found art in Bovril, Nescafe and
Labatt's beer bottles, the local cor
ner store on a sunny afternoon,
with the Weston's bread girl on the
sign and the Vancouver mountains
reflected in the glass.
And then she found it in the Vancouver Canucks ("I liked their
costumes") and became fascinated
with their total absorption in
hockey. Somehow managing to cast
a calming hand over the furor of
thousands at a Canucks hockey
game, French actually captures a
hockey player in a thoughtful,
reflective moment.
This reflective quality amongst
crowds is repeatedly captured in
scenes from a fair, Italian day, and,
of course, hockey games. Collette
French's water-colour celebration
of life in pastel colours, in singing
faces and in ordinary moments is
the work of an artist at home with
herself and the world.
Leonard Brett, who's work has
been featured locally since 1966,
had to go to Europe before he could
see Canada clearly. "Coming back
was as if I had never seen the country before," he says.
Enraptured by the flat style and
the first tentative Renaissance experiments with perspective, Brett
strives for the same flat, almost
primitive quality. But rather than
producing seventeenth century
scenes of the crucifixion and St.
Sebastian pierced with arrows,
Brett turned his talent to Fraser
Valley farmhouses, small-town
dump   heaps   and   bedroom   win
dows. He also captured the houses
of our grandmothers: neat, clean,
welcoming, often overcrowded,
with tenderly nurtured flower
gardens, green lawns, and B.C.
mountains everywhere.
The one disconcerting note in
Brett's style is his human figures.
They are not stylized enough to
convince the viewer of the artist's
control, but seem instead like a
child's awkward attempt at real
human beings. It was unfortunate
the exhibition of Brett's work did
not show as much stylistic consistency as the others; his lovely renditions of Hornby Island, the
Queen Charlotte Islands, and
Botany Bay, were all excluded.
For unself-conscious humour,
scenes of the comfortably familiar,
and bright, colourful, happy art,
the Surrey Art Gallery has excelled
itself in presenting these three artists in their first major showing.
Kitsilano sprouts
some country
REFLECTIVE MOMENT . . . cool new Canuck art
By PETER BERLIN
"You have to eat an awful lot of
sprouts to get the buzz you would
from one bottle of Blue," Jerry Jeff
Walker told a packed Soft Rock
Cafe during his show Wednesday.
At first glance it may seem odd
for a gritty down-home boy like
Walker to be playing his songs
about the glory of booze and his
longing for West Texas to the alfalfa crowd in the non-licensed Soft
Rock in Kitsilano.
But the locals pulled on their
cowboy boots in a display of solidarity and Walker responded by
giving a wonderful  show  full of
Perfect play just not Wilde enough
By CORINNA
SUNDARARAJAN
The play is quite perfect: the
first act ingenious, the second
beautiful, and the third
abominably clever. But one sympathizes with Oscar Wilde's
reluctance to have his play performed except by puppets, for
the cast of the Frederic Wood
Theatre's production The Importance of Being Earnest is
simply too ordinary and too
artless to create the extraordinary artificial atmosphere so
essential to this play.
The    Importance   of    Being
Earnest
By Oscar Wilde
Directed by John Brockington
Frederic Wood Theatre
Until January 21
In a world where handbags
breed babies and fictitious invalids explode, even the slightest
suggestion of ordinariness in an
actor is as fatally disruptive to
the delicate unreality as a shrill
doorbell to a dream vision. It is
an unwelcome awakening from
fiction to fact.
Thus when Bruce Dow as
Algernon Moncrieff bounds
prosaically across the stage and
delivers his lines with a gusto
more appropriate to the devouring of cucumber sandwiches
and, worse still, heartily guffaws
at his own witticisms, he is comical — but in the style of a
vaudeville ruffian rather than a
subtle sophisticate.
Equally awkward, Louise
Moon as Cecily Cardrew attempts to display signs of emotion, even passion, as though her
character were some palpitating
heroine instead of an implausible invention. Carolyn Soper,
who alternates performances
with Moon, is competently
counterfeit, almost as artificial
as the flowers she tends. Only
Philip Spedding who plays the title role and so is justified in being somewhat earnest, achieves
an effective balance between
controlled irreverence and irrepressible reserve.
