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The Ubyssey Feb 21, 2011

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Array Not worth two hoots SINCE 1918
March 7 - March
2011
UBC students will hit the polls
in two weeks to vote on
renewing the U-Pass,
raising student fees
and changing
\ AMS bylaws.
\ Our coverage
1 on Page 4.
SPORTS | A LOOK AT UBC ATHLETES WHO HAVE TRANSFERRED FROM NCAA SCHOOLS  PAGE 7
CULTURE | THREE INTREPID WRITERS TAKE ON THREE DIFFERENT DIETS FOR A WEEK  PAGE 5 2/UBYSSEY.CA/E VENTS/2011.0 2.21
FEBRUARY 21,2011
VOLUME XCII,  N°XXXV
EDITORIAL
COORDINATING EDITOR
Justin McElroy: coordinating@uhyney.ca
NEWS EDITOR
Arshy Mann: news@ubyssey.ca
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR
Kalyeena Makortoff: kmakortoff@ubyssey.ca
SENIOR NEWS WRITER
Mich Cowan: mcowan@ubysseyca
CULTURE EDITORS
Jonny Wakefield & Bryce Warnes:
culture@ubyssey ca
SENIOR CULTURE WRITER
Ginny Monaco: gmonaco@ubyssey ca
CULTURE ILLUSTRATOR
Indiana Joel: ijoel@ubysseyca
SPORTS EDITOR
Marie Vondracek: sports@ubysseyca
FEATURES EDITOR
Trevor Record :features@ubyssey ca
PHOTO EDITOR
Geoff Lister: photos@ubysseyca
PRODUCTION MANAGER
Virginie Menard: production@ubysseyca
COPY EDITOR
Kai Green: copy@ubysseyca
MULTIMEDIA EDITOR
Tara Martellaro: multimedia@ubysseyca
ASSOCIATE MULTIMEDIA EDITOR
Stephanie Warren:
associate.multimedia@ubysseyca
VIDEO EDITOR
David Marino: video@ubysseyca
WEBMASTER
Jeff Blake: webmaster@ubysseyca
Room 24, Student Union Building
6138 Student Union Boulevard
Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1
tel: 604.822.2301
web: www.ubyssey.ca
e-mail: feedback@ubysseyca
BUSINESS
Room 23, Student Union Building
print advertising: 604.822.1654
business office: 604.822.6681
web advertising: 604.822.1658
e-mail: advertising@ubysseyca
BUSINESS MANAGER
FerniePereira: business@ubysseyca
PRINT AD SALES
Kathy Yan Li: advertising@ubysseyca
WEB AD SALES
Paul Bucci: webads@ubysseyca
ACCOUNTS
AlexHoopes: accounts@ubysseyca
CONTRIBUTORS
Ben Cappellacci
Halle Hui
Catherine Lai
Amelia Rajala
Ian Turner
Josh Curran
Miranda Martini
Charles To
Page 5 illustrations by Indiana Joel
LEGAL
The Ubyssey is the official student newspaper of
the University of British Columbia. It is published
every Monday and Thursday by The Ubyssey Publications Society. We are an autonomous, democratically run student organization, and all students are
encouraged to participate.
Editorials are chosen and written by the Ubyssey staff. They are the expressed opinion of the
staff, and do not necessarily reflect the views of
The Ubyssey Publications Society or the University of British Columbia. All editorial content appear-
ng in The Ubyssey is the property of The Ubyssey
Publications Society. Stories, opinions, photographs
and artwork contained herein cannot be reproduced
without the expressed, written permission of The
Ubyssey Publications Society.
The Ubyssey is a founding member of Canadian
University Press (CUP) and adheres to CUP's guiding principles.
Letters to the editor must be under 300 words
Please include your phone number, student number
and signature (not for publication) as well as your
year and faculty with all submissions. ID will be
checked when submissions are dropped off at the
editorial office of The Ubyssey; otherwise verification will be done by phone. "Perspectives" are opinion pieces over 300 words but under 750 words and
are run according to space. "Freestyles" are opinion
pieces written by Ubyssey staff members. Priority
will be given to letters and perspectives over free-
styles unless the latter is time sensitive. Opinion
pieces will not be run until the identity of the writer has been verified. The Ubyssey reserves the right
to edit submissions for length and clarity. All letters
must be received by 12 noon the day before intended publication. Letters received after this point wil
be published in the following issue unless there is
an urgent time restriction or other matter deemed
relevant by the Ubyssey staff.
Itisagreed byall persons placing display or classified advertising that if the Ubyssey Publications
Society fails to publish an advertisement or if an
error in the ad occurs the liability of the UPS wil
not be greater than the price paid for the ad. The
UPS shall not be responsible for slight changes or
typographical errors that do not lessen the value or
the impact of the ad
7\V
^* %f^ Canadian
-r-p. qi *--. University
roL        Press
jpe- Rainforest
Alliance
Canada Post
Sales Agreement
#0040878022
EVENTS
ONGOING EVENTS
UBYSSEY PRODUCTION • Come
help us create this baby! Learn
about layout and editing. Expect
to be fed. • Every Sunday and
Wednesday, 2pm.
RESOURCE GROUPS • Are you
working on a progressive project,
but need funding? Do you have
an idea, but can't get it off the
ground? Apply to the Resource
Groups for funding! Come in,
pitch your idea to us and we will
consider fully or partially funding
your project. • Every Monday,
i lam in SUB 245 (second floor,
north-east corner). For more info
email resourcegroups.ams®
gmail.com.
ILS00KYUNGMCLAURIN ART EXHIBIT:
THE BEAUTY OF NATURE • With
references to the tradition of
landscape painting that captures
the beauty of the land and
trees, Kyung's art pieces have
a surrounding landscape that
serves as a backdrop to her daily
life within her adopted homeland
of Canada. However, through her
works, she also illustrates the
darker side of the landscape,
confronting the troubling aspects
of environmental pollution that
threaten nature. • Runs until Feb.
26, artwork featured in Irving
K Barber foyer and Ike's Cafe
gallery.
MONDAY, FEB. 21
[TITLE OF SHOW] • [title of show]
is Broadway's newest, hilarious
cult hit musical and is making its
Western Canadian premiere in
Vancouver. Best friends Hunter
and Jeff decide to write a musical starring themselves and their
wacky and sassy ladyfriends
Heidi and Susan. • Runs until
Feb. 26, Mon.-Fri. 8pm, Sat.
2pm and 8pm, Arts Club Revue
Stage, 1585 Johnston St, Granville Island. $25, call (604) 629-
8849 or go tovancouvertix.com
to reserve.
TUESDAY, FEB. 22
SWEPT AWAY: KATSUSHIKA 0EI
AND HER FATHER H0KUSAI • Katherine Govier is invited for a talk
and reading from her novel The
Ghost Brush (Toronto: Random
House, 2010). The Ghost Brush
is a look into the life of Oei,
the daughter of the Japanese
painter Katsushika Hokusai.
The book is available through
the UBC bookstore and will be
available for purchase at this
event. • 5-6:30pm, Asian Auditorium, go totheghostbrush.
com for more information on
the novel or go to Katherine
Govier's site at govier.com.
WEDNESDAY, FEB. 23
THE PILLOWMAN • UBC Players'
Club presents The Pillowman.
Katurian, a writer in an unidentified authoritarian state, becomes
the prime suspect in a series of
child murders when the police notice similarities between his violent stories and the deaths they
are investigating. The Pillowman
takes a look at violence, abuse
and the influence of art in the
modern world without trepidation. • Feb. 23-26, 7:30pm, Dorothy Somerset Studios. $5 members, $8 students, $10 non-students, tickets can be reserved by
emailing productions@ubcplayer-
sclub.com or at the door30mins
before the show.
