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The Ubyssey Jul 25, 1984

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Array Bleed with joy for needy B.C. Red Cross in Angus Building, July 18 and 19
THE^^BYSSlY
ol. Ill, No. 4 C^»^ July 18-25, 1984 228
PITTENDREIGH
...supporting two children
By ROBERT BEYNON
The student says he knows two UBC women students who built up a
clientele and now prostitute themselves weekly to pay their tuition and
living expenses. They had few options, he says * ■     al m.       al
Ethics are irrelevant, says the student, because the two have found a pragmatic means
of buying their degrees. The student, who
would not allow his or the women's names to
be printed to protect their identities,
says the two women have found a way to
overcome B.C.'s incredible youth unemployment.
The tough times crunch has really hit B.C.
students. B.C., despite its forests, ocean, and
geological resources, has an unemployment
rate which only barren Newfoundland rivals.
According to Statistics Canada, 25 per
cent of B.C.'s post-secondary students —
30,000 people — are unemployed this
summer. The B.C. Central Credit Union estimates 31.3 per cent of students are without
work. And many "employed" students have
only part-time work.
These high jobless rates coupled with the
provincial government cancellation of its
student grant program are causing decreases
in post-secondary enrolments, says reports
released by the analytical studies departments
at Simon Fraser University and the University ofVictoria. This summer SFU enrolment
declined for the first time since 1979.
But many prospective students who do
not happen to have rich and willing benefactors are refusing to take out student loans
that could add up to a $30,000 debt for a
. four-year degree. Some students such as single mothers, especially those from the Interior, face providing for themselves and a
family in addition to paying off such a debt.
Other students who return to school
attempt to pass their mid-terms and finals
while bussing tables evenings at some greasy
Broadway restaurant for minimum wage.
If people thought tough times for students
had begun, they were wrong. Hard times are
just beginning and many students won't be
coming back.
year sciences at UBC, says he won't come
back this fall. He has tried door to door
selling and even gold panning, applied to the
student placement organization Joblink and
the Campus Employment Centre, and given
applications to numerous businesses. But
Christensen says he still cannot find enough
money to return to school.
"Even if I got a job now there's not enough
time for me to make enough to pay tuition
this year unless the job pays $15 an hour."
Tuition on average will be $1300 this fall at
UBC.
Christensen says he could take out a student loan, or work and study alternate years,
but he prefers to take this one year out and
make a lot of money — if he finds a job. He
says he hopes to make enough money this
year to pay for two or three years .tuition, if
he stays at home.
Christensen says the provincial government is to blame that he won't return to
school. "It's not just me, they're screwing
this province up," he says.
Chuck Chase, a mature honours history
student aiming for law school, says he won't
return to school either because he cannot
afford to take out a large loan this year and
every year until he finishes the law degree.
And although he works part-time at a
warehouse now, earning $800 per month, he
says with living expenses he will not make
enough money to return to school.
"I lived on just rice for more than a week
this year while I finished my essay and I
won't do that again," he says. "I was undernourished and trying to get my papers done
and wondering how I would pay the rent."
He has many years experience as a logger
and he still hopes to get a job logging somewhere on Vancouver Island this year although he hasn't found one yet.
His law degree may take him seven years,
returning to school every alternate year, he
says, but he will do it.
"I blame the provincial government for
the problem," he says. "As far as them taking
away the grants and making it all loans...
their whole restraint policy, it's all crap. I
think they're anti-people."
Shauna Markham, B.C. and the Yukon's
assistant coordinator for Canada Employment Centres for students, says the centres
are doing their best to find jobs but the
economy is tight. She says in the Metro Vancouver area the centre placed 3128 students
in part-time and full-time work since April,
an increase of 35 per cent from last year. But
she says due to their method of keeping statistics it is impossible to know how much
money the average students made.
She says most will have to get a loan this
year.
a
@
rik Christensen, who just finished first
Capital Venture has dubious record
Jocial Credit hopes are high but the province's Student Capital Venture Program
which gives students a $2,000 loan to run a summer business is still unproven.
No exact statistics are available but approximately 200 students have accepted the
loan that must be payed back this fall.
John Beckmann, who started a lawn and hedge maintenance business in West
Vancouver with a venture loan, says he isn't making as much as he hoped to.
He originally hoped to make $12,000 this summer, was still hoping to make
$6,000 when he spoke to The Sun for a June 16 article, but is now hoping to make
from $2500 to $3,000.
"The job gave me a big jolt," he says. "I realized I better get an education or I'll be
doing this for the rest of my life." The costs and hassles of the job were much more
than expected Beckmann says, who works five and a half days a week as it is.
Canadian Federation of Students spokesperson Donna Morgan says she expects
that few Venture businesses will be successful. Consumer and Corporate Affairs
minister Jim Hewitt's son told the Simon Fraser University student council he
thought at least one third of the Venture businesses would go broke and that few
would be successful, she says.
"The failure rate among small businesses is really high and how they expect a
student to set up a successful business in four or three months with $2000 I just
don't know," Morgan says. In a similar program in Ontario close to one third of the
students go broke annually.     	
mm
lome students, will be returning to
school this year but it will be a tough haul for
many of them. They will come back with
maximum loans or as part-time students,
building up a debt load for their graduation
or taking away valuable study time to support
themselves.
Fern Pittendreigh, a single mother of two
children, says she saved enough money as a
cook at a fishing camp in the Queen Charlotte
Islands to pay her first year of fine arts at
Emily Carr College of Art and Design.
But she says this summer working 40 hours
per week for five dollars an hour as a pastry
chef she just manages to pay the bills for
herself and her daughter and son, aged 11
and 14.