But the ultimate test of any
production of The Importance
of Being Earnest is the skill of its
Lady Bracknell, the most
dignified and designing defender
of social conventions. Micki
Maunseli, the theatre's current
artist-in-residence, presents a
tiny but titantic, withered but
wiry woman — a portrayal that
is less imposing than it is
curious. Her abrupt phrasing,
which seems to mimic the harsh
breathlessness of age, contrasts
strangely with her imperious
gaze. She is neither quite real nor
unreal, but a curious mixture of
senility and spunk.
Stephanie Berkmann as Miss
Prism and Mark Hopkins as
Canon Chasuble play delightful
dotards, and yet lack the vitality
to sound some of the play's best
lines above a mumble of infirmity. Consequently, their wily flirting, so charming if done well,
seems merely fussy and fusty.
Indeed, the only artistic puppets in this cast are Shauna Baird
and Lyle Moon. Moon, who
plays a shuffling butler, scowls
more than he speaks, and yet it
so    expressive    in    his    sour
reticence that he represents the
true triumph of form over content. But even more triumphant
is Baird, who plays Gwendolen
Fairfax with stylish abstraction.
The plasticity of her poses and
meticulous elegance of her voice
make her as finely crafted a
work of artifice as the play itself.
She too is quite perfect.
On the whole, the cast is indifferent, and yet the play with its
two puppets, exquisitely costumed by Brian H. Jackson and
sumptuously housed by J. Arn-
burn    Darnall,    is   quite   an
aesthetic experience.
One wonders, therefore, why
John Brockington has chosen to
stage a cut and condensed version. Wilde originally wrote The
Importance of Being Earnest in
four acts with two extra
characters, and its reduction to
three acts was required only to
make time for a curtain-raiser
skit — a convention which is
now obsolete, and yet which
seems to have influenced the
play's presentation permanently.
WILDE . . . puppets would have been better
J
good tunes, husky singing and modest integrity.
Walker first gained widespread
attention as part of the singer-songwriter boom of the early '70s. He
sits halfway between the melodic
post-hippy consciousness of a
James Taylor and Willie Nelson's
outlaw country and western style.
The difference is Walker has never
been concerned about selling records.
One of his lyrics asserts that the
crucial thing about performing music is "laying your soul on the line."
Walker has had a few hits, including Mr. Bojangles. He played it
early in the show, obviously bored
with its sloppy sentimentality. L.A.
Freeway and Up Against the Wall
You Redneck Mothers were also
disposed of early, but with more
gusto.
Walker's music is always very
close to country music. His gruff
singing style was complemented by
the pure country style steel guitar
playing of John Inmon.
Furthermore many of the themes
of his lyrics are traditional country
music themes. There are songs
about how much he likes West
Texas and misses it when he is
away. I Want to Go Home With the
Armadillos was performed with a
fine comic touch.
He sings about drifting and always having to move on. And songs
about ordinary down-home folk,
and about the local cobbler Charlie
Donn. And, of course, he sings
about going to bars and picking
up/being picked up by women such
as Must Have Got Lucky Last
Night.
Walker embraces many of the
same values as the folk from Kitsilano without ever breaking with his
roots.
He represents the alternatives to
big cities, big government and big
corporations. He also represents the
independent little guy who stays in
the country and refuses the glamor
of selling out if it means he can't be
true to himself.
He rejects, in Redneck Mothers,
the bigotry associated with the rural
south, but also keeps traditional attitudes toward drinking and
women.
There are a lot of people out
there like Walker.
But he does have a distinctive
style, which allied to his well-crafted and often intelligent songs,
makes him a pleasure to watch and
hear. Page 14
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, January 20, 1984
Yfaufic
NITECLUBBING
B.B. King: the most important post-war
blues guitarist to emerge alongside Muddy
Waters, John Lee Hooker and Lightnin' Hopkins, till Jan. 28, Plazazz. International Plaza
Hotel.
AI Wold: the pianist/saxophonist leading a
hot jazz quartet, Jan. 22, Classical Joint.
231 Carrall, 689-0667.
Juba: an all-woman jazz group keen on Latin
rhythms, Jan. 27-28. Classical Joint.
The Oriental Roof Top Orchestra: a uniquely named Dixie group, Jan. 24, Hot Jazz
Club.
CAMPUS SOUNDS
Graduate student chamber music recital:
Terence Dawson, pianist joined by singers and instrumentalists performing the
music of Brahms, Chopin, Berg, Faure
and others, Jan. 22, 2:90 p.m.. Recital
Hall.
