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UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Jan 7, 1966

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 NUDIE PICTURES STILL HUNG AT UBC
BATON ROUGE, La. — Residence
walls at Louisiana State University here
have never been nuder.
The housing administration has 'banned nude pictures in any form—including
pictures on walls or in books or magazines.
The student newspaper, The Daily
Reveille, protested even medical texts
and Playboy would be included.
It said it would be ridiculous to ban
Playboy, the first of the large nudie
magazines, because it contains some of
the top literary figures and thinkers of
the  day.
At UBC, Housing Director Knute
Buttedahl said "no such rule exists here."
"Tackboards were placed in every
room and the housing administration is
not concerned with what goes on them,"
he said.
All he worries about is that the
public halls be in good taste. He said
there has never been a similar problem at
UBC, as UBC students are on the average
very mature and responsible.
Buttedahl said the Louisianna legislation left no opportunity to practise
self restraint:
"University is one place where one
has a chance to practise restraint," he
said.
Buttedahl said he couldn't afford
Playboy, "but it has very nice pictures."
He also said that no mature person
should be restricted; but he does not
agree with smut.
TiVF UBYSSEY
Vol. XLVIII, No. 33        VANCOUVER,  B.C., FRIDAY, JANUARY 7, 1966 «gH*>48    CA  4-3916
UBC'S LIBRARY will grow to three times its present size over the next ten years,
according to head librarian Basil Stuart-Stubbs. Planned changes include additional
stack and study facilities by  1968 and "branch" stations located around the campus.
UBC library will expand
threefold in ten years
UBC's library will triple
in size from 700,000 volumes
to 2,000,000 in ten years, said
chief librarian Basil Stuart-
Stubbs Thursday.
This growth will require additional stack, public work,
and study areas by  1968.
Stuart-Stubbs said he. sees
the answer in.a decentralized
system of large branch libra
ries, such as the Woodward
Library, the Forestry-Agriculture Complex under construction, and the planned Music
Library.
Other branches are needed
to serve undergraduate students, and the faculties of
science, applied science, and
education, he said.
"There are no definite plans
Drug expert Dr. Alpert
brings LSD to UBC
"IF" is coming to UBC.
Dr. Richard Alpert and Stephen Durkee will conduct
an "IF" meeting at noon, Jan. 11, in the UBC auditorium.
An "IF" meeting consists of questions and answers
exploring the possibilities of LSD and similar consciousness-altering chemicals.
Alpert was discharged in 1S«S3 as professor at Harvard
for unauthorized experiments with students with LSD.
Alpert said the drug produces a strong intensification
of the senses.
"It is a religious experience without any significance
side effects on the human body," he said.
The meeting is sponsored by Special Events.
for these yet because of a
lack of funds for construction
and operation," he said.
If construction funds can
be obtained, the staff and
operating budget will have to
be  increased.
The doubling of book purchasing is already creating
staffing problems for the processing divisions. "Although
additional personnel have
been added a backlog of unprocessed material has developed and will continue to
grow,"   said   Stuart-Stubbs.
"Despit great effort by the
UBC staff, the staff shortage
is such that while we provide
the quality of reference service desired, we do not provide the quantity required."
He said to retain professional librarians, 'They must
share in any large salary increases enjoyed by other
groups on campus."
He   pointed   out   that  two-
thirds of the library staff are
clerical    employees    whos'e
(Continued  on page  3)
See:   MORE  LIBRARY
Vic council
gains lead
in fee fight
Victoria college students won a partial victory with the
board of governors Wednesday, and started on the second
phase of program which could mean a levelling off of rising
student fees in B.C.
At an emergency meeting late Wednesday the board
decided to drop back the deadline on second term fees from
Jan. 8 to Jan. 15.
Since the second term began students have been holding
back $56 of their fees to protest the 1965-66 fee hike.
Fifteen hundred students have signed pledge cards
promising to withold the money despite the threat of a $10
fine for late fees.
extension not enough
But the Victoria student
council held their own meeting Wednesday, decided the
one week extension was not
enough and voted to pay the
extra $56 on Jan. 27, the day
the legislative assembly opens.
Victoria AMS president Paul
Williamson said the date was
chosen because it would focus
public attention on the student
stand.
"As far as we are concerned,
the issue is not the fee deadline," he said Thursday.
"Jan. 27 is the day the house
opens and we want to keep it
alive until that time."
He said payment of fees on
the new deadline would have
accomplished nothing.
MALCOLM TAYLOR
. . . clarity stand?
gathering support
"Now we will be able to
press our case," he said.
"We will by that date (Jan.
27) have prevented a fee increase in B.C."
Williamson pointed out that
new plan would win public
approval since students had
promised to eventually pay
their fees.
"What we needed was some
way to force the public attention to the fight," he said.
"We are not holding a gun
over the provincial government's head. We will pay."
Williamson said he thought
students who had withheld fees
would get by without paying
the $10 fine since there was a
possibility the board would
grant another extension.
"In a sense, we have made
a guarantee to them that they
won't have to pay," he said.
If the board does decide to
levy the fine, Williamson said
he will lead an appeal for $15,-
000 to all Canadian student
councils.
He said he already has the
backing of various organizations.
A column in The Victoria
Times Thursday suported the
student stand.
Williamson said students exempted from Canada student
loans for not paying full fees
were now able to become eligible by signing a statement
that they would pay their fees
by Jan. 27.
Victoria College president
Malcolm Taylor said Thursday
the board of governors granted
the fees deadline extension to
enable students to clarify their
stand.
But, he said, the board would
not grant further extensions.
"We hoped that they would
not push it beyond Jan. 15,"
he said, 'We cannot tolerate
the rules and regulations of
the university being  broken. Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday,  January  7,   1966
Arnet's curling kings
sweep defensively tonight
The 1965 B.C. curling kings
will defend their crown tonight.
UBC's Jack Arnet and his
rink of third Terry Miller,
second Glen Walker and lead
Soren Jensen, play the Steve
Acres rink at 8:30 at the
Thunderbird Winter Sports
Center. It is the first round
of the club playdowns leading to the provincial championships.
Play continues Saturday
and Sunday at the UBC club
with one winner being declared in the double knockout competition.
JACK ARNET
SHARE campaign
cash
spurs
race
UBC faculties are racing to collect money for "World
University Services's SHARE campaign.
The undergraduate society
collecting the most money for
the money for the University
of Nicaragua health clinic will
be awarded a special plaque
given by board of governors
chairman Ms*. Justice N. T.
Nemetz.
Daphne Kelgard, World University Service treasurer said
today the Engineering, Home
Economics, Arts and Frosh
Undergrad Societies expressed
keen interest in the SHARE
program of inter-faculty competition.
One faculty which will not
win the plaque is Pharmacy.
That faculty shared only $5.50
for the project.
Presently contributions are
coming in from professors who
have already given $700, said
WUS secretary  Ruell  Smith.
The campaign's sing along
with Share program will be
held in the Brock at noon by
the  UBC  Folk   Song  Society.
Admission fee is 10 cents.
AND  THIS IS FAME?
Ubyssey ejected by Board
By ANNE BALF
tion, and what is  the board's "No,   the  board   hasn't  dis-
conclusion?" cussed it," he said.     "It isn't
"Also,   we   understand that even on the agenda. It will be
Knute   Buttedahl  will  be  re- published in the Gazette.''
stration
night.
They   marched   confidently
into the building, planning to
A four-man team of Ubyssey
reporters   and   photographers
was ejected from the admini-     .      ,             ,.      ,       .        ,. n,     „      41   .   .^ ,    .
,   .,,.         _.       . placed as acting housing dir- The Gazette is the exclusive
building     Thursday * .       „     *•                     . .     ,.
B                   * ector.  Has his successor been faculty newspaper.
appointed?" "And I'm not even on the
The bursar disappeared. board   of   governors,"    White
When intrepid star reporter   added proudly.
beard the  board of governors  Pat   Hrushowy  rushed   off to      The horde of student news-
when it came out of the meet-   phone his city editor for fur-  papermen    was    hustled    un-
ln£- ther   instructions,    White   re-   ceremoniously out of the buil-
After they had lain in wait   emerged. ding with no news.
for   15   minutes,  UBC  bursar	
William White emerged from
the room to investigate.
"Is there some particular
reason for your attendance
here tonight?" he asked the
assembled intrepid reporters
Ubyssey star reporter Pat
Hrushowy briefly and skilfully
outlined the important questions at stake.
"Has the board discussed the
Economic Council of Canada's
report with reference to the
need for more higher educa-
PAYMENT
of Second-Term Fees
Students are reminded that second-term fees are
now due and payable and should be paid to the
ACCOUNTING OFFICE
on or before FRIDAY, JANUARY 14, 1966
WUS seminar
Applications for two Canadian Travel and Education
seminars to be held in Ontario
and Quebec during June are
available at the World University Service office.
Grants for travel to the seminars are available.
Applicants must be returning to UBC for the 1966-67
term.
Deadline is Jan. 20.