She says she will take loans for the next
three years, and expects to borrow a minimum of $20,000. "I'm a single mom trying
to go back to school to break out of the
single mother ghetto. I won't be a welfare
recipient. I want to better my children's lifestyles."
See page 2: Trail July 18-25,1984
The Summer Ubyssey
Page 2
Trail's main industry, Cominco, last hired in 1980
From page 1: Hard
And she says she cannot even be
sure of a job at the end and paying
off the debt after school sometimes
frightens her.
"I feel the government is driving
people like me out (by denying us
support), that only the rich kids can
attend," she says. "While other kids
just worry about grades, I've got to
put runners on my kids feet."
She thinks the government should
have some grants based on need,
ability and interest because people
who are hard up for money cannot
afford to spend the time required to
earn scolarships. "There seem to be a
lot of us single mothers, too," she
says.
Another UBC student, Michael
Ross, science 2, says he will not make
enough money to return to school
full-time although he is both working
at a warehouse part-time and fixing
cars when he can get work. He will
return to UBC part-time.
Ross says between travelling from
Richmond to Burnaby for work he
has had no time to find a second job.
But he thinks the Social Credit
government is doing the best they
can.
Student unemployment is bad
enough in Vancouver, which has the
highest metropolitan unemployment
rate in Western Canada (14.7 per
cent), but in parts of the interior like
the Kootenays, the rate can be as
high as 18.7 percent.
The rate is double that for students
in these areas.
Pam Nicols, the Trail Canada
Employment Centre for students
supervisor, says things couldn't be
much worse than they are in Trail, a
small West Kootenays town. Trail's
major industry, the largest lead and
zinc smelter in the world, owned by
Cominco, has not employed students
since 1980. This year Cominco laid
off many full-time workers.
Cominco's falling employment
means the local economy is depressed
and local businesses do not hire students, Nicols says. "They will hire an
unemployed worker before they will
hire a student."
She says 800 students from Trail,
Rossland, Fruitvale, and Castlegar.
registered with the centre which has
found them 234 jobs that lasted at
least five days. Canada Employment
classifies any job lasting five days or
more as regular. One hundred ten of1
"I'm a single mom
trying... to breakout
of the single mother
ghetto."
these are Summer Canada 1984jobs,
jobs sponsored by a federal government program which pays the minimum wage of $3.65 an hour.
Nicols says few people will make
enough money to return to university
without a loan this year.
Corrie Campbell, a Castlegar student who is entering fourth year psychology, says she will not malce
enough money to return to school
this year but her family will help her.
Campbell says the other six women
working with her on Summer Canada 1984 job assembling picnic tables
for a Kiwanis park all rely on family
support. It will be tough for some
¥****•*•*•••*
*    TINA'S   *
women's families, she says.
With no grants available and job
prospects slim, many young people
shy away from borrowing thousands
of dollars and just don't attend university, even though B.C. has a
smaller percentage of people in post
secondary education than any other
province in Canada.
Federal-provincial studies such as
a cooperative Statistics Canada/ Secretary of State 1971 study show that
if students have to borrow large
amounts of money to attend university they will not come.
The 1980 Federal-Provincial Task
Force on Student Assistance accepted grants as a premise. The question
for them was how best to administer
loans and grants.
But Dick Melville, B.C. education
ministry information officer, believes
helping students through school is
not a government job. "It is not the
government's obligation to pay anyone's way through university and I'd
like to know when that became the
government's responsibility," he said.
Donna Morgan, the Canadian
Federation of Students Pacific-Region resource person, says the less
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Located at the back of the Village
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educated, those lacking connections
and those from lower income groups
are particularly hard hit and form
the majority of the 30,000 unemployed students.
"And those figures are quite a bit
low," Morgan says. "They count
people who work one day a week in
those statistics."
She says, "The provincial government is apparently going back
wards. They've been reducing job
creation programs rather than enhancing them."
She says she does not think the
government can make jobs for all
the unemployed. But Morgan says
the government should "set up means
of helping make sure students who
don't get jobs have some means of
passing through school, rather than
pretending the problem does not exist."
SUB LOWER LEVEL
OPEN 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m
Our Delly offers a
superb variety of
made-to-order
sandwiches.
Also:
• Coffee • Juices
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(including Meat and
Vegetable Samosas)
• and Pastries
• We Cut All Materials For You
• Complete Instruction - You
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3657 4A M     mM f\mM p       Near Alma
Broadway t 0*T ™ | \j  | «3 Parking At Rear
Don MacKenzie
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Kaboodles is for kids — big and small.
Stop by and find summer playthings like hula
hoops, bolo bats, sand mills, beach balls, quiet
games for backseat travelling, baby gifts, party
supplies, jelly beans, helium balloons.
224-5311 4462 W. 10th Avenue
Open Friday evenings, too!
Monday
Ballet II/III
8:30-10 a.m.
(Jo Ann)
Ballet I
5:30-7 p.m.
(Jo Ann)
Dates:
Rooms:
Fees:
Registration:
Further Info:
BALLET UBC JAZZ
"Clip 'N Save" Summer Schedule
Tuesday Wednesday Thursday
Jazz I/Ir
8:30-10
(Daina)
Ballet II
5:30-7
(Hellen)
Ballet II/III
8:30-10
(Jo Ann)
Dancercise
5:30-7
(Leslie)
Jazz I/II
8:30-10
(Daina)
Ballet II
5:30-7
(Jo Ann)
Friday
Ballet II/III
8:30-10
(Jo Ann)
Jazz I/II
5:30-7
(Laurie/Glenda)
Schedule effective June 25 to August 10, 1984
Morning ballet classes will be held in Paula Ross Dance Studio. All other
classes will be held in the Music Room of the Asian Centre.
