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UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Sep 18, 1987

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By CHRIS FRASER and FRANK NEZEL
As we flew into Moscow, en route from Paris, we imagined uniformed customs officials efficiently sifting through the copies of
prohibited articles and books we brought for the Canadian exhibit at
the congress of the Nobel Peace Prize-winning International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War (IPPNW).
inside
FRINGE
|i    BINGE
But, with relief and astonishment, we passed through customs
with no inspection whatsoever. In fact, we were laughed at for having
included so many items, items such as watches and clothing, on our
declaration forms. "Only gold and silver are needed," the customs
woman reprimanded us with obvious amusement.
This unexpected freedom prevailed throughout our visit, gradually
eroding our other stereotyped expectations. Except in the very official
buildings and "foreign currency only" establishments, there seemed to
be none of the restrictions on movement we had expected. While we
were touring, our routine became to purchase city maps, bus to regions
well off the beaten track, and then spend hours walking about.
In Leningrad (without the trench-coated KGB escort that we had
expected) we found ourselves walking beside a branch of the Neva
River, in a dilapidated part of the city, along a public walkway
sometimes too muddy to step upon. Railroad tracks were beside us, the
wooden-sided cars having only the red hammer and sickle in faded
paint to remind us that this was the Soviet Union and not a thousand
other places nearer to home.
Another stereotype destroyed was that of Soviet youth being
uniformly mesmerized by Western clothes and consumer goods. It is
true that, in tourist-frequented areas, young Soviet men continually
approached us singly or in small groups, trying to buy almost anything
we had or to exchange rubles for foreign currency.
However, after more exposure, we concluded that many dealers
were using the appearance of Western culture for their own purposes.
They simply wanted money with which to shop in state-run "foreign
currency only" stores ("beriozhka") where goods, from vodka to clothes,
were of a superior quality — and readily available.
By chance, on a magnificent Leningrad boulevard, we met one of
these street dealers, Vlada, and his friend, Mikhei. During an unforgettable dinner at Vlada's apartment, both of them shattered the picture
we held of the modern Soviet citizen. Vlada, a vegetarian herbalist,
liked to speak of love and mystical experience as essential; selling
Soviet flags on the side to tourists was simply a necessity. Mikhei was
a member of a state prohibited rock and roll group: a banned band.
The apartment was quite cramped, and resembled a sort of hippie
pad, with herbs dangling from the ceiling, and the floor the most
essential piece of furniture. There was an OM sign on the wall. In the
kitchen, we saluted each other with shots of pepper vodka. We ate cross-
legged on the bedroom floor with recent Pat Metheny playing on an
antiquated Walkman, Vlada and Mikhei sharing impressions of life in
the Soviet Union.
Both felt spiritually stifled, and in contrast to most Soviets we
talked with privately, had seen no changes as a result of Gorbachev's
reforms. They did believe that he might have the strength to "make
change." Both wanted nothing more than to escape the Soviet Union
altogether, though they believed that the inequalities and injustices of
Western society would make their goal of "personal freedom" somewhat
elusive.
It is easy in the West to think of the Soviet Union, acting through
the KGB, as an efficient police state capable of anything. Yet, upon
receiving the notice which inducted him into military service, Vlada
fled underground for five years, undetected, surfacing only to turn
himself in. After sixmonths of psychiatric detainment, he was declared
unfit for service and allowed to leave detention.
This fits into his plans to leave the Soviet Union for, knowing no
state or military secrets, he believes his application to marry, then
emigrate, will be accepted. He even has a prospective Canadian bride.
Our impressions of Vlada and Mikhei contain many contradictions
and, more than anything else, this seems to identify them as part of the
Soviet Union we glimpsed, for the contradictions surrounded us on
every side.
Technologically, Aeroflot, the national airline, is a good example.
Their large jets - built in the Soviet Union - bark of technological
achievement. Yet, at eight thousand feet, when we mentioned to our
e§*V
interpreter the alarming fact that there was wind and rain whistling
through the emergency escape door, she calmly replied, "Don't worry,
it will close," as if this was a common occurence.
In the same vein, this jet obviously had minimal computer control,
because whenever the pilot descended a few hundred feet, it was not a
graduated descent, but all at once, so leading us to rename the airline
as "Aeroplop".
Many other technological ironies we witnessed reinforced the
impressions gained from our walks in city suburbs: the Soviet domestic
economy and its resultant infrastructure seem to be struggling. Our
experience supports the view that Soviet society is increasingly unable
to bear the financial burden of the arms races (conventional and
nuclear). Recently constructed hospitals we visited contained unused
sophisticated equipment which was beyond repair due to lack of spare
parts; plush, marble-lobbied hotels had restrooms reeking of urine due
to a shortage of antiseptic; major city thoroughfares were rendered
unpassable by untended potholes.
As such, we find it absurd to dismiss, as many have, Gorbachev's
recent initiatives as "public relations" gimmicks. Ranging from manufacturing sector reforms to disarmament proposals, these initiatives
appear to be considered responses to current problems in Soviet
society.
These measures are all consistent with an attempt firstly, to redirect resources towards the failing Soviet domestic economy and
secondly to create via negotiated treaties, an atmosphere of super
power trust and stability.
And we think also that Gorbachev's moves towards a new economic
structure is motivated not by a desire to increase arms production, but
rather by the belief, now shared by many economists, that production
of totally unusable goods (i.e. nuclear-tipped missiles) yields no benefit
to society.
Such items as Gorbachev's reiterated demand for a comprehensive
test ban treaty, or hi s address to the IPPNW congress, read by Communist Party President Dobrynin, calling for a "philosophical change"
away from military responses, and towards negotiated solutions to
global ideological differences exemplify this.
The possibilities brought to light by Gorbachev's disarmament
related proposals in the past two years came under close scrutiny at the
IPPNW conference. With the 3,500 delegates gathered together and
unified by the goal of ending the arms race, we were able to make
contact with, befriend and vigorously debate peace issues with people
from around the world.
Many important officials and personalities from east and west —
including Party President Dobrynin, the US ambassador to the Soviet
Union, and world famous star gazer Carl Sagan — spoke at the
conference andraised the level of debate with their expertise, insights,
and suggestions for possible solutions to arms negotiations stand-offs.
Though at other times the Soviets have dragged their feet in the
arms negotiation process, it appears that the present ideological
rigidity of the Reagan administration has not allowed positive responses to the challenges Gorbachev presents. These challenges give
some faint hope of global movement towards the theme of the Moscow
congress, namely Albert Einstein's famous call for "a substantially new
manner of thinking if mankind is to survive."
A matter about which we feel strongly is the often stereotyped
presentation of the Soviet public which airs on our TV news
which airs on our TV news bulletins regularly. These pictures give no
sense of the warm-heartedness and humor of the Soviets we met each
day, or of the open sincerity of their reaction to us.
In Georgia, for instance, we were given ice-cream by smiling street
vendors who wouldn't let foreigners pay. Or, when we were lost in
Moscow, there was the red-cheeked babushka, speaking no English and
looking at our map upside-down, who spent a quarter of an hour
nodding, pointing, and smiling us on our way.
see page 16: Soviets
Vol. 70, No.4
Vancouver, B.C. Friday, Septrember 18,1987 BETWEEN
CLASSES
TODAY
CAMPUS PRO-LIFE
Carol Everett - former abortion
clinic manager. Organization
meetng, 12:30 p.m., SUB 211 E.
PSCHOLOGY STUDENT'S ASSOCIATION
Bzzr Garden, 5 p.m.-8 p.m.,
Arts 200 Ixiunge.
DISABLED STUDENT'S
ASSOCIATION
General Meeting, 12:.'!0 p.m.,
212.
, Buch
, SUB
SATURDAY
BAPTIST STUDENT MINISTRY
Ice skating party and fellowship,
7:30 p.m.-10:00 P.M.,
Thunderbird Winter Sports Centre
(main rink).
SUNDAY
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
A magical evening dance, 8:00 p.m.,
Celebrities Night Club.
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Tiina Klasen - Report on trip to
Eastern Europe, 8 p.m., Lutheran
Campus Centre.
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Communion Service, 10 a.m.,
Lutheran Campus Centre.
MONDAY
UBC FILM SOCIETY - CLASSIC
SUBFILMS
Film presentation - "Rosemary's
Baby," directed by Roman Polanski,
7:00 p.m. and 9:30 p.m., SUB
Theatre.
UBC NEW DEMOCRATS
Organizational meeting, 12:30 p.m.
-1:30 p.m., SUB 249 F
(UBC NDP Office).
SPANISH CLUB OF UBC
Organizational meeting for wine/
cheese next Friday - all welcome,
Spanish not a prerequisite, 12:30
p.m.,
Buchanan B330.
Mental Health Association
to work on a one-to-one basis
with adults who have had
treatment for a mental illness. Those volunteering
meet with the clients two to
five hours a week and assist
them in developing everyday skills through social,
recreational, or educational
activities. A preliminary
training course is provided.
Please call the Volunteer
Coordinator at 734-2344.
Long Term Care Patients
Need Help
The Vancouver Health Department is recruiting volunteers for the Long Term
Care Program. For two
hours a week, volunteers
will work in conjunction
with the Activities Coordinators to organize programs
for Seniors, help with outings, parties, etc. and work
on a one to one basis in a
Community Centre setting.
Please contact Chris at 734-
1221.
Volunteers Wanted for
Festival
Urbanarium Festival '87
needs volunteers to work: at
info booths in shopping
malls; as hosts/hostesses at
the Festival; and model
builders to work on a city
model. This festive exhibition of art, architecture and
urban planning runs from
October 2-17, in Vancouver.
Call 684-9932.
Be a Rhodes Scholar
For information and application for one of the eleven
Rhodes Scholarships to be
awarded to Canadian students this fall, contact Peter
D. Fairey at 669-2611.
Deadline: Oct. 23,1987.
Campus Pro-Life
INVITES YOU TO HEAR
Carol Everett
FORMER ABORTION CLINIC MANAGER
Friday Sept. 18th
SUB 211 12:30
MONDAY
UBC INTRAMURAL SPORTS
Registration. For tho first time, the
soccer league is offering a co-
recreational program (both men
and women can play on the same
team), 9:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m., 2:30
p.m. -
3:30 p.m., UBC Intramurals Office,
SUB 66, or at our booth during
Clubs Days.