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Engineers and Scientists:
Let's talk about a career at Boeing...
50-year leader in aerospace technology
Campus Interviews Monday and Tuesday, January 17 and 18
The most effective way to evaluate a company in terms of its potential for dynamic
career growth is to examine its past record, its current status, and its prospects
and planning for the future, together with
the professional climate it offers for the
development of your individual capabilities.
Boeing, which in 1966 completes 50 years
of unmatched aircraft innovation and production, offers you career opportunities as
diverse as its extensive and varied backlog. Whether your interests lie in the field
of commercial jet airliners of the future or
in space-flight technology, you can find at
Boeing an opening which combines professional challenge and long-range stability.
The men of Boeing are today pioneering
evolutionary advances in both civilian and
military aircraft, as well as in space programs of such historic importance as
America's first moon landing. Missiles,
space vehicles, gas turbine engines, transport helicopters, marine vehicles and basic
research are other areas of Boeing activity.
There's a spot where your talents can
mature and grow at Boeing, in research,
design, test, manufacturing or administration. The company's position as world
leader in jet transportation provides a
measure of the calibre of people with
whom you would work. In addition, Boeing
people work in small groups, where initiative and ability get maximum exposure.
Boeing encourages participation in the
company-paid Graduate Study Program at
leading colleges and universities near
company installations.
We're looking forward to meeting engineering, mathematics and science seniors
and graduate students during our visit to
your campus. Make an appointment now
at your placement office. Boeing is an
equal opportunity employer.
(1) Boeing's new short-range 737 jetliner. (2)
Variable-sweep wing design for the nation's
first supersonic commercial jet transport.
(3) NASA's Saturn V launch vehicle will power
orbital and deep-space flights. (4) Model of
Lunar Orbiter Boeing is building for NASA.
(5) Boeing-Vertol 107 transport helicopter
shown with Boeing 707 jetliner.
Divisions:  Commercial Airplane   •   Military Airplane   •   Missile  •   Space  •  Turbine  •   Vertol   •   Also, Boeing Scientific Research Laboratories Friday,  January  7,   1966
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
LIBRARY MEANS STUDY to some students, but wet snow means hard snowballs to
others, as Engineers demonstrate at the height of an interfaculty fray Thursday. Red
Horde representatives claimed a small band of arch-rival sciencemen fled into "Sedgewick stacks", and probably got lost. Snowfights continue Friday.
WINNERS ACCUSED
This cup runneth away
The McGoun Cup is missing.
The cup, presented annually to the top debaters in the
Western Inter-Collegiate Debating Championships, has
heen missing for two years
and is now being sought by
a Winnipeg law firm.
Debating Union member
Jack Khoury said Thursday,
"The Winnipeg barristers have
been trying to dig up information on the cup but none has
been forthcoming."
A law firm representive
suggested UBC is holding the
trophy, he said.
"Although we have won the
McGoun Cup two years in a
row we have never been presented with the trophy,"
said Khoury.
Manitoba won the competition three years ago and the
nward has not been presented
since that year.
The contest will be held on
January 28 with two UBC
debaters defending "Science
is the opiate of the 20th century" at UBC and two opposing the resolution in Winnipeg.
MORE LIBRARY
(Continued from page 1)
turnover  rate   was   46.5   per
cent for 1965.
"Improvement in present
conditions must wait upon an
improvement in salary scales
for clerical employees, for it
is a plain fact that university
salaries are not competitive
in the local market," he said.
Book purchases have doubled since the gift of $3 million from Dr. H. R. MacMillan
in February 1965.
"Unless some angel appears,
funds for construction will
have to come through the
board of administration," said
Stuart-Stubbs.
something's missing
Gage pulls reins
on runaway loans
Dean Walter Gage's office has stopped accepting applications for Canada Student Loans.
FUR W FEATHERS
Basketball Birds
tackle Grizzlies
Fur and feathers fly this weekend at Memorial Gym
Gym when UBC's basketball 'Birds host the tall and tough
University of Montana Grizzlies.
Game   time  is  8:30   tonight	
and Saturday.
UBC is riding a three-game
losing streak which coach Peter Mullins hopes to break
but the going won't be easy
for his hot and cold Birds.
UBC split with the University of Puget Sound Loggers
here last weekend, winning the
opener 86-72 and then losing
72-60 the following evening.
Earlier this week, in Portland, Ore., Birds dropped two
games to the University of
Portland,  96-90  and  60-50.
UBC now has a 6-5 win-loss
record this season.
Grizzlies have won only two
of eight games and will be
without a star player for the
remainder of the season.
Ed Samelton, a 6'3" senior,
was declared a scholastically
ineligible  Wednesday.
Samelton was the Grizzlies'
leading rebounder and scorer
last year and was second in
scoring   in   eight   games   this
BOB  BARAZZOUL
.  .  .  leads Birds
season.
Transfer student John "Doc"
Holliday, from Charlotteville,
Ind., is an outstanding guard.
He scored 1,140 points in two
seasons at John Handcock (California) College.
The Grizzlies will show
plenty of height with 6'7" John
Quist and Gordie Zillges and
6'10" centre Tom Schilke.
Leading scorer for UBC after 11 games is Bob Barazzuol,
who has averaged more than
20 points a game.
High school preliminaries
will be played both nights starting at 6:30.
•      •      •
North Vancouver and Windermere meet tonight with
Point Grey and John Oliver
playing Saturday.
A special half-time show
Saturday will feature the
Cheney Studs Courteers from
Tacoma, Wash., a team of 12 to
14-year-old miniature Globetrotters who perform to the
. beat of popular rock and roll
music.
COACH MULLINS
.  .  . against Grizzlies
Poor,War Speaker
The director of Canada's war
on poverty opens the Vancouver Institute lecture series
Saturday at UBC.
R. A. Phillips, who succeeded Tom Kent as Privy Council special planning director,
discusses elimination of poverty
in Canada in Hebb Theatre at
8:15 p.m.
"We need a chance to catch
up with the backlog," Gage
told The Ubyssey Thursday.
"We'll start accepting applications again Monday — probably."
Gage had no figures on the
number of loan applications
received this year.
"We'll have more information next week," he said.
The dean would not say how
much money remained in the
federal loan fund.
"The university doesn't run
the loan fund," he said.
UBC was allotted one million
dollars from the fund in 1963.
Students can bororw $1,000
a year over a five-year period.
The loans are interest-free —
until six months after graduation.
•
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For information applications and appointments please see your                         ;ti—•_L—1_L^b»
STUDENT PLACEMENT OFFICE           -^^P5^ mnnsn
Published Tuesday, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university
year by the Alma Mater Society, University of B.C. Editorial opinions
expressed are those of the editor and not necessarily those of the AMS
or the University. Editorial office, CA 4-3916. Advertising office, CA 4-3242,
Loc. 26. Member Canadian University Press. Pounding member, Pacific
Student Press. Authorized as second-class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies for general
excellence and editorial writing.
FRIDAY, JANUARY 7,  1966
"Nobody shoots at a dead duck"
-W. A.  C.  Bennett,  Nov.  5,   1965
Dirty war ends
The decision of the Victoria AMS to pay the fee increase Jan. 27 has probably forestalled any further
escalation of a hassle which was rapidly assuming the
status of a dirty war.
And the way seems clear now for Victoria's board
of governors to express tangibly its announced support
for student actions designed to publicize the plight of
higher education in B.C.
Victoria AMS president Paul Williamson has been
leading 1,500 withholders of the $56 fee increase into
what would certainly have been a serious clash with
Victoria's administration.
He had announced the AMS intention was to
withhold until definite information on next year's fee
structure was made public. And the administration was
already unveiling its weapons by warning that fee withholders would be ineligible for student loans.
Williamson, however, appears to have been unwilling to use the ultimate student weapon — the strike
— to counteract the inevitable administration reaction
to his group's position.
So he decided to work to gain the ultimate possible
publicity out of the dispute, by deciding on non-payment
of the fee increase until Jan. 27, when the legislature
meets again.
And since peace is the obvious alternative to war,
under the circumstances this is probably the wisest way
out of the situation for Victoria's AMS.
But one positive move could yet come out of Victoria — besides the publicity the withholding has gained
and will yet create.
If the Victoria board of governors is willing to continue the policy of compromise it has already shown by
extending the deadline for fee payment without penalty
to Jan. 15, a whole new spirit in administration-student
affairs will have been shown.
If the Victoria board of governors is willing to postpone its fee payment deadline another 12 days to meet
Williamson's objective of Jan. 27, it would add real
teeth to Victoria president Malcolm Taylor's statements
of support for student attempts to dramatize the higher
education dilemma.
It will show tangibly that the board of governors at
at least one B.C. university recognizes student action in
this sphere is being carried out with the idea of improving the university world.
"Our independence depends on our not talcing a political
student requests would be taking such a position."—Victoria
position. To comply with
president Malcolm Taylor.
r*'K:
■. "%*'*&£& JZ*
Suckling pig no snap
By IAN CAMERON
For the last week I have
been going slowly up the wall.