Just $30.00 for a whole term of unlimited classes of your choice (you may
take any or ALL of the classes offered). New member "Club Fee" of $5.00
is extra where applicable. Drop in fee is $5.00
Register daily between 12:30 -1:30 p.m. in SUB 216E, or register in class.
Available at registration, room 216E SUB, or phone 228-6668 July 18-25,1984
The Summer Ubyssey
Page 3
Inequalities remain for women
By ROBERTBEYNON
Job prospects for women in the
1980s are dismal and women's second-rate place in universities are not
changing quickly, say two reports
compiled recently by a woman student's officer workers.
The   report   on  women   in   the
. workplace in the 1980s, compiled by
Nancy Horsman, said the largest labour force increase is expected to be
women in the 25-44 age group, who
will increase by 5.6 per cent per year
these women will go into clerical
work where average wages are 27 pei
cent less than the average wage
workers receive. The average salary
rate for selected skilled and unskilled
occupations dominated by men is 132
per cent of the national average, says
the report, which is based primarily
on the Economic Council of Canada's- report, In Short Supply: Jobs
and Skills in the 1980's, published in
1982.
The report also said that although
between 1980-5. women constitute 40 per cent of the
But the report sa.d 80 per cent ol   work foroc;iheir unempioyment rate
is higher and that 50 per cent of un- -
employed women fail to return to
the fulltime workforce.
"Women will be segregated into a
"ghetto" employment situation in
offices, banks, etc.," the report said.
According to the report the best
bet for employment in the 1980s
would be science, business or medicine with some background in computers. These are areas which few
women are entering.
The report said women at UBC
are suffering due to the new micro-
technological changes. Jobs are being
eliminated and workers are not being
trained to use new equipment.
"The report is based on information that is already available to
anyone, on Stats Canada, provincial
government and Economic Council
of Canada projections," said Hors-'
man.
In a second, related report,
Horsman says technological change
is occuring and new jobs are emerging while women continue to enroll
in traditional faculties such as nursing and arts which will provide few
jobs in the future.
Horsman blames womens' failure
to enter non-traditional fields on lack
of encouragement at all levels of ed-
VANCOUVER
cappella singer
plus audience.
FOLK MUSIC wowed more than 25,000 people this weekend at Jericho Park. Here Vancouver songwriter Ferron
Sarah Fa vret and Deborah Silverstein do their finale in a Saturday performance. They received a standing ovation
Patti Flather photo
, Teresa Trull, a
from the 1,000
Legal funds to defend fired professors
By NEIL LUCENTE
Faculty could sue UBC's Board of
Governors with the help of a special
legal fund designed to help fired professors.
The Canadian Association of
University Teachers will start levying
funds from faculty associations
across Canada to create,a legal fund
for B.C. professors if any faculty
members are fired without a formal
agreement on firing procedures, said
CAUT executive director, Donald
Savage.
The provincial government abolished tenure in its Bill 3 which said
faculty could be fired for reasons of
financial exigency. While no faculty
has been fired at UBC, Savage said
the CAUT is ready to "swing immediately into action" if the university
terminates faculty.
"We are not about to tolerate unreasonable firings of anyone at UBC"
said Savage.
Savage said the CAUT is ready to
take the provincial government to
court if any firings occur but he added
the Board of Governors will be the
likely defendants.
"If the province uses Bill 3 to act
directly, we would respond directly.
But Socreds usually hide behind the
Board and so CAUT will probably
take the Board to court. Why should
the government take the flack if the
Board is willing to take it?" said
Savage.
The faculty association is without
a formal agreement on firing procedures but will draw up proposals for
an agreement to be presented to the
administration in September.
Savage said the CAUT legal fund
would have little purpose if UBC's
faculty association approved formal
firing procedures. But he added professors can imply unfairness in a
termination despite an agreement
and ask CAUT for help in a defense.
"We would ask the university to
send us an affidavit or testimonial
As the world Turners...'
Prime Minister John Turner announced he would run in the
Vancouver riding of Quadra at the Bayshore Inn Monday.
"I met with the executive of Vancouver Quadra and they extended
an offer to place my name in nomination as the Liberal candidate
for Vancouver-Quadra," Turner said.
Later Turner said, "There are now no historic NDP ridings.
There are no historic conservative ridings. Every riding in B.C.
becomes a potential Liberal riding."
Quadra incumbent Bill Clarke, a Progressive Conservative, said
he is not worried because Turner is running against him.
Quadra stretches from Shuaughnessy to UBC. ■   •
Turner said as prime minister he will have little time to campaign
in Quadra for the September 4 federal electiohV^na his wife and
family will campaign in his place. t***?|-\:-
Turner is currently the most famous of alongline of talented
Ubyssey writers, editors and photographers.   -■'/.,   •
showing that they tried all other
channels in saving money before firing a professor. If we find they have
not, we will then proceed to levy
money for a defense," said Savage.
Savage would not say under what
law or precedent the CAUT would
defend a professor.
Meanwhile UBC's faculty association proposed to create its own legal
fund to defend any terminated professors, said faculty association president Elmer Ogryzlo. The fund will
be used only if the association has no
formal firing agreement with the
administration, he said.
"We're hoping we don't have to
use such funds," said Ogryzlo. "But
we greatly appreciate the support
from the CAUT and other faculty
associations."