TUESDAY
UNITED CHURCH CAMPUS
MINISTRY
Informal worship, all welcome,
noon, Lutheran Campus Centre.
HOT
FLASHES
Volunteer to Beat Mental
Illness
Volunteers are needed by
the Vancouver-Burnaby
branch   of  the   Canadian
THE CLASSIFIEDS
20-HOUSING
Rates: AMS Card Holders-3
lines, $3.00, additional lines,
60 cents., Comercial - 3 lines,
$5.00, additional lines, 75 cents.
(10% DISCOUNT ON 25 ISSUES OR
MORE)
Classified ads are payable in advance.
Deadline is 10:00 a.m. on the day before publication. Publications Room
266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T 2A7
05 - COMING EVENTS
UBC Students
We Welcome You To
St. Anselm's Anglican Church
University Blvd.
Sunday Services -
8:00a.m. Holy Eucharist
11:00a.m. Holy Eucharist
For more information on our
ministry and program
for students - please call
office: 224-1410 Rectory 224-
2568
FESTIVAL OF ANIMATION -
1987
16 Award Winning Animated
Shortfilms
Two Weeks Only:
Fri., Sept. 18 thru Thurs., Oct. 1
Showtimes:  7 & 9:30p.m. - Sat.
& Sun. Matinee: 2p.m.
THE RIDGE THEATRE -
3131 Arbutus (at 16th)
Admission: $6.00 Advance Outlets,
$6.50 at the Box Office
Tickets Available AMS Box Office
For Information Call 738-6311
10 - FOR SALE-COMMERCIAL
69 BEER DRINKING GAMES. The
best way to start a party. Send $3.95
plus name and address to DRAKE-
MARTENS PUBLISHING, 4490 W
llth, Vancouver, V6R 2M3
ii'?f6r'sale-private	
POOTiAC'ASTWi976r2'dr!"harch,'
automatic, full instrumentation. 2
new snows & 1 add. tire & other parts.
62,000 km. $850. Contact Anna 228-
4711 local210 Days.
1974 TOYOTA COROLLA 1200 runs
great, new clutch, spare set of winter
tires. $1000 228-8990
1976 ALFA ROMEO ALFETTA, 5-
Spd. Sunroof, Pirellis, low miles, runs
perfect, asking $2975 Ph. 731-7545
FOR SALE Brand new queen size
deluxe futon, never been used, new
$185. Asking $140 obo. Call 299-3613
TYPEWRITER FOR SALE.' Ele.ctric"
erase function etc. Like new. $200.00
obo Call 688-3242 after 5 p.m.
11 - FOR SALE-PRIVATE
r9^6"c6rf"(MlfsUBiSHiT'5'SPD
Manual trans. AM/FM. New radials.
4-dr. exc. cond. $1,350. 261-0013
ass6rtmeotof"mattoesses&'
single box spring 321-0150 or 263-
0765
RELIABLE ''TRANSPORTATION.
1975 4-Dr Valiant. 6-cylinder engine
runs well $600 obo. Call Jeff at 876-
9402 or 291-3597.
4 SALE' 1982RD350LCI'.Fa'i'rin'g','gre'a't'
shape, very fast. Must sell to pay tuition ph. 738-4689. $900 obo.
1975 DATSUN'210;! Good"cond;'min.
rust. New brakes, tires, muffler; std.
trans; doesn't burn oil; good gas
mileage;xtra snows; exc. student car.
$1050 Greg 524-0542 / 522-3362
i98i"HOraA"cfviC."Fo7''sde""5
speed, 84,500 km. $2500 Call 222-
1965
FRESH''6l__sfAGAN' APPLES FOR
SALE Place orders now - delivery in
Oct. Call Mary Anne at 321-5863.
"73 CUTLASS, mech! excellent,' body
fair, great student car. $700 obo Ph
736-6647 evenings & weekends.
MO^G'SALE'Sunl"_6th'i'^"ib8-
1930 W. 3rd Ave. Kitchen items, TV,
desk, misc. furniture.
FORSALE-CANOE in'e'x'c'. 'condition.
$350.00 and shortwave radio $100.00
Call 263-5118 orsec Lori in BrockHall
166
HONDA c'X-'sob',''w'ate'r'-'coo'ie'd,'s'ha'ft'-''
drive, fairing, saddlebags, 28000 kms,
$1000 obo 224-3058
COMPOTER'^iBMcom^
Tandy  SX,  640 K  2  floppy  drives,
modem, printer, monitor. $1500 261-
2242 days, 737-7999 Eves.
MOVrNGSALE'-'Quccn"s'z. 'futon'ind.'
base & linen $200, kitchen items,
please call 685-4184. evenings.
MOVING - Must sell Datsun 510,''2Dr
' automatic, exc. cond. in & out service.
Pis call 683-4996
MOV_^G'SALE?Woorrug,'p'inc'mir-'
ror, 4-piecesofa, big bike rack, cheap!
Please call 683-4996 eves.
r5?FOUND	
i^N's^ATOR's''in'B-_i't''Thur's'.'
Sept. 17.  Call Angela 224-3136
26-HOUSING	
AFFORDABLE'r^
ing.  Full  time   cook,large  common
area,  pay TV - Room and board -
$1400per term - some singles avail.
call 224-9866 Fred
or Rusty.
1 BR S/C bsmt. suite for mature female
student,N/S $200/mo in exchange for
some after school/eves companionship
for 13 yr. old girl. Phone 263-9182
Kerrisdale.
SUB-LETTING. 3BR house, fully
furn. c/w FP 70th/Granville area, lg.
yard $750/mo. util. incl. Refs. required
Nov-April 266-5934
30 - JOBS
FUNK NIGHTCLUB  downtown  requires exp. waiter/
esses, buspeople. Apply Wed or Thurs
9-11 pm.
871 Beatty.
MONITORING STATION
OPERATOR Work any shift orcombo.
of Mon-Fri 6-9 a.m. or 10 p.m.-l
a.m.;Sat & Sun 7 a.m. - 3 p.m. or 3 p.m.
-11 p.m. Exc. English & phone manner.  Call Donna 731-8204.
70 - SERVICES
SHOPPING HEADS  STOP WASTING cents. Join the dancing
carrots at Agora Food Co-op. Dunbar
&17th.
FUND RAISER WITH expertise in
Indian Act & CanadianGranting
Agencies etc. can obtain commissioned freelance Assoc, with a native
group.  Call McCoy, 580-3484.
75 - WANTED
MOTHER'S   HELP   REQUIRED.
Hours flexible.  1/2 to
3 days a week. Phone 228-9329.
RINGETTE COACHES
& REFS REQUIRED
For Kits & Riley Park
Arena Teams
(Players 5-12 yrs. of age)
274-5982 - Peter
OPEN CASTING CALL
For a Paramount Feature Film...
THE EXPEKTS*
Starring John Travolta
We are looking for people to take part in this production as
extras. In order to apply, you must be of legal age.  We arc
.carching for two specific looks: (1) a wholesome, americar
small town look, and(2) a more contemporary, new york
nightclub look.  If possible, please bring a current photo of
yourself and come dressed for the part.
SAT. SKIT 19, 11:00 A.M. TO 4O0 P.M.
PAGEBROOK HOTEL... 1234 HOHBY
85 - TYPING
WORDPROCESSING, essays & thesis by exp. wordprocessor &
spellchccked.   521-8055.
TYPEWRITING-MINIMUM NOTICE. SERVICE essays & resumes,
scripts, Proofreading, writing/research help.   327-0425.
ADINA WORD PROCESSING: student discounts.  Laser & letter
quality printers.    10th & Discovery
222-2122.
JUDITH FILTNESS, 3206 W. 38TH
AVE 263-0351 experienced
& accurate, student rates available.
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST,  30 YRS
exp. word proc. & IBM
typewriter.   Student rates.   Dorothy
Martinson 228-8346
ACCURATE REPORTS. Broadway &
Granville.  732-4426
Student rates available.
I
[fSsnoN
Your affordable fashion store
has a NEW LOCATION
at the corner of Fourth & Alma.
WATCH FOR
OPENING SPECIALS
THIS WEEKEND!
and watch for the opening of
our NEW MEN'S STORE at
3638 West Fourth Avenue.
WOMEN'S
3696 W. FOURTH AVENUE
AT ALMA IN KITSILANO
128 LONSDALE
IN NORTH VANCOUVER
MEN'S
3638 W. FOURTH AVENUE
128 LONSDALE
PLUM'S THE ONE...
where fashion is affordable!
Page 2
THE UBYSSEY
September 18,1987 Boon speaks out on South Africa
By JOHN RICHMOND
Media coverage of South Africa
is twisted and blacks and whites
really love each other and want to
get along, a white South African
told a lunch crowd on Thursday.
Michael Boon, speaking at
an Integrity in Action Club meeting, told the audience about "life
as it really is" in South Africa.
"Most of the fighting I've
" 'Taking a political
stand prevents people
from acting on their
concerns.'" (Boon)
seen is between black groups in
the townships? Boon said.
Boon said most of the inci
dents he reads about in the western press simply don't happen.
Boon said he should know
about the situation since he is a
resident of the Natal province
and is building a house in Kwaz-
ulu, a black South African "homeland".
South African politics are
generally viewed as being ex-
"Most of the fighting
I've seen is between
black groups in the
townships' " (Boon)
tremely polarized and Boon
claims that this is the very problem that keeps people apart.
Boon said sanctions serve
only to alienate the South African
Doctor with nose in
dirt sniffs out change
Dr. Wilbert Danner of
UBC's Geological Sciences
Department has turned a peculiar habit into cold, hard cash,
as well as an interesting study
that is receiving attention in
various journals, including this
month's OMNI.
Danner's habit of looking for
fossils as he walks led him to
start noticing various patterns
of dropped coins in parking lots
at UBC and at the adjacent
Wreck Beach. These patterns
of coins were then reasoned to
be an example of the sedimentation process.
In four years of research,
Danner has found that the
highest rate of sedimentation
for the parking lot is during the
winter on very cold and rainy
days when people just don't
bother to look for their coins."
He has also noted that the rates
of sedimentation are higher
near parking meters, especially those surrounded by
shrubs or hedges.
On the other hand, the
beach provides its best returns
during the summer months
when people are carryingtheir
pants and loose change finds
its way to the sand. Danner
has found that the rate of this
sedimentation is particularly
affected by the Transit System. During a Transit strike,
the sedimentation rate lowered and again when bus fare
was raised to an even one dollar, the rate plunged.