Ever since The Ubyssey won
the damn Southam Trophy,
my life has been miserable.
The first day of classes, The
Editor (blast
his beady
little eyes)
has been on
my back
about a banquet for the
victory.
The first intimation I had
cameron was when he
came into my little closet and
yelled "CAMERON. We're going to have a victory celebration. We're having roast ox.
You're in charge, since you're
managing editor."
After I got him calmed
down, I discovered that he's
taking some sort of early English type course, where they
are studying some guy called
Chaucer or something, and
they're learning all about the
way these guys eat or something.
So now he thinks that if
they can do it, so can we. And
we means me. So I start to
phone. No one has any ox,
roast or otherwise. So that
does that.
So I tell Wayman. And immediately he says all right, so
we make do with suckling
pig. Suckling sounds obscene
to me, but at least it's not four
{he &dv£nbtj*s
^MQRAIMAW^a^S"
EDITOR: Tom Wayman
News       Ron   Riter
Associate   George Reamsbottom
City        ....   Al    Donald
Photo       Norm   Betts
Sports   Ed Clark
Ass't News   Dan  Mullen
...     Richard   Blair,   Robbi  West
Ass't City   Danny  Stoffman
Page   Friday       John    Kelsey
Managing       Ian   Cameron
Features       Mike   Bolton
CUP       Don   Hull
Hordes turned up Thursday to
write for Canada's best. Searching for AMS and administration
types were Anne Balf Marilyn "(I
type) Hill, Vicki Smith, Blair
Halse, Bert Hill, Carol Wilso'n,
Andrew Horvat, Wally Klamnier,
Jim Good, Bill Grant, Bruce Benton, Chris Brockhurst, Ann .1. L.
Bishop, Derrick Blackie, Val Zu-
ker, Howie White, Kris Emmojt,
Dick Taylor, and Pat (groan)
Hrushowy. Thanks, people, your
city  desk   appreciates  it.
ToOAV,OL)R  FAVOURITE   PARAXON; OF  EVEj?VTMIM6-   CONVERTS    TWO    MISGUIDED    tAORTAL.%:
top.'ail**) nel
jo
IF  THE THAU) a>nES SOOH ENOUGH, THE rlAAl <5P STAIAJCESS STEEL   RETORA/S MEXT UJEEK.J ®
letters, so I get on the phone
again.
Sorry, they say, no suckling
pig. I heave a sigh of relief.
Four people faint. I take some
Lysol, thinking it's Listerine,
and sigh again.
Then I find I can't talk, because Lysol is corrosive, or
something. But it doesn't
really matter, because Way-
man has come up with some
fink staffer who has connections, and this guy knows
a guy who has suckling pigs.
So he phones the guy, and
we get two 18-pound suckling
pigs. Then comes the cooking
problem. I approach the girl
who does the women's page,
and ask her how would she
like to cook two 18 pound S.P.
(In sign language, since I still
can't talk.)
When she gets through
laughing, she tells me that
a) she knows from nothing
about suckling pigs, b) do I
know how long that would
take? and c) what kind of an
idiot am I, anyway?
So then I'm really up a
creek. But then everything is
solved. One of the staffer's
mothers will do it. Then we
get another phone call. Only
one pig we got. So now what?
Well, says I, I'll phone the
unwed mothers home and
we'll have suckling baby instead.
This is vetoed by general
vote.
So we decide to make do
with one suckling pig and 40
pounds of beef. Then I find
that maybe 60 people aren't
going to show. Maybe we only
got like 30 people. So what do
we do with 40 bloody pounds
of beef?
But then comes another
call. Now we ain't even got
one suckling pig.
Anyone know where I can
get a good price on 50 hamburgers? Friday,   January   7,   1966
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
FOREGROUND
LATE NIGHT SESSION at the printers sees huddle over the forms with Associate
Editor George Reamsbottom, Editor Wayman (beard), and foreman Jack. Anguished
look on face of printer Ted is probably caused by Ubyssey staffers insistance that the
type is rubber and can fit in anywhere.
CITY EDITOR AL DONALD finds some compensation for his
hectic life in session with beauteous reporter. Donald and
assistant Danny Stoffman are responsible for organizing
the eager hordes of reporters by assigning stories to them
as they troop in during the noon rush. Below left, a
pensive Donald considers his next move.
TOO BUSY TO GIVE anything but his back to the
camera. The Ubyssey's
famed cartoonist Jeff Wall
draws on in perfect bliss in
his own little office.
Heres  The  Ubyssey
fun by night or day
In at 12:30, out at 4:30 if
you're lucky.
That is a typical work day.
At 12:30 Monday, Wednesday and Thursday keen reporters crowd around the city
desk fighting to get the best
assignments.
Working   for   The   Ubyssey
puts you in position to know
the campus better. You meet
interesting   people   and   they
get to know you.
If you are a glory seeker,
you will be at home working
for The Ubyssey. Your picture will appear in the paper
and your name will always be
in print. You can show your
mother how famous you are
at UBC.
After    gathering    material
for your story you return to
the office and fight for a typewriter.
One   overworked   Ubyssey
editor had this to say.
I'm not sure whether its
like an idealist's nightmare
or an masochist's dream
world. You sacrifice the pleasures of social life, rack your
bleeding skull until its painful just to read the funnies,
bitch at your dwindling supply of friends, antagonize
profs by sleeping in class,
scream at fellow Ubyssiers
who have the nerve to out
rant-and-rave you, attack sex
and booze in frustrating fits
and starts and slowly, happily
slip into a secure state of total insanity.
SLOTMAN, THE SUN'S Bill
Rayner, is a perennial part
of The Ubyssey scene. Our
professional aid, Slotman
looked like this as he stepped off the plane from the
CUP conference in Calgary
during the Christmas holidays.
WE SAID WHAT? Associate
editor George Reamsbottom
looks over the production
in the cold light of day. He
and News Editor Ron Riter
have the enviable task of
seeing the paper "to bed"
each press night — mornings
aren't  always  so pleasant.
REPORTER'S LIFE ISNT ALL LAUGHS, but it has its moments
Here Pat Hrushowy is contemplating yet another mangling
of his much-maligned last name.
YES, MOM, THEY LET me eat my lunch in The Ubyssey
office, too. Council reporter Doug Halverson eyes the
cameraman narrowly as he chews openly. Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday,  January  7,   1966
JWEEN CLASSES
UN reviews world events
UN CLUB
Current events discussion
Monday noon, upper lounge
International House. General
meeting next week.
• •      •
PRE-SOCIAL  WORK
Speaker from Indian Affairs
on "The Indian in B.C.," Monday noon, Bu 202.
• •      •
LUTHERAN STUDENTS
General meeting Monday
noon, Bu Ext. 2250.
• •      •
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
Testimony meeting noon today, Hut 0-12. All welcome.
• •      •
VCF
Discussion on coming events
Friday, Angus 110. Dr. Pat
Taylor, physics department, on
"Work and the Christian."
• •      *
UBC PIPEBAND
Regular   practice   Tuesday,
7:30  p.m.,  Armory.  All  interested.
• •      •
PRE-LIBRARIANSHIP
Meeting today noon, Bu 225.
Miss Egaff on financial aid
available for training. All welcome.
* *     *
PHRATERES
All-phi meeting today noon,
Bu 104. Very important business to be discussed.
Not I org est
OTTAWA (UNS)—Montreal,
Canada's largest' city, is smaller than Paris, New York,
Tokyo, London and a number
of other large cities around the
world.
No survivors
LISBON (UNS) — There
are no survivers of Columbus'
original crew, the discoverers
of the Western Hemisphere.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day. $.75—3 days, $2.00. Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Publications Office: Brock Hall. Ext. 26. 224-3242
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost & Found
11
FOUND ADS inserted Tree. Publications office, Brock Hall. Local 26,
224-3242.	
LOST ON 23rd DECEMBER, one
zippo lighter engraved with Borden cow. Virtually valueless but
dripping with sentiment. Reward
for   return.     Telephone   228-2131.
LOST LAST MONDAY—GENUINE
Hawaiian pineapple. Reward offered for information. Has great
sentimental value. Phone 876-
9914.
LOST — A BLACK LEATHER
change purse, containing seventy
dollars, meal pass, keys. Finder
please return to Margaret, Box 68,
Totem  Park,  U.B.C.    Reward.
Special Notices
13
WHY PAY high auto insurance
rates? If you are over 20 and have
a good driving history you qualify
for our good driving rates. Phone
Ted Elliott,  224-6707.
DANCE TO THE CHESSMEN SAT.,
Jan. 8th, in Brock Hall, starting
at 9 p.m. Don't miss the term's
first  really big dance.
FARMER'S FROLIC, HARD-TIMES
dance, Saturday, January 15, 9:00-
1:00 in U.B.C. Armouries. Cost,
$2.75 per couple. Support the biggest dance on campus! Also support the AGG-IB APPLE DAY on
Tuesday,  Jan.   11.
