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The Ubyssey Sep 6, 1991

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Array theUbyssey
i   j Bouncing
Those
Cheques
p.3
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E
Founded in 1918
Vancouver, B.C., Friday, September 6,1991
Vol 74, No 2
Surprise loan fee hits students
Three per cent fee, ten per cent tuition and
seven per cent GST stretch students* finances
Students line up for loans. Many of them are
unaware of the three per cent guarantee fee
they will be charged.
GEORGE ANDERSON PHOTO
by Sharon Undores
Students are surprised to discover that they must pay a three
per cent "guarantee fee" on Canada
Student Loans this year.
The three per cent is paid at
the bank, as a processing fee. Despite the fact that the implementation of the new policy was announced on August 1, many people
are just finding out about it now.
Carol Gibson, the director of
awards and financial aid at UBC,
said, "The three per cent fee is part
ofthe students final repayable debt
load."
The AMS has organized a petition which is currently circulating around SUB. Kelly Guggisberg,
coordinator of external affairs, said
that the petition is going very well.
She expects at least 5,000 signatures and will run the petition for
another week.
Guggisberg said, "Probably 90
per cent of the students are unaware ofthe fee—most had no i dea.
If anything, it will make students
aware that the loan system is in
jeopardy."
Fiona Buss, a fourth year English student, found out about the
fee when she was in a four-hour
line up to get her loan on Tuesday.
"What's the point ofthe loan,
if you calculate what you need and
then that amount doesn't exist.
"Why not put the three per
cent on when you pay it back, or
why not make the interest a bit
higher? As it is they are taxing the
poor," Buss said.
Nikola Marin said she is getting the same amount of money for
her loan this year, as she did last
year. "It wasn't enough to live on
last year and it definitely won't be
enough this year.
"Now there is the seven per
cent GST on my books, the ten and
a half per cent tuition increase and
the three per cent loan processing
fee. This is crazy, it adds up to a lot
of money."
Robert Rust, a mechanical
engineering student, said, "It is
ridiculous, I will have to use my
loan to get my loan. There was no
prior mention of this, I just found
out and I have no money in my
account.
"The government can choose
to do whatever they want, they
have got us over a barrel. Students
apply for help because they need
money," said Rust.
Sherri Hancock, a second year
medical student, said "I haven't
heard anything about it. The fee is
asinine, there was no notification
and people will be getting less than
they asked for anyway.
"They shouldn't be allowed to
change the rules without a formal
proposal. If we change our need,
we have to go through a reassessment procedure.
"They are just changing the
rules on us, without allowing us to
compensate for it in our budget,"
said Hancock.
Guggisberg said, "There has
been a significant increase in the
demand for emergency loans this
year, but there is less money for
them, because people didn't pay
back their loans last year.
"It's hard to say what the increase is due to. It could be the
three per cent fee, the poor job
market this summer, or the fact
that the programme has been
around for two years and more
people know about it now."
AMS spends $3,000 on junk mail to students
by Rick Hiebert
The Alma Mater Society has
spent at least $3,000 to send an
information pamphlet to UBC
students that includes junk mail.
The AMS, despite the release
of two AMS-sponsored back-to-
school guides this week, signed a
contract with a Toronto marketing
firm to send outa 16-page pamphlet
about AMS programmes, services
and student council members in
late August.
Students are unhappy that the
package, mailed to the home of
every UBC undergraduate, contains ads to sell magazine subscriptions and credit cards to students.
Clegg Campus Marketing approached the AMS last fall to sell
the idea of a joint mailout to UBC
students, Martin Ertl, AMS director of administration said.
"They wanted to do a mailout
in connection with last spring's
AMS elections, but that was too
soon. Roma (Gopaul-Singh, last
year's director of administration)
thought it was a great idea and
passed it onto me. We talked in
March and tookit from there," Ertl
said.
"Students have to hear about
the Alma Mater Society before they
show up on campus. We have other
ways to reach them on campus,
but none reaches students in their
homes. The more times we can get
our message out, the better," he
said.
However, some students are
upset that they are getting junk
mail in the package, just because
they are UBC students. Clegg
Campus Marketing paid for 60 per
cent of the AMS mailout. In exchange, their ad materials made
up most ofthe package sent to all
undergraduates.
Meeting addresses
asbestos concerns
Asbestos removed from
the Henningsphysicsbuilding
three weeks ago poses no danger to staff or students, said
UBC's occupational hygiene
officer at an information
meeting on Thursday.
The Workers Compensation Board had ordered the
building closed for one week
in August while asbestos was
removed from the corridors.
At a meeting called to address the concerns expressed
by staff and students, David
Bell allayed fears of health
risks.
"Asbestos isn't a problem
unless you're working with
high levels of asbestos for a
long time," Bell said.
Long-term exposure to
asbestos is linked to lung
cancer.
"To send the AMS material
out is a good thing," said Shelley
Young, a fourth year Fine Arts
student, "but I certainly mind the
junk mail.
"These people are out there. If
I want to get magazines or a credit
card, I don't need the AMS' help.
To me, it doesn't seem part of the
AMS'job."
Gail Knight, al so a fourth year
Fine Arts student, said she found
the implied message ofthe mailout
offensive.
"Any kind of literature tends
to sell the business-UBC connection," she said. "The AMS is in
cahoots with these advertisers and
it's all about 'what can we sell to
students', not purely student concerns. You shouldn't need to have
everything turn a profit."
Ertl is unsympathetic.
"The ads went a long way to
helping us cover our costs. Most
reasonable people woul d agree that
the junk mail is offset by the
valuable information they get from
the AMS," he said.
John De Bono of Clegg Campus Marketing said the AMS' deal
was very attractive to his company.
"What we are doing is offering
services to students. The AMS is a
student service organization, so it's
a good fit," he said. "If they are
trying to promote the services that
they are offering they have to advertise, like a health programme,
for instance. They have a communications goal, so do we."
"We get to make our advertisers happy as well," he added.
The deal is similar to one the
company has with nine other stu-
Did you receive your Junk mail?
dent councils at universities across
Canada. Student governments at
places like the University of
Toronto, McMaster, Guelph,
Wilfred Laurier and Guelph also
participate with Clegg in mailouts
like the one at UBC.
Fortunately for junk mail haters, Clegg does not have a list of
UBC students. For the AMS
mailout, the registrar's office pro
vided labels, but the company and
the AMS are eager to try future
mailouts with advertising to UBC
students.
"We hope to work with the
AMS again," De Bono said. "Martin did an excellent job, he's a sharp
guy."
"Yes, well absolutely try it
again. As a matter of fact, we're
going to think of ways to make the
next mailout better," Ertl said. Classifieds 228-3977
RATES: AMS Card Holder* - 3 lines, $3.00, additional lines, 60 cents; commercial - 3 lines, $5.00, additional
lines 75 cents. (10% discount on 25 issues or more) Classified ads payable in advance. Deadline 4:00p.m., two
days before publication. Room 266, SUB, UBC, Van* B.C. V6T2A7, 228-3977.
11 • FOR SALE - PRIVATE
SHARP 64K IQ 7200 Pocket Computer +
64K programmable/stats card. 128L for
$250.00 OBO. 255-9541
XT COMPUTER Roland Dot Matrix
printer. Good Condition $750.00. Phone
736-8540. Leave message.
84 MUSTANG - Auto, cloth int. 71,000 km,
P/S, P/B, am/fm cass, sunroof, one owner
excellent cond. Asking $4500. 421-6135
1983 VOLVO DL4 dr sedan in need ofTLC.
Motorinexc. cond.Body&soul rusty. 250,000
km. $550. Phone 228-1573.
1983 HONDA ACCORD. Bleutlunt stereo,
dual mirrors, 165,000 km. Silver, exc. running & body cond. $3100. 272-1022.
1981 MAZDA 626. 2 dr, 5 sp. Good cond.,
runs well. Reliable. On campus. 224-8725.
$1800 obo.
1984 450 HONDA Nighthawk. Mint cond.
Cheap tramp. Easy parking. Best offer
takes. Call Dave 278-3411 (2259) - day, 734-
0257 - eves.
1976 MGB. Good cond. Runs well. $2300
obo. Located on campus. 224-8725.
1987 RED CRX SI HONDA, 5 sp., power
sunroof. Only 34,000 km. Spotless. Ex.
cond. $8800,736-7574.
1981 LE CAR, Good condition, $800. Fun to
drive! Ph: 222-9219.
1989YAMAHAVIRAGO,250cc,2000K. As
new, asking $2200. Ph: 272-4169 after6 pm.
20 - HOUSING
ROOM FOR RENT. UBC Village, 2 blocks
from SUB. Sept 4-15th. Also large room for
travelling people, 7 days or less - 224-2310,
after 6 pm.. Above stores.
RENTING 2 furnished rooms for 1 person,
pref. female. Shared bath & kitchen. $300/
mo. & incl. utilities, dishes & linen. Must
like dogs. 325-0969 • 54th/Victoria.
25 - INSTRUCTION
PIANO LESSONS, UBC Village Area
A.R.C.T.B.MUS. 984-7340OR224-7150. All
ages.
Between
Deadline for submissions: for
Tuesday's paper is Friday at
3:30pm. NO LATE SUBMISSIONS WILL BE ACCEPTED.
Note: "Noon" = 12:30 pm.
FRIDAY, SEPT. 6th
Graduate Student Society, Open
Stage Night. 8-11 pm, Grad Student Centre - Fireside Lounge.
SUNDAY, SEPT. 8th
Agakhan Foundation. A9km walk
to raise funds for Third World
Development. Walk begins at
Lumberman'sArch-StanleyPark.
11:00 am. Info: Zahra 432-6709.
L,«,~
SELF SERVE
tZ£\l wLaserPri/iting
^j^t^T     • IBM COMPATIBLE
MIU^     • MACINTOSH
• WORK AREA
• QUALITY COPIES
UNIVERSITY VILLAGE
2nd FLOOR
2174 WESTERN PARKWAY
VANCOUVER
B.C.