Acting president and Board of
Governors member Robert Smith
said it is unlikely professors will be
fired without a termination agreement. He added faculty terminations
are a last resort and will be conducted
along the lines of a financial exigency
agreement.
ucation.
"The counselling should begin at
the secondary level to encourage
women to go into the sciences and
industrial education," said Horsman.
"The counselling is almost too late
when women reach UBC."
Horsman said efforts should be
made to place capable women in the
president's office, hire more women
professors, and point women students to non-traditional studies such
as engineering.
She said workshops should also
be organized to help women overcome math anxiety and other psychological problems women experience when they enter non-traditional fields.
Associate vice president Don
Russell said that the university is
improving its representation of
women but that it takes time. A positive sign is acting agricultural aean,
Beryl March, who is a woman, said
Russell.
"I agree in principle that women
should be encouraged to enter non-
traditional fields," Russell said.
UBC wage
vote starts
By PATTI FLATHER
The UBC administration and the
faculty executive have presented a
salary proposal that gives less to UBC
faculty than the recent Simon Fraser
University faculty agreement that
included a 2.7 per cent pay cut.
The salary proposal worked out
last week will freeze both wages and
bonuses, called increments, for the
1984-85 year, the second year in a
row, said faculty association executive officer Andrew Brockett.
Brockett said the agreement is
worse than SFU's because while SFU
faculty took a pay cut they will still
receive an average three per cent increment this year.
"On average at SFU there's an increase. Now you compare our proposal with theirs and who's done better?" said Brockett.
UBC formerly allotted three per
cent of its faculty salaries budget for
these increments, he said. He said
UBC used a system based on awards
for outstanding performance, satisfactory work and the correction of
anomalies,  which are  out  of line
salaries. .
and what it was last year is absolutely
nothing for that and nothing for cost
of living."
Brockett said he could not remember the last time there was a
total freeze at UBC, adding that while
the UBC system was more flexible
increments based on seniority are
commonly accepted in universities
and other fields.
Brockett said faculty members received ballots by Monday and will
have until August 7 to vote on this
new agreement. The faculty will also
discuss the proposal at a closed
meeting this Thursday, Brockett said.
Physics department head Llewellyn Williams said he is definitely not
in favour of the proposal since the
young and the very good will be penalized by a complete freeze because
they will not advance.
"Clearly that will affect UBC's
ability to retain people," Williams
said.
"I would have preferred to have
an across the board cut and then
used that money to take care of the
young and outstanding people," he
added.
Acting president Robert Smith, a
proposal negotiator, said the proposal will go before the board of governors August 2 for approval. The
board has ultimate authority regarding university expenditures and will
have to accept the proposal.
Smith declined comment on the
proposal. July 18-25,1984
The Sum
'**«    V
- Neil Lucente photo
Ferron SJINQS
wjtIh raw ecIqe
By PATTI FLATHER
The Saturday afternoon workshop at the Vancouver Folk
Music Festival was billed
"What is Women's Music?" — there
was a general consensus the title was
a bit off but the music was great.
"See, I don't really know what to
sing cuz I can't answer the question,"
said Vancouver songwriter Ferron.
As the joke sunk in, she sang a new
and powerful song about a child
growing up in a home where the parents are always fighting. Her lyrics
are like poetry, full of images, and
her strong voice has a uniquely raw
edge.
The crowd of more than 1,000 did
not mind at all when she forgot the
last verse — they loved her. Ferron
recently toured the U.S. and received
a four star rating in Rolling Stone
for her new album, Shadows on a
Dime.
Deborah Silverstein, hailing from
a small Pennsylvania town, sang a
tribute to her mother's life entitled
"Letters from an Allegheny Town,"
a song written when her mother died
and all the daughter had left were
her mother's letters. As the song
ended, a woman murmured,"beauti-
ful."
"I started playing women's music
in 1973. We didn't even know such a
thing could exist ourselves," she said.
Silverstein was a founding member
of one of the first bands, New Har-^
mony Sisterhood, to blend traditional music with feminism.
'*■*..
"RhyThM An'
By PATTI FLATHER
"I
ff
<1V.
/*'
- John Knowles photo
Australian folksinger Judy'Small
caused the crowd to erupt into
laughter with her country-style takeoff oh religious prudity. She found
the chorus, "Turn right: and go
straight," on a notice board at St.
Hilda's Church of England in Ka-
tumba, Australia and added her own
gems such as "I didn't wake up till
the age of 23.1 turned right and went
straight if you can catch my meaning..." Small also did a moving
commentary of the aging of herself,
her mother, and her niece.
Other performers included duo
Teresa Trull and Barbara Higbie,
who is also an excellent fiddler and
pianist, from North Carolina, and
Seattle a cappella group We Three.
The latter groups was impressive with
"Bells", a song with complicated
harmonies ending with the three singers resonating like bells.
All performers sang on stage for
the finale, Ferron's spiritual Testimony, from her 1979 album of the same
'name: "By our lives be we spirit/By
our hearts be we women/ By our eyes
be we open/By our hands be we
whole."
The crowd gave a standing ovation.
want my own doors to open,
I've got my own heights to climb...
Yes, I have the same right to live for
myself as you do. I have the same
right... right.,, right..."
Lillian Allen's voice is first powerful, then fades off in a remarkable
likeness to an echo as she reads her
poem "Liberation."
• Allen, a Toronto poet originally
from Jamaica, was one of the highlights of the Vancouver Folk Music
Festival, this weekend at Jericho
Park. Allen writes and performs a
unique brand of poetry known as
dub poetry which is incredible to
hear.
As she reads poems written in the
Jamaican dialect, Allen'svoice is alternately rhythmical and chanting,
tough and searing, sarcastic and
funny, and always sensitive, as when
she recites a work on the birth of her
daughter.