Ice Fellies - David Raven: rock on skates
with this sturdy Vancouver artist, Jan. 27,
Thunderbird Arena,
Doreen Oke: a harpsichordist playing the
music of Rameau, Duphly and Bach, Jan. 25,
Recital Hall, noon.
Eileen Broadie/Philip Tillotson: vocal-piano duet on the music of Brahms, Wagner
and others, Jan. 26, Recital Hall, noon.
CONCERT CONNECTION
Magnetic Band: creative Vancouver artists
exploring classical new music, artists include
Patrick Webb (keyboards) and Salvador Fer-
reras (percussion), Jan. 20, 8 p.m., SFU
Theatre, 291-3514.
Dionne Warwick: Do you remember classics
like Walk On By and Do You Know The Way
To San Jose? Well, here's the person responsible for those tunes in the flesh to bet
out those same tunes and others, Jan. 26, 30
at 9:30 p.m. Orpheum Theatre.
Soundwave '84: an evening of vocal jazz featuring the Hi-Los, Jan. 27, 8 p.m., Q.E.
Theatre.
The Kitchen Syncopators: sing everything
from Smokey Wood to Billie Holiday, Jan. 27,
Oddfellows Hall, 1720 Gravely.
CAMPUS FILM
SUBfilms (SUB Auditorium, 228-3697) Jan.
26-29: Diva, 7 p.m.; One From The Heart.
9:30 p.m.
Cinema 16 (SUB Auditorium, 228-3698) Jan.
23: Ivan the Terrible Part I, 6:30 and 8:30
ALTERNATIVE CELLULOID
Pacific Cinemathaque (1155 West Georgia,
732-6119) Jan. 20: Gods of The Plague, 7:15
p.m.; Querelle. 9:30 p.m. Jan. 21-22; Solo
Sunny, 7:30 and 9:30 p.m. Jan. 25; Conversation Piece, 7:30 p.m. Jan. 26: A Certain
Tradition of Quality. 7:30 p.m.; La Symphonic Pastorale, 9:30 p.m.
Society Promoting Environmental Conservation (2150 Maple, 736-SPEC) Jan. 21:
SEE
III
«L   LSAT • MCAT • GRE
GRE PSYCH • GRE BIO
MAT-GMAT-DAT
OCAT • PCAT • VAT
SSAT-PSAT* ACHIEVEMENTS
SAT -ACT- TOEFL • MSKP
NATIMEDBDS-ECFMG
FLEX • VQE • NDB • RN BDS
CPA • SPEED READING
Storfeu-ti. KAPLAN
EDUCATIONAL CENTER
1107 N.E  4Sth Street
Seattle. Wa. 98105
I206I 632-0634
Keepers of the Wild, Tankerbombs, A Matter
of Choice, 2-4 p.m.
REPERTORY CINEMA
Ridge Theatre (16th and Arbutus, 738-6311!
Jan. 20-26: Angalo My Love. 7:15 and 9:30
p.m., starring Robert Duvall.
Vancouver East Cinema (7th and Commercial, 253-5455) Jan. 20-22: Merry Christmas. Mr. Lawrence. 7:30 p.m.; Double Suicide, 9:45 p.m.; Jan. 23-24: Death of a
Salesman, 7:30 p.m.; Contempt. 9:30 p.m.;
Jan. 25-26: Taming of tha Shrew, 7 p.m.;
The Lion in Winter, 9:15 p.m.
Hollywood Theatre (3123 W. Broadway,
738-3211) Jan. 20-22: Without A Trace, 7:30
p.m.; The Verdict. 9:36 p.m.: Jan. 23-29: A
Man Woman and Child. 7:30 p.m.; 48 Hrs.,
9:25 p.m.
Savoy Cinema (Main and Kingsway,
872-2124) Jan. 20-22: Fanny and Alexander.
7:30 p.m.; Jan. 23-23: Zoot Suite, 7:30 p.m.;
Stormy Weather. 9:30 p.m.; Jan. 25-26: Go
West, 7:30 p.m.; The Circus, 9:15 p.m.
CAMPUS THEATRE
The Importance of Being Earnest: an Oscar Wilde play directed by John Brockington,
Jan. 23, Freddy Wood Theatre. 8 p.m.,
228-2678.