224-6225
FAX 224-4492
OPEN EVERY DAY M-TH 8-9
FRI 8-6    SAT-SUN 11-6
ENGLISH/FRENCH as a second language
lessons. Qualified teacher; near UBC.Please
call Annabel at 228-8357.
30 - JOBS
MOM NEEDS AFTER SCHOOL CARE 3
to 6PM. Mon, Tues, Thur, Fri. Wed 1:45 to
5:45. Pis call 224-6533 leave message.
NEED EXTRA FUNDS? Ideal opportunity
for clubs, societies, individuals seeking
fundraising programmes. No investment
reqd. We provide all inventory. Commission
paid immediately. Call Ken 270-6348.
70 - SERVICES
SINGLES CONNECTION - An Intro Service for Singles. Call 737-8980.
+HALF PRICE BEER+ No kits, no clean-
v p, no sediment in bottle. Use our professional equipment to brew your own beer on
our premises. Richmond Beer Works, 1401
West Broadway, Vancouver(at Hemlock)244-
8103.
INDIVIDUAL WITH BJV. (HON) * MA
seeks position as research assistant in biological or social sciences. Qualifications include 2 years exp. as RA, publications,
teaching & field exp. Phone Paul, 684-7604.
80 - TUTORING
EXP. MATH TUTOR needed approx. 3
times/week for Math 130 & Stats. 733-6840.
ENGLISH 100 & THE ECT, specialized
tutoring available. For more information,
call Jeff at 224-1031 or 734-7975.
 85-TYPING	
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST. 30 years exp.,
WD Process/typing, APA/MLA, Thesis.
Studentrates. Dorothy, 228-8346.
AMS WORD PROCESS-ZING
Professional service for resumes, letters,
essays, theses and much more!
Check out our competitive rates, fancy
typestyles and snappy paper — with
envelopes to match.
Come in and browse ... Room 60, Student
Union Building or phone: 822-5640
MONDAY, SEPT. 9th	
UBC New Democrats. General
Meeting. 12:30 -1:30, SUB 205.
UBC New Democrats. Election
Planning Meeting. 12:30 pm, SUB
205.
TUESDAY, SEPT. 10th
Lunch-hour seminar: "Hong Kong:
Lame Duck or Golden Goose?" by
Dr. Lee Ngok, Univ. of Hong Kong.
12:30 pm, Asian Centre, Seminar
Room 604.
WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 11th
Gays & Lesbians of UBC. Discussion Session: Open Forum Topic
TBA 5 pm - 7 pm. SUB 213.
• FAST ACCURATE typist/secretary. 20
years exp. WordPerfect 5.1, medical/legal
terminology, 255-4955.
WORD PROCESSING Student Rate. Call
224-9197
CiTR 101.9 fM
Live Sports Broadcasts
proposed schedule
(men's home games unless
otherwise indicated)
FOOTBALL
Sat, Aug 31, 7:30 pm - Alberta
Sun, Sept 15,3:30 pm - Shrum Bowl
Sat, Sept 28, 7:30 pm - Manitoba
Sat, Oct 19, 7:30 pm - Calgary
Sat, Nov 2,1:00 pm - Saskatchewan
Sat, Nov 9 - Playoffs (times TBA)
HOCKEY
Sun, Oct 20, 1:30 pm - Manitoba
Fri, Nov 15, 7:30 pm - Alberta
Fri, Nov 29, 7:30 pm - Calgary
Sat, Jan 18,1:30 pm - Regina
Sat, Feb 1, 7:30 pm - Lethbridge
Sat, Feb 15, 7:30 pm - Saskatchewan
BASKETBALL
Wed, Oct 30, 8:00 pm - Buchanan
Cup
Thur, Oct 31,8:30 pm - York
Mon, Nov 4,8:30 pm - Seattle
Christian
Fri, Nov 22, 7:45 pm - Calgary
Sat, Nov 30, 7:45 pm - UVic
Sun, Dec 1,2:00 pm - UVic (Women)
Sun, Dec 1, 4:00 pm - UVic
Fri, Jan 17, 7:45 pm - Alberta
Fri, Jan 24, 7:45 pm - Saskatchewan
Fri, Feb 7, 8:15 pm - UVic (away)
Sat, Feb 8,8:15 pm - UVic (away)
Fri, Feb 14, 7:45 pm - Lethbridge
Feb29-Marl
Hockey and Basketball
playoffs
(times TBA)
Gays & Lesbians of UBC. 1st General Meeting. Noon, SUB 212A
(thru & beyond SUB 212).
FRIDAY. SEPT. 13th	
Graduate Student Society. Open
House — Featuring tours of the
Grad Centre, a BBQ (4:30-7 pm)
and dance (7 pm -12 am). Graduate Student Centre.
TUESDAY, SEPT. 24th
A Brown Bag seminar on "Indonesian Development in Agriculture" by Dr. H. Didung, Director
General of Food Crops in the Dept.
of Agriculture, Indonesian Government. 12:30 PM, Asian Centre
Seminar Room 604.
MUSICIANS
Do you play an orchestra or
band instrument?
Yes you can perform with the
UBC Symphony Orchestra
or
UBC Wind Ensemble
No, you do not have to be a
music major!
No, you do not have to enroll
for credit!
Yes, you can enroll for credit!
228-3113
224-8246
GMAT LSAT
GRE
Weekend Test
Preparation
Next seminars
Sept. 21 & 22
Call: 222-8272
Spectrum
Seminars
PROFESSIONALS IN TEST PREPARATION
r^a£  VARSITY COMPUTERS
Vancouver, bc      SERVING VANCOUVER SINCE'87
TRISON 386SX
' 16MIU3B6SXCPU
' 1 Meg RAM
• 1£or1.44Megfloppydrive
• 1 sariat. 1 parallel, 1 game port
' 101 kaya tnhinced keyboard
1 40 Meg hard drive
> Monomoritorwrtti Herculej
compatibles cart
TKIS0N386DX-25
• 25Mta 386DX CPU
• 1 Meg RAM
• 1.2 or 1.44Mig floppy drive
• 1 serial. 1 parallel, 1 game port
■ 101 keys enhanced keyboard
• 40 Meg herd drive
• Monomonitorwilh Hercules
compatibles cart
TRISON 386DX-33
• 33Mhz 386DX CPU
• 1 Meg RAM
• 1.2 or 1.44 Meg floppy drive
• 1 serial, 1 parallel1.1 game port
• 101 keys enhanced keyboard
• 40 Meg hard drive
• Monomoritorwrtti Hercules
compatibles card
*850°°
*1000°°
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(604) 222-2326     Fax: (604) 222-2372
If you or if you know of anybody
who was at the
Flamingo-Hilton Hotel,
by the pool this past March 30,1991
(Saturday day before Easter)
Good news!
Please call
(213)434-9393 or
(213)869-1648
WRITING THE
OCTOBER
GMAT?
Kaplan's
GMAT
test prep course
starts Sept. 12
on U.B.C, campus
Stanley H. Kaplan
Educational Center Ltd.
944-7717
LEARN TO
SCUBA!
UBC's Scuba Club offers an open water
training programme for an incredible
$130
Next course starts Sept 9
AQUA
SOCIETY
Lower Floor SUB
Tel 822-3329
includes tuition, rentals, student kit, pool fees and more!
rams
i^j
rnmsi
^j
The AMS Coordinator of External Affairs is now
accepting applications for 5 student at Large
positions for The External Affairs Commttiee.
This committee deals with long-term and current student
issues such as Tuition, On and Off-campus Housing. The
provincial and federal student assistance programs and
post-secondary education in B.C. The committee will
meet about once per month and will be chaired by The
Coordinator of External Affairs. Any student can apply.
Applications in the form of resumes are to Kelly
Guggisberg - SUB Rm. 250 by no later than Sept. 20th.
4
4
2/THE UBYSSEY
September 6,1991 mm
W-
*
<
*
4
NDP promises tuition freeze but students cynical
by Martin Chester
VANCOUVER (CUP)—The BC
NDP's promise to freeze tuition
fees is clouded in cynicism resulting from their Ontario counterparts' change of heart on a similar
promise.
NDP post-secondary education critic Barry Jones says his
government will stop all tuition
fee hikes for one year to study the
barriers students have to face to
get a higher education. This is a
long standing NDP policy which
will cost eight to ten million dollars for the one year.
"We need to be sure it's not a
person's economic or social background that makes them eligible
for post secondary education,"
Jones said. "The important criterion of access is the ability of people
to benefit from the post secondary
experience."
However, the Ontario NDP
made a similar promise before
they were elected last September,
but chose to put an eight per cent
cap on fee increases instead.
Jones said the NDP would
not renege on this promise.
"I'm not in the business of
running an election on promises
that will not be followed through
upon," Jones said.
Brad Levigne, chair ofthe BC
component ofthe Canadian Federation of Students, said his organization would be active in ensuring the promise becomes a government policy if the NDP is
elected.
"We welcome the initiative,
but what happened in Ontario
makes a lot of students cynical,"
Levigne said.
He also sai d he hopes the NDP
would extend the term ofthe freeze
so that it can have an effect on the
present above inflation tuition fee
increases including a 20 per cent
increase at Kwantlen College in
Surrey and 17 per cent at Douglas
College in New Westminister.
UBC's tuition rose ten per
cent this year and there are plans
for ten per cent increases in each
ofthe next two years.
"We've been calling for a
freeze and an eventual rollback of
fees to ensure better access for
new students," Levigne said.
Levigne said BC-CFS is in a
better position than the Ontario
Federation of Students because
they have had a chance to prepare
for an election for quite sometime
and they have the Ontario experience behind them.
"We startedlobbyingthe NDP
on the freeze back in March of
'90," he said. "They were talking
about dropping the freeze policy
and we pressured them to put it
back."
We made it known that we
were quite cynical aboutanjrthing
they promise and that it would
have to be backed up by a plan ...
before the election."
CFS national communications officer Jocelyn Charron said
students said there was always a
difference between a political
programme during an election and
the policy of a government.
"Students must ensure that
the pressure is kept on through
the NDP youth," Charron said.