"Me labour me labour me labour
me labour..." Allen chants nodding
her head and swaying her body. She
tells the laughing audience that little
girl just wouldn't come till she was
ready. And then, "Me push me.
push..." Allen's voice drops as she
describes the ultimate moment when
her daughter is born.
Alien's poems hit the reality of being black, an immigrant, a woman.
She reads from one poem: "I came to
Canada to find the doors of opportunity well guarded." She describes
the menial jobs and discrimination a
black immigrant faces. Sheconcludes
the work yelling "I flghi back! I fight
back!" to the stunned audience. Allen
gets her message across.
"My poetry first rewrites history,
sets the record straight »** she says in a
Sunday interview. "It condemns all
aspects of oppression, agitates social
conscience, provides some kind of
vision in content and spirit-"
Explaining how shebe^nteajJiib,
4 ner Ubyssey
July 18-25,1984
HarcJ TiMEs"
poet, Allen says she is first a part of
the Jamaican tradition of talking in
metaphors and using imagery. Then,
she made a conscious decision to follow "humanistic social" pursuits over
science, she says.
Alien, who has been writing as long
as she can remember, says her dub
poetry is linked to the entire cultural
reggae movement of the 19?6's.       "
Allen published a book, "Rhythm
An' Hard Times" two years ago
which has sold 2,000 copies, and a
record entitled "De Dub Poets" but
at first it was not easy.
Sp.
«o-<
"When I couldn't get published I
had to create a way to reach the people. It's an act of resistance that I've
developed performing my work. 1
published myself, really,"
Six others in the Toronto black
community were able to publish after
her, Allen says, adding that more
black publications' are in the works
there. "Once I went through the process, I exposed it," she explains.
Allen says poetry is still an effective
tool and weapon for passing on culture, for agitating, for sharing. Judging from the response to her work at
the festival, she is right. During the
interview a beaming woman tapped
her on the shoulder and told her she
was the best thing at the festival.
Lillian Allen is both a poet and a
performer. But the Canadian literary
establishment - the Canada Council
and the League of Canadian Poets -
do not recognize her or give her
funds. Allen attributes this to nervousness about her poetry's style and
content.
"Because they didn't create it... it's
out of their control. It's in the control
of the people. It's folk." ~
Alien stijl earns her living as a ful-
Itime community worker but says the
balancing act with her poetry cannot
go on forever. But she insists I write
the following quote down.
"You persist and you survive and
you have to salvage what you can
and move on."
Crowc) joiNS
dAINCETROUpE
By CHARLIE FIDELMAN
To see people dancing at the Vancouver Folk Music
Festival is not unusual, but to see them on stage
keeping time and stomping with the performers is
unique.
Gwinyai and Sukutai Marimba Ensemble, who perform dances, songs and music from the Shona people of
Zimbabwe, believe that if you can walk you can dance,
and if you can talk you can sing.
This means the audience should be part of the performance. And so they were. Children were lifted onto
the stage, adults jumped in, and the rest of the crowd
which did not fit on the small stage gyrated on the turf.
This high energy comes when "you play with your
heart," said Lora Leu Chiorah, leader of Sukutai. "We're
playing African music and what Zimbabwe is about,"
she added. There are eight adults and four children in
the group to help spread the word.
"We don't separate children from our life," said Lora
Leu. The Shona people are very proud of their history
and culture, and music plays a prominent role, she says.
It is expressed in everything from routine tasks to sacred
functions. "And so we don't separate the children, they
are part of the oral tradition." The youngest member is
seven years old but he started playing music as early as
one and a half years of age.
Gwinyai and Sukutai means to be strong, to keep on
going, and to do it well. The Shona people have been an
oppressed people for such a long time, explained Lora
Leu, so that much time passed before anything was
heard about Zimbabwe. Zimbabwe gained majority rule
in 1980.
And the Shona people also seem to be a happy people.
Their dances are rhythmic and very sensual. Dressed in
traditional costumes of Shona designs and colors, they
moved with strength and agility that could put many
aerobic classes out of business. The crowds loved the
ensemble.
"If people don't get up and dance, it (the performance)
is not good," said Lora Leu, "people hear it and the
music tells them to move."
The traditional percussion instruments played are the
various drums, mallet marimbas, and the mbira which
is a plucked idiophone similar to the kalimba.
The seventh annual Folk Festival was lucky to have
Gwinyai and Sukutai Marimba Ensemble here this year-
— they were invited last year but did not make it. And
from the response the group received, they should be
back again next festival.
i;
IS****,.
■ Neil Lucente photo
- John Knowles photo
i* * *\    it _	
Robert Beynon photo July 18-25,1984
The Summer Ubyssey
Page 6
The Late Blunter: A premier performance of
Vancouver playwright John Lazarus' fantastical
comedy, the Arts Club Theatre Seymour, 687-
5315. Opens July 2.
Guys and Dolls: A classic musical fable of
Broadway, Arts Club Granville Island Theatre,
687-5315. Opens July 13th.
California Suite: Four playlets whose action
focuses on the adventures and misadventures
of various hotel guests in a Beverly Hills Hotel,
Vagabond Players of Queen's Park, 521-0412.
Opens July 25.
Oh, What a Lovely War: by Charles Chilton
and the Theatre Workshop, reviews the madness of World War I through songs and
sketches, The Frederic Wood Theatre, 228-
2678. July 25-August 4.
Mousetown: Nasty things happen to rats that
don't believe in Santa Claus, The Waterfront
Theatre on Granville Island. Opens July 13.