ON THE TOWN
North Shore Live: a takeoff on live TV
shows, till Feb. 4, Vancouver East Cultural
Centre.
K2: about the struggle for survival on top of a
mountain, elaborate set, till Feb. 11, Vancouver Playhouse.
War Baby: a Margaret Hollingsworth play
performed by the New Play Centre and the
Belfrey Theatre, Jan. 25-Feb. 11, Waterfront
Theatre, Granville Island, 685-6217.
Die Mutter/The Mother: a return engagement of the play by Bertolt Brecht, Jan.
22-22, 8:30 p.m.. Theatre Space, 681-0818.
Key Exchange: about a worldly bachelor and
a photographer, the makings of a stormy relationship, till Feb. 18, Arts Club Seymour,
687 5315.
She Stoops to Conquer: a classic English
comedy of manners, opens Jan. 27, Arts
Club, Granville Island.
Me Me Me: a group self portrait show with
portraits by such notables as I Braineater and
Oraf, till Jan. 28, Unit/Pitt Gallery. 163 W.
Pender, 681-6740.
The Price of Poker: Gambling on Solidarity:
a video installation by Chris Creighton-Kelly
about the political battle waged by the Solidarity labor groups, opens Jan. 23, Unit/Pitt.
TAKE A
GOOD LOOK
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and price to all
the rest.
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3727 W. 10th Ave. (at Alma) • 222-2221
Manet and Balthus: books and posters, till
Feb. 1, M.C. Duthie Gallery, 776 Thurlow,
689-4766
Photography in Louisiana: a collection of
works from the New Orleans Museum of Art,
till Feb. 26, Presentation House, 986-1351.
Daniel Leville: a unique five-person dance
company, Jan. 20-21, 8:30 p.m., Firehall
Theatre, 280 East Cordova, 689-0926.
Edam Performing Group: a Vancouver experimental dance group, Jan. 26-28, Firehall
Theatre.
"Mi
<lU00fi
TODAY
Scarfe
STUDENT COUNCIL FOR
EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN
Dog    n'Suds,    11:30   p.m,-1:30
lounge.
PALESTINE EDUCATION COMMITTEE
Lecture by PLO officer, noon, Buch   A202
PHI KAPPA SIGMA FRATERNITY
Toga Party, 8 p.m.-l a.m., 4644 W. 11th Ave.
HILLEL
Oneg Shabbat, 8 p.m., 944 W. 23rd.
DEPARTMENT OF SLAVONIC STUDIES
Lecture by Vladimir Frumkin, professor of Russian on Conservation of Mythical Reality: Soviet
Mass Songs, noon, Buch. A202.
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Squash night, beginners welcome, 8-10 p.m.,
Winter Sports Centre.
THUNDERBIRD SWIMMING AND DIVING
Hosting Pac 10 powerhouse University of
Washington, students free with AMS card, UBC
Aquatic Centre.
THUNDERBIRD HOCKEY
Canada West match vs. Calgary Dinosaurs, students free with AMS card, 8 p.m., Thunderbird
arena.
THUNDERBIRD VOLLEYBALL
Women's   Thundervolley    tournament,    call
228-2295 *c. info, students free with AMS card,
all afternoon and evening, War Memorial Gym,
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Floor hockey practise, 5:30 to 6:30 p.m., Osborne Centre, gym F.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Burns Night, to commemorate and celebrate the
famous Scottish poet Robert Burns, 8 p.m., International House, upper lounge.
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Badminton night, 4:30 to 6:30 p.m., gym A Osborne Centre.
MUSSOC
Rehearsal for Oklahoma to run scenes with and
without music, 6:30 p.m., Old Auditorium,
LES BALLETS JAZZ DE MONTREAL
Les ballets jazz de Montreal will do a lecture
demonstration, noon, SUB auditorium.
MOTORCYCLE CLUB
Bzzr Garden — T-shirt silkscreening, 4 p.m.,
SUB 205.
UBC DANCE CLUB
Special Friday class featuring street hustle lessons (last class), noon, SUB ballroom.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
A variety of professionally taught ballet and jazz
classes are offered, noon, SUB 216E.
SATURDAY
THUNDERBIRD VOLLEYBALL
Women's  Thundervolley  tournament,  all  day.
War Memorial gym.
THUNDERBIRD HOCKEY
Canada  West  league game  vs.   Calgary  Dinosaurs, 8 p.m , Thunderbird arena.