CFS tells students to 'bounce your cheques'
by Dawn Mitchell
HALIFAX (CUP) — Student organizations and the chartered banks
may join forces in an attempt to
overturn a federal decision to tax
student loans.
Effective August 1, students
must now pay a three per cent tax
on their loans. The Mulroney government claims the tax is an attempt to recoup money lost when
students default on their loan repayments.
The tax, administered by the
chartered banks, must be collected
before students receive their cash.
"We've heard through national
sources that the banks are very
upset and don't want to collect (the
tax)," said Scott McCrossin, chair of
the Students' Union of Nova Scotia.
McCrossin said he thinks students could dodge the tax by writing cheques they know will bounce.
"I understand that if a student
writes a cheque for the tax on an
account that does not have enough
money to cover it, the banks are not
worried about going after it, or
implementing non-sufficient funds
charges," he said. "It's a fifteen dollar gamble for the students."
A spokesperson for the Canadian Bankers' Association said she
wasn't aware ofthe practice.
"That would be a bank by bank
or branch by branch decision, but
probably would not be an announced
policy ,"saidBarbara Amsden, CBA
director of financial affairs.
"No matter what some people
think, banks do have some sympathy for students," she said. "But, it
would be an expensive experiment
for students and for banks in terms
of public relations."
The Canadian Federation of
Students wants to capitalize on the
bankers' negative feelings by encouraging students to make the
collection ofthe tax as cumbersome
as possible.
"We're asking students to write
their cheques on legal size pieces of
paper and demand to see the bank
managers," said Jocelyn Charron,
CFS communications officer.
She said she hopes this will
lead to renewed protest on the part
ofthe chartered banks, andincrease
pressure on thefederal government
to abandon the tax.
Despite the publicity about the
tax, many people were still unaware
of the surcharge until they negotiated their loans.
"I'm mad as a hopping turtle,"
said one Mount St. Vincent University student. "I got to the bank and
had to take $100.80 out of my own
pocket. It's scandalous."
The student said she was not
informed of the charge by the student aid office when she applied for
her loan.
"I was going to call the receiver
Students make their concerns known.
general and ask why the government is doing this, where is the
money going, and can I get a receipt
for the money I paid," she said.
And to add insult to injury,
students will also have to pay interest on the amount they are taxed.
Six months after a student
leaves a post-secondary institution,
interest charges on the loans kick
in. Charron said some students do
find profitable employment but
many have to take odd jobs and
cannot afford to repay the loans.
DIANNE RUDOLF PHOTO
CFS estimates the government
stands to make $18 million from
the tax, while it has cut transfer
payments to the provinces, reduced
its services to help students find
jobs after graduation and levied the
GST on textbooks.
Upgraded auditorium may soon achieve popcorn status
New screens soar for workers In SUB.
GARY MUIR PHOTO
by Raul Peschiera
During the summer, the student Film Society upgraded the
SUB auditorium.
Two years ago, the FilmSoc
improved the sound system from
mono to stereo. Unfortunately,
16mm film is mono and the audience could not fully appreciate the
improvement.
With the purchase of two
35mm projectors and a large
screen, the quality of the sound
and showings have reached their
full potential.
Due to these improvements,
The Vancouver Film Festival will
use the SUB auditorium as one of
its venues for the first time in its
ten year history.
Normand Bouchard, FilmSoc
operations manager, said, "SUB
admission has not gone up, but
The Film Festival will probably
charge more since they are bringing in the films and collecting admission themselves."
In the past, many people
complained not only about the poor
clarity of the films, but the torn
screen.
Films shown were often faint
and peppered with dark line flaws,
and the sound track was full of
pops and cracks.
"The old 16mm projectors, are
just like the ones you used to see in
high school," said Bouchard.
Bouchard hopes the improvements will draw more viewers. "I
think that the poor quality of the
16mm turned off many students.
"35mmfilmisfourtimeslarger
than 16mm and the new projectors
move frames faster, creating
clearer images."
Hesaidthenewscreenismuch
bigger than the ones at the Royal
Centre and about the same size as
the small Cineplex Odeon theatres.
The new format will enable
FilmSoc to acquire film which is
not available in the 16mm format,
including many newer films.
"When we get a big movie, the
film will fill up from wall to wall,
taking advantage of our wide
screen."
The quality of the images is
now comparable to commercial
venues off campus.
In the near future, a popcorn
machine will be added because of
customer demand. One long-range
plan for the auditorium is to upgrade the sound system to a surround-sound dolby stereo system.
September 6,1991
THE UBYSSEY/3 NEWS
Council ignores plans for date rape campaign
Qlfoir wih&i
n
TORONTO (CUP) — Although 25
percentof reported sexual assaults
take place during orientation each
year, U of Ts student council did
not include an anti-date rape
campaign during this year's activities.
Student council women's officer Diane Dobson said she had
been rebuffed by council members
about the campaign. They told her
she didn't start organizing early
enough, orientation sponsors
would object to the campaign and
that it would hurt campus unity,
she said.
Dobson said t.he gave them
plenty of notice by proposing in
May.
"I think it's a combination of
incompetence, lack of communication and lack of support."
Council president Peter Guo
disagreed.
"As far as I'm concerned it was
a problem of logistics. We were
very keen when she came to us
with the proposal," he said.
"But we were screening the T-
shirts and there are deadlines to
be met," Guo said. "There's no
proposal on my desk right now
outlining what dates and times
things are supposed to happen."
Susan Addario, U of Ts safety
officer, said she was disappointed
that date rape was not addressed
during the week-long activities.
"There are a lot of situations
provided by orientation activities
where sexual assault can take
place," she said. "We know that
about a quarter to a third of the
assaults reported to responding
organizations on campus, take
place during orientation activities.
That's only those that are reported."
Addario said she thinks students should assess the council's
priorities and the way they chose
to allocate time and resources.
"I don't want to be misconstrued as laying the blame (at the
council's) door," she added. "If
there's blame to lay it's for students
to decide. As a student, one has to
look at what they had to spend and
what they spent it on and make a
decision as to whether they spent
it in an appropriate way."
Professor assaults
student; pays fine
MONTREAL(CUP)—AConcordia
University disciplinary panel has
slapped the wrists of a professor
who had to be pried off a student at
a party.
A Concordia code of conduct
hearingthis summer ruled against
psychology professor Morris
Shames, who assaulted history
student James Brown at a party
last April.
A three-person hearing board
ordered Shames to pay a $100 fine
or apologize to Brown before
August 31, barred Shames for a
year from the college where the
altercation took place, and
recommended a letter of warning
be sent to him.
Brown said code admini strator
John Relton told him Shames had
paid the $100 fine.
Shames attacked Brown after
he commented on a statement
Shames had made about the
murder of 14 women at Montreal's
Ecole Polytechnique, Brown said.
"(Shames) grabbed me by the
arm, dug his fingers into my neck
and pushed me back against the
wall," he said.
After the incident, Brown filed
a complaint with the university.
Shames responded by filing a
counter-complaint, saying Brown
had defamed him at the party,
during the complaint process and
in an interview with a campus
newspaper.
The hearing board said
Brown's comments were fair and
in the public interest and dismissed
Shames's complaint.
Shames is on sabbatical and
did not return phone calls.
Brown said the decision is not
necessarily a victory for students.
"Where the interest of the
university is at stake they make
sure you lose," he said. "When an
individual is involved they don't
care, and use it as a flag-waving
case to make students think they
are empowered."
WE WILL TEACH YOU...
• to write news articles
• to do arts reviews
• to cover sports
• to take & print photographs
•conduct interviews
• do page design
* • typeset
• wordprocess
• do paste up
All we ask is your time...
THE UBYSSEY
SUB 241K
«
-*
V
4
4/THE UBYSSEY
September 6,1991 ASOUT CAMHJS
/•> * y *  '"* *>
■*
V
Questionable library access
by Cheryl Niamath
UBC library users with disabilities can now get specially-
coded library cards which will entitle them to enhanced services in
most library branches. However,
Main Library—UBC's largest library—has many barriers to
people with disabilities, and there
are no plans to renovate the
building.
Sheryl Adam, Information
and Orientation librarian in Main
Library, said that services such
as book retrieval, browsing assistance and photocopying have always been available for people
with disabilities, but the enhanced
service cards "will make it perfectly clear to staff that a person
has a disability, whether it is
visible or invisible."
The Main Library building,
constructed in the 1920s, "was
built to be inaccessible," said
Adam, adding that at the time the
library was built, it was never
considered that people in wheelchairs woul d ever go to university.
Adam said the attitudes of
librarians and library staff have
changed, "and certainly people's
demands have changed."
Barriers such as narrow passageways, heavy doors and a
freight elevator which rarely stops
exactly in line with the floor make
Main Library difficult to use.
Library staff are in the process of marking wheelchair routes
through the building. They plan
to install a keypad next to the
---Tv it
"?-\*1
Sheryl Adam, Information
and Orientation Librarian.
locked door leading to the freight
elevator, so wheelchair users do
not have to ask for a key at the
information desk.
The library will not be renovated because a new, more easily
accessible building will be com-
pletedby 1995. "ButMain Library
isn't the only library in the world.
Sedgewick is quite accessible,"
said Adam.
Ruth Warick, director of the
CHERYL NIAMATH PHOTO
Disability Resources Centre, is
pleased that the library is providing enhanced services for people
with disabilities.
"There is an important principle being recognized by the library. To provide equal access to
people with disabilities, you
sometimes have to do things
differently...The library deserves
full credit for its initiative," said
Warick.
Centre seeks broad access
by Dianne Rudolf
Outside the Disability Resource Centre, I approached a visually impaired woman making
her way along the sidewalk. "Excuse me..." I began, but she cut me
short with an assertion that she
could manage, she was all right.
After introductions were made,
however, and my intentions
known, she relaxed and was eager
to talk about her way of life at
UBC.
Shea, a second year music
student, has had minimal difficulties in the interpersonal relations. She says people are helpful,
but do not realize the landmarks
she depends upon. "On the whole
people are usually very happy to
give directions."
Like many other disabled
students, Shea faces many challenges daily not experienced by
others.