Vaudeville East: a series of four different
vaudeville evenings throughout July and August, The Vancouver East Cultural Centre,
254-1555, July 22, August 12, and August 26.
Was He Anyone?: The story of the rise and fall
of Albert Whitbrace; an untalented nobody
who manages to capture the heart, imagination
and wallet of the entire world, at the James
Cowan Theatre, 298-7322. Opens July 18.
The Unfestival: a potpourri of clown, theatre,
dance, mime and music at odd times and in odd
places, at the Firehall Theatre, 689-0691. July
14 to August 11.
A Day in the Death of Joe Egg: a probing, yet
amusinganalysisoftherelationshipof a married
couple who are faced with the daily difficulties
of rearing a severely handicapped child, at
Studio 58, Vancouver Community College,
Langara Campus, 324-5227. July 24 - August 5.
Japanese Art andf ulture: an exhibit of Japanese arts and crafts ranging from kite making
to Kendo, July 14-22, Arts, Sciences and Technology Centre, 600 Granville St., 687-8414.
B.C. artists: Contemporary prints with focus
on well-known B.C. artists such as Jack Shad-'
bolt, Alistair Bell and Pat Martin Bates, July
11 - August 10, Burnaby Art Gallery, 6344
Gilpin St., 291-9441.
Laurent Roberge, two sculptural works: Two
sculptural works called National Geographies
and 8192 Orderly Strings, July 3 - August 10,
UBC Fine Arts Gallery, 228-2759.
Watercolurs by Fred Prows* and Donna Bas-
paly: two local artists display watercolours, at
the North Vancouver Community Arts Council,
988-6844. July 11 - August 7.
Halfyard's Little People: a display of simple,
yet very expressive dolls, at the Cartwright
Street Gallery, 687-8266. Opens July 12.
Catherine Jones: Paintings on the Edge of
Death: is a series of witty and playful paintings,
at the Contemporary Art Gallery, 687-1345.
Opens July 24.
Survey of Contemporary American Art: Forty-six works by twenty-one artists. Included
are paintings, prints, sculpture, ceramics and
two-dimensional mixed media works, at the
Vancouver Art Gallery, 682-5621. July 6 - August 6.
HcVl£6
The Bad and the.Beautiful: a 1952 melodrama
directed by Vincente Minnelli starring Kirk
Douglas, Lana Turner, and Dick Powell,
at the Surrey Arts Centre.
Ridge Theatre (16th avenue and Arbutus, 738-
6311). That Sinking Feeling, 7:30and 9:30 p.m.
QUALITY
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day before publication.
Publications ftoom266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
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11 - FOR SALE
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tires on rims, radio, see at UBC. $1750.
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WORD PROCESSING -Essays,
reports, thesis work done on
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35 and decide. Bilingual service.
Fast turnaround. Convenient to
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$1.00/page. Refs. avail. 736-1305;
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REASONABLE RATES. Call 876-2895
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letters, manuscripts, resumes, theses, etc.,
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222-2661
From page 8: Yippie
Elaine, an ex-hippie, and Shelley,
an anti-nuclear punk, represent the
heritage of the 1960's, and so help
Blumer adjust to the Sometimes
nightmarish world of 1984.
On the whole, the male characters
are better-drawn and more substantial than the female characters. Blumer, Rex, and Garth all have, if not
fully-rounded, then at least fullblown
lown characters. Whereas Elaine and
Shelley are too 'nice' to be as interesting.
Part of the problem is that neither
of the women have as strong a conflict with Blumer as do the men, so
they do not get as many good lines.
Nonetheless, Elaine and Shelley
are well-played by Meredith Bain
Woodward and Miriam Smith respectively.
Robert Metcalf as Rex and John
Destry Adams as Garth both play
the straight man well to Rick Scott's
kooky Blumer. Metcalfe is especially
good as the screwed-up Rex, who
used to be known as 'Sunshine' but is
fast turning into 'Sleazebag'.
The brightly-painted orange set
designed by Ted Roberts adds to the
comic feeling of the play, and the
costumes, expertly designed by Phillip Clarkson, tell us much about the
characters before they even open
their mouths.
1
University of British Columbia
STAGE CAMPUS 84
OH, WHAT A LOVELY
WAR
by Charles Chilton &
The Theatre Workshop
Directed by Henry Woolf
JULY 25-AUGUST 4
Adults        $5
Stud./srs.   $4
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SC^^X^ July 18-25.1984
The Summer Ubyssey
Page 7
^m.-m*M
UBC needs equalizing
No single institute can change a cultural phenomenon. And no one suggests
that UBC adopt a policy that could eradicate sexism in Canada or the rest of the
universe.
However, an influential institution,
(such as UBC) can strongly influence its
surrounding society. By adding to the
murky pool of knowledge. UBC can be a
leader of trends. That seems to be the
general claim of academics in the arts,
sciences and multiple technologies.
At present. UBC maintains a passive
role (incidentally, passive is traditionally
a feminine 'trait'), in aiding their own female academic achieve equal status. The
administration's passive support stretches only to the point of admitting
women are as capable as men. The administrators, almost entirely male, say
women can apply for the same jobs and
can study the same courses that are
available to men. That is nice to know.
However, a recent report by the
women's office shows women are not
moving into administrative positions and
not enrolling in the traditionally male faculties such as engineering.
And although it is not publicized often,
sexual harassment exists on this campus
and it won't go away by itself. One wonders how committed to equality te male
hierarchy at UBC is.
UBC's passive non-tactics of dealing
with an important issue are as good as
wishing for sunshine will all our hearts
and souls. Is equality an active goal or a
passive wistful wish at UBC?