COLD? WARM UP TO THE
sounds of "Soul Unlimited" at Totem Park Friday, January 7, from
9 p.m. to 1 a.m. It's another
mixer!
DEREK, tonight's the night; I need
you; please come. Forever yours,
Angle.
Transportation
14
RIDE NEEDED URGENTLY BY
two Burnaby girls from vicinity
Boundary and Marine, Monday,
Wednesday, Thursday, Friday for
8:30 lectures. 434-3797. If necessary could meet car at Kingsway
and McKay.
WANTED—RIDE FROM WALTING
and Rumble, South Burnaby.
Phone Sherry, HE 5-1204. 8:30
classes.
CARPOOL IN WEST VAN (VICIN-
ity West Bay), needs drivers.
Phone WA  2-7384.
WEST VAN CAR POOL—WANTED
1 or 2 drivers. British Properties
preferred.   922-6869  or   922-1665.
Wanted
15
I WOULD LIKE TO BUY AN Inexpensive bicycle. Please phone
Tom at 224-9137.
AUTOMOTIVE ft MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
FOR SALE—ANYONE INTEREST-
ed in a great buy on a 1957 or
1965 Volkswagen phone 224-6857.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Typewriters 8c Repairs
42
GOOD CLEAN TYPEWRITERS, »20
up. Also Typewriter repairs at
50 percent savings. Poison Typewriters, 2140 W. 4th. Phone RE
1-8322.
Typing
43
PROFESSIONAL TYPING, ARDALE
GRIFFITHS LIMITED, 70th and
Granville, Phone 263-4530.
Help Wanted
51
*400 PER MONTH WHILE BEING
trained to sell Business Life insurance. Career position with unlimited possibilities; age 21-30.
Good education and background.
Character subject to scrutiny.
MU   5-7234.
MALE STUDENT WANTED TO
work 36 hours per week. Apply
Mrs. Harries, Library Circ. Office.
ACCURATE TYPIST, HOURLY, TO
suit your schedule. Alumni Association, Room 252, Brock Hall, or
228-2800.
CANTEEN MANAGER WANTED
The Acadia Camp Students' Council requires a manager for its canteen, responsibilities to start May 1,
1966, and duties to start September,
1966. Applicants who are able to
stay for more than one year are
especially   encouraged   to apply.
Duties include all aspects of managing the operation. Previous experience in retailing is desirable but
not  essential.
This is an excellent opportunity
for a married man to gain valuable
experience in management and administration while attending university.     Housing is  supplied.
Applicants   are   asked   to   send   in
confidence    a   complete    resume    of
qualifications and experience, before
January 31, 1966,  to:
Vice-President,
Acadia Camp  Students'
Council,
Acadia Camp, UBC,
Vancouver 8,  B.C.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
KLASSEN'S USED FURNITURE
Mart takes pleasure in announcing
a greatly enlarged store to serve
you. Also beer bottle depot at rear
of store. (25c per doz.) Across
the street from Peter's Ice Cream,
3207 West Broadway.    RE 6-0712.
ONE PAIR LADY'S SKI BOOTS
and press, good condition, size 6.
Phone 738-3240.
Rooms
81
LARGE BED-SITTING ROOM IN
quiet home, private bath and entrance. Phone, frig included.
$45.00.     AM   6-8078. '
FOR RENT, NEAR U.B.C—ROOM
available to female student. View,
own entrance and bath. Feb. 1.
731-2576. 	
SLEEPING ROOM FOR GIRL, 10
minute walk to campus. CA 4-
6865.
Room ft Board
82
UNFURNISHED LARGE BACH-
elor apt., Jan. 15th, near U.B.C,
near beach.    Phone CA  4-4948.
Arts  Anti-Calendar
The arts undergrad society
needs help in producing its
first anti-calendar.
The calendar will include
course and exam content, and
student opinion.
Students interested in distributing questionaires and
later writing course evaluations should attend the meeting
in Bu. 100 noon Friday.
(4lH   B.C. Hydro and Power Authority
requires
COMMERCE   and   SCIENCE   (MATH.)  GRADUATES
for the following CAREER  OPPORTUNITIES:
—COMMERCE GRADUATE IN TRAINING (ONE)
—Accounting Option
INDUSTRIAL   RELATIONS  TRAINEE   (TWO)
—Commerce/Industrial Relations Option
-^SYSTEMS ANALYST-PROGiRAMMER (THREE)
—Maths. Major
—Commerce/Accounting Option
CAMPUS INTERVIEWS - JANUARY 17, 18
Please contact the Student Services Office
for an interview appointment.
DEPARTMENT OF THEATRE
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
HAPPY DAYS
by Samuel Beckett
Student Performance - Mon., Jan. 17 - 7:30 p.m.
TICKETS 75c
THE AUTHOR OF "WAITING FOR GODOT" WRITES A WHIMSICAL COMEDY OF
THE ABSURD, WITH JOY COGHILL, DIRECTED BY KLAUS STRASSMANN.
Note: Some tickets at 75c will be available for all the other performances,
January 14-22.
SUPPORT CAMPUS THEATRE
LOOK INTO YOUR FUTURE AT RIO ALGOM
EXPLORATION is vital to Rio Aigom's progress and
expansion. The Company maintains a strong exploration
programme which takes crews throughout North America
in search of new development opportunities.
MINING Rio Aigom's mining interests are both
extensive and diversified: uranium mines and mills in the
Elliot Lake district; gold in the Timmins area; copper in
north-central Ontario, in northern Saskatchewan
and north-western Quebec. Still other properties are under
investigation for possible exploitation.
STEELMAKING Atlas Steels Division is one of the
world's major producers of stainless, tool and alloy metals.
Its expanding operations include an integrated steel mill
at Welland, a continuous-casting, stainless steel mill 40
miles from Montreal, extensive metallurgical laboratories,
and marketing offices and service centres throughout
Canada and the world.
Rio Algom
A member of the worldwide Rio Tinto-Zinc Corporation Group
RIO ALGOM MINES LIMITED WILL HAVE AN INTERVIEWING TEAM ON CAMPUS Jan. 10 & 11,
1966 to interview and discuss employment possibilities within the organization with prospective
graduates in the following faculties and disciplines, Elect. Eng., Geo. Eng., Mech. Eng., Met.
Eng., Mining Eng. Further information as to interview timetables and company literature may
be obtained from your Placement Office. 'ft •*■;»':
■*'M
wouhMt cmd mM4y
unfair, littfrihytfiite
twtf «a*wirt» coittcittt
« Mtim$i«(tt c«view
dHh* {Kf*r f 6v««*
days tit IMI& .
'"** )::Jc *-*>-* ">V*I
• lias
INCONCEIVABLE —
Totem Park residents began their cloistered fall
term with Housing's version of the Gideon Bible
firmly fixed on the bulletin
board.
Most students tore up
the little notices listing
housing regulations for
dorms.
Comes the end of holidays and students returning to the nunnery found
a repeat indoctrination
plus a bulletin stating the
new standards in residence.
Less euphemistically, that's
"no" to guns, noise, booze,
and sex.
And someone had to unlock every room in the
priory to stick the Bibles
up. Are telescreems a la
1984 next?
• •      •
INNCOMMUNICADO—
The Totem Park police
state coincides with the
rumored return of ex-
Housing Czar John Harr
from Elliot Lake.
The French government's
refusal to buy Canadian
uranium nixes UBC's belated attempt to civilize its
housing policy.
Vive la difference!
• •      •
IMPENDING — Announcements by AMS pre-
sidental power seekers.
Best bet: seven - year
power planner Ed Lavalle,
fresh from California
beaches and ready to tackle fellow aspirants Chuck
(the secret document)
Campbell and Peter (nee-
EAP) Braund. And don't
count out the upstart
Ubyssey editor.
Former pick to click,
veep Bob Cruise, now
lusts after the soon to be
created job of ombudsman.
• •      •
INNOCUOUS   —   AMS
biggie Byron (that's leadership, sir!) Blunder is
lamenting the loss of Granny's gift Comet on the way
back from Banff.
At least the second Hender fender bender is somewhat more dramatic than
the first garbage truck
grate.
• •      •
INTOURIST  —  Shivers
felt in South Brock after
the dramatic reappearance
of Indo-Irish rabble rouser
Hardial Bains should soon
subside. Bains returns to
Dublin with love Monday
to resume university teaching.
• • •
IN TROUBLE — Psycho
100 types are crying the
blues. Seems the department wheels went neurotic
over the word that in-
sincere  students  of  all
years and faculties thought
the course was mickey
mouse, and took it to pick
up an easy three units.
So the wheels turned the
screws and the result was
a 60 per cent failure rate
at Christmas.
•      •      •
I N C O R R UPTIBLE —
UBC student Bridget Murray was married over the
Christmas holidays.
The former Miss Murray
is the granddaughter of
hell-raising publisher Ma
Murray of the Bridge
River-Lillooet News. Premier W. A. C. Bennett did
not attend.
•      •      •
INCOGNITO — UBC
president John Macdonald
headed the lineup on opening night for the latest
James Bond thriller, Thun-
derball.