THE CROSS EYED BEAR/BOOM
BOOMS EXTRAVAGANZA FEATURING
RIVERDALE' Come for a night of
comedy and music celebrating
the release of the first Cross
Eyed Bear comedy sketches,
including Riverdale, the fan-
made trailer for a very dark
Archie comics adaptation. Then
enjoy a performance by local
sensations The Boom Booms,
a wonderful band with a soulful
sound everyone can enjoy.
This event is a fundraiser
to support Point Blank
Creative and United Visions
Entertanment's next short
Mister Forgettable. • 8-11 pm,
doors open at 7pm, Rio
Theatre, 1660 East Broadway.
$11.50 or $15 at the door, go
to brownpapertickets.com/
event/157609 to reserve.
LAUGHTER ON THE 23rd FLOOR •
The annual medical school play
will be Laughter on the 23rd
Floor by Neil Simon. Inspired
by Simon's early career as a junior writer for a variety comedy show, it portrays the manic antics of a group of comedy
writers as they struggle with
their show's inevitable cancellation. • Runs until Feb. 25,
8-11 pm, Medical Student and
Alumni Centre, 2750 Heather
St. $12 students, $15 non-students, e-ma/V medplaytickets®
gmail.com to purchase.
THURSDAY, FEB. 24
SPARTACUS YOUTH CLUB CLASS SERIES • The Vancouver Trotskyist
League presents their second
Spartacus Youth Club Class discussion: Egypt After Mubarak.
• 6:30pm, SUB Room 42V,
call (604) 687-0353 or email
trotskyist_vancouver@shawca-
ble.com for more information.
DISCOVER DANCE! LORITA LEUNG
CHINESE DANCE COMPANY* The
Lorita Leung Chinese Dance
Company is recognized by
China as North America's
leading Chinese dance performing group. They will be
showcasing the astonishing
diversity and beauty of Chinese dance in the next edition
of The Dance Centre's popular
Discover Dance! noon hour series. From the poise and control
of the classical style to the exuberance of ethnic folk dances, the company will trace a
journey through Chinese art,
culture and traditions. There
will also be a question-and-
answer session with the dancers. • 72pm, Scotiabank Dance
Centre, 677 Davie St (at Granville), $10, $8 students, seniors
and children. Go toticketsto-
night.ca.
FRIDAY, FEB. 25
UBC LIBERTARIAN CLUB DISCUSSION • UBC Libertarian Club
proudly presents a discussion
event regarding the WikiLeaks
controversy. Speakers Anthony Mayfield and Paul Geddes,
President of the BC Libertarian Party, will be discussing
Wikileaks, a non-profit organization that releases confidential documents to the public
from anonymous news sources. Discussions will be held
afterwards on issues like freedom of speech, national security and rights of the press.
Your opinion is welcomed. •
5-6:30pm, Room 203, Buchanan A, free.
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OXFORD SEMINARS
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March is
going to be a
busy month
for us. Send
us your
events before
everyone else!
events@ubyssey.ca
tlTHEUBYSSEYca 2011.02.21/UBYSSEY.CA/NEWS/3
NEWS
EDITOR ARSHY MANN»news@ubyssey.ca
ASSISTANT EDITOR KALYEENA MAKORTOFF»kmakortoff@ubyssey.ca
SENIOR WRITER MICKI COWAN»mcowan@ubyssey.ca
UBC forces Sauder to pay back for renovations
KALYEENA MAKORTOFF
kmakortoff@ubyssey.ca
Ayear after Sauder asked its students to finance upgrades to Henry Angus, UBC is forcing them to
pay some of it back.
The Board of Governors (BoG)
has instructed the Sauder School
of Business to pay $4 million to
partially reimburse students and
the university for funding renovations to the Henry Angus Building, after Sauder was found to
have significant reserves at its
disposal.
At the February 7 BoG meeting, plans for significant renovations to the Henry Angus building project were presented, even
though lastyear's upgrades were
supposed to be the end ofthe renovations. It was at this time that
Sauder was shown to be finishing the year with a substantial
$24 million in unrestricted operating reserves.
After closed-door discussions
among the governors, they allowed the unexpected phase
three construction to begin in
April—with some caveats.
The BoG decided that Sauder
was in a position to transfer $4
million from their reserves: $2
million back to the university for
their assistance in phase one and
$2 million to benefit future Commerce students, who will be paying additional student fees beginning in 2012.
"The reason behind the $4
million as I know it is that...is
what the faculty can spare from
their reserves without dipping
too low.
"They want to keep some
healthy reserves," explained
The Henry Angus Building. GEOFF LISTER PHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
Sean Heisler, a student BoG
representative.
"But nonetheless, outside of
the reno project and some AV upgrades, there was $4 million extra that wasn't needed, so it was
decided that that should go back
to paying some ofthe debts from
phase one and two. So the suggestion was to split it 50/50, half of
that going back to the university
and half of it going to students."
Sauder's reserves were never
previously offered up as assisted funding to the project, despite
calling for substantial student-
paid assistance and an emergency
loan from the university throughout the past two phases. After
funding fell through for phase
one costs, UBC ended up giving
emergency funding amounting
to $10 million to Sauder for the
Angus Building, which the faculty claimed was needed to ensure
they would notlose accreditation.
To fund phase two of the project, Commerce students will begin paying an extra $500 yearly fee on top of their student society fees, a decision which was
passed by referendum in March
2010, to pay the total $17.9 million required.
Prior to the March 2010 referendum, Sauder Dean Daniel
Muzyka said to The Ubyssey that
"there hasn't been another pot of
money to put into this," and that
the building upgrades have been
"respectful costs" and at a "minimal reasonable standard."
"Could they have paid for
some? Sure, they always have
money in their reserves," Heisler
explained. However, he contends
that Sauder did still need financial assistance. "I don't believe
Sauder could have paid for the
entire project themselves, at least
not with the committed expenses they had in their reserves."
Connor McGauley, the outgoing CUS president, said that Sauder was not hiding information
from anyone in terms of finances.
"The rule is that $6-10 million has to be kept in case of a
down year in the real estate market such as 2008. And so what
happened this year is because
of such a strong real estate market, at the end of the fiscal year,
[reserves] were higher than expected [and] the school decided
to donate it back. So that's a good
thing, it's win-win.
"I totally understand students'
[negative reaction]. [But] I think
the reaction is based on that the
information hasn't been put out
there."
According to McGauley, a meeting is set to be called for Monday, March 1 at 6pm in Angus
293, where the building committee of the CUS Board of Directors will go through the process that has taken place since
renovations began.
However, Heisler suggested
that the situation has already
resulted in positive gains for
students. "This may be one of
the first times money has gone
back to students. I think it's a phenomenal step forward and it reflects really positively on both the
board and the administration as
far as I'm concerned."^
From the palace to the barn: Aprodicio Laquian
CATHERINE LAI
Contributor
For a young man growing up in
a tiny village in the Philippines
amidst the violence of the Huk
rebellion and WWII, the privilege of education was an "escape
hatch" which helped him break
free from poverty.
Today, Aprodicio Laquian is
a Professor Emeritus at UBC
and vice-chair of the University Neighbourhood Association
(UNA).
His extensive resume includes
positions with the United Nations, the International Development Research Centre (IDRC)
and the office ofthe President of
the Philippines, as Joseph Estrada's Chief of Staff.
Growing up in a family of eight
children, "we were very poor, dirt
poor... and then WWII came, and
we really starved," Laquian said.