Arlene Eliuk, coordinator of
information at the Disability Resource Centre, says, "There is a
lack of awareness in society and
people don't know what it means
to have a visual impairment or
hearing loss. They take [the use of
their senses] as a given."
For a disabled person, equal
access to education is not limited
to getting in and out of buildings.
"That's only a small part of it,"
Eliuk says.
An able body passes centre for
the less abled.
September 6,1991
DIANNE RUDOLF PHOTO
Specific problems include old
elevators, which are ill-equipped
to accommodate those in wheelchairs and worn buttons which
hinder those who cannot use their
tactile sense.
Late distribution of class
reading lists causes another difficulty. Valuable time is lost when
a text is not available at the Recordings Library, and the student
must purchase and record it on
their own. Shea and Eliuk suggest
reading lists be distributed to disabled students earlier.
Shea says UBC campus is
"very poorly lai d out," adding that
street crossings could be more
clearly defined. Obstructive construction areas pose problems to
students in wheelchairs and to
the visually disabled.
Shea is more concerned with
the poorly-lit areas around Vanier
and the Student Union Building.
"Alone in the dark, there is a danger of being attacked, so I don't go
out much at night unless I'm sure
of where I'm going," she says.
The Canadian National Institute for the Blind currently
provides orientations which facilitate adjustment to living in
any area.
There is a possibility of UBC
starting a similar programme.
"Provided there is enough interest," says Eliuk, "there may be
something like that established."
Definite changes include a
new addition to Brock Hall, w"hich
will house Admissions, Financial
Services, and other popular offices.
This centralization means
greater convenience for all students, but will make a world of
difference to the disabled.
THE UBYSSEY.
More fun than getting your
wisdom teeth ripped out.
(Ask Mike)
SUB 241K
High Holiday Services at Hillel House
for Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur
Festival Meals are provided for:
Students $5.00 Lunch & Dinner
Non-Students $6.00 Lunch
$7.00 Dinner
(Meals must be pre-paid)
Call Hillel House to make reservations
224-4748
Seating for services is free
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THE UBYSSEY/5 ABOUT CAMPUS
LUNCHEON SMOkCASBORD
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3504 West 4th Ave., Vancouver, B.C. 732-4535
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(Aug 19-Sept. 15,'91)
SAVE UP TO $50
on a new pair of shoes, (with trade-in)
All trade-ins are recycled
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to find an apartment |
to dress up and look G...O...O...D! tommorrow
to phone my mother
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to rent a TV* VCR
to rent a bed
to get furniture for my place
to make sure I sit next to... in class
to go on 'like' a real date
to keep up with my reading each week (.. .right!)
to get some coffee now... /
Just too many things to do and not enough time to do the tun things?
Grantree Furniture Rental can help. Rent a complete apartment
of furniture or just a bed, or just a TV, or just whatever you need.
Call or hurry in special students' rates in effect now!
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FURNITURE • TVS • VCRS
Rules to make
busing a breeze
by Cheryl Niamath
Every morning, a zillion people squish into BC Transit buses
and make the trip out to UBC.
Every night, the same zillion people cram the buses home.
If you're one ofthe lucky people who has a car, or a friend with
a car, or a trusty bicycle and a home near campus, don't bother
to read this—it's not for you.
If you're one ofthe unlucky zillion, pay attention.
There are rules for riding the bus. Most people obviously
don't know them. So to make bus travel more pleasant for all of
us, here is a handy list, in no particular order. Clip it out and keep
it in your knapsack for easy reference.
1. If the bus is crowded, MOVE
TO THE BACK. If people are
standing up in a big bunch next to
the back doors, just say "excuse
me" and push past them. If you
don't move to the back, the front
will get jammed and the driver
won't stop for all those sad-looking
people at Broadway and
Macdonald.
2. Don't sit in the courtesy
seats if there are old people on the
bus. It only makes you look bad.
3. Don't play the music on your
walkman too loudly, especially if
it's bad music.
4. Respect other passengers'
personal space. That means not
leaning on people when the bus
turns a corner, not resting your
groceries on people's knees and
not sitting TOO CLOSE to people.
5. Bathe regularly, especially
in the summer months.
6. Drivers have all the power.
Don't argue with them—you'll
only lose. If you have a problem,
take down the bus number and
whatever other information you
can think of, and make a formal
complaint.
7. Don't expect other passengers to be terribly impressed if
you take up an entire seat or two
with your overstuffed backpack.
8. Don't stick gum on the
seats.
9. Try not to hate everybody
else crowdingin on you on a packed
bus. Tell a few jokes or something.
Crowded happy people are a lot
easier to deal with than crowded
grumpy ones.
TU1ITIVTC1 What?  A  b"fi
J-KHJlVlr  whirligig thing?
by Charles Gillis
A tour of UBC's TRIUMF particle accelerator should inspire
fledgling physicists and chemists
to indulge in the high-profile research being done in our own
backyard.
After all, we don't want
graduates to leave UBC calling
TRIUMF "that big whirligig thing
that shoots atoms around like a B-
Bgun."
TRrUMF is an acronym for
Tri-University Meson Facility—
dubbed so despite the University
of Alberta's involvement along with
the three BC universities in its
management and operation. The
accelerator is located off the southeast corner of campus, and one can
get there by simply following
WesbrookMall about one kilometre
past West 16th Avenue.
WHAT IS A PARTICLE ACCELERATOR?
The main structure at the
TRIUMF complex houses a giant
electromagnetic disc or cyclotron,
in which negatively charged hydrogen ions circulate.
These ions are intermittently
energized with "kicks" of electric
voltage until, travelling at 75 per
cent the speed of light, they are
stripped of their electrons.
The electronless protons are
then bent out ofthe cyclotron in a
single, intense beam, which is directed on a target of carbon atoms.
The resulting collision "chips off"
physically unstable particles called
mesons.
TRIUMF scientists experiment with some of these mesons,
called pions, to develop and test
theories in subatomic science. In
short, TRIUMF facilitates research
in the fundamental forces and
building blocks of nature.
WHAT HAS TRIUMF ACCOMPLISHED?
Since its first day of operation
in 1974, information collected at
TRIUMF has been used in several
applied biomedical, medical and
geological programmes.
Pions, for example, form a sufficiently focussed and energetic
beam to destroy deep-seated cancerous tumours in humans.
TRIUMF also has its own pion
therapy clinic. Other experiments
have led to breakthroughs in cardiac diagnosis, radioisotope treatment, and positron brain-scanning.
HOW CAN STUDENTS FIND
OUT MORE OR BECOME INVOLVED?
Anybody can arrange a tour of
the facility by phoning the Information Office in advance. TRIUMF
staff will organize up to two tours
a day and head of information
Michael LaBrooy can answer many
of your detailed scientific questions.
TRIUMF also hires 35 to 50
summer students each year.
6/THE UBYSSEY
September 6,1991 ABOUT CAMPUS
y
>
#
W
Reconstructing UBC
by Charlie Gillis
You have probably noticed the
flurry of construction at UBC. It is
part of a long range development
plan for the campus conceived by
the president's office and the Planning and Development Department.
P & D released a discussion
paper outlining the proposed
changes last September. Several
projects from the complete draft
plan have funding intact and are
underway.
But in the past year the plan,
which outlines a retail district and
a commercial hotel on University
Boulevard, has recei vedlittle input
from the student body.
If you have questions or concerns about the proposed"new face"
of UBC, contact the Planning and
Development office. Copies of the
discussion paper are available.
1.NETWORKS OF CENTRES
OF EXCELLENCE
Phase one of this venture has recently been completed. Perched on
top of the UBC Bookstore, the
building will house offices coordinating scientific research and
provide some space for actual research. The Networks is a federally
funded programme.
2.DAVID LAM MANAGEMENT
RESEARCH CENTRE
Those of us who remember the Bus
Stop Cafe are thinking this building better have a damn good snack
bar. Part of Strangway's controversial efforts to make UBC a repository of information for the
private sector interests, the
centre's research bureaus and library mean little to the average
student. The building will, however, offer a graduate placement
service.
3.FIRST NATIONS HOUSE OF
LEARNING
Native students will have an on-
campus centre for study and classes
in this stylized version of a Coast
Salish longhouse. The site originally planned for the buil di ng rai se
the ire of a group of faculty members who disputed the destruction
of old trees in the area.
The longhouse represents interesting and inventive architecture
in contrast to recent projects on
campus. .
IS *
4.UNIVERSITY SERVICES
BUILDING
This is the new home ofthe Physical
Plant and the Purchasing Department, among other things.
S.CECIL GREEN COLLEGE
This is the site ofthe former Social
Work building. Researchers and
scholars will work and reside in
this complex. It will overlook the
ocean from what may be the best
vantage point on campus.
6.RITSUMEIKAN HOUSE
Conceived and developed for a
Pacific Rim cultural exchange, this
residence will offer 100 beds to
UBC students interested in sharing the university experience with
students from Kyoto, Japan. During the planning stages, input was
solicited from UBC residents and
housing staff-members. Originally
scheduled to open for this September, the residence should be
completed for Winter Session 1992.
Interested students should contact
Student Housing for details.
7JBELKIN ART GALLERY
The gallery will be built on the
Main Mall side of Freddy Wood
Theatre and hold the university's
art collection. An exhibition hall
for art shows and UBC artists is
also in the plans.
8.BROCK HALL STUDENT
SERVICES BUILDING
Phase one will be added to Brock
Hall. The student services in the
General Services and Administration Building (Loans Office, Registrar, etc.) will relocate to the new
building, as well as Student
Housing.
HAMPTON PLACE
Mark Betteridge, president
of the UBC Real Estate Corporation, said the sale ofthe second
land lease was awarded to United
Properties three weeks ago.
Townhouses and some four-
storey apartments will be built
adjacent to Thames Court. Construction should start in six
months and be completed in a
year. The deal is quite secure
and will close in November,
Betteridge said.
J.