UBC must examine its hiring procedures, and its implied channelling of
women students; and should restructure
the handling of sexual harassment complaints. Or else UBC must face the criticism that it's influence is a leadership
from the tail end rather than the head.
Folk festival success one to be emulated
Vancouverites were given the
chance to be alternately obnoxious and aecent last Weekend
when the city staged its two major
summer festivals. If people wanted to, they could leisurely enjoy
world-classfolk, blues and ethnic
music at Jericho beach and then
pop down to the traffic (and people) congested West End to ex-
trovertly flex their brilliantly
tanned biceps or cleavages in
what has got to be Vancouver's
cheap solution to Malibu beach.
It's probably unfair to juxtapose
two events so differently motivated from one another but it is
hard to resist when both occur on
the same weekend on the same
turf. While the Sea Festival was
claustrophobically   crowded.
loud, hostile, and neurotic, the
Folk Festival at Jericho beach
consciously aimed at being a decent, civil affair.
It is rare to see any event plan
its agenda with such careful
awareness. It seems that everyone
was taken into account in the festival's planning: residents were
spared the torture of dealing with
and cleaning after hordes of raucous people drunk on liquid depressants; the disabled were given free admission and all stages
were accessible to them; children
under three were also freely admitted while clowns and costumes were employed to keep
their interest piqued.
The Festival tried to address
uZettetA
Universal Esperanto comes to UBC
speaking to people" and for this a
common language is almost a necessity.
The international language, Esperanto, is ideal for this- purpose,
largely because it can be learned in a
fraction of the time that it takes to
learn another language. This language is hot just "pie in the sky";
more than a million people in over
In this age of rising international
tension, some people think the only
way to attain peace in the world is to
agree on it at a conference table. They
forget that before nations live in
peace, the people of the earth must
learn to understand each other and
tolerate each other's ideas. In order
to achieve such international understanding,  we  must  have "people
' THE UBYSSEY
July 18-25, 1984
The summer Ubyssey is published Wednesdays throughout the
summer sessions by the Alma Mater Society of the University of British
Columbia, with additional funding from the Walter H. Gage Memorial
Fund, the UBC Alumni Association, and the federal summer career
access programme. Editorial opinions are those of the staff, and not
necessarily those of the university administration, or of the sponsor.
Member of Canadian University Press. The summer Ubyssey's editorial
offiuce is SUB 241K. Editorial department, 228-2301/228-2305.
Advertising 228-3977/228-3978.
"Hey newshounds, he's running in Quadra," screamed Robert Beynon with undisguised
glee, recalling last week's masthead. Stephen Wisenthal said nothing but the dollar signs in
his eyes grew ever larger at the thought of all the ads. Neil Lucente, Charlie Fidelperson and
John Knowles wondered what wonderful photo possibilities there would be. Winnie Tovey
and Lee Boyko lamented the fact that the bubblehead would be running so far away from the
Peak. Patti Flather said the election would be useless because the current political system is
useless and irrelevant and paternalistic to boot. Kirk Brown and Elena Miller didn't understand.
one hundred countries are already
using Esperanto.
At the 69th World Esperanto
Congress, which will be held at UBC
from July 21 to 28, you can see Esperanto in action as lOOOEsperantists
from over 50 countries meet for 8
days of serious discussions, lectures,
excursions, and entertainment.
If you would like to come to the
beginners lessons or participate in
the cultural events during the Congress, write to the Congress Committee office at 53 N. Boundary,
Vancouver V5K 3S4, or call (604)
298-6019.
Anyone wanting to learn more
about Esperanto can write to the
Canadian chapter of this world-wide,
non-profit movement: Canadian Esperanto Association, Box 126, Stn.
Beaubien, Montreal, Quebec, H2G
3C8. Ask for our free, ten lesson postal course and please include a
stamped, self-addressed envelope.
Paul Manson
Prince Rupert, B.C.
issues of worldwide importance
as well. Performers with ethnic,
feminist, homosexual, and political appeal were carefully chosen
not just to entertain but to inform.
And in a time of high unemployment and low morale for Vancouver's youth, the festival employed 500 young volunteers.
Before it is totally forgotten, it
should be mentioned that the'
music was excellent.
The people responsible for the
Sea Festival should learn a lesson
from the organizers of the Folk
Festival — mainly that a crowd of
people makes a mob. not a festival. Let's just hope Vancouver
becomes known for its Folk Festival.
The Summer Ubyssey wishes to acknowledge the support it received from various
organizations which made this summer
newspaper possible. The UBC Alma Mater
Society, the Walter Gage Fund and the
UBC Alumni Association all contributed
funds.
Special thanks go to Bogdan Czaykowski, Slavonic studies department head,
for his letter of reference supporting us.
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681-0165 July 18-25,1984
The Summer Ubyssey
Page 8
Bergman recycles artists' life
By CHARLIE FIDELMAN
"Perhaps never before," writes producer Jorn Donner,
"has Bergman discussed the problems of being an artist
in so open and maked a manner as in After The Rehearsal."
Set back stage amidst old sets and furnishings, the
film is 72 minutes long and contains only three speaking
parts.Henrik Vogler (Erland Josephson) is directing a
production of Strindberg's "A Dream's Play" for the
fifth time. He <;asts a young ingenus, Anna Egerman
(Lens Olin) in the leading role and he gave her mother
Rakel (Ingrid Thulin) a much smaller role in an earlier
production of A Dream's Play.
One of the most personal of directors, Ingmar Bergman's characters mirror his obsessions without referring
to Bergman himself. After The Rehearsal portrays the
older man as an artist, and shows the difficulty of
separating one's life from one's work.