During the war, Laquian recalls Japanese soldiers performing atrocities such as the systematic beheading of villagers, some
of whom were Laquian's cousins.
"All of us would be brought to
the marshes [to] hide, but then
any male that they [would] find
in the village they would line
them up, and then there [would]
be this collaborator of Filipinos
with a bag over their head... and
then they say this one, this one,
this one, and then they will ask
them to dig their own graves."
He said that death was commonplace to him at the time. "It's
a wonder, you know, living four
years like that, that I didn't get
traumatized or anything like that."
Laquian considers his rise
out of poverty an "accident" that
he attributes to his being the
second youngest in his family.
When he came of age, his brothers and sister were already working and they insisted thathe continue with his education. Flying
straight to Boston from the slums
of Manila, he went on to study at
MIT on a Fulbright grant.
Later on, he worked for the
IDRC, picking out young people from Africa with potential
and giving them scholarships to
study social sciences abroad. He
also helped the organization rescue scholars from Uganda during the country's period of turmoil and smuggle their families
from Kampala.
He recalled it fondly as "the
best foreign aid program of Canada that nobody ever hears about."
Throughout his career, Laquian has returned to the Philippines several times to try and
use his abilities as an expert on
urban planning and development to improve living conditions there. Each time, he said,
he comes back disillusioned by
Laquian in his UBC home. CATHERINE LAI PH0T0/THE UBYSSEY
the corruption ofthe Philippine
government. "In a system of honour among thieves, ifyou are not
a thief, you don't have any honour," he quipped.
His brief term as Chief of Staff
to former President of the Philippines Joseph Estrada ended when he was fired for commenting on television about the
president's habitual nighttime
drinking with cronies. Laquian
maintained thathe was only joking and that the media took his
comments and blew them out of
proportion.
"I wasn't saying anything that
everybody didn't know," he said.
He considers his term as Chief
of Staff "spiritually" successful.
However, Laquian continues to
contribute to the community
through the UNA. "As long as
my brain is functioning and my
health is good, I will try to do
something to help people," he declared. "The beauty of it is I don't
see even a whiff of corruption." va
NEWS BRIEFS
UBC'S ENDOWMENT FUND
GROWING
UBC's endowment fund portfolio increased by 1.5 per
cent in the year ending September 30, 2010, despite
decreasing by 2.4 per cent in
its final quarter.
In a report prepared by Investment Management Trust
Ine, the university's investment
arm, a strong performance in
the US, European, Australia
and Far East equity markets
was credited with the portfolio's growth.
Real estate detracted from
the fund performance by 0.8
per cent due to non-Canadian
properties and currency impact.
The total value of UBC's endowment fund was reported at
$874.1 million. Once over a billion dollars, it lost approximately 20 per cent of its value following the 2008 world financial downturn.
SARAH MORGAN-SILVESTER REAPPOINTED CHANCELLOR
UBC Chancellor Sarah Morgan-Silvester has been reappointed for a second three-
year term, extending her term
as UBC's 17th Chancellor until 2014.
As Chancellor, Morgan-Silvester is the ceremonial head of the
university, confers all degrees
and sits on both the Senate and
Board of Governors.
"Ms Morgan-Silvester has
been an outstanding leader and
ambassador for UBC over the
past three years," said UBC
President Stephen Toope in a
press release.
Morgan-Silvester was appointed to her position in April
2008. She is also the current
chair of Port Metro Vancouver
and BC Women's Hospital &
Health Centre Foundation.
CAM0SVUN FIGHTS UVIC
STUDENTS ON CFS
VICTORIA (CUP) — The students' society at Camosun College recently approved unlimited spending for a campaign to
combat the University of Victoria's attempt to leave the Canadian Federation of Students
(CFS).
In a motion passed at their
Feburary 7 board meeting, the
students' society's signing officers were given power to approve spending over $500 with
no maximum amount on the
time-sensitive, pro-CFS campaign. Spending over $500 is
usually approved at bi-monthly
society board meetings.
Michel Turcotte, director of
operations, estimated the pro-
CFS campaign will cost a few
thousand dollars, and cited possible advertising costs for the
high amount.
"If it becomes a very polarizing campaign and there're many
people on different sides, and
you have to engage in expensive advertising or something to
reach out to those people, that's
going to add some costs," said
Turcotte.
The Victoria referendum to
leave the CFS is scheduled for
March 29-31. 4/UBYSSEY.CA/NEWS/2011.02.21
U-Pass referendum called for March
New system would cost $6 more per month and make passes monthly
GEOFF LISTER PHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
ARSHY MANN
news@ubyssey.ca
The U-Pass, by far the AMS's most
popular service, will be up for renewal this March—with a number of changes.
From March 7 to 11, the AMS
will be asking students to approve
a new Metro Vancouver-wide system that will see all post-secondary schools adopt a $30 monthly
transit pass. This is $6 per month
more than UBC students currently pay for the program, but is required by all schools wishing
to have a U-Pass under the new
system.
Alongside the U-Pass, the AMS
will also be asking students to restructure the fees they pay to the
society as well as for a number of
by-law changes. Due to the popularity of the program, U-Pass
votes—and any questions on the
same ballot—almost always reach
quorum, a significant hurdle for
any referenda.
Newly elected AMS President
Jeremy McElroy said students
should know that voting no to the
pricier U-Pass will mean the termination of any U-Pass program.
"The foremost thing to know
about the U-Pass [referendum]
is that if it fails we lose the program," he said. "We can redo it,
we'll go back to referendum if it
fails because there's no way we're
going to let that happen, but this
isn't an optional thing."
McElroy acknowledged that
some people may be upset about
the increased cost ofthe U-Pass,
but said that the price itself is not
something the AMS can change.
"The foremost
thing to know
about the U-Pass
[referendum] is
that if it fails we
lose the program."
JEREMY MCELROY
AMS PRESIDENT
"The price increase is non-negotiable at this point. That was
an amount that was agreed to by
the Province and Translink and
then offered to students by referendum," he said.
According to John Coombs, the
manager of strategic planning
and policy in the transit branch
ofthe Ministry of Transportation,
the amount of $30 was reached
by calculating approximately how
much the UBC and SFU passes
would cost today after inflation,
UBC and SFU are the only two
schools which will be paying more
for their U-Passes. Coombs said
that this does not mean that students from either school are helping pay for smaller schools in Metro Vancouver.
"Your $30 is still a heavily subsidised rate, very heavily subsided. You aren't subsiding anyone
else with your $30," he said.
"While it's true you as individual students will be paying a little
bit more, the service going into
UBC and supporting the high utilization of U-Passes is still very
high."
The Province has pledged $20
million dollars between now and
April 2013 to cover the costs of implementing a provincial wide U-
Pass program.
Along with the increased
price, the actual pass itself will
be changed so that new ones will
be issued every month instead of
every term.
"The company that makes the
machines that print our [current]
passes stopped making those machines in 2005," said McElroy.
"Also, with Translink planning
to bring in the new smart card
system in 2013, they didn't want
to spend a significant amount of
time or energy on a new technology that was going to be pushed
out by the smartcard. So [Translink is] bringing out a monthly
fare card similar to what regular fare cards are like, except it
has a unique identifier for each
school on it and you have to show
[it] with your own student card
to verify."
McElroy said that the AMS is
still working with the university to decide how the passes will
be distributed.
"We're investigating the possibility of dispensing machines,
similar to a parking ticket machine, where you swipe your student ID...and it will pop out a
pass for you. We'll strategically
place those around campus so
that people can get to them relatively easily and also to avoid
really long line-ups."
Because the new passes will
not have names or pictures on
them, students will be required
to carry both their U-Pass and
their student card.