In four years Danner has
netted a total of $507.74 that
he intends to put towards a
student bursary. He's hoping
for increased revenues with
the circulation of the new
Canadian dollar coin.
~1
people, and will have a minimum
economic impact.
"I know from my own experience as a businessman that the
communist countries are always
willing to pick up the slack," he
said.
But Alton Harris, a black South
African in the audience, disagreed. Harris said Boon's picture of South Africa is simplistic.
"I'm afraid I cannot agree
with Michael's theme, life as it
really is," he said.
Boon responded quickly to
Harris, saying, "we should have
dinner ... guys like you and me
can   demonstrate   that   it   can
work."
Boon wrapped up his talk
by urging people to join the UBC
Integrity in Action club, and said
everyone should stand up and "be
bigger than themselves" when it
comes to questions of politics.
Redneck last seen handing out leaflets promoting right to life for unborn cattle of jersy descent.
>
_
_
3
o
Soccer  birds kick-off
This weekend the UBC men's
varsity soccer team begins their
third CIAU national title defence
at O.J. Todd Fields.
The 'Birds will face the University of Calgary at 2 pm on
Friday, and the University of
Lethbridge on Saturday also at 2
pm.
However, they'll be playing
without the services of three
time All Canadian Brian Kennedy, and outstanding forward,
Ken Mulleney.
Replacing Kennedy in goal
will be outstanding newcomer
Rob Zambrano, and filling
Mulleney's goal scoring role will
be natural scorer Fred Torres.
Joining Zambrano and Torres-
are highly touted rookies Colin
Pettingale, Mike Mosher, and
Tom Kim, who should have and
immediate impact on the team.
Although talented rookies
appear to be the trend this year,
returning to the team are 13 of
last year's 17 players - including
assistant coach, Dave Partridge.
Look for UBC's back wall,
KevinRiley, Gregory Young, Alex
Percy, and Kevin Colbowl, to
achor the team this year in their
bid for an unprecedented fourth
straight national title.
"Our entire back wall is returning," said head coach Dick
Mosher. "That's what won the
national title for us last year."
Historical atlas hailed as
historical landmark
Cole Harris holds a copy of a very big book.
deanne mould photo
By DEANNE MOULD
When UBC geography professor Cole Harris took on the editorship of the Historical Atlas, he
took on our vast country too.
"A lot is a blur. There were so
many trips across this
country...perhaps fifty...so many
people visited? he says.
He calls his book the first real
interpretation of Canada's prehistory. It is a record in maps of
earliest Canada's social history,
not its political one, and contains
information never previously
published or available.
The atlas is being hailed by its
publisher as "a landmark
publication...one of the most ambitious publishing projects ever
undertaken in this country."
Harris has been working on the
recently published first volume
for three of the past eight years.
The other volumes are expected
to be finished in 1990 and 1993.
"I'm very happy with the finished product. Its been very well
received," said Harris, citing
advance orders for three-quarters of the first printing of 34,000
copies.
Harris said he was struck by
the "bigness of the country." He
said editing the atlas was a wonderful opportunity for him to
learn more about Canada, in a
unique way, than ever before.
The project began in 1979 when
a group of University of Toronto
scholars and histographers, including Harris, received funding
from the Social Sciences and
Humanities Reseach Council of
Canada: about $5 million to date.
The atlas will be of interest to
the general public, early Canadian history teachers, students,
and particularly Harris' class
who were asked to buy the $85-95
volume.
Other UBC contributors include Arthur Jay Ray, department of history, M. Dale Kinkade,
linguistics, Gary Coupland, anthropology, Graeme Wynn, geography, and artist Gordon Miller
who does work for the museum of
anthropologv.
September 18, 1987
THE UBYSSEY
Page .'3 DONT MISS OUR FIRST DELICIOUS
HOT  LUNCH!
AT
HILLEL  HOUSE
(behind Brock Hall)
Tuesday Sept. 22
12:00- 2:00
Newspapers seized
McGill administration calls news photo obscene
By TU THANH HA
Canadian University Press
MONTREAL (CUP)—McGill university administrators removed the first issue of the McGill Daily
from the stands two weeks ago after school officials
judged a photo in the news section to be offensive.
The picture showed a woman's hand holding a
penis. It was the reproduction of a photograph from
an exhibit on pregnancy and sexuality.
The Daily ran the photo with a news story about
its police seizure last July 28 from a Montreal art
gallery.
The copies of the Daily were taken by McGiU's
Physical Resources Department during the night of
Sept. 2. They were returned three days later, on
Friday Sept. 4.
"I was on my way to the office when I saw there
were no issues in any buildings? said Daily news
editor Chris Lawson. "We had to call half of the administrators in the entire university to find out who
was responsible."
"THE MASTER'S PIECE siezed" by Martin Lebovitz:
art or pornography?
Sam Kingdon, associate vice-principal for the
Physical Resources Department, said the university
acted following complaints from students, staff, and
parents.
"It was registration week and there were a lot of
people around? said Kingdon. He declined however to
reveal how many complaints were received, saying
only that it was "an administrative decision of McGill
University."
"Clearly the McGill administration feels it has
more authority than the Montreal police," Lawson
said. "After all, the MUC police didn't feel that it could
confiscate Voir magazine which had also printed the
same photo - uncensored."
Kingdon said the decision to remove the Daily
from the stands was taken after "preliminary legal
advice." According to him, the copies were given back
because "there were simply some doubts on whether
what was published was legal or not."
Kingdon refused to name the university's legal
council.
"The story is simple: the university administration found the photos obscene or illegal? said Kingdon.
"I would suggest people see the content and the size of
the picture and the way it was reproduced to understand the decision."
But according to Stuart Russell, the lawyer defending art gallery owner Ebie Weizfeld, McGill administrators had no right to decide whether the picture was obscene.
"So far there have been no charges laid and no trial
has been set to find (the original photograph) indecent," said Russell. "For Sam Kingdon to seize a newspaper is outrageous, a violation of freedom of the press
and a violation of the charter of rights."
McGill students did not seem offended by the
photographs.
"It didn't bother me at all," said microbioloby
student David Dahan. "When you look at advertisement in other papers, it is so explicit it makes me sick
- at least this is not trying to sell me anything."
But another student, who wished to remain
anonymous, said she was "surprised" and "shocked" by
the picture.
"Some people in arts think they can do things like
that but there has to be a limit to arts," she said.
"I have been associated with McGill for such a long
time that a thing like this is really surprising," said
Russell, who studied law at McGill. "I expect this to
happen to a high school paper, not at a university."
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Page 4
THE UBYSSEY
September 18,1987 SIKHS  FUND POSITION
By JEFF SILVERSTEIN
An endowed position in Punjabi
lanquage and literature and Sikh
studies has been established at
UBC this year.
"With close to a million Sikhs
living outside of India, this position is long overdue and it will
hopefully have a demonstrative
effect leading to similiar positions
elswhere," said Harjot Singh
Oberoi.
Oberoi has been appointed to
the new position on a temporary
basis while the search for a permanent appointment continues.
Oberoi said "UBC is the first
university oustside of India to establish such a position."
The position covers three new
courses. These are: basic Punjabi,
intermediate Punjabi and Sikh
studies. Oberoi hopes the Sikh
'diaspora', or migration, to Canada
will be added.
UBC seemed to be the obvious
choice for this position because of
its strong Department of Asian
Studies and its pacific rim location, according to professor D.
Overmyer, head of Asian Studies.
The endowed position was created by funds put toward by the
Federation of Sikh Societies of
Canada and a matching grant by
the Canadian Minister of State
and Multiculturalism of $300,000.
"If I aim just nghtl bet I can hit that asshole in the head," says alien at CITR bash. noel delahunt photo
Petition
weak
Although three out of four students are signing, only 250 signatures have been collected on the
AMS tuition waiver petition.
Kurt Preinsperg said to reach
the 2000 signatures required before the AMS sends the petition to
UBC president David Strangway,
a booth would have to be established in SUB. "We aren't really
standing out there bugging students to sign up," Preinsperg said.
Preinsperg said the issue is not
yet dead. "It would be a mistake to
keep pursuing it too much longer
but it would also be a mistake to let
it drop too quickly," he said.
On the general issue of tuition
rebates, Preinsperg said, "I think
it's distressing that those responsible for enacting this folly of a
policy have not come forward to
publicly debate it."
Preinsperg also said that the
petition was successful in educating students about the issue.
"There are very few alert students
on campus who don't know that
faculty kids are given financial
preference at UBC. That was our
educational objective."
Mothers want
food nuke-free
By MAN-KIT KWAN
Mothers Against Nukefood
want irradiated food properly
labelled because they think
Atomic Energy of Canada Limited is preparing a deal that will
see irradiated food imported
into Canada.
"Candu reactors are no
longer selling, so now they
(AECL) want to sell irradiators
instead. Under the foreign aid
program, Canada
"The Atomic Energy
of Canada ... want to
sell irradiators to
make money
ma MacAdam
" Thel-
has given one to Thailand and
in return Canada will take back
irradiated food," said a MAN
spokesperson.
"The Atomic Energy of Canada, the Science Council of
Canada and the Health Council
of Canada all want to sell irradiators to make money so they
want irradiation regulated as a
food process rather then as an
additive as it is now," Thelma
MacAdam of MAN said.
Irradiated food considered a
process would undergoe less
testing than it would as a food
additive.
But the chairperson of the
Standing Committee on Consumer and Corporate Affairs
said, "the irradiator to Thailand
was a CIDA (Canadian International Development Agency)
deal. Canada will not be getting
any irradiated food back in return."
"Our recommendation is that
irradiated food continue to be
regulated as a food additive,"
said Mary Collins, M.P. for
Capilano.
Collins added that, "we have
no evidence of any irradiated
food in Canada. If there are then
they are in Canada illegally."
CITR PRESENTS
D.O.A.
Plus guests
L. KABONG
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25 DOORS OPEN
8:30 P.M.
SUB BALLROOM - NO MINORS
Advance Tickets $5;00 UBC Students
AMS Box Office
WHAT AM I GONNA EAT??
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with our NUTRITIONAL LIFESTYLE PROGRAM.