THUNDERBIRD RUGBY
Vancouver First Division vs. Trojans, 2.30 p.m.,
Thunderbird Stadium.
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Pub Night. 7 p.m. to 12 a.m., SUB 212.
UBC DANCE CLUB
Wine and cheese dance party, 7.30 p.m. to 12:30
a.m., SUB Ballroom.
AMS ROCKERS
Social Night, 8:30 p m., SUB 207/209
SUNDAY
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Praise, worship and teaching, 7 p.m., SUB 212
MUSSOC
Rehearsal — Oklahoma, with orchestra 1-4p.m,,
Old Auditorium.
UBC MOTORCYCLE CLUB
Sunday ride to Troll's at Horseshoe Bay,  10:30
a.m., leaving from SUB traffic circle.
MONDAY
UBC SPORTS CAR CLUB
General meeting, 7 p.m., SUB 213.
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Kung Fu class, 5:30-6:30 p.m., SUB 207-209.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration for winter ballet and jazz classes,
noon, SUB 216E.
STUDENTS FOR PEACE AND
MUTUAL DISARMAMENT
General meeting, all welcome, noon, SUB 206.
MUSSOC
Rehearsals — Oklahoma, lighting and costume
parade 6:30 p.m., piano run 8 p.m., Old Auditorium.
EAST INDIAN STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Open house food fair, noon, SUB 205.
TUESDAY
CAMPUS PRO LIFE
Morgantaler vs   Nathanson,  video debate on
abortion, noon, SUB 212.
EAST INDIAN STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Open house fashion show, noon, SUB Ballroom.
OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS
General   meeting,   12   p m.,   Lutheran   Campus
Centre conference room.
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Aerobic class, 4:30-5:30 p.m , SUB 207-209.
PRE-MED SOCIETY
Lecture   on   neurosurgery   bv   Dr    Thompson,
noon, IRC 1
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration for  bailet  and jazz classes,   noon,
SUB 216E
PHILOSOPHY STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Videotape   showing   on   Wittgenstein's   philosophy, noon   Burnanan 8228.
Little Sister's Book and Art Emporium
and Gays and Lesbians of UBC are
sponsoring Vancouver's first Gay and
Lesbian student artists. Submission information for the event is available from
Barb at 669-1753 or Michael at
228-4638.
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: AMS Card Holders - 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; additional lines 60c. Commercial - 3 lines,
1 day $4.20; additional lines, 65c. Additional days, $3.80 and 60c.
Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 10:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications, Room 266, S.U.S., UBC, Van., B.C.  V6T2A5
Charge Phone Orders over $5.00. Call 228-3977. v'u
COMING EVENTS
30 - JOBS
85 - TYPING
EVOLUTION
AND CREATION
Debate
Evolution — Mr.
Fred Edwords
American
Humanist
Association
Creation Dr. Earl
Hallonquist
Creation
Science Association of Canada.
Woodward Instructional Resources
Centre, Auditorium No. 2
Wednesday. January 25, 1984
7:00 P.M.
FREE
WANTED: Person to translate book of ap
prox. 100 pgs. from Polish to English. Lisa
988-3654 after 7 p.m.
THE LAUGHING MAN
INSTITUTE
presents Franz Bakker, M.D., Director of the Radiant Life Medical Clinic in California discussing
the Spiritual Principles of Sexuality and Human
Happiness according to the American spiritual
teacher, Da Free John. Tuesday, Jan. 24, at
SPEC Energy House. 2150 Maple Street, 800
p.m., $5.00 Donation.
11 - FOR SALE - Private
SINGLE  BED  in good  condition.   $80 ob.
732-9972
WANTED: Commission student travel sales
reps. Contact Greg Hogarth at: Blyth Et
aCo., 84 Yorkville Ave., Toronto, Ont. M5R
1B9 (416) 964-2569.
MODELS. Female, photographer's
models required. $15/hr. No exp.
necessary. For audition send photo & write
— Femme Enterprises, Box 344, 717 Den-
man St., Vancouver V6G 2L6.
35 - LOST	
INDIAN SWEATER Et toque. Vacinity
Chancellor & Wesbrook. $50 reward.
228-6525 or 224-3742.
LADIES OMEGA WATCH: soft silver band
with round white-faced dial. Reward.
Please call 874-0725.