Some AMS councillors raised
concerns over the new system
at the last Council meeting, but
McElroy believes that few students
will be overly inconvenienced.
"This won't affect 99 per cent
ofyour travel because you only
have to show your student [card]
if asked by transit police or staff,
which is usually just fare checks
on the Skytrain," he said. "So
when you get on the B-line you
can still just pass your U-Pass."
McElroy said that although he
knew most ofthe students voting
in the referendum would be primarily interested in the U-Pass
question, he argued for the importance of the fee and by-law
questions.
"I want to make sure everyone
fills out the rest ofthe ballot, for
the by-laws and the fees," he said.
"Don't just vote on the U-Pass
because that's only part of what
the AMS does. We can't bring the
U-Pass if we're bankrupt and have
to dissolve."
This is the first of three articles
looking at various aspects ofthe
March referendum. The next two
will examine fees and by-laws, tl
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CULTURE
EDITORS BRYCE WARNES & JONNY WAKEFIELD »culture@ubyssey.ca
SENIOR WRITER GINNY MONACO »gmonaco@ubyssey.ca
ILLUSTRATOR INDIANA JOEL»ijoel@ubyssey.ca
WHY
GEOFF LISTER PHOTO ILLUSTRATION/THE UBYSSEY
From freegans to vegans to locavores,
people change their diets for the better
lealth of their bodies, their communities
and their planet. The way we see the world
affects what we eat, and vice versa.
PALEO DIET
Five hundred generations ago, humans ate differently than they do now. The diets of most
modern peoples are built around foods that
only became readily available after civilization began. Hunter-gatherers from the Paleolithic Era
had little access to grains, \—
legumes, dairy or sugars.
Even the fruits, vegetables
and meats we buy from supermarkets are products of selective breeding, and did not exist
in their modern form until well
after the advent of agriculture.
Followers ofthe paleo diet do
their best to approximate the
eating habits of pre-agricultural
humans. Some include an exercise regimen meant to replicate
a cave-lifestyle. Practitioners claim
that human genetics are adapted to such
a regimen, and have changed little over the
past 10,000years. According to Sebastien Noel's
website Paleodietlifestyle.com, this means a diet
"high in fat, moderate to high in animal protein and low to moderate in carbohydrate [sic]."
FRUITARIAN
While some believe that humanity is hardwired to consume the flesh of other living
beings, there are factions of people who take
great pride in pointing out that Eve was tempted by an apple rather than a hunk of
NY steak.
These produce pushers
are adherents of fruitarian-
ism. There are broad definitions of what exacdy a fruitarian diet entails. Most con
sume nothing but fresh fruits
and nuts, while some versions
of the diet allow for grains and
legumes. The strictest fruitarians consume only what would "
organically fall from the plant.
Unlike with vegetarianism
and veganism, science does little to defend fruitarianism. The
Health Promotion Program at Columbia University warns thatthe
diet can lead to deficiencies in protein, iron, calcium, B vitamins and
zinc—among others.
For adherents to fruitarianism, these cautions are secondary to moral and environmental concerns. According to Dr Rod Preece,
author of Sins ofthe Flesh: A History of Ethical
■SERIES
By committing myself to the paleo diet for
a week, I'm resigning myself to a diet consisting mostly of meat and eggs, supplemented
by vegetables and the occasional handful of
nuts and seeds. Those
who aim to lose weight
quickly are encouraged
to forego all fruits and
avoid starchy tubers like
potatoes and yams, and
that's what I intend to do.
My normal diet doesn't
include many processed
foods or a lot of sugar, so
those won't be difficult to
do away with. The biggest
"obstacle, as far as I can
see, is becoming a teetotaler for a week. Civilization
and alcohol are inextricably
linked—which makes me very,
very civilized. Hopefully all the ba-
* con, steak and sashimi will make up
for the lack of liquor.
-Bryce Warnes
Vegetarian Thought, fruitarians believe their
chosen diet "is the diet most considerate of
our fellow sentient animals."
The justification of any conscious diet is complex and personal, but with
fruitarianism that justification tends to favour a
particular brand of crazy.
One website suggests that
"onions perhaps make us
cry because they don'twant
to be cut up... we also make
them cry ... perhaps we do
not recognize their tears."
Even adherents of the
fruitarian diet admit that
it's a difficult lifestyle to sustain. Some partake in it as
a clease or detox, or a quick
way to kick-start weight loss.
I've chosen to adopt the restrictive form of the diet, as
the version allowing for grains
and beans seems a little too close
to my regular eating habits.
I'm curious to see how many ways there are
to make fruit salad.
—Ginny Monaco
And some people see the world
in unorthodox ways. Take fruitarians, for instance. Among their
number are those who use biblical references to the Garden of
Eden as the basis for a diet built
only on foods you can squeeze for
their juices. And many who follow the paleo—or "caveman"—diet
see the invention of agriculture
as the source of humanity's ailments. They do their best to live
like hunter-gatherers, although
they're more likely to do their
hunting and gathering at the local
Whole Foods and butcher's shops
than in the wilderness.
How practical are these diets?
And more importantly, are they
worth the effort? Ancient Vedic
and Taoist texts suggest that by
carefully selecting the foods one
eats and how one consumes them,
an acolyte can overcome physical
limitation and attain new levels
of spiritual strength. (As you will
see, some modern raw-food vegans
make claims of a similar sort.) But
is it really practical for, say, a university student to build their life
around such restrictive regimens?
As an informal experiment,
Bryce Warnes, Jonny Wakefield and
Ginny Monaco have each dedicated
themselves to one of these "lifestyle" diets for one week. The goal
is to figure out how difficult it really is to subscribe to such eating
habits, as well as appreciate the
short-term effects such changes
can have to a person's physical
and mental health.
Warnes will follow a paleo diet,
which tries to replicate the diet of
humans about 12,000years ago.
Wakefield will become a raw-food
vegan, abstaining from animal
products or anything prepared
at over 46 degrees Celsius. And
Monaco will turn fruitarian, a
subset of veganism—emulating,
more or less, the diets of Adam
and Eve.
Over the next three weeks,
these lab rats will publish the
results of their experiments. The
findings will be highly subjective
and not scientific by any means.
But hopefully, they will help others appreciate how difficult it is
to change who you are by changing whatyou eat.
RAW FOOD
It's the Monday before reading break, we're in
an edit meeting and we've decided to do a feature on lifestyle diets. I remember hearing something aboutjonsi Birgjsson, the falsetto lead-
singer of Sigur Ros, being a
rawfood vegan—in Iceland,
where all they eat is fish and
nothing is green. Sigur Ros
is cool...Sure, I'll spend a week
on raw food.
As I write, I'm paging through
a raw cook book and frantically
scarfing down almonds, trying
to maintain a reasonable level of blood sugar. As it turns <$&
out, anything heated above
46 degrees Celsius does not
count as raw. That proscribes
a lot of things we don't normally think of as "cooked"—
coffee and beer among them.
On the bright side, RAWvolu-
tion—a raw food cook book by Southern California raw food dude Matt Ams-
den—makes the payoff of laying off the heat
sound pretty great.
For one, raw food retains water and enzymes,
two vital pieces in digestion. Less time spent
digesting equals more energy for other things,
says Amsden—like studying, spiritually
questing and yes, yoga.
Also, cooking cuts out a
big chunk of vitamins.
"Cooking destroys over 80
per cent of a food's nutritive
value," says Amsden.
He follows this out to its
logical conclusion: GODLIKE
POWER. "I am never ill, I've
forgotten what a headache
feels like, any wounds heal
much more quickly," says
Amsden. "I am physically
stronger, and my reflexes
are incredible.