Was he getting a line on
the new arts dean Dennis
(double oh) Healey's possible methods?
INDEBT: — Expect the
continuing SUB construction halt to continue indefinitely as AMS thinkers worry about how to
kid everybody that it's
all  right,  roger.
Trouble is, construction costs rose 35 per cent
last year. They're expected to go up another 15 in
1966.
•      •      •
INDEED: — Eight-foot
boy scout Malcolm McGregor (he's the Classics
Head) has been affectionately mooning about
Brock Hall and The Ubyssey's offices of late.
Considering his violent
reaction against Arts U.S.
Concensus magazine last
month, maybe even The
Ubyssey looks good.
Friday,  January  7,   1966
THE        UBYSSEY
Page  7 pi
ON THE COVER:
Girl  in   long  grass.
Editor: John Kelsey
Current affairs-
Steve  Brown
Science, the arts—
Al   Francis
Drawings-
Arnold Saba, Al Wiggan,
Jeff Wall
Item: Cavalier, this
month, advertises a five-
foot-five, 40-20-40 blonde,
brunette or redhead,
pneumatic ,$49.95, dressed in baby dolls, plastic
woman.
We'll bet the surrogate
honeys satisfy your every
need — they're recommended for bachelor digs
as the adult's answer to
the bariby doll — and we
see future improvements.
Like, for instance, simulated body heat, just
plug it in.
And a string you pull
to make it say "mmm . .
mm . . . m."
Item: There's a house
in town with a great
stomping Christmas display on and around it.
The yard is two feet deep
in snow, nativity on one
side, family of life-size
plastic snow-men on the
other.
Ersatz birth on one
side, ersatz images on the
other.
Item: Plastic flowers
don't shed.
Item: The logical conclusion of facial make-up
— the Revlon way — is
elaborately painted
flowers on the cheek,
multi-color rampant on a
field of china pink.
Streaked with an artfully applied artificial
tear.
Item: At the drive-in
Jmovie, 2,0QO people in
their little cars hear actors on the screen imitate
emotion, and. vicariously
thrill to it . »
, Later, on all the side
roads in the west, the
same viewers repeat
those emotional words,
craftily memorized from
the silver screen, to the
same object of infatuation each watched the
original with.
And get away with it.
Item: Via electronic
communication, a man
can be anywhere in the
world, doing anything
other men do, without
moving. Granted, it's one-
dim ensional, but the
other senses can be occupied by eating potato
chips, gratified by cigarettes, irritated by piles.
In this way, the transition from death to life
is unnoticed — indeed,
immaterial.
Elect council by popular vote    theatre
pf 2wo
By  GARTH  BROWN
Student council in its
present form is not taken
seriously by anyone, not
even students.
Meaning that the student
point of view is not being
effectively represented. It
should be.
Councillors are elected to
perform two functions. They
are the chief executive of
their undergraduate societies.
They are also members of a
council elected to consider
matters of importance to
students generally.
Garth Brown, arts 4, has
served on four AMS committees and filmsoc. He is
one of the more noted alumnae of  Kimberley, B.C.
Each of these jobs requires
a lot of time and effort if it
is to be done well.
Often neither job is well
done.
The executive members of
the present council are loaded down with bureaucratic
jobs.
In addition they can be
reasonably expected to be
aware of the general issues
facing students, particularly
fees, student housing on and
off campus, representation
on the Senate, etc.
Usually the general issues
are forgotten. The result is,
in matters where student
opinion should be most
clearly represented, it is not.
This is not intended as a
criticism of specific councillors.
On the whole, they work
hard and represent their
faculties fairly.
But the present form of
student government is weak.
Changes are necessary, and
we should make them now.
The functions of student
council can . be roughly
divided into two categories.
One is as board of directors
of the Alma Mater Society
— the administrative functions fall in this area.
The other is as spokesman
of the students on matters
like fees. In my view this
representative function is
most important.
The AMS has a fairly efficient paid administrative
staff. Most of the administrative function of the society
is performed by the staff or
by the maze of committees
of appointed bureaucrats.
There is room for improvement, naturally, but most of
the work is now performed,
or could be performed by
this machine leaving the
council free to concentrate
on the general matters.
To perform the representative function, a council of
the present size is not necessary.
Further, it is not necessary or particularly representative to have councillors elected from the undergraduate societies. The smaller societies are over represented, the larger societies
under represented.
campus
I propose a council of 15
members at large, and five
executive members to be
elected in campus-wide elections.
If the single transferable
ballot system of proportional
representation was used in
in the election of members
at large, any significant
opinion or point of view
would be represented.
Any group that could
muster six per cent of the
student voting could elect a
councillor.
In numbers, considering
the past few AMS elections,
300 students could elect their
man.
The executive positions
would be president, vice-
president, secretary, treasurer, and ombudsman. Two
positions on the present
council have been discarded,
mainly because they can be
effectively performed by appointed or paid bureaucrats.
The ombudsman would con
sider complaints about the
AMS, faculty, or administration and take up legitimate
beefs with the appropriate
authorities.
The undergraduate societies would continue to perform the functions they now
have. The Undergraduate
Societies Committee could be
revived to act as a liaison
group.
The advantage of my proposal is the members of
council would have time to
keep up with the university administration and the
two senior governments in
matters of general interest,
while the undergraduate
societies could continue to
perform their more established functions.
- eaht-lcoun-   cccn   w ou   ce
This idea in a much more
detailed form is now being
considered by the Constitutional Revisions Committee.
Similar changes proposed in
the past have been killed by
unfriendly councils. I hope
this time it will reach the
floor of the AMS general
meeting in March.
poetry
BLOOD
By HENRY WEILER
Another modem hymn also to be sung to "What
a Friend We Have in Jesus".
What a friend we have in churchmen,
Who go marching as to war,
To make certain Virtue triumphs
And sweep Sin from our shore.
See them damn the wicked Yankee
See them send him straight to Hell;
See them cry up to the Heavens
That the truth they'll always tell.
As they march into the sunset
Solid Virtue to the fore,
Eyes averted from Viet Cong victims
Executed by the  score.
GORE
By ROBERT MacKENZIE
The battle soon began
Though none knew who shot first.
No craven coward ran.
They fought as though accurs'd.
The last man who could stand,
One man for land vying,
Was shot down by the hand
Of a man there dying.
Down, down, down, fell the rain.
Down it came; one great flood.
It fell upon the plain
To wash away the blood.
Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Major
not quite
major
By CLAIRE WEINTRAUB
Hey folks, it's going to be
a damned good show!
Cyril Simon's directing in
Playhouse's Major Barbara
bogs down a bit after the
delightful prologue, but a
Shavian dialogue perks
things up.
David Hooks and Dorothy
Davies as Lord and Lady
Underwood are almost perfectly cast. Hook deserves
special mention for his poverty speech in act three.
George Bernard Shaw's
Major Barbara; opened last
night, closes Jan. 22; at the
Playhouse. Good.
Major Barbara's meeting
with the impenetrable Bill
Walker (played by Allan
Dobby — Bravo!): alas, poor
Shaw, he should have been
a romantic!
J. C. Juliani as Morrison,
the Butler — show stealer!
Also to be credited with
show stealing are Dorothy
Fowler and the inimitable
Hutchinson Shandro, whose
Charles Lomax was indomitable.
Egad. Greek? Anything:
Cannons, Salvation Army
Drums, you name it, he does
it.
The young Eric Schneider
and Susan Ringwood prove it
again: Miss Ringwood's too-
too ingenue parts are getting
a bit tedious and Schneider's
mannerism of foot tapping is
annoying. Reasonably well-
acted, but not quite real.
Hail to Charles Evans for
his ingenious sets, and to
John Fenney for his costumes, even though the shoes
don't match.
Like, theatres are what
give people insight into the
way things work, and happen. Actors make discoveries about themselves. Dorothy Davies told me that
David Hooks' poverty speech
made her cry.
I sat there dumb in the
audience, listening to a man
act as mouthpiece for ^the
wisdom of the ages. Actors
are sybils like people.
You watch the show, and
something live is born. Something mysterious has taken
place — almost like a mass.
Because Andrew Under-
shaft, maker of cannon and
millionaire, is more concerned with saving people than
saving souls in spite of his
Major Barbara.
David Hooks speaks the
words of Andrew Unider-
shaft-George Bernard Shaw
and says, like man Poverty
Is The S~ts.
The maker of cannons and
the builder of weapons is a
pacifist and it takes the
bloodiest battle to make
Major Barbara see souls can
be as well saved in the world
as they can in the Salvation Army.
Friday,  January  7,  196o overseas
*   -^ sb&
Dutch students not
just picking tulips
By CAJO KOOY
Dutch students have insane
initiation ceremonies. In a land
of practically no drunkards
they're seen drunk and disorderly on the streets.
Occasionally they riot. They
throw policemen in the canals
ior kicks. They hold parties
which keep the neighbours
awake for blocks around. Once
they graduate and hold down
jobs they're deeply respected,
but while they're students
they're  considered   no   good.