DK. BEIGE CAMELHAIR SCARF on Jan.
17 between Wood Library and Sub; past
pool and aquatic centre. Please call
324-3502.
40 - MESSAGES
PALENAKA, Happy Birthday! Cheers to
ya! Have a good one. KALEIKA
WORD PROCESSING
SERVICES
DAYS' NIGHTS! WEEKENDS/
Spelling & Grammar
Expertise
Marpole Area
Reasonable Rates.
NANCY
266-1768
20 - HOUSING
45 - PERSONALS
IF GAY. under 25, honest, N/S, N/D, not
into clubs, then will share furn. apt. near
Broadway & Alma. 2 baths, 2 beds, etc.
$100/mo. Box 46364, Stn. "G" Vancouver.
VACANCIES IN STUDENT RESIDENCES
for Ladies. Room & Board. Come to the
Housing Office or call 228-2811.
1 PERSON N/S, to share house nr. Bwy. &
Dunbar with 2 people. Lge yd. W/D, fully
furn. $260 mo. plus util. Avail Feb. 1
736-9303 aft. 5
M/F TO SHARE 2 bdrm hse., 33rd Et Main.
$245/mo. Et 54 util. pref. n/s with interest
in Humanities. Gary. 874-3396.
25 - INSTRUCTION	
LSAT, GMAT, MCAT preparation. Call
National Testing 738-4618. Please leave
message on tape if manager is counselling.
ESSAYS, term papers, reports etc. Writer
with extensive academic exper. can assist
with research, writing editing. 682-1043.
ARE YOU ADOPTED? Am looking for
male, born @ V.G.H., Sept. 23/1958. Apparently now known as Christopher & taking economics. Any info. pis. call 467-2913.
70 - SERVICES
EXPERT research help for hire. 224-5802 or
224-6518.
DONT HAVE A WAY with words? Professional free-lance writer offers proofreading/editing of term papers, reports,
essays. Research services Et private instruction also avail. Specializing in Sociology Et
the Humanities. Reasonable rates.
683-0075.
HOME DAYCARE Bilingual Fr./Eng 14th
& MacDonald. $15/day. Lunch Et 2 snacks.
Christiane 732-5669 or 736-1684.
EXPERT TYPING. Essays, term papers,
factums, letters, manuscripts, resumes,
theses, IBM Selectric II. Reasonable rates.
Rose, 731-9857.
DOTS WORD PROCESSING service
offers reasonable rates for students for term
papers, essays, Et masters thesis. 273-6008
evenings.
U—TYPE Micom word processor available
for rent @ $5/hr. Jeeva @ 876-5333.
WORD   PROCESSING   SPECIALISTS:   U
write  we  type  theses,   resumes,   letters,
essays,    days,    evenings,   weekends.
736-1208.	
WORD PROCESSINGIMicom.) student
rates for theses typing $12/hr. Equation
typing available. Jeeva 876-5333.
WORD PROCESSING. Essays, Theses,
Resumes, Etc. by professional typist. Ask
for our student rate. Ellen, 271-6924.
"U-TYPE-IT" WORD PROCESSING. $6
/hr.  Free training, near UBC comfortable
atmosphere 228-8339.
85 - TYPING
TYPEWRITING - Essays, resumes, MINIMUM NOTICE REQUIRED. Tapes
transcribed. UBC Village location. 224-6518
day or night.
ACCURATE, FAST TYPING. Reasonable
rates. Near UBC. Call anytime before 8
P.M. Ask for Vera 266-0497.
EXPERIENCED TYPING: Bby. area reason
able rates. Thesis, term papers, essays
433-5894.
90 - WANTED
RIDE WANTED TO UBC Mon, Wed, Et
Fri. from 41st Et Victoria @ 7:45 a.m.
324-6278.
UBYSSEY CLASSIFIED ADS
GET FAST RESULTS! Friday, January 20, 1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 15
Artists' show collective outrage
By VIRGINIA VON HAHN
Individual works of modern art,
viewed on their own, often say little
and lack any sort of artistic
puissance. But individual works of
art can say a great deal when each
work of art becomes a significant
entity acting as a building block to a
finality. The Western Front's current show South of the Border's Artists' Call Against U.S. Intervention
in Latin America creates this kind
of effective synthesis. The show
features the works of six Seattle artists.