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MIPS BOOKSTORE
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Call 822-2665 • UBC-BOOK
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Darlene
Marzari, MLA
Vancouver Point Grey
Working for you
As your local representative in the BC Legislature I want to ensure that UBC students are
heard by the government in Victoria. For the
last five years I've raised issues of concern to
UBC students - issues like education funding,
a student loan system that better meets your
needs, affordable student housing and adequate childcare for students and university
employees. I want to continue to hear from
you and work with you to make UBC a better
place for students. Don't hesitate to call my
office at 732-8683, or drop by. We're open
Monday to Friday, 9:30 AM to 4:00 PM at
2505 (©Broadway).
Are you on the Voter's list?
A provincial election must be called this fall.
To vote, you must be registered on the Provincial Voter's list If you've moved in the last six
months, or if you haven't received a BC
Voter's card, you may not be on the Voter's
list And that means you may lose your right to
vote.
To check your eligibility contact:
Elections BC
100 475 E Broadway
Vancouver
Telephone: 660-6848
^ptemtor 6, J<^
THEUBYSSEY/7 CLOSEST BICYCLE SHOP TO UBC
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«.
8/THE UBYSSEY
September 6,1931 Carleton U. spraying
carcinogens on campus
by Katie Swoger
OTTAWA (CUP) — Carleton University sprayed its property with a
carcinogenic herbicide last month
despite promising in April to suspend its use.
Chris Soutter, an Ontario
Public Interest Research Group
coordinator, said students notified
his office in August, just days after
campus property was sprayed with
2,4-D.
Groundsmaster, the company
contracted by the university to
spray the fields, placed signs saying "Pesticides in use", said Soutter.
v
*
Student sits and studies on the hHI outside
the Student Union Building.
CHERYL NIAMATH PHOTO
On the back ofthe sign was a list of
the chemicals being used, including 2,4-D.
Repeated high doses of 2,4-D
lead to a higher incidence of cancer, while low doses can cause nausea and headaches, according to a
1989 study by the World Health
Organization.
The chemical has beenbanned
for use on public property in large
cities including Ottawa. However,
the university is considered private property, exempting it from
the municipal bylaw.
Chuck Watt, a Carleton vice-
president, had told OPIRG in an
April letter that the university
would not use the herbicide until a
review of campus turf management
was completed.
However, Soutter said university employees told him they
believed sports fields were exempt
from the agreement.
Watt's letter made no reference to any exemptions to the
policy, he added.
"I think they are trying to get
away with what they can," said
Soutter. "I'd like to believe they
made a mistake, but they should
have consulted us first (before
spraying) in any case."
Exposure to the herbicide can
also cause skin rashes, eye and
throat irritation, as well as disorders of the digestive and nervous
systems, and liver damage.
Natives protest university's
desecration of sacred ground
by Clive Thompson
TORONTO (CUP) — The University of Toronto may help build an
observatory in Ari zona that native
Americans say violates their religious rights and environmental
law.
The University of Arizona has
invited U of T to help fund the
world's biggest telescope, said
Ernie Seaquist, head of U of Ts
astronomy department.
Costing $60 million, it would
be one of three telescopes in the
project, which i s al so funded by the
University of Ohio, Germany's Max
Planck Institute, and the Vatican.
U of T has not yet accepted,
but is interested and is looking for
a donor to foot the bill, Seaquist
said.
But some Canadian natives
and environmentalists are asking
U of T not to join the project, saying Mt. Graham — where the telescopes will be located — is sacred
Apache ground and an environmentally sensitive area. On August
19,20 people gathered outside U of
Ts astronomy department to protest the university's potential involvement in the project.
"This project is a desecration
ofthe Apache people who use that
mountain," said Mohawk Nation
member Danny Deaton. "What if
people came here to Toronto and
started raping the graveyards?
This is what these people are facing."
U of T has not yet assessed the
ethical and environmental aspects
ofthe project, Seaquist said.
"It's far too early for us to have
thought about that."
The project recently made
headlines in the United States
when two Arizona Apache elders
filed a lawsuit to stop construction, which began last April. The
suit names Arizona's Forest Service as the defendant, claiming it
violated several environmental
laws and the Apaches' freedom of
religion by giving U of A permission to begin construction.
Apache elders regularly use
the mountain for healing purposes
such as gathering water and herbs.
Patricia Cummings, one ofthe
Apaches' lawyers, said the Forest
Service didn't make a serious effort to contact the tribes before
starting the project. U of A and the
Forest Service sent letters to 19
tribes, but many tribes say they
didn't get the letter or got it too
late.
U of A spokesperson Steve
Eremine said the university can't
be held responsible.
"In each case they (the tribes)
were asked for comment and in
each case they refused."
Butthe Forest Service ignored
existing research material that
explains the religious and cultural
uses of the mountain, Cummings
said.
"They have the papers which
talk about the Apache use of the
mountains. They have thatin their
archives."
James Abbott, Forest Service
supervisor for the area and a defendant in the lawsuit, said he
could not comment on the case.
The plaintiffs also claim the
Forest Service's studies of the
observatory's environmental impact di dn't meet environmental law
standards.
Steve Warshal, a U of A biologist who participated in many of
the studies, agreed. He said the
Forest Service ignored evidence the
project will endanger at least six
new species of insect and one species of squirrel found only on Mt.
Graham.
However, U of A astronomer
Michael Cusanovich said U of A
has already won preliminary trials for previous lawsuits launched
by environmental groups.
The court will also have to
consider that construction has already begun on two of the telescopes, he said.
"Whatever (environmental)
disturbances are going to happen
have already happened."
St. Marks
College
Roman Catholic Theological College
On U.B.C. Campus
Announces Courses for 1991 - 1992
Graduate Courses: (Fun Term)
1) Augustine: A Christian Transformation of Culture
Thurs., 7:30-9:30, begin Sept. 12. Fr. Paul Burns
2) A History of the Church
Thurs., 7:30-9:30, begin Jan. 16. Fr. James Hanrahan
3) Theological Themes in Literature
Tues., 7:30-9:30, begin Sept. 10 or Jan. 14. Fr. Ed Heidt
Non-Credit Courses: (Normally six weeks)
Beginning the Week of September 16
1) Ethical Issues in Life and Death
Mon., 7:30-9:00 p.m., Sr. Marina Smith
2) Galileo Science and the Catholic Church
Wed., 7:30-9:00 p.m., Fr. Leo Klosterman
3) The Gospel of John (at Little Flower Academy)
Wed., 7:30-9:30 p.m., Fr. James Hanrahan
4) Jesus Ben Stra and Hebrew Wisdom Literature
Mon., 4:00-5:00 p.m., Dr. Paul M. St. Pierre
5) Liberation Theology
Thurs., 7:30-9:00 p.m., Fr. Eduardo Diaz
6) Newman and the Development of Doctorine
Thurs., 7:30-9:00 p.m., Fr. Leo Klosterman
7) The Spirituality of Thomas Merton
Mon., 7:30-9:00 p.m., Fr. Ed Heidt
8) Women in Canadian Society:
A Social Jiistice Approach
Thurs., 7:30-9:00 p.m., Sr. Marina Smith
Pastoral Courses: (Full year; no fee)
1) Fundamentals of Faith (begins October 8)
Tues., 7:30-9:00 p.m., Fr. Leo Klosterman Sr. Monica Guest
2) Third World Immersion (begins September 17)
Tues., 7:00-8:00 p.m., Fr. Paul Burns
Beginning the Week of January 13
1) The Catholic Church in B.C. History
Mon., 7:30-9:30 p.m., Fr. James Hanrahan
2) The Church and Contemporary Challenges
Mon., 7:30-9:00 p.m., Sr. Marina Smith
3) Darwin, Evolution and the Church
Wed., 7:30-9:00 p.m., Fr. Leo Klosterman
4) The Divine Poems of John Donne
of Bread Street and St. Paul's
Mon., 4:00-5:00 p.m., Dr. Paul M. St. Pierre
5) Faith and Post Vatican II Church Architecture
Thurs., 7:30-9:00 p.m., Shelagh Lindsey
6) Help in Living Through Serious Loss (Pastoral Course)
Tues., 7:30-9:00 p.m., Dorothy Stanwood
7) Prayer in the Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius
Wed., 3:30-4:30 p.m., Dr. Shirley Sullivan
8) Religious Education for the Year 2000
Thurs., 7:30-9:00 p.m., Sr. Marina Smith
9) Religious Vision of Bernard Lonergan
Thurs., 7:30-9:00 p.m., Dr. Patrick Crean
10)The Spirituality of Thomas Merton
Mon., 7:30-9:00 p.m., Fr. Ed Heidt
Registration and Fees
A Registration Form and course description will be found in the College
Catalog. Please pick one up at the College or write the Registrar
requesting a copy be sent to you. The fee is $1^.00 per course for
students and seniors, $30.00 for others. To obtain graduate credit for
the Credit Courses, it is necessary to register through tthe accrediting
institution.
ST. MARK'S COLLEGE
5935 lona Drive, Vancouver B.C., V6T1J7
(604)224-3311
Principal: Rev. T. James Hanrahan, CSB, BA, MA, LMS
Registrar: Rev. Leo J. Klosterman, CSB, BA, MS, PhD
'TCcct^c &
KIWI'S BUSINESS CENTRE
2490  BALACLAVA  AT  W.  BROADWAY
Phone    731-6945        Fax    731-1752
SELF SERVE COPIES   6 CENTS EACH
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September 6,1991
THEUBYSSEY/9 ARTS
I should've gone to work instead
by Carla
Maftechuk
One ofthe
most
amazing aspects
of Enumclaw's
Lollapalooza
festival was not
the rain that
drenched concert-
goers for ten
hours straight,
but the fascistic
rules being
enforced by the
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two plays by Margaret Hollingsworth
THE MOUNT PLEASANT COMMUNITY CENTRE
3161 Ontario St. at 16th
Friday. Sept. 6 2:30 pm
Saturday, Sept. 7 noon
Sunday. Sept. 8 noon
Wednesday, Sept 11 9:45 pm
Thursday, Sept 12 9:45 pm
The University of British Columbia
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
1991-1992 SEASON
5th of July
by Lanford Wilson
Septemeber 18-28
by William Shakespeare
November 6-16
SARCOPHAGUS
by Vladimir Gubaryev
January 15-25
SEMPER FIDELIS
by Ian Weir
March 4-14
Information & Reservations Phone: 822-2678
Room 207 Frederic Wood Theatre
King County fairgrounds
employees.