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Try it for 60 days - MONEY BACK GUARANTEE
To order, please call MRS. GANNON 325-0538
SKI FOR FREE AT WHISTLER MOUNTAIN
when you buy a pair of tickets at Can -Ski to
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Oct. 15
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The feature length Ski Film From
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FROM:
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September 18,1987
THE UBYSSEY
Page 5 UBC BOOKSTORE
RETURN POLICY
CXHrtlSlBOOKS
Sessional course books may be returned (accompanied by the original
for full refund any time up to the following session deadlines:
receipt)
FALL SESSION           OCTOBER 2,1987
WINTER SESSION    JANUARY 29,1987
SPRING SESSION    MAY U, 1987
SUMMER SESSION JtJtV 16,1987
After the respective deadline all course books will be non-returnable.
Books must be unmarked and saleable-as-new condition.
NON-COURSE BOOKS, MERCHANDISE & SUPPLIES
Returns will normally be accepted up to 10 dags from date of purchase, when
accompanied by SALES RECEIPT.
NO RETURNS on sale items, special orders, _ectoonic and computer goods,
lined shorts, bathing suits and swimming accessories.
REMEMBER TO KEEP YOUR RECEIPT
NO RECEIPT - NO REFUND
NO EXCEPTIONS
Jlfe BOOKSTORE
Applications for Ten Positions on the 1987/88
AMS SUB
SECURITY TEAM
Are Now Being Accepted
The Security Team works Friday, Saturday, and
other designated days in the Student Union
Building. The Team is responsible for assisting the
Proctor in protecting SUB from vandalism, aiding
security teams hired for any SUB function and
implementing SAC policy in SUB.
Application forms are now available in the AMS
Executive secretary's office , SUB room 238.
These positions are open to male and female
U.B.C. students.
APPLICATIONS MUST BE RETURNED
BY
4P.M. Friday September IS 1987
WHO WON THE MOUNTAIN BIKE?
During registration, September 2-4, Kuwahara Bikes (Fred
Deeley Cycle), Robert Corr Natural Soda, and Maranatha
Christian Club co-sponsored a booth where thousands ot
Robert Corr Sodas were distributed and an 18 Speed Kuwahara mountain bike was raffled off.
Bike winner David Black (left), 4th year psychology student,
is presented the prize from Darwin Dewar. Over 3950
students participated in the raffle. Over 200 also indicated
an interest in bible studies and over 190 indicated an
interest in finding a church.
** Do not miss RICE BROOCKS
September 22-25 Woodward 4 at 7:00pm
Maranatha Christian Club 228-8554
WE'D LIKE TO SEE THE
DAY:
When health research
gets $400 million and
generals have to run
across the country on
one leg to raise money
for jet planes.
U.S. boycott of disarmament meeting
is ignorant, Canadian groups say
By JAMES YOUNG
Canadian University Press
VANCOUVER (CUP)—The
U.S. boycott of a U.N. conference
on disarmament and development
is "remarkably ignorant," but consistent with the Reagan administration's fear of the organization,
say representatives of Canadian
groups working for third world
development.
They also contend that
Canada's input into the conference has been weak, in order not to
offend the U.S.
The U.S. boycotted the three-
week conference in New York because it considers disarmament
and development separate issues, decisions to cut funding to the or-
It also rejects any proposals to ganization and to withdraw from
automatically transfer money cut   UNESCO.
from military budgets to third
world aid.
"The boycott is consistent with
the Reagan administration's foreign policy...of pouring huge
amounts of money into arms,
while drastically cutting their
development aid budget," said
John Graham, B.C. regional coordinator for Oxfam.
Graham said the boycott was designed to avoid criticism at the
conference, while carrying out a
long-term strategy of undermining the U.N., as shown by previous
*0f&r
For the Roads
to Higher Education
Attention all post-secondary students! Before
you open a textbook this term, study the benefits
of fast, affordable transit to and from school.
FAST TRAX, the post-secondary student's transit
guide, will be available on campus this fall. Pick
one up for complete information on routes serving
your college or university, how they connect with
the rest of the system, and how you can save time
and money with prepaid fares. Watch for details
on posters and in the September 11 edition of
The Buzzer.
BC
Transit
Vancouver Regional
Transit System
"It comes from such a narrow
minded perspective that sees the
U.N. as socialist and un-American," he said.
Similar criticisms were voiced
by CUSO and Canadian Crossroads International which place
students, graduates and others in
third world development projects.
Pat Clarke, regional coordinator for CUSO in B.C., called the
U.S. separation of disarmament
and develoopment issues "an almost unbelievably ignorant analysis."
"There is a pretty direct relationship between the lack of materials for economic development
and expenditures for the tools of
war," said Clark.
Both Graham and Clark said
External Affairs minister Joe
Clark's statements at the conference were designed to avoid U.S.
criticism.
Although Clark endorsed the
principles of arms reduction and
increased foreign aid, he rejected
any international transfer mechanism to convert savings from military budgets into economic assistance for the third world.
Clark told tho conference, which
continues until Sept 11, that the
proposal was simplistic, would
create another development bureaucracy, and did not address the
issue of why governments felt
compelled to acquire arms.
"Clark is kowtowing to the Reagan administration on that one?
said Graham.
But Gary O'Connor, international programs director for Canadian Crossroads International in
Ottawa, disagreed.
"I don't think you will ever get a
government to agree that there
would be an automatic transfer of
funds from armament spending to
development," said O'Connor, arguing that individual governments would want to retain decision-making power over their
budgets.
Graham also argued that the
Canadian government's position
was hypocritical, as defence
spending under the Mulroney
government has increased in real
terms and will continue to do so
until the end >f the century under
the terms of this year's white paper on defeni i
Canada currently spends about
$10 billion for defence and $2.5
billion for foreign aid. Development groups want the government
to increase foreign aid from the
current 0.5 per cent of GNP, to 0.7
per cent by 1990 — a commitment
Clark made berfore the U.N. in
19>s5, but this disappeared from
last year's federal budget.
On a global scale, worldmilitary
spending is about $900 billion
a-nually, or $1.7 million per min-
Page 6
!1E U15YSSI Y
September 18,1987 ,^s
_\&e
W>x*
September 18,1987
THE UBYSSEY
Page 7 FOR DELICIOUS
SANDWICHES
with Daily Specials
Also
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SALADS
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IN SUB LOWER LEVEL
Open daily 7:30 a.m. 5:30 p.m.
GMAT     LSAT
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WEEKEND TEST PREPARATION COURSES
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PROFESSIONALS IN TEST PREPARATION -,y'j
CALL
222-8272
Break away...
and come on down to UBC's closest
off-campus neighborhood pub! The
atmosphere is casual, the service
excellent and friendly. Enjoy a
round of darts or a pinball game
or simply relax in front of our
TSN screens.
Serving UBC students tor
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734-1205
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We are looking for people who are outgoing, energetic and
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566 Cardero
ANY DAY
From 3:00 p.m. 'til 4:30 p.m.
FIASCO
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- wood-fired pizzas
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734-1325
For Monday Night Football in our Sports
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have a slice of wood-fired pizza on us!
($2.00 value)
Lana lust: the
bitch stops
here
by DAVID L. YOUNG
"Hell have no fury, like a drag queen scorned." So
says Lana Lust (Kent Staines), in his one drag queen
show, LANA LUST: THE BITCH STOPS HERE!
The show begins when Lana comes prancing onstage dressed in silver glitter, torn fishnet stockings,
garter, and a black torpedo breasted corset.   She!
looks like a 6'4", muscular version of Madonna, put
through the wringer twice!
Audience participation is a must at this show.
As you enter, you are handed a form on which to write
your questions on "style, success, and sexual perversity," to Lana. And believe me, she answers the
majority of these questions, and in such a way that
would make Dr. Ruth and Joan Rivers blush.
The show has something for everyone to laugh at, as
Lana tells the unique story of her success, which is
attributed to "hard work and clever makeup application."
Lana Lust is truly a Fringe show - it's funny,
rude, and even, at times, relevant.
More bingeing
Fringe plays offer humor,
rudeness & relevance
Redcross
At the Grunt Gallery
By ALAR OLLJUM
Sam Shepard's 1967 mini-play, "red Cross" is
still topical today. Written on the eve of the 'Summer
of Love', this drama is a powerful portrayal of young
America's fear of sex. Now that the big chill of AIDS
is upon us, fear of sex is once again ubiquitous.
Scott McNeill as the virile Jim seems ready to let
his sexual frustrations explode, but instead is forced
to divert them into such pursuits as tree-climbing and
swimming in the dark. Sarah Rodgers as Carol is
obsessed with dirt and bugs, but makes no concious
connections between her neuroses and sexual immobility. Pounding headaches overtake her whenever
she comes close to states of physical or mental ecstasy. Jim, try as hard as he may, just can't seem to
understand Carol's predicament.
The encounter between Jim and the maid
(played masterfully by Laurel Grey) is intriguing. At
first, the maid seems world-wise to Jim's sexual
longings. But when Jim reveals his perverse pride in
having little crabs infest his private parts of his body,
the maid is taken aback. Jim's masochism dissolves
her sympathy into contempt.
But the maid is drawn back into Jim's embrace
by his enticing tales of sensual swimmingin the dark,
in the rain. Having caught the maid in his trap, Jim
subjects her to his sadistic side. Sadism is no better
than masochism. The maid is once again disillusioned and leaves.
Red Cross portrays the fear of sex in its many
different ways: denial, subjection and surrender are
j ust a fe w of the responses which can lead to neurosi s,
frustration and even chastity. This multifaceted
reprise is well reflected in, and brings universal relevance to, iti Red Cross	
All shows reviewed, plus many others, are
playing at the Vancouver Fringe Festival
through Sunday, at various times. Phone the
individual venues or see a Fringe schedule for
specific details
Birdbath
At Vancouver Little Theatre
By NANCY CANNING
Bird Bath, by Leonard Melfi, is a wonderfully
warm play which explores the intense relationship
developing between two lonely people.
Denise Lane portrays Velma, a nervous, shy,
repressed young waitress. Freddie, played by Gerry
Bean, is a confident worldly young poet working as
a cook. When they meet, Velma cautiously circles
Frankie, sneaking glances and forcing empty conversation.
Freddie's response is endearing as he patiently
humors her. The dialogue is sensitive and on occasion brutally honest.
The first scene sets the stage, the second scene
confirms the characters, and the ending destroys the
balance.