"The simplicity of feeding
yourself from only the plants
of the earth is, paradoxically,
one of the most profound things
you can do."
-Jonny Wakefield
CHECK BACK MONDAYS FOR REPORTS ON EACH DIET 6/UBYSSEY.CA/CULTURE/2011.02.21
COMICS WITH MIRANDA MARTINI
Chuck and Nancy s infinite playlist
Taking a look at political correctness in the Archieverse
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To the chagrin of many readers, Betty and Veronica have yet to share their secret sapphic desires with one another. PHOTO COURTESY ROBYN LEE/ FLICKR
February is
Black History
Month, and
Black History
Month always
gets me thinking about Archie comics.
You may
have heard,
back in September of lastyear, about a new
character being welcomed into
the fold of Riverdale High—a
transfer student named Kevin
Keller, the first openly gay character in the Archie universe—as
part of an aggressive campaign
undertaken by the new management at Archie to modernize the
nostalgic comic brand.
It is interesting the way you
can track the progression of
social values through Archie,
which is frozen in late '50s
Pleasantville, yet occasionally allows foreign contaminants from the evolving world
outside to seep in through the
fourth wall. Those of you who
have read Archie comics might
be familiar with Chuck, a mild-
mannered aspiring cartoonist
and his girlfriend Nancy, who
quietly appeared in Riverdale
in the early 1970s. A glaringly
obvious yet virtually silent response to the civil rights movement, Chuck and Nancy were
the first black characters to appear in Archie, alongside Valerie, who appeared in the stead of
an extraneous member of Josie
and the Pussycats around the
same time.
I read a lot of Archie when
I was a kid. They were always
there on the stands at the local corner store, tempting me
as I bought my penny candy. I
liked the small, safe, predictable
world in which their adventures
took place. I knew it was inane
and vapid. In all my years of
reading Archie comic "funnies,"
I don't think I ever laughed out
loud once and that didn't bother me. Escapism has its place,
and for me that place was Archie, where the political, painful, morally ambiguous world
I lived in changed its clothes at
the door like Mr Rogers.
Politics tend to stand out all
the more for their absence. Archie's desperate attempts to remain relevant and PC make
it clear that it would never
change if it had its way. Archie would have gone on chasing knee-length pencil skirts
in a completely whitewashed
world if enough readers in the
'50s and '60s hadn't started
wondering where all the black
faces were. Archie has yet to
introduce an Asian character,
or a transgendered character,
or a character of mixed race
(of course Chuck and Nancy
started dating each other the
minute they moved into town).
It's said that the human mind
will see a human face or shape
in the most primitive suggestions of animation: the swirls
in the grain of wood, a flame
flickering in the fireplace. We
also tend to see our whole complex society in the vague caricatures of some cartoons. Of
course, our reason tells us the
truth: that the quaint apple-pie-
and-baseball American town
Riverdale represents never existed. Chuck and Kevin were already there and they certainly
didn't sidle into the limelight
without a word. However, another part of our brains sees how
easy that world is, how simple,
and lets it become a mirror.
Archie is a relic now, emblematic of a genre that has largely
outlived its usefulness and popularity, but it still stands as an
example of why it's worth paying attention to what we read
when we think our brains have
checked out. Growing up mixed-
race and struggling to define
myself based on what I saw and
read, I was told that making the
problem of inequality and un-
der-representation go away is as
simple as introducing a quiet aspiring cartoonist with a flat-top.
It wouldn't be worth discussing,
if mainstream comics—or TV or
films—were different now, but
the truth is there's still a long
way to go. This kind of lazy tokenism is still the norm and
we're so used to it that it tends
to slip under the radar, tl
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celebrate
research
2011
March 4-11,2011
A campus-wide showcase of
public events on a variety of
research topics and themes.
All members of the UBC
community are welcome.
Visit our online calendar of
events for more information.
DO YOU WANT THE CHANCE TO EARN
this Spring /Summer?
www.PropertyStarsJobs.com
We wont pay you.
Volunteer for Culture
email | culture@ubysseyca
U THEUBYSSEYc 2011.0 2.21/UBYSSEY.CA/SPORTS/7
SPORTS
EDITOR MARIE VONDRACEK»sports@ubyssey.ca
Leaving the business behind
A look into why athletes who went south to the NCAA came back
Kelly Kunsu at UBC practice. JOSH CURRAN PHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
IAN TURNER
turner@ubyssey.ca
Go to the States or stay close
to home?
Big Ten Conference or Canada West?
Packed stadiums or parent-
only crowds?
A possible full-ride scholarship or a summer spent babysitting to pay tuition?
Such questions filled Megan
Heise's head when she was in
grade 12.
As a top-flight field hockey recruit, she eventually narrowed
her decision down to the University of Iowa or the University of Victoria.
Most of her college-bound
teammates from Chilliwack,
BC would go on to play at the
University of Victoria, but at
age 18, Heise was seeking some
excitement—which the island
outpost didn't offer.
"I went [to Iowa] because I
wanted the experience," Heise
said. "I didn't want to pass up
the experience and not see what
it was like because I've always
been big into athletics... Everybody there is super enthusiastic about sports and that is the
kind of atmosphere I wanted to
be a part of."
A visit to the Iowa's athletic
department arranged for Heise
proved to be the tipping point.
"It doesn't matter
what else is going
on. We're paying
you."
KELLY KURISU
"I got to go to an Iowa vs Iowa
State football game—which was
the most unreal thing I've ever
seen in my life. Since they
don't have professional sports
in Iowa, college football is the
way of life," Heise said. "Itwas
a big school rivalry. I remember people running through
the streets saying, "We're going to beat State."
"I'd been to UBC games and
there was barely anyone in the
stands and in the States, you're a
celebrity. We got first-class treatment on my initial visit. It was
unreal. Everything was Iowa,
Iowa, Iowa. It was like a college
movie and I wanted to have it."
A similar elite sentiment
drove former UBC baseball
pitcher Jordan Anderson down
south to Central Arizona College from his Burlington, Ontario high school.
"I knew I didn't want to stay
in Canada because I wanted to
play baseball at a competitive
school... I really had no desire
to stay in Canada. One still has
that mentality thatyou have to
go to the States to get noticed,"
Anderson said.
"When I came down here, we
had four or five guys that were
drafted right out of high school,
which is a lot more than most
Division I schools...I wanted
to play professional baseball."
Anderson's professional aspirations wore his body out, however. At Arizona, he threw every
day as part of his four and a half
hour daily training regimen.
The intensity was too much for
his arm, which lead to a season-
ending injury. With his chance
at professional dreams over, he
had a change of heart.
"I went to UBC because, at
that point, I knew I really didn't
have a shot at going on to play
professionally and UBC is a
great academic school. I knew
I needed to get some sort of education and even then, if something went right, I would have
still had a shot to go on and play
professionally. [UBC] had two
guys drafted lastyear."
But Anderson found baseball
training at UBC to be no less demanding than at Arizona. After
getting injured again at UBC, he
opted to hang up his mitt for
good.
Anderson's experience,
where teams from both the
US and Canadian train equally rigorously, was the exception
amongst those interviewed.
Kelly Kurisu, a current UBC
offensive lineman, found the
athletic routine far more demanding down south while
playing at Western Washington University, before the program was cancelled because
of the million-plus dollar
financial burden of fielding a
Division II football team. He explained that in the NCAA, with
big scholarships come a bigger responsibility to the team.
"They do expect you to be
a lot more involved with the
football program. Since they're
giving you money, they can expect that—versus up here, a lot
of the guys on the team aren't
getting any money so the coaches are more lax, saying, 'Well,
okay, you don't exactly have to
do this. You don't have to come
to that,'" Kurisu said.