MUSIC
Lollapalooza
Enumclaw, Washington
Aug. 28
No cameras, no umbrellas
and no food. People who were
caught inside with forbidden
substances such as peanut butter
sandwiches were escorted out by
several security members. No
one was allowed to re-enter after
leaving.   .
Those who actually managed
to remain on-site found themselves shivering and slipping
through mud instead of
dancing.
One ofthe few highlights of
the too-long day was the performance given by Siouxsie and the
Banshees. The only band to be
called back for an encore, their
sound was excellent.
Headliners Jane's Addiction
were a disappointment even to
die-hard fans. The band had
trouble remembering which song
to play next and made several
false starts. Even recalling their
own lyrics proved too difficult at
times.
Maybe if the crowd had also
ingested whatever the band had,
the show would have been a lot
more fun. "Jane's Addiction's last
concert" was a poor send off for
them. Even some people who had
waited all day to see the band
left before they finished.
Off to one side, the festival
took on a different look. Under
the only shelter available,
several political groups had
tables set up alongside displays
of local art.
People from Radical Women,
Refuse and Resist!, and Queer
Nation were happy to talk and
provided a welcome distraction
from the cries of "faggot" and
"motherfucker" made by Henry
Rollins, Ice T and the Butthole
Surfers.
What could have been a cool
reason to "take the day off was
overall a let down. As one
concert-goer said, "Let's avoid
the rush and leave when it's
over.
• • • Lollapalooza
o
by Raul Peschiera
The story I heard was
100,000-plus people were
going to attend. My brother and I
bought our tickets early—30
dollars for all those bands is
amazing.
You see, lollapalooza means
"huge party of many people" and
on the news I saw scenes of
swarming, sweaty crowds
screaming and singing, and
people diving off the stage to surf
or wipe out.
But it was raining. Not too
bad though, the King County
Fairgrounds in Enumclaw (the
place ofthe great party) was 45
miles south of Seattle and the
weather could clear up. We just
turned up the radio, crossed the
border and took off.
We got lost. You'd think a
concert where more than 100,000
people were supposed to attend
would have signs to help you out.
Went to a gas station and
stood in line to ask directions.
Turned out, everyone else at that
station was going too.
After several kilometers of
twists and turns, we got to the
end of a traffic jam—more than
ten kilometers of over-heated
cars inched towards the fairground. By now it was pouring.
Three hours. That's right,
three hours of waiting, car-
crawling and a hell of a lot of
stopping. People parked about
five kilometers away, thinking
lollapalooza was just over the
next hill. They were mistaken.
We had to bribe a parking
lot attendant to let us park
across the street.
We finally got there, it was
pouring and the Violent Femmes
were just ending. We missed the
Henry Rollins Band, The
Butthole Surfers and most ofthe
Femmes. Great fun.
Mud, rain and they would
not allow anyone in with food or
umbrellas. Everywhere smelled
like horse excrement. Organization? Talk about absolutely none.
The Violent Femmes were
good, from the little we heard,
and we thought the day would
pick up.
My brother and I stood
under the only covered spot,
where bad art was displayed and
a man lifted a concrete block
with his nipples.
Then Fishbone came on and
danced to their ska and new rock
sound. Their show is best when
the crowd is right there at the
stage. But here they were too far
away (the organizers had to
make room for the bouncers);
Fishbone looked lost and tired.
But they still ended too soon.
All the bands seemed to play for
forty minutes, then the wait
seemed almost as long for the
next act.
Meanwhile we were soaked,
cold and tired of seeing a man's
nipples stretch half a foot.
Ice Ts performance was the
best. The power of his music and
lyrics flew through the steaming
crowd and they sung and
danced. His stage presence was
overwhelming, and as he
shouted "Fuck the police!" even
the county police danced.
Body Count came on and Ice
T provided the vocals. Though
they were virtual unknowns
before this show, other rock
bands better watch out. Body
Count will take over.
By the end of Body Count,
we were hyped and wired, but
the rain, the cold, the mud and
the misery of portable toilets
were too much.
Maybe under better conditions we would have liked
Siouxsie and the Banshees, but
when she said, "You don't
deserve it but 111 give you this
one," I lost all interest. Not
much to say about Jane's
Addiction, the headline act,
since we were laughing at them
for most ofthe time. Perry
Farrel talked for ten minutes
about his girlfriend and how
much he loves her. Then he
added a racist joke that fell
quite flat on the crowd.
As a friend said, "I couldn't
see anything and all I could
smell was bad breath, bad, bad
b.o. and horse shit."
And as my brother noted, "I
would pay 30 dollars NOT to be
here."
From bar mitzvahs to jamming
by Kevin Elaschuk
Chris Sigerson is a versatile
jazz pianist who plans to make some
changes in his career.
Sigerson, aged 28, comes from a musical
family. "My father, uncle and grandmother are
all piano players," Sigerson says.
INTERVIEW
with Vancouver musician Chris Sigerson
He began playing piano at a young age, often
while his uncle or father played organ.
"We'd play standards like A Train', 'Georgia'
and 'Satin Doll' just for fun."
Sigerson probably knew a couple hundred
standard tunes by the end of elementary school.
"Throughout my career, which has had its
instabilities, I have benefitted a lot from my
family, and especially from my dad who has been
very supportive."
Music became a focus for Sigerson while
attending high school in Richmond, where there
was a good nucleus of players to jam with. "We
had a very demanding music teacher. He challenged us yet he would leave us to our devices. I
played flute in the school combo." Ironically, the
combo's pianist is now a flautist in the Toronto
Symphony Orchestra.
He later entered the Vancouver Community
College, where he formed a trio with bassist Ken
Lister and drummer Craig Scott. The trio still
...continued on page 12
Jazz pianist Chris Sigerson.
JOANNA GRAYSTON PHOTO
10/THE UBYSSEY
September 6* -1991 ARTS
O
O
o
-.-   ft***4*"-"!
Freedom of expression is
always a concern, as humans
are always struggling to
develop innovative and
creative ways to communicate, as well as deal with
external and internal
repression. The presentations at Vancouver's 7th
Annual Fringe Festival
are a vibrant part of this
struggle.
Whether it's the
insanity ofthe modern
world, coping with
guilt and deceit,
wallowing in agony,
sex and food, or
working towards
self-liberation, the
Fringe depicts
themes daring,
dangerous and downright demented.
An international array of
theatre companies are
participating, from local
Vancouver and BC troupes to
the Moscow Youth Art
Theatre, which is presenting
an adaptation of Orwell's
Animal Farm from a Soviet
perspective. The book has
only recently been translated into Russian, and in
light ofthe dramatic
changes in the Soviet
Union, including the failed
coup attempt, Orwell's
message is imbued with a
renewed importance and
presented in a new fashion.
Take a journey out to
the Fringe, where perceptions of reality are remodeled and everyone gets
caught up in the comical,
colourful and clamorous
scene that takes over
Mount Pleasant every
September.
Tickets are available
the day of the performa nee
at the Central Outlet
Wicket Service (COWS) at
240 E.lOth and Main Street
until 60 minutes before
showtime, or at the venues
45 minutes before
showtime. Additional
information can be obtained at The Fringe Club
on the third floor of Mount
Pleasant Legion at 11th
and Main and the Grunt
Cafe (209 E.6th and Main).
•***
Taste freedom at the
Fringe
.5-
n
Swarming, sweaty crowds at Lollapalooza.
The 7th Annual Fringe
Festival Venue list:
1. Hot Jazz Club, 2120 Main St. & 6th Ave.
2. Arcadian Hall, 2214 Main St. & 6th Ave., (main
floor).
3. Main Dance Place, 2214 Main St. (upstairs).
4. The Anza Club, 3 W.8th Ave. & Ontario St.,
licensed (19 yrs. and over only).
5. Lunatic Fringe Cabaret, 315 E.Broadway &
Scotia St.
6. Cinderella Ballroom, 185 E.l 1th Ave. & Main.
7. Heritage Hall, 3102 Main St. & 15th Ave.
8. Vancouver Little Theatre, 3102 Main St. (back
alley).
9. Cambrian Hail, 215 E.l 7th Ave. & Main.
10. Mount Pleasant Community Centre
3661 Ontario St. & 16th.
RAUL PESCHIERA PHOTO
Doing so much
by Harald Gravelsins
Imagination, guts and persistence are the sort of
things that get a Fringe show on stage. Not
money. The Fringe is the art ofthe impossible. Not
just in the performance we actually see, but behind ...
the scenes and each step ofthe way following the
scramble to get in an application in January. ...>:&s
There are steps like firing one of your lead actors ,,
with two weeks left to opening night. Or scavenging -^
through dumpsters and dark alley ways for props and %
set materials. Or believing that you will fill the house ' v
when your potential audience has no less than ninety-
nine other Fringe shows to choose from.
FRINGE PREVIEW
Abrasion ' "!<
Anza Club
September 6, 7, 11, 12, 13, 15
Producer Doti Sombu Niedermayer has done it all
and then some. Niedermayer and life partner Brian
Peterson are producing Abrasion, which represents
their first appearance in the Fringe. 7
Niedermayer fired the lead actor,.but quickly
recruited a strong new lead actor to fill the gap in the .7*
cast (Some desperate pleading worked wonders.)
Each ofthe hundreds of posters and handbills
printed a month ago had to be amended. Correction
fluid, white tape and the simple stroke ofthe pen were
the options.
While searching for props, Niedermayer scored a
discarded dry cleaner's counter as well as some sign
boards. (The streets and laneways of Mount Pleasant
are abound with raw materials for creative minds. )
Abrasion developed from a script written by
with so little and laughing
about it P™„5,,-,„fW,,,,^mmtl,„
i-ivS^1 '...-ulMBii'v*:'
'" ^flMh'ii
Sl^^CMp
Peterson as part of his thesis requirement for a
master's degree in theatre and creative writing f'rojn
UBC. The piece was first presented two years ago fts
part of UBC's Brave New Playwrights series.