The sets are simple, barren, and work effectively to create an atmosphere of emptiness for the
two characters. Denise Lane executes Velma's lines
with believable innocence. Gerry Bean portrays
Freddie's depression with explosions of anger which
unnerve both Velma and the audience. Well acted
and well worth seeing.
WORSHIPPING COMMUNITIES ON OR NEAR CAMPUS
ANGLICAN CHURCH
St. Anselm's Parish Church
University Blvd. (near University Golf Course)
Sunday Worship: 8:00 a.m. & 11:00 a.m.
Pastor: Rev. CF. Raymond
Phone: 224-1410, 224-2568
LUTHERAN CHURCH
Lutheran Campus Ministry
5885 University Blvd. (at Wesbrook)
Sunday Worship: 10:00 a.m. & 7:30 p.m.
Pastor: Raymond Schultz
Phone: 224-1614
ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH
St. Mark's College Chapel
5935 Iona Dr. (NE of Gage Towers)
Sunday Worship: 9:30 a.m., 11:00 a.m. & 7:00
Phone: 224-3311
RED LEAF
Restaurant
Luncheon Smorgasbord
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2289114
10% DISCOUNT ON
PICK UP ORDERS
LICENSED PREMISES
Mon.-Fri 11:30-9:00 p m
CLOSED SATURDAYS
Sundays and Holidays   *
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2142 Western Parkway
UBC Village
Opposite Chevron Station
GRAK3OPENING
p.m.
UNIVERSITY CHAPEL
5375 University Blvd.
Sunday Worship: 10:00 a.m.
Phone: 222-0800
Contact Person: Mike Nicolls
UNIVERSITY HILL CONGREGATION
United and Presbyterian Churches
Chapel of the Epiphany in the
Vancouver School of Theology
6030 Chancellor Blvd.
Sunday Worship: 10:30 a.m.
Minister: Alan Reynolds
COPY SALE
COPIES
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-. 224-6225
Page 8
THE UBYSSEY
September 18,1987 Red
channels
At Heritage hall
By DAVID L. YOUNG
The Touchstone Threatre company opened their
twelfth season to a packed house with their Fringe
production of Red Channels, a highly stylized, well
developed melodrama, dealing with life during the
McCarthy era.
Jennifer Martin and Leslie Mildiner, who co-
wrote this play, adeptly recreate the tension and
paranoia of this period. The Play allows the audience
to relive those glory days of American history - lovely
days, filled with carefree trivialities such as: What
should one serve your company for dessert? And,
:endless Sundays of grass cutting?
But these days also possessed the stress of questioning ones' loyalties, and worrying if anyone is
going to implicate you as a possible subversive, red,
God-hating, card-carrying commie!
Roger (Kevin McNulty) works for the state department; his wife Margo (Barbara Russell), is just a
"typical American housewife". They are true consumers of the fifties, with a house, a car, a bar-b-que,
and most importantly, a television set.
I       The t.v. set stays on throughout Roger and
Margo's dialogue, spewing out news clips from the
senate hearings, commercials, and old clips from t.v.
sitcoms like "I Love Lucy". Each t.v. clip is cleverly
connected with the plot and the structuie of the play.
The majority of these nostalgic tid-bits cause some
interestingreactions from both Roger and Margo. To
go into more detail would spoil an intriguing and
unique concept, which must be experienced first
hand.
McNulty and Rusell have some fantastic ensemble moments in this play. Director Roy Surette
and his production staff have truly devised a show
worthy of representing Touchstone's season opener.
Greater Vancouver's favourite cynics, No Fun,
are presenting their theme-show, The Rich Folk
Festival, live in the Ubyssey office, SUB 241k, 3:30 -
7:30 p.m. today.
So what is No Fun?
It was founded back in the seventees, the decade
of pet rocks and Airport movies, by David M., a dryly
witty rock icon. Their crazy folk-rock-on-a-drug-as-
yet-undiscovered music commands a constant following among thinking hipsters and bighairs everywhere.
Their presentation of the Rich Folk Festival at
University of Victoria earlier this month drew a large,
enthusiastic crowd who already knew half the words,
to their songs including Be Like Us, a cover of a Simon
and Garfunkle song and their perennial favourite
(with special hand movements) Work, Drink, Fuck,
Die.
Paul Leahy is the other half of No Fun. He plays
the electric guitar (M. plays an acoustic with pickups)
and sings the occasional song.
No Fun has come a long way since they were the
official folk-rock duo of Expo '86.
In January they hit the cover of the entertainment section of the Globe and Mail under the headline
"The pair of zanies who are No Fun have great fun
trashing pop culture."
Next week they will be issuing The New Switche-
roo, their first recording since 1985's 1894.
They have a monster hit about Jim and Tammy
Bakker called Lets Get It Right and Get It On which
has been on CITR's playlist for nearly four months.
The Rich Folk Festival (which they are presenting in the Ubyssey office, SUB 241k, 3:30-7:30 p.m.
today) is one of a number of completely different No
Fun theme shows, including No Fun in Love, their
Major Record Company Signing Party, and a wild No
Fun at Christmas.
They are also calling themselves the official folk-
rock duo of the Calgary Winter Olympics and the 1988
Brisbane Worlds Fair.
The cover of 1894 features a stylized picture of M.
and Leahy driving the band car, a Torino.
"I like to think of it as the car Elvis would have
driven if he had been me," says M.
THE NHL COMES
%
TO UBC
_r
Thurs. Sept. 24
7:00 p.m.
VANCOUVER CANUCKS
BLACK/GOLD GAME
See all the Canucks stars in action here at the
Thunderbird Winter Sports Centre.
Tickets: Adults $5.00 - students/children $2.00
Tickets available in the Lounge and Sport Shop at the
Winter Sports Centre.
~th tux\ - no maR ■\&
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Public Service Commission
of Canada
Commission de la Fonction
publlque du Canada
Employment
Opportunities
1988
Having hired
approximately
1,000 university
graduates last year,
the federal Public Service is
continuing to search for talented
people to join its ranks in 1988.
Employment opportunities are available
for students graduating in computer science,
economics, finance and mathematics. Career
opportunities in purchasing also exist for
graduates in engineering and business
administration. If you are interested, please
forward your application to the nearest office
of the Public Service Commission of Canada by
October 30. 1987.
If you have selected a career as a Financial Officer,
please submit your application by October 30,
1987 and present yourself at the Financial
Administration Test of Technical Knowledge being
held on Thursday, November 12, 1987 at
7:00 p.m. Candidates who have already passed this
test or hold their RIA/CMA, CA or CGA are exempt
from this exam.
Once again this year, the Office of the Auditor General
is looking for graduates in accounting for their Audit
Training Program. If you are interested in this
program, your application should be sent to the
nearest office of the Public Service Commission of
Canada by September 30, 1987.
Persons wishing to join Canada's Foreign Service must
present themselves at the exam being held on
Saturday, October 17, 1987 at 9:00 a.m. An
application need not be submitted in advance.
Employment opportunities are
also available in other disciplines.
To be considered for these jobs, you
must forward your application
For more     "^^^^^-^^^^ to us for inclusion
information,    ^^^fc^J^^^^ in our national
please contact       ^^fc^J^^^        inventory of
your campus ^^^fc^_*-^^^        applications.
placement office or the
nearest office of the Public
Service Commission of Canada.
The Public Service Commission is
an equal opportunity employer.
Canada
September 18,1987
THE UBYSSEY
Page 9 fio <or) $uS _.fiie Sggg *£
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,.i.**v,.;.. <* j£,.
WITH BOOTS LIKE these who wouldn't be a star
steve chan  photo
Lang is a show stopper
By IAN MCLAREN
K.D. Lang and the Reclines
salvaged an under-attended affair
last weekend at the Whistler
Mountain Music Festival.
Organizers made an ambitious attempt to provide free, non
stop entertainment over the two-
day event. With 2 outdoor stages
and staggered starting times, the
line-up included acts such as Shari
Ulrich, Skywalk, Ron Haywood
and the Stripes, and Women of
Motown.
Now Open
Til 8:00p.m. Fridays    : HAIRCUTS $9.00 I
Monday to Saturday
9:30 a.m. -6:00 p.m.
: STYLE $12.00 :
NEW LOCATION
2585 W. 16th (at Trafalgar)
NOT VALID SATURDAYS
734-2343
BEATUTOR!$!!
BE A TYPIST   !$!!
REGISTER
SPEAKEASY
SUB 100B MAIN CONCOURSE
"STUDENTS HELPING STUDENTS"
UBC CLUBS DAYS
STUDENT UNION BUILDING, SEPT.23-5
But cool weather and poor
promotion resulted in an indifferent attendance, particularly on
Saturday when chilled mountain
winds kept the crowd away. ,
However, the sparse audience
that shivered through the afternoon was rewarded with fine
music; Shari Ulrich sounded great
and Haywood and the Stripes kept
the crowd hopping with their selection of cover tunes.
Sunday's outdoor offerings
were better attended. Confined to
the town stage, the mellow sounding Big Band Trio alternated with
the rhythmic Suntone Carribean
Combo. Onlookers huddled over
drinks   in   the   outsoor   cafes,
Music
KD Lang at the Whistler Mountain Music Festival
September 12 - 13
lounged in the square or danced in
front of the band shell.
But, if it was cool outside, it
was sizzling inside the Whistler
Conference Centre. Wearing a
black shirt, yellow neckerchief,
white patterned square dance
skirt and shiny silver boots replete
with thick orange socks, K.D.
Lang gave a 90-minute show that
gave ample evidence why she'd
been chosen Entertainer of the
Year at the previous night's Country Music Awards.
Lang's first three songs exhibited the full extent of her showmanship and vocal range. Opening with the slow bluesy, "Don't
Ever Leave Me Again", followed by
"Love With You", she showed she
can growl as well as she can purr.
Lang's theatrics on "Johnny
Get Angry", (throwing haymakers, collapsing on stage) had
the audience laughing but they
were also revelling at the power
emanating from that dimunitive
frame.
Spiriting a line from the
Beastie Boys, "You Gotta Fight for
Your Right to Polka", and with the
black-shirted Reclines providing
solid back-up, Lang blasted
through the polka parade and her
video hit, "Tune Into My Wave."
By this time, a large portion of
the multi-generation audience
were on their feet doing two-steps,
Q-steps, and all kinds of fancy
steps.