"You're here at this time. You
got to do this at this time. It
doesn't matter what else is going on. We're paying you."
Kurisu estimated UBC football trains about an hour and
a half less per day than WWU's
now defunct program did.
All student-athletes interviewed for this article said that
at UBC the academic program
was much more challenging
than at the schools they attended in the States.
"I never had any
school work..."
MEGAN HEISE
During Tyler Ruel's freshman year at Wayne State, the
school chose to end funding
for the ice hockey team Without a palatable scholarship offer, Ruel came back to Canada, where he enrolled at UBC.
"The education you get at
UBC, I feel, is a lot better than
what you get at most universities in the US. I feel there is
definitely more of an emphasis on academics here," said
Tyler Ruel, a forward for the
UBC hockey team who played
one year at Wayne State Univ-
eristy before their team was
disbanded because of the program's high financial costs.
"I find that at UBC you have
to earn your grades a little bit
more. I feel some of the classes down there could not really be a school class," he added.
For Heise, it was a similar
experience of slack academics.
"Itwas justpointless, I'dgo sit
there and twiddle my thumbs.
I never had any school work...
On my first paper at Iowa, I got
an A+ on it and I was like, 'Oh, a
100 person class and my TA just
told me I got the top mark in the
class.' That was scary."
Anderson had the easiest
time.
"I was told what was gonna
be on my exam beforehand. I'm
sure other students weren't told,
but I think that comes down to a
school decision," he said. "If the
school wants to allow that to happen, then they can allow that to
happen. I highly doubt that's going on at Stanford."
Most others said they were
pushed through the academic
requirements to ensure they
meet the NCAA's academic criteria to be eligible to play.
The more athletic-focused
schools' easier academic requirements are not due entirely to the NCAA. Amongst one of
the top 30 universities, UBC
has a higher reputation academically than many schools
in America. But the large monetary sums they spend on fielding teams is also a factor in
their less academically rigorous programs.
With large budgets, attendance minimums and professional-calibre facilities, the
coaches are under a lot of pressure to justify their costs—which
can quickly suck the fun out of
the sport for an eager beaver.
After one year at Virginia's
West Liberty University, backup
Thunderbird quarterback Ryley
Wright went north in search of
a football program with a team-
first mentality.
"If you go down there, and
say something happens to your
arm, shoulder and you're out
for training camp, or you might
have been a second-string guy
and they might have been hyp-
ingyouup. But as soon as you're
hurt or out and you're not in
their plan, you're not in their
plans," Wright said.
"I don't want to bash what happened down there, but it's a business. Ifyou're not doing exactly
what they say, you're kind of a
wash off. When I came up here
I felt instantly that the coaches cared. That was big for me.
I wanted to play for someone
who was big on character and
who also wanted to have a relationship with you off the field."
Fitting into a business plan
is tough. Current T-Bird basketball guard Doug Plumb found
that out as a young 17-year-old
in Minnesota.
When Plumb's father went to
the US for employment, Plumb
tagged along in the hope of elevating his game. After making the varsity team in grade
10, he chose to play collegiate
ball in the States, thinking "it
was America or bust."
At Minnesota State University, he didn't have much
opportunity, as he was 17
years old on a team comprised of 23-year-olds, many
of whom were considered top
Division II players. Without
playing time and with most of
his family still in Pitt Meadows, Plumb wanted to come
home because he had lost his
confidence.
"It seems like a business
down there," he said.
"When I came
up here I felt
instantly that the
coaches cared."
RYLEY WRIGHT
"Your coach will recruit over
you if he sees something he
doesn't like. Ifyou lose your
confidence because you're not
getting playing time, you don't
have the support network to
stay positive because your family isn't in town."
After a year at Minnesota
State University, Plumb came
north again and played two
years for the University of Fraser Valley before transferring
to UBC.
Like Plumb, Anderson sees
the benefits of the NCAA: increased exposure—some games
are aired on local channels—
and better competition.
Ruel was more ambivalent.
"I'm an NCAA guy so I'm very
pro-NCAA," Ruel said. "I really think it would get the UBC
name out there. You know, if
you're playing down south,
there's a lot more coverage on
TV of college hockey, especially
Division I. Division III, I'd feel a
little bit more skeptical about."
But he said that some of his
current teammates wouldn't be
able to play NCAA hockey because, unlike the CIS, individuals who played junior hockey cannot subsequently play
in the NCAA.
"It'd suck to see my teammates not being able to continue their education." tl
Former Minnesota forward Tyler Ruel. GEOFF LISTER PHOTO/THE UBYSSEY 8/UBYSSEY.CA/S PORTS/2011.0 2.21
BIRD DROPPINGS
EMOTIONAL FINAL WEEKEND AT
THE UBC RINK
Five Thunderbird women played
their last hockey game ever in
the blue and gold of UBC last
weekend at the Doug Mitchell
Sports Centre.
In the last two game series of
the 2010-11 season, the 'Birds
faced off against the Manitoba
Bisons, the only team they had
yet to beat this season finishing
sixth in Canada West.
"I think we're a long way from
where we were, but we're a long
way from where we want to be.
The results this year weren't what
we wanted, but we were thrown
some curveballs and we competed really hard,"commented head
coach Nancy Wilson.
Both losses were of four goals
to two with goals from Kaitlin
Imai, Kelsey Halvorson, Amanda
Asay and Lisa Bonang, who was
playing for the first time since November, when she was forced to
sit out due to injury.
"I'm proud of our team, I'm
proud of our seniors and I'm looking forward to building," Wilson
reflected. "We had lots of adversity this year. We started off
so strong, but our first six weekends were a tough schedule, and
then we came back and it started with the illness and the injuries. That's the stuff we need to
play through, and that's when
we started to identify ourselves
as a team."
Prior to Saturday's game, the
five graduating players—Alisha
Choy, Melinda Choy, Ashley Henry, Lisa Bonang and Kirsten Mihalcheon—were honoured for their
five CIS seasons.
Team captain Henry reflected
on this tear-jerking reality. "It's
pretty sad. We've been counting
down the days 'til now and it's a
really special weekend."
"Nothing can bring us down
now. We're excited to toss the
torch on to the girls coming up."
UBC VOLLEYBALL SQUADS FINISH
REGULAR SEASON AT TRU
The UBC volleyball program travelled to Kamloops last weekend
to face the Thompson Rivers University Wolfpack.
Both the men's and women's
team were closing out their regular season schedule on the
road with already secured playoff spots. Even with the playoff
birth already intact, the teams
took their matches seriously, with
the men falling to the Wolfpack
both nights 3-2 and 3-0, ending
the regular season in seventh
place in Canada West.
"It was a bit of a tough one to
take, as they all are when you lose
in five. We definitely played well
over the first three sets but then
kind of trailed off as the match
went on," said UBC men's volleyball head coach Richard Schick
after the Friday night loss.
However, the Thunderbird
women's team swept TRU to
win the Canada West conference in their hunt for a fourth
straight CIS banner. Head coach
Doug Reimer was pleased with
his team's efforts.
"We were able to maintain
our focus and intensity, especially with our serving which is hard
to do in this gym. We'll look for
more of the same tomorrow night
as we try to close out the season
with another good performance."
Both the men's and women's
CanWest quarterfinals will be battled out next weekend with the
men on the road and the women here at home. ^J
THUNDERBIRD ATHLETE COUNCIL
ATHLETE OF THE WEEK
BLAIR BANN
Blair Bann completes another successful season for UBC. GEOFF LISTER PHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
This week's athlete of the week honours go to Blair Bann, a fifth-year men's volleyball player.