It has undergone substantial revision in the
workshops used by the cast to prepare the show for the
Fringe. Apart from Ryerson alumnus Todd Dulmag?,
the cast consists of UBC graduates and students,
including Gary Davis, Deb Pickman, and Renee Iaci.
Taking the show off campus and taking on the
world by way ofthe Fringe says a lot about its creator's
guiding spirit. Peterson is at the threshold of crossing
into art as a livelihood. A few make it big; a small
number get by; more end up starving and hiding from
the student loan police; most pack up their idealism
and sell out to the world of suits and ties.
Abrasion draws upon such fates and inflames
them in a peculiar family setting. Dad wants to pass on
the family business—building condominium retreats
on islands of toxic waste in the South Pacific.
Neither of his sons appears to be a likely successor. One aspires to be a poet and the other to live the
safe and secure yuppie lifestyle. Mom suffers the
turmoil oflife on the crutch of religious dogma and her
daughter-in-law maneuvers into anyone's agenda if
there's material fortune to be gained.
s From someone else's pen all this might come out
dripping with ponderous righteousness. Peterson has
chosen to make the piece a comedy, and has filled it
with sharp-edged wit, dark shadows and many shades
of gray. It promises to be a good time and intelligent.
Sounds too good to be true, doesn't it? But hey,
this is the Fringe after all, and as Niedermayer and
Peterson can tell you, more things are possible than
vou imagined.
September 6,1991
THE UBYSSEY/H 'A
AMPUS
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Hours: 9:30 AM-5:30 PM
Monday - Friday
10:00 AM-4:00 PM Saturday
Bar mitzvahs
exists to this day.
The members were individually inspired by the 1960s Miles
Davis quintet rhythm section
with pianist Herbie Hancock,
bassist Ron Carter and drummer
Tony Williams.
College highlights for the
Sigerson trio were successful
performances with the VCC Jazz
Choir at the Queen Elizabeth
Theatre and at the Orpheum and
working with the great jazz
vocalist Ernastine Anderson. At
this time the trio also began
performing around the city,
Sigerson says.
A few years ago, Sigerson
added alto saxophonist Roy Styffe
and myself on trumpet to the trio
to perform at the Alcan Jazz
Festival. "I felt good about the
concert and the series of smaller
venue gigs that led up to it. It
was great to play our original
music," Sigerson says.
Sigerson, an unselfish
player, is just a happy to accompany as he is to. play solos and
cannot be pigeon-holed as a jazz
player. Sigerson, who has played
more than his share of weddings
and restaurant gigs, says he has
played in almost every community hall in the city.
Five years ago, Sigerson
toured with vocalist K.D. Lang
and her band. The group played
in Nashville, Tennesee where
they performed on the Hee Haw
television show at the Grande
Ole Opry. "I'm influenced by my
wife Joanna's musical tastes,
which include country music and
the blues."
He has also played in Tokyo
with the funk group H.B. Concept. Unlike horn players who
carry their own instruments to
every gig, a pianist often has to
adapt to the piano that is
provided. Sigerson has found a
partial solution to this problem.
.continued from page 10
"I often carry a digital piano to
gigs so I don't have to be handcuffed to a newly painted piece of
furniture.
Sigerson is recovering from a
summer filled with casual gigs
and a two-week teaching stint at
the Courtney music camp.
Tm at another crossing
point in my career. It's not the
first nor the last. I want to move
in a positive musical direction. I
want to spend less time playing
weddings and bar mitzvahs and
play more quality music.
"I plan to start having
sessions at my home where we
can play for ourselves because we
want to."
Sigerson hopes to do some
recording soon and is excited
about doing more composing. "I
hope that my writing will reflect
my various musical interests."
He successfully debuted
some of his original composition
a few months ago at Cafe Django.
Sigerson is another musician
frustrated with the lack of
venues for jazz in Vancouver.
"The Coastal Jazz and Blues
Society do what they can to
promote improvised music, but as
far as steady club gigs go, the
scene is the worst that I've seen
it in ten years of playing. There
should be at least three or four
good jazz rooms in the city."
I asked Sigerson what was
keeping him in Vancouver.
"There's been enough of various
types of work up to this point and
there are some fine players here.
I don't want to wander aimlessly," he says.
"While I'm here, Fm going to
develop my own music and put
my own personal stamp on
already existing music."
When Sigerson feels ready,
he intends tour, playing jazz
clubs and festivals. Vancouver
may not be his base in the future.
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12/THE UBYSSEY
September 6,1991 HILLEL HOUSE HAPPENINGS
Words for the wise
Some people are like toads
who glumly squat, daring anyone
to make a derogatory remark
about their warts. If anything
negative at all crosses their path
(e.g., a wasp), they lash out with
their tongues and completely
swallow it, stinger and all. This
will make them very cranky, and
they are apt to feel stung for a 1 ong
time afterwards. For years they
will sit, frowning, on their lily
pads, keenly on the lookout for
more wasps. They will squish
anything that looks even remotely
insectoi d, thinking that it must be
another damned wasp. If other
toads should happen along, the
wasp will be messily regurgitated
for all to see. Soon, the entire
pond will be hopping, and every
toad will be sure to make plenty of
waves. Even if the swallowed
object wasn't a wasp at all, but
rather a delectable moth, the riot
will continue loud with croaks
about the injustice and
unpalatability of it all.
I don't think we should always be on the look out for wasps.
True, wasps are all too common,
but so are those little green things
that always fly into your hair but
don't bite. (Of course if you find
them in your rose bush you'd better
spray them with something.) If
one is too busy looking out for
wasps, one easily misses these
pretty green bugs. Worse yet, in
paranoia, one might mistake them
for a wasp and squish them. It is
a wise toad who recognizes that
not everything resembling a wasp
is something to get puffed up
about. I submit that many toads
are yelling "wasp" who should be
yelling "daddy longlegs", "Rod
Stewart", or some other (more
accurate) insect name.
Brian Rowley
Dietetics 4
September 1991    Tishrei 5752         ]
 Y—.	
l:unoay                 Monday                Tuesday              woonoscay             Thursday                Friday                 Saturday
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September 6,1991
THE UBYSSEY/13 Loan fee
hypocritical
The Canada Student Loans Program was
set up to provide aid to students seeking an
education but in financial need. It aimed to
provide students with a means to finance their
eduaction.
Yet this aim is being eroded.
If you applied for a Canada Student Loan
and have been to pick it up, you probably discovered the government has instituted a three
per cent guarantee fee on CSLs to be paid before
you receive your loan.
This guarantee fee ostensibly offsets the
cost of students who default on their loans. It is
part of the "deficit reduction," which students
are apparently responsible for. (As opposed to
the military, corporate grants, etc.)
The government has decided the deficit is a
greater priority than educating the population
and making education accessible to all.
This fee is effectively a three per cent cut to
loans. With the maximum CSL amountof $3,570
a student pays a $107 guarantee fee. This is
$107 less for students on loans to live on; the
money could have been spent on groceries, rent,
tuition, books and the necessities of living.
Tragically, it has been implemented at a
time when students have experienced a drop in
the number of summer jobs as well as soaring
tuition.
Students who do not need loans will be
unaffected by these changes. It is students with
lower incomes, and those in financial need, who
will suffer. Again, they will find another barrier
between themselves and an education.
And as if to add insult to injury, the government has failed to inform students of the new
fee, leaving it as a surprise.
Although it is convenient to be able to pay
with a post-dated cheque, not all students have
the option of chequing accounts. This leaves
buying a money order, paying cash, or dropping
out.
the Ubyssey
September 6,1991
The Ubyssey is published Tuesdays and Fridays by the
Alma Mater Society ofthe University of British Columbia.
Editorial opinions are those ofthe staff and not necessarily those of the university administration, or of the
sponsor. The Ubyssey is published with the proud
support ofthe Alumni Association. The editorial office is
Rm. 241k of the Student Union Building. Editorial
Department, phone 822-2301; advertising, 822-3977;
FAX* 822-6093
Today was the day that Mikey had all four
of his wisdom teeth yanked out. Sharon
Undores promptly placed them In the navel of Sage Davies. who came down from
the mountain bearing gifts for all. Greg
Davis injured himself in the line of nutty
duty, so Yggy King did a nice thing and
healed his wound with magic herbs. Tanya
Paz fought the evil dragon, while the wizard ElaSine Griffith played cards with Kevin
Elaschuk and Rick Hiebert. Effie Pow told
bardic tales for Carla Maftechuk and
Harald Gravelsins to enjoy, but kept getting
distracted by Matthew Johnson and
Dianne Rudolph doing that head spinning
thing. Sam Green and Paul Gordon played
in the heather while Victor and Martin
played with the weather. Don Mah found
his way In. jest because he was once nice
to George Anderson the bard. Melanie
and Sue of the PK clan deposed the monarchy, while Raul Peschiera and Helen
Willoughby-Prlce tried to Instill another. In
the end. Karlyn Koh. Cheryl Niemath. and
Charlie Gillis formed an autonomous
colecttve which everybody joined 'cos it
was much more fun than watching Paul
Dayson pick. Steve Chan spread joy and
light, and Chung Wong joined with nature.
Frances Foran and Rod Solar just chilled,
surveying the scene. They even shared a
bit of Mike's nitrous, laughing all the way.
Editor*
Paul Dayton • Sharon Undoroa • Carta Maftachuk
Raul Poachlora • Efflo Pow
LET   t*\£ bBT TWi6 ST/W5HT-— I  BtftfKeW/
*3$oc Ahiv pm yyc ur FiesMr.*.. so r ca* pay
>T  BACK LAt^R AT  Pf*U*2  Pi-US   &\lgr A*J>
-^/\ir~ cam r &c rcfz rn^ piSiw.£MGe^^t^,r
Letters
WSO needs
new decorator
What happened to the
Women Students Office?
The counsellors are gone,
replaced by new, unknown
staff. The office, painted
white and battleship grey, is
as intimidating as a dentists
office. Staff are hidden behind doors and high reception desks. The brochure
makes me think of a Socred
Women program.