The rest of the show saw Lang
belting out a mixture of country,
blues, the odd square dance, and of
course her re-incarnate, heart-
wrenching version of "I Fall to
Pieces."
But at the end, when the bar
table and ashtray were hauled out,
there was no doubt about the encore. Lang reappeared and after
sitting the audience and herself
down, launched into a histrionic
version of "Three Cigarettes in the
Ashtray", her current hit that left
an elated crowd roaring with appreciation.
Page 10
THE UBYSSEY
September 18,1987 Ollie mania lives
By RICK HIEBERT
It had to happen. Whenever
an American is suddenly vaulted
into national prominence, inevitably people try to make money off of
the celebrity's new found fame.
Take Lt. Col. 0 liver North.
His testimony to the Congressional investigating commitee on
the Iran-Contra affair had barely
ended before two ingenious
Americans had rushed out a
colouring book satirizing the entire controversy.
The Ollie North Coloring
Book, by Mad magazine artist
Mort Drucker and Paul Laikin, is
an offbeat look at the subject and
his adventures. The book uses the
format of a children's colouring
book to blast North and his
friends, in the Oval Office and
elsewhere. It leaves nothing
sacred and is often funny.
They take a jaundiced view of
North. Underneath the first caricature of North, Drucker and Laikin put; "This is our hero./ Color
him red, white and blue./ He is a
true patriot./ He did a lot for his
country ./He smuggled arms to our
enemy./ He sneaked the profits to
rebels./ He broke a lot of laws of the
land./ He did it for Truth, Justice
and the American way!"
Drucker and Laikin lambaste
everyone involved, and although
they save their sharpest satire for
the Reagan cabinet and North's
doings and acquaintances, they do
poke fun at the other side of the
debate once in a while.
There is some rhetorical slop-
piness in the book. For example,
Drucker and Laikin imply that the
"Nicaraguan Resistance" and the
Sandinistas are essentally the
same, only the Sandinistas have
bullets for their guns. This shows
an ignorance of recent Latin
American history.	
Also, Drucker and Laikin
should have been a little more
careful when talking about North.
Some of the stuff they say about
him is almost slanderous. They
may feel North may deserve to be
blasted, but there is still debate on
whether what he did was wrong or
illegal, so some of the more freewheeling satire could have been
toned down.
The Oliver North Coloring Book
By Mort Drucker and Paul Laikin
Andrews and McMeel
1987
All in all, however, this is an
amusing trifle that everyone who
doesn't take the subject too seriously will get a kick out of. It will
make a nice collector's item that
you can show to your grandkids
when Lt. Col. North becomes the
answer to a Trivial Pusuit question.
.Arthur
Andersen
INTERESTED IN C.A. EMPLOYMENT?
ARTHUR ANDERSEN & CO. is seeking graduates for Vancouver and
all other offices of the firm. Candidates will be graduating in May 1988
and would ideally have most, if not all, 45 credit hours required by the
ICABC and be currently registered in the Commerce Faculty.
Submit an original or photocopy of your UPCA form and a copy of
your most recent transcripts by October 2 to the Canada Employment
Centre on campus, Brock Memorial Hall. All resumes will be
acknowledged. You will be contacted on or about October 9 regarding campus interviews which will take place during the week of
October 19 and 26th. Additional information is available at the
UBC Canada Employment Office.
2300 -1055 West Hastings Street
Vancouver, B.C.
V6E 2J2
(604) 688-8111
D
D
D
[□ □[□]
The people who brought you
THE COCONUT PARTY would now
like to lead you astray
with
UNDERCUT '87
Sept. 26
8 F'.M.
Armouries
No Minors
Tix$5
AMS Box Office
FUS Office
(MCM! 62)
HOW CAN YOU S.
TRAIN TICKET?
□ Bring your own
chair.
□ Offer to entertain
^passengers with selected
/readings from your poetry.
4
Show your student
card.
The train's definitely the smart way to
travel. Even smarter these days with VIA's student
fares. Just show us your student card and you're
on your way, 1/3 richer. Have a relaxing ride. Meet
some new friends. And let the good trains roll!
For more information and reservations,
call your Travel Agent or VIA Rail. VIA's student
fares are available to full time students. Some
conditions apply regarding times and dates of travel.
Ask for details.
Next time,
choose VIA.
ACTA*
CUE!-—"""a
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September 18, 19*7
THE UBYSSEY
Page LI HP-DAY TODAY!
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 18th
10:00 a.m.-2:00 p.m.
MEET OUR HEWLETT-PACKARD REPRESENTATIVE AND FACTORY EXPERT FROM THE U.S.!
Get a FREE Demonstration on any of our HP products! We're giving away HP Souvenirs on this day
only. Take the HP Advantage and find out more about HP-12C Rebate Offer and Free HP-41 Modules!
BOOKSTORE
228-4741
UB.C
BOOKSTORE
20% OFF CALCULATORS
TI-74
THE TI-74 BASICALC™ CALCULATOR
MORE PROGRAMMABLE PROBLEM-SOLVING POWER
THAN ANY OTHER CALCULATOR AT A COMPARABLE PRICE.
M It's both an advanced scientific calculator, with 70
(unctions - and a BASIC programmable calculator.
with 113 commands.
M 8K bytes of built-in RAM, with another 8K available in an
optional plug-in cartridge.
y Display shows up to 31 large alphanumeric characters
(scrolls left or right to 80) and 14 status indicators. Adjusta
bie contrast.
^ Scientific functions include common and natural logarithms and
antiloganthms, reciprocals, powers, roots, factorials, and trigonometric calculations, including inverse, in degrees, radians or grads.
Sale ends Sept. 30.1987
156
96
BOOKSTORE
228-4741
UB.C.
BOOKSTORE
**»r*'WBiiis^g*Bg^gg__JSa___B__3
20°/0 OFF TYPEWRITERS
P ANASONIC KX-R200
TYPEWRITER
LETTER-QUALITY DAISYWHEEL PORTABLE
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER WITH 7KB
MEMORY, 14 CHARACTER PLUS COUNTER
LCD AND LIFT-OFF CORRECTION.
m 7 KB MEMORY
r 14 CHARACTER ' ADDITIONAL
PLUS COUNTER LCD FEATURES
m 11,2-INCH PAPER * 96 character
CAPACITY keyboard
i*" EDITING FUNCTIONS * Express backspace
m AUTOMATIC * Index/Reverse
FUNCTIONS index
•S 1-LINE CORRECTION • Auto carriage
MEMORY return
"" LETTER-QUALITY • Right margin flush
DAISYWHEEL • AC/DC operation
Sale ends Sept 30, 1987
Reg $34995
BOOKSTORE
2284741
VSO
opens
By DEAN MICHAEL GUSTINI
At the opening concert of the
VSO season last Sunday, a sumptuously decorated cake stood in
regal stillness in the lobby of the
Orpheum. Sadly, it was mere
decoration. Visually teasing, it
was entirely in keeping with the
musical goings-on in the theatre.
The orchestra scaled itself
down to chamber dimensions for a
reading of Mozart's Symphony
#24. Lighthearted and full of the
exuberance of youth, it was played
well.
In the Mendelssohn Violin
Concerto in E-minor, the VSO and
Moscow-born violinist Shlomo
Mintz, batoned by Rudolf Barshai,
developed a rapport - that give
and take musicians call rubato -
that brought out the romanticism
of the piece. I
Mintz played with a driving
intensity at times and a passionate, lyrical and playful quality at
others. His virtuosity was especially displayed in the cadenza of
the first movement and the chugging vivace of the final movement.
After intermission we were
treated to a Mahler symphony.
The Titan, Mahler's first symphony, is not a mammoth work
like some of his others but it does
reflect his belief that, "A symphony should be like the world. It
should contain everything".
Barshai led the VSO authoritatively here and his fluid movement evoked just the right sound
from the orchestra. Barshai
brought out the wide dynamic
range(caressing pianissimi to
clobbering fortissimi), rhythmic
interest(Yiddish dances to comical
elephantine andantes) and colour
inherent in the piece.
Page 12
THE UBYSSEY
September 18,1987 By MARTIN DAWES
Most of us know very little
about the disabled. In
fact, most of us avoid the
issue whenever we can because we
find it depressing. The Impossible
Takes a Little Longer, which will
be shown this Tuesday, in the
SUB Ballroom, is not a depressing
film - quite the contrary. This film
is inspiring, thought-provoking,
and it hopes, action-provoking.
Directed by Anne Henderson of
the National Film Board's
Women's Studio, the film examines the working lives of five
physically disabled women, and
also glances at some of their personal lives.
Film documents
disabled
Movie
The Impossible Takes a Little
Longer
Produced By the National Film
Board of Canada
Tuesday, September 22, 7:30p.m.
SUB Ballroom
This film emphasizes the importance of work in providing, in
the words of Kathryn Drummond,
the central character of the film, "a
sense of self-worth...a purpose."
Without jobs, the film claims, the
disabled feel they are a burden to
society.
The film also examines the difficulties disabled women have
finding employment. Linda
McBride, a parapalegic since early
childhood, was rejected for promotion to jobs she knew she could
perform. "You don't seem to move",
she says, and adds that employers
underestimate her and think she
ought to feel grateful for having a
job at all.
Kathryn Drummond
The film makes it clear that
progress for the disabled is due
more to advances in technology
than to public concern. For in
stance, Kathryn must work in bed
during the afternoons - and how
does a person with no limb control
use a telephone while in bed? Use
your head: she dials with her
tongue, activating a microphone
like device which she also speaks
into.
The film suggests that with
out advanced technology these
women would miss out not only on
jobs, but also on the education
needed to even become candidates
for jobs.
Director Anne Henderson offers a tautly-constructed "blend of
realism and hope", to quote one
character's recipe for success. In
choosing some of the more successful individuals she has created an
inspiring and educational film
which will both strengthen the
disabled community by showing
them examples of achievement,
and also correct misconceptions
and eliminate disrespect amongst
the general public.
Remember this.  I can do something you can't do and you can do something I can't do. But we both have
to do it.
Mother Teresa to Bob Geldof
UBC
OUR.     /
N>        Sept. 2.1 $ 22.