Bann is thought to be the best libera in the league, and has won CIS libera of the year two
straight times already. In the team's last home game of the season on February 5, Bann's
impressive defensive play set a CanWest record, along with a personal milestone, which
helped the team to defeat the Regina Cougars 3-1. With a total of 15 digs that night, he not
only set the Canada West single season record for most digs, but also gained his remarkable
1000th CIS career dig. He now leads the CanWest in career digs by almost 300.
—Amelia Rajala
HS4J FREE AWARENESS EVENT
TOPLAY
TUESDAY, MARCH 1 - 6:45pm
SUB AUDITORIUM - NORM THEATRE
UBC CAMPUS - 6138 Student Union Boulevard
A RARE OPPORTUNITY TO LEARN ABOUT RIGHT TO PLAY'S VITAL IMPACT ABROAD-
SPEAKERS INCLUDE
Right To Play Representatives from LIBERIA, & Athlete Ambassador and OLYMPIC GOLD MEDALIST
TO REGISTER
Canadian International
Development Agency
Agence canadienne de
developpement international!
CALGARY       EDMONTON        TORONTO        OTTAWA        VANCOUVER        KELOWNA       MONTREAL
www.righttoplay.ca 2011.02.21/UBYSSEY.CA/OBITUARY/9
In Memoriam: Eric Nicol
Earlier this month, Eric Nicol passed away at the age of 91. While the name may not mean anything to most UBC students, for
decades he was known as one ofthe greatest, funniest writers in Canada. In the course of his seven-decade career, Nicol won
the Stephen Leacock Award for Canadian humour three times (no other writer has won more), penned over forty books, wrote
a regular humour column for The Province/rom 1951 to 1986 and was appointed to the Order of Canada in 2000.
Nicol began his career with The Ubyssey, writing a regular humour column under the pen name "Jabez," which quickly
became the most read item in our vile rag.
We are honoured to be a small part of his legacy, and today present his first ever piece as Jabez for us, entitled
"The Mummery,"from September 24, 1940, in his memory.
Once upon a time, long, long ago, before
anyone had ever heard of Hitler, or Mussolini, or Lifebuoy, there lived a very plump
man named Emperor Concertinos the Colossal, who commuted between Rome
and Cleopatra before she gave him the
old barber shop brush off in favour of one
Marc Anthony, the answer to a maiden's
phone number.
Now, this Concertinus was a dyspeptic grouch, owing to his habit of taking the
odd snort of olive oil without soda, and we
do mean bicarbonate. He was never really happy unless he was burning a Christian here and a Christian there, and sometimes all over.
So one day we find him sitting in the
ping-pong room, morosely watching his latest troup of dancing girls, the Carthaginian
Follies, supposed to be the hottest outfit
north of the Tiber, as the historian Herodotus tells us, with his teeth in his cheek.
Connie—for 'twas thus that he was
called by the boys down at the Arena—
Connie turns to the giant Nubian slave
standing behind him in the capacity of
Vice-president in charge of Kill That Thing
Before It Lays Its Eggs.
BRING EM ON!
"Where are the Christians I ordered from
Sears, Roebuck, Snowball?" barks the Emperor.
"They's heah, boss," the slave replies,
drawing a bead on a bluebottle.
"Then why the Helios don't they send
them up, with the matches?" screams Connie, punching his pillows viciously.
"Well, boss," says the technicolour job,
"I done heard they was held up at de Customs by de man lookin' to see if they done
brought in mo' than $100 worth o' goods."
"Bah," snarls the Emp., and unwraps a
package of Fleishman's Yeast.
He stares a moment at the dancers, who
are just going into a Macedonian version of
the Kansas City Cakewalk.
"Women!" he growls.
"Yeah, man, boss!" grins Snowball, sniping at a daddy longlegs.
"What are they but a lot of skin and bone
and hair, tossed together?"
"Thatfo' me, boss!" yells Snowball, forgetting himself completely.
By the end of the week, everybody had
forgotten him.
"Ship these babes back to the Major," the
Emperor orders the new slave, "and tell him
he can send his next few units to the Imperial sawdust bin. And send in a fresh clown.
This one seems to be dead."
FROSHUS
A few moments later, a strange, little
man enters, covered with green paint, waving a Calendar in one hand and a Calendar
in the other.
"What's your name, fool?" snarls Concertinus.
"Shall I tell you in Latin, or will you take it
straight?" laughs the joker, nervously.
"FROSHUS," he continues, wiping the
blood from his nose. "Froshus is the name."
"O.K., Froshus," sighs the Emp., "make
like Bob Hope. "
AS ITWAS IN THE BEGINNING
And that, children, was the start of the
freshman as we know him today, and we
try not to. For this squirrel, Froshus, was
later positively identified as a first student
at the Rome Tech, an Aggie, where he had
enjoyed that position for more years than
the Faculty cared to remember.
And if this evidence appears somewhat
hungry to the naked eye, it is definitely
corroborated by the words of the mighty
Cicero when, standing before the Senate in his custom-built toga, he declared:
"Hunc jam ipsit dipsit oof hanc valves
grindes, hujus?"
Or, in the free translation: "The Emperor has been writing to the papers again
about the last shipment of dates not being
fresh, men?"
The comma has been definitely debunked
by the best historians as a hyphen that has
gone Hollywood. But don't let me get on the
subject of dates and freshmen. This column
is supposed to be funny, but not that funny.
I think the tale is interesting, though,
now that the academic vernal equinox has
once more hit the campus. Once more
the new sap is circulating in the old tree.
New limbs have sprouted, and very nice,
too. The same old bark may be heard in
the lecture rooms. But don't let me carry the figure too far, as the Duchess said
to the Count when he suggested a hike
through the Adirondacs.
And so, as the dusk falls across the peak
of Mount Blanc, we say Goodbye to old Hawaii, until next week, when we return for
a tramp through the jungles of Darkest Africa. Bring your own flytox, children, tl
IHt: UBYSSEY, CiTR AND
LONG & MCQUADE
INVITE UBC STUDENTS TO VISIT
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'A complex tale about Hfe and art, about fact ami
illusion, about politics, society, cruelty and
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—Financial Times
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Agenda for Tuesday's
Staff Meeting
1. Introductions
2. New Members
3. Conflict of Interest Motion
4. Referendum Discussion
5. Summer Budgeting
6. Staff Restructuring
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JUSTIN MCELROY
coordinating@ubyssey.ca
ft THEUBYSSEYc 10/UBYSSEY.CA/G AMES/2011.02.21
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U THEUBYSSEYc 2011.02.21/UBYSSEY.CA/OPINIONS/ll
OPINIONS
DO YOU CARE? WRITE US A LETTER»feedback@ubyssey.ca
EDITORIAL
TSKTSK, SAUDER
Two weeks ago, UBC Insiders broke the story that
the Board of Governors have forced the Sauder
School of Business to pay $2 million of a $17.9 million renovation on Henry Angus that Commerce
students voted lastyear to fully fund themselves,
to the tune of $500 per year.
Why? Well, in 2010, Dean Daniel Muzyka
claimed that the renovations needed to happen
and the money had to come from students. There
was no alternative funding. In 2011, the faculty
announced they have $24 million in reserves.
Oops.
Since that little bit of information was revealed,
some Sauderites who supported the project have
expressed disappointment that they were overly trustful of a man with a nice Powerpoint presentation, allowing them to be misled without
full information.
However, if there's one student undergraduate
society on campus susceptible to this sort of sell
job, it's the Commerce Undergraduate Society (CUS).