When I started at this
University as a mature
single parent, I knew that I
would need support to get
me through. I found that
support at the WSO. The
office was comfortable and
womanly. The staff were
warm, supportive, and most
importantly, accessible.
Whatever Marsha Trew's
plans are, she has effectively
destroyed the one place on
The Ubyssey welcomes letters on any Issue. Letters must be typed and are not to exceed 300 words in length. Content
which Is judged to be libelous, homophobic, sexist, racist or factually incorrect will not be published. Please be concise.
Letters may be edited for brevity, but it Is standard Ubyssey policy not to edit letters for spelling or grammatical mistakes.
Please bring them, with Identification, to SUB 241k. Letters must Include name, faculty, and signature.
this campus where women
could get the support and
help they needed in the type
of environment that would
empower them. If it hadn't
been for the WSO, and especially for Nancy Horsman,
I would not still be here at
UBC continuing my studies.
I mourn the demise of our
space and call on all other
Women students to join together to protest the loss of
our office.
Charlotte Vimtrup
Sociology
Ubyssey
unjust?
Hey Ubyssey, if you
claim that you do "not print
letters deemed racist" as you
state in the September 3 issue then why is your staff
writer Chung Wong allowed
to allege that " Words have
less meaning to whites (Aug
15)"?
It seems to me that there
is more to being just and fair
than is understood in your
Politically Correct philosophy.
David Chivo
Take a chill pill
Dear Chung Wong,
After being a faithful
reader of your Ubyssey articles over the last few
months I have come to an
explicit conclusion. The
reason why you are persecuted in societyis not because
you are Asian—it is because
you are goofy.
Please, take a Valium
and get a life.
Sincerely,
Antonia Rozario
Nursing
A bad smell
Jennifer Craig, who's
playing nasty games? (Letters, Sept. 3, 1991) Who's
the woman "undermining
and maligning another
woman in a newspaper"?
Nancy Horsman is righting
to save a crucial service for
women on campus. She is
disagreeing with an administrator and a policy. You
are the "worse than offensive" one, for you are the
woman viciously attacking
a woman, not a position, in
the newspaper. Jennifer
Craig, you are the one who
"stinks".
Charlotte Vimtrup
Sociology
TROY TAYLOR: The letter
you submitted exceeds the
300 word limit. Please come
in and either edit your letter
or re-submit a revised copy.
Going to class
by Chung Wong
Sitting at the steps before Buchanan Tower, I
found myself peacefully
clothed in Thursday
afternoon's tropical sunshine, plotting my escape.
Where will I go?
When the bell rings at
2:20 p.m., I find myself suddenly feeling like a turnstile with herds of people
rushing by me, ignoring my
existence. Only two would
recognize me past my
shades. All the others
seemed to look up, down
but not all around.
At 2:23 p.m., the second herd rushes in. Beyond
their blinders, there seemed
to be a certain united rhythm
to their steps. I almost felt
like a city slicker. Do I actually want to be one of them
once again for the fourth
time?
At 2:25 p.m., a student
with      a
white
cane approaches
the steps.
After tapping them with her
cane, an animated expression that resembles one that
accompanies, "Oh shit,"
flashes across her face. She
then heads toward the Rose
Garden.
Freestyle
At 2:27 p.m., the last
herd or lost herd seemed to
have lost their rhythm, unable to decide between fast
and slow and stop and go.
Yes, they're late. Naughty,
naughty. Should we feel like
this?
  At     2:28
p.m., the
student
with the
white
cane returns and I approach her to inquire if she
needs directions—the least
I could do as a seasoned
traveller on these stampede
trails.
"Fm headed toward the
Music Building," she says.
"But I can't take the steps
or 111 get lost."
I accompany her on the
alternative path and discover that it is no piece of
cake either: Protuding concrete objects, a Physical
Plant truck from behind, a
maze of columns, a choice
between a slow elevator or
stairs with glass doors. And
the end, a classroom door
that doesn't open well. Not
to mention the strange
voices and strange conversations from people seemingly far from pleasant.
I must get out of here.
14/THE UBYSSEY
September 6,1991 -4
*
lETTERS/OP-ED
This freestyle was submitted in
March, 1990, but not printed It is
being resubmitted, for the realities still ring true for too many
Asians who join or work for The
Ubyssey.
by Chung Wong
No name, Mandel (Ngan),
Steve (Chan), Keith (Leung),
Chung, David (Loh), Victor (Chew
Wong), Hao (Li), Don (Mah), Hai
(Van Le) and Roger (Kanno).
In order of frequency, these
are names I have been called by
Wrong name
the dominant Caucasian sector of
The Ubyssey between 1988 and
1990.
The listexcludes Chen, Cheng,
Chong and Chang.
Being called the wrong name
comes with working in an office
Freestyle
with several whites—usually a
majority. I have yet to come across
an Asian who has not had this
disturbing reality. Do we really all
look like no-name brand products?
In last year, I have heard
Christina (Chen) used interchangeably with Carol (Hui), and
likewise, May (Wong) for Brenda
(Wong). Dave and Don seemed to
have been the same one. And myself, how about a smaller subset
ofthe list above in return for my
years of experience here.
I worked with Victor Chew
Wong at The Toronto Star and I
was frequently called Victor.
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receive one complimentary menu
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Limit $7.00        Exp. Sept 30/91
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Reservations 731-7899
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 I
Make love
not hate
In the Tuesday, September 3rd,
edition of The Ubyssey, T.L.
Danlock writes "...if they (recent
immigrants) wish to remain Chinese, East Indian, or whatever,
they should go home because they
obviously do not appreciate the
general openness and kindness of
real Canadians,..." T.L., they are
"home." They are "real Canadians." And they may "remain Chinese, East Indian, or whatever" for
as long as they wish. Debasing
their heritage or trying to dispossess them of it is neither "open" nor
"kind" but racist.
Ubyssey, please stick to your
usual letters policy: don't print such
hate. The freedom debate does not
include the freedom to oppress.
T.L., thanks for your reminder
of China's genocides in Tibet, East
Turkestan, and Mongolia. Lets
not wage cultural genocide against
non-caucasian Canadians.
Canada's First Nations shared
their land with us Caucasians and
our culture. Let's "appreciate the
general openness and kindness" of
these "real Canadians" by following their example and sharing with
all peoples ofthe world. Love, don't
hate!
John Lipscomb
MBA 2.5
this Office (formerly the Dean of
Women's Office) has given thousands of women a stronger sense
of personal worth within a university environment of male "rationalism" and patriarchal control.
The counselling function has
been the constituency part ofthe
Women Students' Office. When
women have come bodily into the
Office for help with their concerns,
they have come with identifiable
women's issues. Advocacy for
women students at UBC has
started here. From such advocacy
has come the Academic Women's
Association and the Sexual Harassment Office.
The Office will now promote
temporary programs in male-traditional faculties. Counselling of
women students will be left to
other agencies on campus and in
the community, according to director Dr. Marsha Trew.
Staff of the Office understand
the frailty of this course. Programs in Science and Applied
Science faculties which are advertised in a current Women
Students' Office brochure are
lovely to talk about, but fragile to
touch. It is highly unlikely that
faculty deans will long want the
women's office advising them on
matters of policy within their
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disciplines.
Further, the window-dressing effects of such programs hide
from the public some of the academic realities for women at UBC.
At this university, favoured programs in science and in computer/
applied sciences are dripping with
funds, while the arts and the less
favored sciences live in third world
poverty.
Since women undergraduates
are registered largely in Arts and
in the life-promoting sciences, they
cannot command the power, nor
the prestige, accorded their
brothers in the science technocracies.
When public relations' programs have run their natural
courses, and have collapsed of
their own lack of substance, the
Women Students' Office will have
little left. It is a sad ending for a
viable women's service office on
this campus.
Veteran staff of the office have
had no input into the dramatic
change of direction, and they leave
their offices in Brock Hall 203
with increasing despair and a
cynicism for the future of women
at the University of British Columbia.
Nancy Horsman
WSO Counsellor
THE
UfflMfflE
PUT-ON
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We use only premium latex. And Shields
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Thinking
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Shields. Your partners in
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Shields
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Make no mistake
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Frailty in WSO
A dispute over major changes
in the UBC Women Students' Office—changes which eliminate
counselling and promote programs
in male faculties—has grown increasingly serious. No resolution
seems possible to seasoned staff
members of the Office, who are
taking unpaid leave and resigning University appointments.
The Women Students' Office
at UBC has been part of student
services at the University for 70
years—the office celebrates its
birthday September 21.
Over that long span of years
Frosh not yet Jaded by the
unrveristy experience.
THE OFFICE OF AWARDS
AND FINANCIAL AID
WILL NOT BE MAILING DURING
THE CANADA POST
LABOUR DISPUTES.
If you submitted a CSL/BCSL application
between August 1 st and August 9th, your notice
of award, and for those eligible, a work study
application, will be available in the Awards
Office after 1pm on Friday, September 6.
If you are expecting information from the
Awards Office please contact us. Notices not
picked up will be mailed when the postal dispute
is settled.
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THE UBYSSEY/15 "Ever wonder
why non - IBM
computers are
always called
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or "PC
compatibles"?
r
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Think about it.
T"7 he reason is
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with superior quality,
value and unparalleled service. Always a
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way for the rest ofthe
microcomputer
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fooled by the followers,
go with the best.
SPECIAL OFFER
It's now easy to have the best.
As a university student, staff, or
faculty member, you qualify for a
special offer from IBM. The
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everything you need.
WHAT'S IN "THE PACKAGE"?
Until October 31sl, you can
purchase the IBM PS/2 Model 55SX
with everything you need lo make
coursework easier and faster than
you could ever imagine. The Model
55SX offers the best possible
performance at a reasonable price!
THE IBM PS/2 MODEL 55SX
What separates the PS/2 from
other PCs is IBM's "Micro Channel™
Architecture". It provides a
multi-lane "highway" for your
information, enabling you to perform
multiple tasks at the same time. The
PS/2 works faster to help you work
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