12.-30— I '. 2.0
coaa£  .xoiN   -nte   ^u,vl   iaj.th -me
LARGEST    CU>B     oi>i    CA/A"PU$ /
KE-n-SfE*-  K£ CL.JB5 t>fryS  : serr. 23-^5-
UBC CHAPLAINS' ASSOCIATION
Providing: Worship Counselling Program Support
CATHOLIC CAMPUS MINISTRY
St. Mark's College Ministry (N.E. of Gage Towers)
5935 Iona Drive, Van. V6T 1J7
224-3311
Sunday Mass: 9:30, 11:00, 7p.m.
Weekday Mass: 12:35,4:35
Newman Club: Thurs. 12:30 p.m.
Fr. Leo Klostermann, C.S.B.
Fr. Paul Burns, C.S.B.
Monica Guest, SCIC
MarkGazin, C.S.B.
Brian McGregor-
Foxcroft
ANGLICAN CATHOLIC
CHURCH OF CANADA
224-5964
Ray Schultz,
Chaplain
LUTHERAN CAMPUS MINISTRY
Wesb'ook at University Blvd.
224-1614
Sunday Eucharist 10:00 am
Evening Prayer Sundays at 7:30 pm
Sunday Firesides 8:00 pm
Luthe'an Student Movement
Tuesdays 6:00pm
Watch 'Tween classes for info about
TGIFe, Retreats and Socials.
Brad Newcombe,
Chaplain
UNITED CHURCH
CAMPUS MINISTRY
5885 University Blvd.
224-3722
Regular activities include
Tuesday noon worship, Lutheran Centre
Wednesday evening potluck dinners
and program
at 6:00 p.m. at the Lutheran Centre
Wednesday noon "Table Talk"
in SUB212A
UNITARIAN CHAPLAINS
Rev. Harold Rosen
UNITARIAN MINISTER
Ms. Fran Buckmaster
Grad. Student-- Vancouver School of Theology
UNITARIANISM:
A Religion For Agnostics, Humanists, Theists, Christians and Non-
Christians
A Religion Which Encourages People To Find and Otter Their Own
Special Gifts.
A Religion Which Builds Bridges Among Different Seekers of Truth.
Home: 325-0044
Church: 261-7204
Robert Powell
PENTECOSTAL CHAPLAIN
Robb is the Pentecostal chaplain to both
UBC and SFU.
As well as offering counselling and
pastoral services to the UBC community,
Robb also helps to direct University
Christian Ministries, a growing interdenominational campus group which meets
Thursdays, 12:30 pm at SUB 205 and
7pm at the Lutheran Campus Centre,
5885 University Blvd.
To contact him, please call
224-3722, 684-3778 or 732-3759
Dr. Mordehai Wosk,
Executive Director
JEWISH STUDENTS
ASSOCIATION
HILLEL HOUSE
Located Behind Brock Hall
224-4748
Box 43 Student Union Building
UBC Vancouver B.C. V6T 2A5
Doors Open 10:00 am - 5:00pm.
Mon - Fri.
WELCOME TO FAMOUS HOT
LUNCHES!
Social, Educational, Cultural & counselling
Douglas Johnston
Residential Dean/chaplain
CAREY HALL
BAPTIST COLLEGE
5920 IONA DRIVE
If I can be of assistance call
Office 224-4308
Home 224-0355
September 18,1987
THE UBYSSEY
Page 13 Exotic
dancers and
hockey don't
mix
Good hockey doesn't make exciting copy
for Vancouver Sun reporter John Armstrong.
Instead, he has to resort to descriptions of
exotic dancers sliding "down a brass stanchion toward the combo glass tub and fountain below" to surpass the thrills of a mere 6-
5 Canadian victory over the Soviets.
Armstrong, in a front page article on Tuesday, described how Cindi, a downtown "lady
of the evening" awaited the end of the game
when business would boom. She stated her
affection for playing games rather than
watching. Cindi is blonde and wears a sheer
red blouse. Is this why Armstrong interviewed her?
On Wednesday, after the game, Armstrong decided to gain insight from Creston,
an exotic dancer who was naive enough to
think that the fans' sudden outburst at
Lemieux's winning goal might be for her.
Creston was cavorting on the carpet. Is this
why Armstrong interviewed her?
Canada was down 3-0 five minutes into the
first period. By the third period they tied the
score, and with only one minute twenty left
in the period, Lemieux scored the winning
goal. Any sports writer should be able to
make good copy of such an exciting game.
But Armstrong was more intrigued by
Creston. She surfaces in the third paragraph, and after that the story never leaves
the bar.
He must have felt the world needed to be
reminded that there are still women who
cater to the needs of men like the "pinstriped print shop manager," who consider
the dancers "something to look at between
periods."
"Canadian men know where their priorities lie," writes Armstrong.
And so the rejected females must patiently
await the attention of a group of boisterous
men whose primary goal, one of Armstrong's
cohorts says, is to "stay sober enough so that
you're awake if there's overtime." If any
women bother to stick it out, they'll probably
find their man can't get it up. In other words,
no score.
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Friday
throughout the academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of British Columbia. Editorial
opinions are those of the staff and are not necessarily
those of the administration or the AMS. Member Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey's editorial office is
SUB 241k. Editorial department, 228-2301/2305. Advertising, 228-3977.
It was a dark and stormy night and Catherine
Monk, Deane Mould, Jennifer Lyall, & Grace Aquino
were sitting around the smouldering remains of a
campfire. "What are we going to do?" asked Alar Olljum
& Laura Busheikin. "Yeah? said Nancy Canning,
"We've got all these soggy marshmallows left." "Don't
whine," said Ronan Oger, snuggling closer to Corine
Bjorge & Carolyn Sale for body warmth, "We've got all
the necessities." "Easy for you to say!" said Rick
Hiebert, Ross Mclaren & Jeremy Fraser in unison.
"You have the only tent." added David Chu. Suddenly
a large crash came from the woods. Noel Delahunt,
Chris Fraser, Victor Wong & Frank Nezil shrieked
"Save us!" and grabbed Jenni Mott for protection.
Cathy Chung, Ian McLaren, Martin Dawes, Dean Michael Gostini, Steve Chan, Lydia Schymansky & others searched the area. Soon Elizabeth Piccolo & Jim
Steiger noticed that David L. Young was missing.
"Maybe he's been taken by the thing in the woods!"
gasped Elynn Richter. Just then Dale Enns solved the
mystery: he found a tent a few yards away with moans
of "Tannis, Oh Tannis!" emanating from it.
.    I-fV      ihe   usual,   borir^     day,--'-    •
i     JUST        00MT      fcMOV-/      WHICH
PROBLEM TO 16MCRE FIRST      .
Se^Bod^Jzj
Letters
Perks for
profs works
As two "lucky" offspring
of academics, we would like
to respond to Mr. Kurt
Preinsperg's modest proposal—leaving out the
Swiftian satire.
Preinsperg is indeed
correct when he quotes 50
G's per annum as "paltry"
for a professor, if that sum is
compared to amounts paid
out by eastern Canadian
institutions. Ours is seen as
an academically competitive university, but in terms
of professor's salaries, UBC
does not make the grade,
we have to find othelStejisip
lure unsuspecting doctorate
holders to our moss-league
institution. It's a hard world
out yonder, Kurt, and qualified instructors are not attracted to UBC merely by
our dazzling sunshine and
our entertaining B.C. politics.
How then? Perks, Kurt.
Bribery.
Fee-waiving is widespread: S.F.U., Langara
and the regional B.C. colleges have their versions,
and it is a cheap way to trim
burgeoning class sizes by
getting new staff, to rejuvenate an aging, and therefore
higher income faculty, and
to generally recapture some
of the glory this place feels it
once had.
Free tuition for faculty
children is a lure; a drawing
card. It helps attract and
keep desperately needed
young instructors when
they are in their reproductive years. Besides, everyone needs a bonus—if Ubyssey editors will receive $500
monthly, for 60 hours a
week, shouldn't we get
something for having to go
home to a prof each day after
lectures?
Geoff Garshore - arts 4
Ken Friesen - arts 3
UBC students
can't afford
condoms
This letter is written in
response to the September
15,1987 front page Ubyssey
article entitled A Trojan
special: free condoms for all.
I strongly object to the
use of $1,450.00 of our AMS
fund to purchase 10,000
Trojan brand condoms
which were thrown to bystanders from the Trojan
horse last September 11,
1987. Tim Bird, one of the
horse's masterminds, was
quoted as saying: "Many
people entering the university are often uneducated
and sheltered about safe sex
and it's the responsibility of
older students to educate
them". Bird's rationalization for this gimmick is not
worthy of my rebuttal.
The money used to purchase the condoms could
have paid for a student's
tuition fees and books. Alternatively, the money
could have been spent towards printing more informational brochures on
AIDS and hiring some students to distribute these
pamphlets throughout the
campus. Would not this
latter approach be more effective in promoting "safe
sex" and the awareness of
AIDS?
Perhaps the manufacturer of the condoms should
be made to pay for this publicity stunt. Better still, the
safe sex advocates and masterminds of the Trojan
horse, Tim Bird, Don Isaak,
and their cohorts should be
made to pay for those condoms.
Winston S. Sayson - Law 3
"Fun courses"
no joke
I was quite annoyed to
read the ill-informed comments in the September 9th
Ubyssey article "Fun
courses To Take." In particular, I refer to the description of Fine Arts 100, a
course which I took 4 years
ago.
The article claims Fine
Arts 100 to be one of the
easiest courses on campus,
when in fact the intellectual
level of Fine Arts 100 is well
above the average first or
second year survey.
Sure, the course is fun,
interesting, and well
taught. But easy it is not.
Those enrolling in Fine Arts
100 "to get credits without
doing any work" are in for a
surprise. As for the remark
"you'll do fine if you can
remeber Picasso was the
guy who drew like you did in
kindergarten"...well...
if an Art historian had a
nickel for every time he
heard that moronic cliche....
David Webber - arts 4
Ribbed rubbers
rile Carol again
It is incomprehensible to me that the sole
condom machine in the
women's washroom in SUB
contains nothing but ribbed
condoms. Ribbed condoms
are often uncomfortable to
the point of pain for the
woman, and they are definitely too thick for the male.
They are coated with too
much bad-smelling and
tasting lubricant and/or
spermicide. Not only that,
they are ugly, and have you
ever tried to commit fellatio
over one?