As a general rule, student politicians from that
faculty have two main traits: they trust what the
university tells them, and they don't want to do
anything that might damage future career prospects. This is in many ways natural; when you're
in a program that from day one values mentoring, working as a team and professionalism, accepting the opinions ofyour superiors and not
rocking the boat becomes a way of life. The Sauder School of Business does many good things, especially when it comes to engaging students, connecting them to businesses and making them
employable, but teaching critical thinking is not
their strong suit.
So it was somewhat inevitable that most of
the CUS would urge students to trust Dean Dan
and work as a team towards a shared goal. Sort
of how Bijan Ahmadian—himself an MBA student—urged the AMS to trust UBC and work as a
team towards a shared goal on pretty much any
issue that came up.
Of course, the Sauder administration, like UBC,
is self-interested and has its own agenda. Sometimes, they will want to do things which benefit future students (and the bottom line) much
more than current students. A good and courageous student leader will recognize such instances and speak out. There weren't enough of them
in the CUS to prevent a $500 tuition increase that
didn't need to happen.
Thanks to the BoG, instead of Commerce students paying that fee for 35 years, they'll probably only pay it for 28—wonderful news for the
Sauder Class of 2044.
As with any lapse in judgement, the important thing to do is to move forward with lessons
learned. The new CUS President, Johannes Rebane,
spent ayear as an executive in the AMS and thus
is plenty aware ofthe dangers of groupthink and
being overly trustful of superiors. We hope that
under his watch the CUS advocates for their students first and the faculty second, tl
POST-SECONDARY FUNDING NOT PRIORITIZED
IN PROVINCIAL BUDGET
Last week the provincial government released
the 2011-2012 budget. So with the election coming up and voters paying close attention, funding for post-secondary education and student
support should be on the rise, right? Of course
not, you goon!
Overall funding for post-secondary education
will see barely any increase at all, clocking in
barely over 1.8 per cent. Some have called this
"status quo" budgeting, but keep in mind that
since that is under inflation, it represents a gradual decrease in real funding. When you factor in
the real cuts that have been made to student aid
over the past three years, it's even worse. Student
support—loans, bursaries and the like—appears
to be losing funding, despite student debt in BC
ranking among some ofthe worst in the country.
With leadership races still ongoing in both the
Liberals and NDP, it isn't entirely surprising that
we haven't seen any concrete plans for advanced
education yet. However, with thousands of students graduating university with heavy debtloads
and meagre employment prospects, that seems
like a fairly hollow excuse, vl
FACULTY dlETS® UBC
EN6/fiJE£Riti<5,
flftrs
ComW\£RCE
BRYCE WARNES GRAPHIC/THE UBYSSEY
OPINIONS
Cappellacci: My view ofthe state of UBC
BEN CAPPELLACCI
Perspective
I spent the last year experiencing a
reality of the university that few students, including those involved within student politics, get to see. What
did I learn?
There is no single "UBC," but instead many different united departments. Depending on what part ofthe
university you interact with, your perception of what UBC is can differ entirely. Underlying the entire university's operations is the financial engine that drives not only research and
hiring, but also campus development
and programming.
With the global recession, UBC's investments took a significant hit and
there has been a dedicated effort not
only to rebuild some of that lost investment but to correct a multimil-
lion dollar structural budget deficit
that has occurred over the past two
years. Make no mistake, however; the
university has ways of finding money
when it really needs it most. Normally though, funding is hard to come by
and the more centrally benefiting a
project is, the less support it gets from
the faculties. As a result, we are seeing a turn toward more faculty-centric
planning, which by and large contributes to the "united departments" idea.
The organizational culture of UBC
isn't to be the innovator, but to model things based on the successful programs of others. UBC is a top university on a global scale, its resources are
considerable and the programs and
initiatives they engage in are always
top notch—but this only happens only
after they have been proven.
President Stephen Toope has dedicated the next five years to enacting
Place and Promise, the strategic plan
for the University. Many ofthe new initiatives students will see thisyear will
be in line with Place and Promise. At
the same time, you will also see a lot
of people try to justify their programs
under the plan, which is the opposite
way strategic planning is executed.
An organization the size of UBC has
obvious problems of communication.
There are just too many things happening for anyone to adequately coordinate and thus there is a lot of waste.
Everyone wants to be responsible for
the next big thing, but few are willing
to take the time or risk to really make
a new program exceptional.
There exists a very significant disparity between the academic and administrative functions of UBC. The
Vice President Students portfolio controls most of whatyou see outside the
classroom at UBC and is by far one of
the most proactive parts of UBC when
it comes to improving the student experience. Yet paradoxically, the part of
UBC that is perhaps worst off is what
you actually see inside the classroom,
and it's almost impossible for student
politics to induce reform to the educational experience.
UBC is first and foremost a research
institution, so very little is done to improve the educational experience for
its undergraduate students. This largely has to do with the fact that professors
are not teachers; they are researchers.
But more importantly, this has to do
with the reality that the independence
of professors is actually far greater than
one might think. The administration
has very little control over education.
As a result, the way classes are taught
is never reviewed and there is no standard for how material should be taught
well. Instead, millions of dollars are
spent on programs to "enhance" learning outside the classroom.
The university has gained significant control over its destiny from the
province. The recent changes brought
on by Bill 20 represent a level of power that is normally held by a city government. This has left a bit of a democratic vacuum on campus. While the
university executes its plans in good
faith, it is hard to deny that the Board
of Governors is not democratically
accountable.
Within the recent Land Use Plan,
UBC articulated the need to transfer
housing originally intended for the
UBC Farm to other spaces on campus. In doing so it revealed how important developing private housing
is to its long term financial stability.
This is one of the reasons the Gage
South has been such a contentious
issue, as its sale represents a sizable
amount of upfront liquid capital that
is so valuable to the debt-maximized
university.
The one thing that will continue to
make UBC outstanding is the creativity and energy of its students. Student
achievement outside and inside the
classroom help make UBC the great
place it is. The great range of clubs,
services, programs and events that
are completely student-run are absolutely astounding. Students here are
independent, innovative, organized
and passionate. The wider university is hardly aware of or acknowledges
these activities—but perhaps it's that
lack of support that has made these
students who they are.
This campus is an incubator for
ideas, dreams and visions of its students. So, while this university represents incredible opportunity; it's
clear why our motto is "Tuum Est", tl
Ben Cappellacci was the 2010-2011 AMS
VP Academic and University Affairs.
LETTERS
Whoever you are Mr. Editor, willyou
have some consideration for us students. For crying out loud, this is a
school environment where students
should be focusing on their studies,
so stop bombarding us with tons of
sex related articles, which are distracting and offensive to some of us.
Publish articles that will help us do
better on our studies instead of pulling us away from them.
—Renata Lenart
Guest Editors Note: My God, you re right!
However will students fight on to complete their midterm examinations? Truly, a sad day for this otherwise dignified publication. Say, have you seen our
nude calendar? UBYSSEY.CA/OURCAMPUS/2011.02.21
amS I Insider weekly
student society     a weekly look at what's new at your student society
SUB 249C
internship@ams. ubc.ca
www.ams.ubc.ca
604.827.3607
Now accepting student applications
for summer internships.
Available in a variety of industries. Participants will
also have the opportunity to take part in a
professional development workshop series
presented in partnership with MyGradGuide.
Application deadline is March 4th.
For more information visit: www.ams.ubcca/services
Or email: internship@ams.ubc.ca
IVIYGHjjSUB Thematic Workshops
New SUBThematic Workshops on February 23rd and 24th.
We will be holding a series of workshops for people to provide additional
clarifications, additions/suggestions towards each specific area of focus.
There will be five workshops: club spaces,
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Formore info, checkout:
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