I gather that the night life
I saw was fairly typical. In
every university city there are
special student clubs, which
are converted buildings (sometimes even old warehouses)
that student societies have
bought or have been given;
• they serve as social centers,
pubs, cafeterias, hell-raising
spots, and generally a place to
go.
All university students wear
dissent
Canada . . . raper
of  her  allies
By DON  WISE
The myth of neutrality in
foreign affairs so long fostered
by our interim prime minister
can no longer be seen as merely a farce.
It is no longer acceptable
as a guise of pseudo-moralism.
It is now an outrage— a
severe breach of human dignity.
Noble Canada indeed . . .
Petty Canada, scolding her
greatest ally, flirting with the
enemy — the sworn destroyer
of western civilization.
Yes, beneath the baby face
of international saviour festers
the running sore of economic
exploitation.
Canada grows smug and fat
while Americans die.
Noble Canada — reaper of
wealth, raper of friends.
The time has now come for
Canada to face reality.
Regardless of the moral justification of American policy,
we must pledge our full allegiance to our one staunch ally.
Canada has few friends. And
. many enemies. Hungry
enemies.
ties. You can't get into your
club without one. Freshmen
have their heads shaved—part
of the initiation.
The club I visited was two
storeys. The pub upstairs was
mixed, but the big one downstairs allowed no women after
8 p.m. everyone drank huge
amounts, friendly fights broke
out frequently, impromptu
songs were sung, lively discussions and name-calling sessions never ceased. And later
a bottle-smashing orgy got underway.
On my frequent trips to the
bathroom I noticed that affixed
to the wall was a large square
porcelain bowl with a prodigious flushing apparatus and
two hand-holds above and beside it. European plumbing is
odd at the best of times but
usually I can figure out what
things are for.
This time, I had to ask a
student what purpose the weird
contraption fulfill|ed. It was
specially provided he explained, for those who had overindulged and were obliged to
hang their heads over a convenient receptacle. These things
are placed in all student hangout.
"Very thoughtful" I mur-
mered, and decided to call it
a night.
•   .   •
critics
By GABOR MATE
Certain critics of America's
Viet Nam policies have long
averred that the U.S. is deliberately creating a refugee
problem in South Viet Nam.
These critics maintain that by
purposefully and systematically destroying the crops and
dwellings of the peasant population in Viet Cong held areas,
the Americans are forcing the
people to flee into government
refugee camps, where they
are dependent on American
hand-outs for their livelihood.
The purpose is two-fold. The
For the iir$ 2,000 mifps
me ride s]
VGtG^i
Off we go, 6,000 milesj,
caulking gun, hemp andJFolJj
wagen, rallying i
Pacific.
It's   the   first
Pacific Rally,  Ei
Yokohama,   leaving
house at 9 a.m.
Forty-three   cars ,
pete for the covej
Cup, donated
ever^
toi
port by the
and Thea
KeorJ
foundation.
Page! Friday will be right
tS^re swimming, "with Mike
•Wairawlnd Jason Belawg.
Drivers will not get final
ro&te details until the start of
thei||lly, bujjjudges have leak-
th|f?|271 air mile dis-
fM*rb<jyjength.ened by a
dl^-l|g |md^ftr|p^iyfcence
stral#it ^*e Jjyple*%j|4
Retail be the* supreme *te||
of dr%3||g .J^ills as pilot% ar Jib
asked to ni^ig^ their sp*ee|jp
ally-equipped ca|fjhasta|»in-
charted islaiidj#thro&hporm
jungles^iJW around th»#5,000
footjrfiep Marianna Trench.
Navigators   must   cope  with
not  only   tides   and   currents,
lging time
ternational
l^m^WV— unknown factors
•* ceftaHTto  make  computation
difficult at best.
m   More about our team.
||Mike Wallox, 30, is a Van-
eo%?er boy who
tion^^lcompetitio|h^BPI»i^d^
froWJ
Grand-
1 **is voomedt about
oJHWase paaple beu^hiledl
4cmy"pnesk
"ife ail TiaVcfc—
maroon j||||lki|vag'
specjal lilliagnesiu:
wjjjptand the un
sllnfs which can s<
flat, and ironwo
faction on the si
pf  Neptune's  do:
Belawg must co:
all  his   computatioi
^hree   huge   tear-dr
^^anks the Special
with   a
body    to
rsea   pres-
ze a man
tires   for
fting sands
n.
e    Franco-Prussian  s-there are few gas
the  Le  Manic In-f^ side of Hawaii.
ternational
Gibralter CI
d Prix and tl
He was, as he fW$i m,jf/eiM
ed on engine oil andfcm nis
teeth  on camshafts.
Mike first rallied undersea
last year, at the unpublicized
first annual Channel Sub Prix
— Dover to Ypres.
Mike lost only three points,
and those fi^nof jffojgerlyfdog'
ging a no-drpffc and $^se«ftefit-
Belawg himself  needs
introduction to undersea ral
fans as he has been associate!
with the sport since its incep-*
tion in  1957.
He is 25, born and bred under the sea, a man who knows
its every quirk and whim.
If Belawg  can't  navigate  a
win, no-one can.
\  *?Wtgn #iisi-*pace for weekly
-   - , .j.       .,       iepcjrtf ,$|blfa direct to Page
ly soakinr^'tooAuj^iw^fcr.^^^.^r^^^ar,   far   under
<^Pe*%e«! as our team rallys its
|wa# to. success in the classic
"of, tee ^en^tury.
in his floourn^^i
,.   Naviga$$jr &eWiT|fi
She Page Fridafj^ciaL^Jgi
4,-*   i.-ftj* "«&*,«"£"* <•*{,',?*
immediate advantage of such
actions would be to deprive the
Viet Cong of their man-power
supply, and the sympathetic
human milieu in which they
operate. The long range result
to give the government an
opportunity to "educate" the
people.
Such charges are difficult to
prove, unless one has access to
classified documents, and the
Americans have dismissed
them as untrue and invidious
accusations.
Indeed, it is difficult to believe the Americans would
consciously embark on policies so devoid of reason and so
bereft of humanity. Recently
however the critics' arguments
have been lent an air of credence by statements of American senators, among them Edward Kennedy, who have just
returned from a visit to South
Viet Nam.
These senators' report the
Christian Science Monitor, are
convinced   that   "with   educa
tion and training these refugees can form the basis of the
new nation that will arise after
the war", and therefore "These
refugees should be considered
an asset rather than a burden."
Senator Kennedy has said he
will urge Congress "to look
upon the refugee problem not
as a liability but as an opportunity."
Quite without being an inveterate anti-American, and
without having an insatiable
desire to vilify the Americans,
one is still driven to the inescapable conclusion that the
accusers have logic on their
side.
That the Americans carry
out systematic bombing of
Viet Cong-held villages is admitted.
That these bombings . cause
a mass exodus of refugees
(200,000 in the last few months
alone) is also well-known.
That the U.S. considers
these refugees an asset has just
been shown.
Is it not logical to suppose,
then, that one purpose of the
bombing of villages in South
Viet Nam is to create refugees?
Could the American policymakers be so unconscionable?
No, they could not. It is simply
that in considering the totality
of their Viet Nam aims and
policies, they are quite willing
to countenance certain unsavory details.
After all, the napalming of
children has certain inhuman
aspects too, but that consideration must not be allowed to
hinder the anti-Communist
crusade. Similarly, if to deprive the peasants of their
political convictions we have
to deprive them of their homes
and livelihood as well, it's entirely in the interests of liberty
and democracy.
The fact is that American
mentality has become completely inured to violence and
brutality.
These are overlooked in favor of the final objectives, the
defeat of the Viet Cong.
GOldwater's much maligned
dictum, that "Extremism in the
defence of liberty is no vice,"
is in reality the accepted creed
of the U.S. leaders.
Even if one accepted the by
no means factful view that
the Americans are fighting for
liberty in Viet Nam, would it
still not seem incongrous to
turn people into miserable outcasts in order to free them?
When the refugees go back
to their villages after the war,
says Senator Kennedy, "they
will form the nucleus of a new
society, a society prepared to
carry on."
One shudders to think what
that society would be like,
people rendered homeless by
American bombs, kept alive in
refugee lagers by American
hand-outs, and then re-educated by South Viet Nam's military dictators.
pf 3hree
Friday, January J,   1966.
THE        U'B.Y S S E Y
Pag* 9 ATOMIC ENERGY OF
CANADA LIMITED
will conduct
CAMPUS INTERVIEWS
on
Thursday, January 13, 1966
Friday, January 14, 1966
for
Engineers Mathematicians
Physicists Metallurgists
Chemists Biologists
Commerce
CONTINUING EMPLOYMENT
Arrangements for interviews should
be made through your university
placement office
ATOMIC ENERGY OF CANADA LIMITED
Chalk  River,  Ontario
Saxist Pope to bless locals
By ANGUS RICKER
The jazz odyssey of saxist
Byron Pope has found a new
tack.