It is through the combined
presentation of these works more
than through the works themselves
that the show attempts to gain style
and quality. Individually, the drawings say little, but in context with
each other a message, however fuzzy, does come through.
The fuzziness of this message, the
show's crucial flaw, is clarified
somewhat by the exhibit's grand title and by the introductory remarks
at the gallery's entrance.
The show is part of "a grand
scale mobilization by artists and intellectuals across North America to
call attention to the Reagan administration's disastrous military
policies and to raise consciousness
and to make visible the artists'
outrage."
Such commitments are indeed
impressive but perhaps a little too
onerous, for the show does not
quite live up to its pretensions and
were it not for the introductory explanations the viewer could only
puzzle and wonder what the images
were all about.
The show is divided into two
parts. The first part presents the
timelessly fashionable theme of
disenchantment with the U.S. Here
the viewer is proffered with a collection of photos of shabby American
city cores, a mural of a growling
bear and another mural entitled
Rimbaud's City which explains in
stylish prose the insignificance of
any individuals existence within a
metropolis.
There is also a cassette recording
— the show's most masterful touch.
In fact, the cassette alone would
make the trip to the gallery worthwhile. At the cassette station the
viewers can sit in an ugly, smelly
armchair and listen to a visciously
edited recording of Reagan himself
as he espouses in the most
b...b...blun.. .b...blundering manner the virtues of his policies. This
poignant and clever recording is
worth listening to twice.
The second part of the exhibit
moves out of the U.S. and attempts
to focus on Central-America. Here
the theme (although not quite as
clearly expressed as the theme in the
first part) seems to be the photos of
Latin America's dilemma.
The viewer is presented with a
collection of photos of harmless
everyday life scenes in the.banana
belt, a mural entitled The Deer at
the End of the World, and then the
exhibit's most awkward contributions — two newspaper collages on
Aquino's assassination and other
Filipino troubles. Unfortunately
these pieces only distract from the
exhibit's purpose which is
presumably to focus on Central
American problems.
The final culminating clincher is
a poster entitled Preserve American
Values. No doubt, this is an attempt
at biting cynicism — a final expression of the artists-' outrage. Unfortunately, it doesn't fully succeed.
Had the exhibit synthesized the art
works more effectively, showing a
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relation between American values
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B.C. DIRECTOR Cl}Ol'<i,*£' Friday, January 20, 1984
page16 THE    UBYSSEY rnaay, Januarys, laot
Andre's fast for human rights reaches Day 34
By CHARLIE FIDELMAN
A UBC student marked his
thirty-first day of fasting for human
rights in B.C. by hosting a liquid
lunch benefit Tuesday.
Almost 70 people joined graduate
student Andre Sobolewski for a
glass of juice at the Lutheran Campus Centre. Proceeds from the
lunch went to the B.C. human
rights coalition.
"I would not be fasting in the
first place if 1 perceived a sense of
committment to the best human
rights protection," said Sobolewski
on Thursday, the thirty-third day
of his fast.
"If there is righteousness out
there I would stop fasting," he said.
Sobolewski is asking the government to make public its consultation with the B.C. human rights
coalition. "A true concern for
human rights doesn't need to hide
itself."
Lutheran campus minister
George Hermanson compared
Sobolewski's fast to Martin
Luther's "appeal to the best in us."
"If there is righteousness out
there, please contact Andre," said
Hermanson.
Alicia Lawrence, a member of
the B.C. Human Rights Coalition,
disclosed the results of a random
public survey during the lunch. The
survey indicated grass roots support
for human rights she said. The
survey showed:
• 67 per cent disagreed with
government plans to eliminate legal
support for victims of discrimination.
• 74 per cent disagreed  with
eliminating
branch.
•    79    per
necessary   to
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the   human    rights
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<x
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• 60 per cent agreed the human
rights commission should be
separate from an individual
minister.
UBC law professor Bill Black
said the withdrawal of Bill 27, the
proposed replacement for the
human rights code, indicates the effect people can have on government
policies. He called for more support
to maintain the momentum attained.
Blair Longley, a Simon Fraser
University graduate student, is do
ing   just    that.    Longley   joined
Sobolewski's fast Sunday.
Sobolewski asked for support in
the form of letters, telegrams and
phone calls to the government.
"There is no reason why we can't
have the best human rights protection," he said.
With only six days left on his
fast, Sobolewski said he is feeling
very weak and losing muscle mass
rapidly.
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