Anna wants a career as an actress. She is willing to
"go on rehearsing around the clock," and returns back
stage after a rehearsal for a bracelet she never had. Her
chat with Henrik is interrupted by Henrik's dream of
Rakel, the aging actress who is full of bitter recriminations. She and Henrik were once lovers.
Rakel the apparition flirts, cries, cajoles, and quarrels,
about her small part. She has become an alcoholic and
her husband beats her, and if Henrik won't sleep with
her, the doctor still finds her skin smooth, she says,
baring her legs and breasts.
After she leaves, Henrik resumes his talk with Anna.
They speak of her role and their shared lives. They
imagine themselves in an affair: the seduction, the coquetries, and the jealousies, and both realize the affair
will never happen — partially because Henrik doesn't
want to find himself embroiled in a similar affair. Anna
is very much like her mother.
Henrik is a very tender character. He loves his actors
for their courage and intensity. He loves them for the
magic they create and for their sustained childishness
—a childishness so precious that other people build theatres
for the actors to play their games in.
The film consists of gossip, reminiscences, milk mul-
lings on life and the philosophy of art. The two women
take turns entering the stage. They act stagey, demanding, narcissistic, self-dramatizing, horrible, and beautiful
in a way that is emotionally intense. The visuals follow
their facial expressions in a series of tight close-up
shots. These subtle photographic manouevers make
Bergman's 'one-set-play' into a feature film.
Ingrid Tulin performs the alcoholic fading star with
an anguished vulnerability that somehow brings sensuality and beauty to her crying face. And Lena Olin's
aspiring young actress is a fresh and strong character, so
loyal to her part that she aborts a pregnancy.
Bergman does not pit mother and daughter as youth
against age. The tender Henrik is more concerned with
his diminished hearing than with the memory of an old
love, or with the possibility of the onset of a new affair.
The juxtaposition of new and old highlights the resurgence of life; he provides a sense of continuity and
regeneration.
Bergman's After The Rehearsal conveys much more
than a story of the theatre and the people who work
there. It is one of the better films of 1984.
Ingmar Bergman's
After The Rehearsal
Showing at The Ridge
Henrik and Anna imagining
Vippie jumps time
By ELENA MILLER
Billed as a 'fantastical comedy',
John Lazarus' new play The Late
Blumer is a delicate fantasy which is
almost overwhelmed by comedy.
The Late Blumer
By John Lazarus
directed by John Juliani
at the Arts Club on Seymour until
August 4
Based on the whimsical premise
that a drug-crazy hippie from 1967 is
transported suddenly to 1984, the
play tends to lose itself in the working
out of its comic plot. By the end,
however, the fantasy is recaptured as
a computer-crazy yuppie from 1984
prepares to re-surface in the year
2001.
Played endearingly by Rick Scott,
Blumer, the transported hippie, is a
touchstone who reveals both what is
admirable and what is deplorable
about the 1980's.
Some of the characters Blumer
meets in 1984 include Box, a young,
upwardly-mobile executive, and
Garth, a corrupt business tycoon.
They represent the worst of the
1980's, and as such, are Blumer's
sworn enemies.
See page 6: Yippie
BLEED BLEED BLEED BLEED BLEED BLEED BLEED BLEED BLEED BLEED BLEED BLEED
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BLOOD DONOR  CLINIC
July 18th and 19th — 10:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
SCARFE BUILDING STUDENT LOUNGE
THERE IS AN ACUTE SHORTAGE OF BLOOD IN B.C. THIS SUMMER.
PLEASE HELP SOLVE THIS CRISIS BY DONATING.
THE LIFE YOU SAVE MAY BE YOUR OWN.
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SUMMER SCENE
Vol. 13, No. 3
July 18-25
SUMMER
SOUNDS
Free, noon-hour concerts. Bring your
lunch and a friend.
Wednesday, July 18
Thursday, July 19
Friday, July 20
Monday, July 23
Tuesday, July 24
Wednesday, July 25
Jazz - Music Bldg.
Brass Quintets - Clock Tower
Pheonix Jazzers -
Buchanan Quad.
Steven Nikleva Quartet -
Music Bldg.
Galiano Trio - Clock Tower
Gastown Five - Music Bldg.
MUSIC FOR A
SUMMER SCREEN SUMMER'S EVENING
Thursday, July 19:
Wes Foster, Clarinet; Karen Foster, Viola;
Jane Gormley, Piano; music of Mozart,
Brahms, Bruch, Berg and Vaughn-Williams.
Tuesday, July 24:
Bruce Clausen, Guitar; John Loban, Violin;
classical guitar program with the addition of
sonatas for violin and guitar by Paganini.
These concerts are held at 8:00 p.m. in the
Music Building Recital Hall, and are free to
the public. All concerts are co-sponsored by
the S.S.A., Musician's Union Trust Funds,
Extra-Sessional Office, and the Department
of Music.
Free films presented at 7:30 p.m. in IRC
Lecture Hall #2.
Wednesday, July 18:
BLAME IT ON RIO; Michael Caine and
Michelle Johnson star in this raucous,
funloving story guaranteed to keep you
laughing. (Mature)
Friday, July 20:
APOCALYPSE NOW; Marlon Brando,
Martin Sheen and Robert Duval star in this
Vietnam war story loosely based on
Conrad's epic story "Heart of Darkness"
about a journey through thick, forbidding
jungle.
Q3318 Q3338 Q331S Q3318 Q3318 03338 Q333S Q3318 Q3318 Q3318 Q3318 Q3338

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