Pope, arrived in Vancouver
from Los Angeles via the unlikely points of New York and
Detroit.
But nothing is "likely" in
the jazz world as Pope discovered when he attempted to
form a local rhythm section
to back himself and trumpeter
Warren Gale.
Pope's resourceful enthusiasm
plus a fast trip to Los Angeles
has produced the right rhythm
combination   and   his   enthusiasm  has  proven  contagious.
Special Events has arranged
three concerts for Vancouver
students: a two hour session
in the UBC Auditorium at noon
Thursday, January 13 and noon
concerts at Simon Fraser and
City College the following
Tuesday and Thursday.
jazz
At these concerts further developments regarding the formulation of a Vancouver Jazz
Society will be announced.
Pope's goal remains — to establish a modern jazz voice in
Vancouver.
His music is avantes garde
and vital.
I advise anyone interested in
contemporary music not to
miss the chance to keep him
in  Vancouver.
Lord knows Vancouver rarely manages to keep anyone
else of rank in the arts.
Composers exit in droves
By JOHN NORRIS
The number of jazz composers in Canada today can ibe
counted on one hand. Our musical environment offers little
encouragement to a composer
seeking a career in this field,
and the few active jazz writers
spend  more  of  their  time  in
the
S£ay
GEORGIA AT GRANVILLE
Invites you to consider an executive career in retail merchandising.
Our Training Programme offers a challenging and thorough framework
in which you can make rapid advancement tuned to your personal drive
and ability.
A career with "The Bay" can lead you to any of the major cities
between Victoria and Montreal. As a merchandise executive you could
be sent on buying trips to markets in North America, Europe and Asia.
Retail Merchandising will enable you to use your abilities to manage
people, to judge demands of customers, to administer the operations
of a department, to be creative and imaginative; it will challenge your
initiative and drive in the ever changing world of retailing.
Graduates in
Commerce,   Business  Administration  or   Arts
are eligible Sor our Training Programme oS:
• Initial rotation  programme showing you the major sales supporting
departments such as Advertising and Display.
• 2 year course in merchandising which supplements on-the-job training.
• Training under an experienced Department Manager in Sales Management, Buying and Department Administration.
Make an appointment now with your Placement Officer to see our
Representatives for full details or come in and see us in the store. Our
Personnel Office is located on the 5th floor.
Interviews will be
conducted on Campus
January 10th and 11th
other activities than in writing
new compositions.
Jazz is still very much part
of Jthe entertainment world,
but in the normal course of
events it offers little scope to
the composer whose own perseverance must remain the
major factor in any success
which  he  may  achieve.
Ron Collier, one of Canada's
best known and most distinctive jazz composers, could, of
course, make a lucrative living
as a commercial arranger. The
only writing assignments he
accepts, however, are those
which appeal to him musically
or those from which he feels
he will learn something fresh.
This restricts his earning capacity, but it does mean that
the music Collier writes has
integrity and direction.
The music which Ron Collier has written these ten years
has been channelled into directions which indicate, more or
less, the scope of work currently available to a jazz composer
in Canada. His early writing
was for a semi-regular working quintet.
"We had much more opportunity to play in those years,"
he recalls. "There was Stratford. In Toronto, the Town
Tavern hired Canadian groups,
and  the House  of Hambourg
was in operation. Our quintet
had a definite, individual
sound which no one else had
conceived. Out of that period
came such pieces as Quintet,
a suite Four Moods (I later
took one of the themes from
this composition and rewrote
it into Requiem for JFK) and
such songs as Weary."
In 1906 came one of Collier's
major works The City. This
was an hour-long musical impression of the various sounds
of the city, scored for an
eighteen piece orchestra. The
City was twice heard on CBC
radio and was also selected
by the CBC as the Canadian
entry for the Italia Prize competitions in Italy.
It was the CBC which commissioned Ron Collier to write
City was heard twice on CBC
Ya and, more recently the television play Silent Night, Lonely Night. Collier wrote Hear
me Talkin' to Ya in collaboration with actor-singer Don
Francks. It was a musical adaptation of a book outlining the
history of jazz through quotations from musicians, first presented as part of an evening of
jazz at the Crest Theatre in
Toronto. It was a labour of
love for the composer as well
as for the musicians.
Fellini probes psyche
By  AL   FRANCIS
In making Juliet of the
Spirits, Fellini faced two
new problems, the new — to
him — medium of color and
the probing of a woman's
psyche.
Fellini succeeded in both
with the flair and imagini-
tive genius expected of him.
Juliet of the Spirits can
not be compared to other
films. It is a unique experience.
His first venture into color
splashes the screen with hues
not seen before by the technicolor lab. Like symbolism,
he used color as another
means of expression.
As the story sensually wanders between the realms of
solid reality and psychic fantasy — a distinction Fellini
purposefully does not clearly define — the characters
also   range   from  real   to
Miuiiita
Ollllllft
iconic, from commonplace to
utter fantasy.
The first two hours are
engrossing and the last 15
minutes are positively apocalyptic.
Juliet, played with a studied and sensitive serenity by
Fellini's wife, is brought to
face her sexual repressions
when her husband proves
unfaithful
Fellini masterfully juxtaposes the "real" world of
tea party inanities and detective agency efficiency with
the fantasy world of Juliet's
psychic adventures.
Or is it fantasy?
With Fellini you can't be
sure.
ARMSTRONG & REA
OPTOMETRISTS
EYES EXAMINED
CONTACT LENSES
2 Convenient Offices . .
■BROADWAY at GRANVILLE
■KERRISDALE   41st at YEW
Page  10
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday,  January  7,   1966 "to-ferae ctoY\
-people?
WOMEN, / H47£ [WEDDING] 'EM
By JOHN KELSEY
Western civilization is
near the nadir, near collapse,
riding the juggernaut to stagnation and decadence and
death. All will concede that.
It is historically correct to
pin the start of the decline at
a.d. 1921, the year of universal suffrage, the year
women were given the vote.
That was man's most crucial
and excruciating error — he
will burn for it, he is burning.
•      •     •
Since suffrage — and it is
too late to do any revoking
—mass culture and the mass
world has become entirely
woman-oriented. Supply and
demand is controlled by
woman. The world is engulfed in sporadic warfare to
preserve the American ideal,
which rests heavily on mom-
ism's ugly breast. Phillip
Wylie defined the mom syndrome most accurately in his
Generation of Vipers.
That was 1940, but the situation has deteriorated, not
improved. Education is controlled by, and laced with
the asinine frivolities of inadequate women.
The home is woman's real
place, but she is not suited
to be head of it — although
she now is. And even with
the home completely controlled, she has the gall to
enter business and industry
on a par with men. On a par,
that is, when she is on the
attacking side. Attacked herself, she retreats behind the
hymen of femininity, frailly
but falsely. The juggernaut
accelerates.
The entire problem is a
direct result of two things:
universal suffrage and marriage. Universal suffrage let
women out of the kitchen,
into shoes (and pants and
wallets and cars) and over
the world, rampant. Her
meager brain cannot adequately cope with the world
as it is, so she is forced to
denature, emasculate, the
world.
Marriage as it is allows a
woman to castrate, both literally and figuratively, her
man. She has him for life,
and through some quirk in
human make-up, is able to
tolerate herself as an intolerable shrew. Man cannot tolerate her, but he's stuck, im-
■'■*c-
•*.«* •
argHiaent
mersed in the mollasses of
rabid momism. He accepts
his lot; his mother taught
him well. He has no escape
—and she knows it.
Marriage is truly intolerable.
Western man is buried in
a seemingly hopeless dilemma. He is weaned from
birth to adulthood on the
foolish idea that he must
marry before he is fully
grown or face life branded
as an evil old lecher.
Society forces him to
marry before he is physically,
emotionally or financially
ready; he's intimidated into
marrying a nice girl whom
he's never really met let
alone come to know. Society
scandalizes him if he dares
do anything else.
• •      •
Woman has forgotten her
place, although it is one
well-defined through history. Adam was supposed to
dominate Eve. Christian marriage asks woman, always
has, to love, honor and obey
her man.
But the decay of our civilization is only seemingly
hopeless. The answer is illegal co-habitation, variously
called common law marriage
or, in the vernacular, shacking up. Only then are both
parties aware of the other's
rights and responsibilities.
Only then can a shrew be
tossed onto the nearest sidewalk, lingerie showering
around her.
• •     •
Knowing this, the tongue
never blackens, and the potential shrew -remains a
woman. And in the same
case, an inadequate man will
be tossed out butt first—bed-
less,  boardless, broadless.
But this isn't a life rife
with insecurity. Mature
people know they will not
be tossed until they wish it
or the other party wishes it.
It's the only insanity.
Where escape is easy, it
cannot become a dominant
theme for eternal frustration.
It is foolish to believe two
people can be ideally suited
to each other for their whole
lives. People evolve, if
they're alive at all, and people stagnate in their relations to each other — unto
the point of no communication. Why perpetuate a dead
thing?
UNIVERSITY    TEXT    BOOKS
Non-Fiction  Paper  Backs
New and Used
BETTER  BUY BOOKS
1393 W. 10th Ave. - 224-4144
Slacks Narrowed
Suits Altered
and Repaired
Tuxedos Remodelled
Expert Tailoring
UNITED TAILORS
549 Granville St.
University Hill
United Church
on University Boulevard
Invites U.B.C. Staff and
Students to Worship.
January 9th
The Sacrament of Holy
Communion.
Meditation: "R.S.V.P."
Rev. Harold L. MacKay
The Church on The Campus
WELCOMES YOU
ITU BE A SHAKER
WITH
"SOUL UNLIMITED"
TOTEM PARK
FRIDAY, JANUARY 7
9:00 p.m. - 1:00 a.m.
75c
CUISINE AT ITS BEST!
MODERN CAFE
Bavarian Room
3005 W. Broadway   -:-    RE 6 9012
ATTENTION 1966
BACHELOR GRADUATES
IN
-HONOURS PHYSICS
-MATHS AND PHYSICS
-ENGINEERING PHYSICS
-GEOPHYSICS
-CHEMISTRY AND CHEMICAL
ENGINEERING
—METALLURGICAL ENGINEERING
-GEOLOGY AND MINING
-GEOGRAPHY
The Government of Canada offers
professional careers, competitive salaries and excellent opportunities for
advancement in fields such as:
* Atmospheric Sciences
* Marine Sciences
* Geological & Geophysical Sciences
* Metals & Mineral Research
* Analytical   &   Research  Chemistry
* Export Trade Promotion
* Geographical Research
A booklet describing some of the
current projects in "Physical Sciences"
is available at your Placement Office.
See the Canadian Government representative while on   your campus.
JANUARY  12,  13 and  14,  1966.
Application  forms  and  interview  reservations  available  at your
UNIVERSITY PLACEMENT OFFICE.
ATTENTION
1966 GRADUATES
in
GENERAL SCIENCE AND ARTS
with  courses in
Physics and Mathematics
A professional career in Meteorology with an opportunity
to use your training in physic and mathematics is available to you.
See the Canadian Government representative while on
your campus.
January   12,   13  and   14,   1966
Physical Sciences Booklet, application forms and interview reservations available at your UNIVERSITY
PLACEMENT OFFICE.
DALHOUSIE   UNIVERSITY
HALIFAX,  CANADA
GRADUATE STUDENT AWARDS
Physical Sciences
Biological Sciences
Social  Sciences
Oceanography
Medical Sciences
Humanities
The Faculty of Graduate Studies invites applications by March 15
for Dalhousie Graduate Awards, Dalhousie Research Fellowships and
Dalhousie Post-doctoral Fellowships in the Sciences, and by May 1 for
Visiting Fellowships for Terminating Graduate Students and new Ph.D.'s
in the  Humanities and Social Sciences.
• $3,000.00   Honours   Graduate   Entrance   Scholarships    (12    month
period.
• Up to $2,400.00  for Master's Students.  (12  month period).
* Dalhousie   Centennial   Fellowships   of   $3,600.00   for   Post-Masters
candidates in all fields.
• Up to  $4,000.00 for continuing  Ph.D. Students.
Up to  $5,000.00 for Visiting Fellowships in the Humanities.
* $6,000.00 for Postdoctroal  Fellows in the Sciences.
• $7,000.00 for Research Associateships.
* Travel Allowances for Canadian Students.
* Research   Allowances  for   Postdoctoral   Fellows.
The Dalhousie Graduate Awards, the Dalhousie Research Fellowships,
the Visiting Fellowships for Terminating Graduate Students and new
Ph.D/s in the Humanities and Social Sciences, and the Dalhousie Postdoctoral Fellowships are open to Graduates of any recognized university
in any Degree Program for which facilities are available, and are awarded
on the basis of academic standing. Additional special awards are open
to Canadians only.
Application forms and further information may be obtained from the
Dean of Graduate Studies, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia.
Friday,  January  7,   1966
THE        UBYSSifY
Page  11 GRADUATING ENGINEERS
in the Mechanical Engineers Physics
and Metallurgical options:
You will find challenging
engineering work, recognition, and above average
advancement opportunities
with United- Aircraft of
Canada Limited.
For over 35 years, United Aircraft of Canada
Limited has played a key
role in the growth and development of the Canadian
commercial aviation industry. As a member of the
United Aircraft Corporation, it manufactures, sells
and services in Canada the
products of United's Pratt
& Whitney Aircraft, Sikorsky Aircraft, Hamilton
Standard and Norden Electronics divisions.
In 1957, the Company
formed the nucleus of a
design and development
organization which has
since expanded into a 400-
man engineering force.
Among this group's many
accomplishments are the
preliminary design of the
Pratt & Whitney Aircraft
3000-lb. thrust JT12 (J60)
engine (used in North
American Saberliners and
Lockhead Jetstars) and the
development of the now
mass-produced PT6 (T74)
free turbine engine  (used
in the Beech King Air and
the DeHavilland Turbo-
Beaver and Twin Otter).
United Aircraft of Canada now employs approximately 3800 in its manufacturing, overhaul, supply,
research and development
operations. In addition, the
Company's long-term plans
and its pre-eminence in the
gas turbine field have created exceptional opportunities which will prove to
be well worth the detailed
consideration of graduating engineers. For further
information, please contact your Placement Office.
Our recruiting team
will be on campus
January 10
EXCEPTIONAL   OPPORTUNITIES
at
u
p
OF CANADA LIMITED
You Only
GRADUATE
ONCE
If 1966 is your year don't be one of
those who will look back and wish
they had bought a copy of
TOTEM
the memento you will cherish for
years.
Pre-Sale rate of $5.00 pays for the enlarged Grad
edition (which will include the Campus Life pages),
and a Graduation Supplement of the 1966 Graduation ceremonies to be supplied in June.
LIMITED NUMBER TO BE PRINTED
So be sure-ORDER YOURS TODAY
books
Winter
Potlach
happens
By CLARE WEINTRAUB
Winter Potlatch happening: this time with some real
surprises in store. Extra
special: woodcut print, signed by the artist, Ken Boe,
personally; two studied
poems by Seymour Mayne,
the ex-rabbinical Montreal-
er; a short story by Craig
Davidson, entitled "Fresh
Air   and   Westward   Expan
sion"
Good workmanship from
the somewhat Bissettal pen
of Jamie Reid; a treatise on
the terrors of illegal pot in
Spain by "Puff" (the magic
drag?).
A youngish attempt by
Judy Zacharias—who's been
reading Gunter Grass lately
— gets off to a fine beginning in "In his Father's
Book of Names for Boys,
Teilo means a Bright Pupil".
Great title, but- the story
needs tightening. Style overtakes the message: the mind
boggles  in  also-runs.
Tom Wayman's "A Ship
there is" (Waley, Waley)
smacks of Sutzkeyver. (I like
it, what the hell).
Wayne Nyberg: What can
be said?
I'm sorry Pierre Coupey:
maybe it's clear to you, but
your poetry is very young.
GRADUATE FELLOWSHIPS
The J. W. McConnell
Memorial Fellowships
for Graduate Study
at McGill University
Value $3,000 average per annum
(Depending on need, fees, travel expenses,
etc.)
Fields Any department in the Humanities, Social,
of Study Biological or Physical Sciences offering
Graduate programmes leading to the
Master or the Ph.D. degrees.
Tenure Tenable from Mo 5 years (inclusive)
Purpose To enable outstanding students to undertake
Graduate Studies, with the ultimate aim of
strengthening teaching and research in
Canadian universities.
Eligibility       Awards will be made to University Graduates
who are Canadian citizens, or who intend
to become Canadian citizens and to remain
in Canada.
Application
Deadline        1 February.
Application Forms and more detailed
information may readily be obtained by
writing to the Associate Dean, Faculty of
Graduate Studies and Research, McGill
 University, Montreal 2, Que., Canada. .
ENGINEERS:
Here s a Job You Will Like . . .
You are in good physical condition and under 30 years
old . . .
You wish to have a minimum of office routine . . .
You like the outdoors . . .
Travel   to    unusual   places   and   different   surroundings
appeals to your adventurous spirit . . .
You  want genuine  responsibility,  real  opportunity  and
good pay . . .
You  believe in promotion because of merit.
THEN: SCHLUMBERGER OF CANADA has the job for you.
JOB Engineer   Trainee   leading   to   field
Engineer.
On the job.
First six months — $460 per month.
First year — $7,000 to $9,000.
Second  and  subsequent years  —
$8,000 to $15,000.
Promotions from within.
Three weeks annually, increasing to
thirty days after eight years.
EMPLOYEE BENEFITS Life  insurance, disability insurance,
pension   plan,   benefit   trust,   year-
end bonus and others.
Additional  information  can   be  obtained  by writing  to:
Schlumberger of Canada
1780 Elveden House
Calgary, Alberta.
TRAINING
PAY
OPPORTUNITY
VACATION
SCHLUMBERGER
Page 12
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday,  January   7,   1966

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