Clearly, the AMS
has tried to express its concern about the health and
reproductive freedom of the
student body by having this
machine installed. Condoms are indispensable
these days, and if people
forget their condom supply
at home, or run out of condoms while on campus, it's
necessary to have a quick
supply as close to hand as
possible, However, the AMS
has shown poor judgement
by providing a style of condom more unpleasant than
disease and death.
I have brought this
matter to the attention of
Jody Woodland, Vice-President of the AMS, but I don't
believe he took the problem
very seriously. One wonders which kind of condoms
Engineers favor. On the
other hand, I'm sure that
our sensual and beauteous
President would understand, agree with, and instantly do something about
my complaint. I'll tell her
about it the next time I find
her in her office.
Carol Pedlar - arts 4
Page 14
THE UBYSSEY
September 18,1987 Reader impressed with
Ubyssey editorial page
By JAMES H. STEIGER
I was really impressed with last
Friday's Ubyssey editorial page.
The lead editorial accused the
faculty of somehow perpetrating a
"scam" that would give their "already privileged" children an unfair advantage over hoards of
"unemployed parents...struggling
just to send their kids to college."
In the (unnamed) editor's view,
not only are these greedy faculty
afraid to come out of the "woodwork" to defend their ill-gotten
est-hit by "restraint" with a tangible benefit, which costs the university very little, and binds the
faculty closer to the university. It
makes it less likely that some good
young faculty members will leave
UBC for more remunerative positions elsewhere.
You know, I never thought of
faculty as "privileged." In fact, in
overall financial standing, they
barely edge into the middle class
range, sometimes students forget
that most faculty fail to earn above
Perspective
gains in a public "debate," but
the very "credibility" of the faculty
is also now at risk.
Such vivid imagery! Such penetratingly accurate stereo-types!
Imagine all those poor, struggling,
starving students, huddled
around a fire desperately trying to
keep warm, while the sleazy, cowardly faculty and their smug sons
and daughters dine on fine wine
and steak at the opulent faculty
club. Makes one downright furious. Maybe we should start a bonfire, like the peasants in "Frankenstein," and flush the cowards
out of hiding.
I'm glad the Ubyssey editors set
me straight. Imagine my ignorance. I was ready to side with
the faculty. I mean, UBC faculty
produce more research than the
faculty at UVic and SFU put together, and teach just as much,
andyetthey're paid no more, often
less. Didn't seem fair to me.
I thought the old guys were
starting to look a little demoralized, so tuition rebates seemed
like a really nice idea. They provide faculty in an age group hard-
a poverty level until they are
nearly 30. As a result, many faculty, even at age 45, have total financial resources roughly equivalent to those of a high school
teacher (who started earning a
substantial salary at a much
younger age).
But I guess I just wasn't looking
at things from the proper perspective.
Amazing how confused I was! I
thought faculty will only get back
about 45-55% of their childrens'
tuition, because the tuition rebate
is being treated as a taxable benefit. Indeed, it was a mystery why
the university chose to dilute this
benefit by administering it this
way. Now I realize the faculty kids
are really getting "a free ride" with
their tuition rebates. Thank goodness our editors do their research
carefully!
Did your editorial open my eyes!
I thought many large organizations offer their members special discounts on commodities
they produce. They do this to promote morale, and because it
makes   good   economic   sense.
Didn't seem like there was any
real difference between what they
were doing and the UBC rebates.
Consider two individuals, Bob
and Fred. Bob is a UBC professor,
Fred works at a Ford dealership.
Both have children attending
UBC, and both buy a new Thunderbird car. Bob gets a $1000 tuition rebate (after taxes). Fred gets
a $1000 discount on his Thunderbird, while Bob pays the normal
price. Fred uses his $1000 for his
child's tuition. Result? No difference whatever. Right?
Wrong! The editorial set me
straight. Tuition rebates are different, because university professors are different. They're
greedy, and tuition rebates are
"unfair." The editorial didn't explain why. Oh well, I'm sure you'll
explain it in next week's editorial.
Come to think of it, I'm going to
go picket Woodward's employees
immediately. Why should their
children be any more "privileged"
than mine? Why should they be
able to buy nice clothes at a 25%
discount?
You know, I just realized something. If the tuition rebate
awarded to faculty is immoral, so
is the increase in orthodontic benefits! The old system only covered
$800 for each child, while the new
contract covers $2000. Why should
faculty children, as an accident of
birth, have brighter and neater
smiles than children of the unemployed? This is an important
issue. We all know that in B.C., a
good smile is very important. Apparently, in some fields of endeavor, it can be even more important than intelligence, competence, or a good education.
—Jim Steiger is a psychology professor with a nice smile.
earl's
eat a little
eat a lot
4 blocks from UBC gates
party room available
lOth/trimble
222-1342
V, v ' s * $ s s $ $ $ s $ s $ $;^ i- p-
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CAMPUS CUTS
5736 University Blvd
The University of British Columbia
Frederic Wood Theatre
Presents
A Doll's House
by Henrik Ibsen
Directed by Charles McFarland
September 16-26
Special Previews - Sept. 16 & 17
2 for the price of 1 regular admission
Curtain: 8pm
Matinees :    Sat. 19th & Sat 26th - 2pm
Thurs 24th - 12:30 pm
Box Office • Frederic Wood Theatre • Room 207
Support Your Campus Theatre
U.B.C.
BOOKSTORE
'01 «
PENTEL
Poller 0PAQUING FLUID
p^n,wa' CORRECTION PEN
Oil base, quick dry, or
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Reg. $3.50
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SALE ENDS OCT. 16,1987
1
19
EACH
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BOOKSTORE
228-4741
DISPLAY YOUR
CHARACTER.
Kinko's self-service
typewriters and copy
creation centers give your
reports arid presentations
the clean and imprcisive
professional look they
deserve.
kinkcs
OKI   \ I ( < H'll S( ,KI   \ I  I'l-OI'l I
5"06 I  m\ ci mi \   Hl\ d.
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MTH 8 9 F 8 6 Sat 10 6 Sun 11 6
busy bee
ONE HOUR CLEANERS
20% DISCOUNT
Present your AMS student
card and receive 20%
off your dry cleaning.
(Not valid with any other
promotion and excludes
laundry & leather cleaning).
4480-2 West 10th Ave.
(at Sasamat)
PH.:  224-4212
September 18,1987
THE UBYSSEY
Page 15 Soviets voice dissent
from page 1
This warmth was particularly evident at the student
lodgings for the congress, where
Soviet medical students literally
worked around the clock arranging rooms and tours of Soviet
medical schools; a music evening
with local student jazz and rock
groups (which special conference
delegates Stephen Stills and
David Crosby crashed at three
a.m.); tickets for the Bolshoi Ballet; and, most importantly, several
opportunities for lengthy conversations  with  the   students   and
their classmates.
It would be inaccurate to say
that we communicated satisfactorily about the real details of disarmament issues with these students. It was particularly difficult
to elicit critical opinion of the
Soviet system from them. However, we occasionally discovered
vocal dissent from state doctrine.
One Soviet woman, Revina, dis
missed Pravda and other Soviet
journals as "official party positions - not the truth...".
Language and cultural differences were obstacles, as was
time a constraint. Nevertheless,
opinions were expressed, differences found, debates engaged in,
friendships formed (vodka drunk!)
and addresses exchanged. Most
Soviet students we met had a
fervent desire to be understood
more thoroughly by Westerners.
Also, a great sense of urgency regarding nuclear disarmament and
other global issues was present in
the minds of many of the students
we met.
Of course, much of this contact occurred within a political
structure - from the Communist
youth groups right through to the
Politburo - which is intolerant of
organized departure from state-
detemined orthodoxy. That was an
immense cloud which hung over
our discussions and complicated
all of our interactions. However, it
by no means rendered them meaningless. Each person we met
"humanized" the Soviet Union for
us, providing a new window
through which to view its problems and struggles.
Conversely, the encouragement we gave to Soviet medical
students to voice their concerns
about their society and its actions
perhaps can exploit the changes
which, if not taking effect yet as
the street-wise Vlada lamented,
can perhaps occur in the near future.
Our trip was possible through
generosity of the Walter H.
Gage Memorial Fund; UBC
Alumni Fund; UBC Faculty of
Medicine, Dean's Office; and the
BC Chapter of IPPNW.
On Tuesday, Sept. 22, at 12:30
p.m., in Woodward Lecture Hall
#6, we will give a slide show of our
trip. Everyone welcome.
Come hear
-Rice Broocks-
• Speaks to NFL & NBA teams
• Author
• T.V. show co-host
• Popular campus speaker
September 22,23,24, & 25
in
Woodward 4 at 7:00 p.m.
Sponsored by the Maranatha Christian Club     Phone 228-8554
8 FREE BURGERS
AT
STUDENTS ONIY
Details at the Fogg n' Suds
Campus nearest you.
Fairview Fogg  Fogg on Fourth Fogg on the Bay
Broadway & Cambie Kitsilano English Bay
872-3377 732-3377 683-2337
SORORITIES OF UBC
MAKE THE MOST OUT
OF U.B.C. THIS YEAR!
- Meet new people
- Enjoy the parties
- Exchanges with fraternities
- Participate  in  charity fundraising  &
volunteer in community
- Intramural sports and activities
- Develop and exercise leadership skills
- But most of all in a sorority you will
form special friendships that will last a
lifetime
Come see what we're all about:
Sunday tours: Sept. 20th 10 am
at International House
For more information call:
Carey     - 266-2169
Cynthia - 986-2540
Janice   - 732-0471
UBC AQUATIC CENTRE WEIGHT TRAINING
PROGRAMS
UNIVERSITY FITNESS - Monday thru Friday 2:45-4:15pm
Do you like to exercise without the crowds? Then try the
UNIVERSITY FITNESS session at the UBC Aquatic Centre. A
supervised weight room, sauna and steam room are available.
Open to Public Adults, UBC STAFF STUDENTS AND FACULTY.
COST IS $1 PER VISIT OR BUY A FITCARD at $12 for 15 visits.
(Main pool and whirlpool not available)
INTRODUCTION TO WEIGHT TRAINING
Topics in practical and theoretical sessions include: weight
training myths, strength vs. endurance, terminology, use of equipment, proper technique, injury prevention, program design,
muscles and their actions, and physiological differences between
sexes.
INTERMEDIATE WEIGHT TRAINING
Topics include a review of basic weight training principles
and use of equipment, introduction to advanced weight training
principles and exercises, discussion of the different training
programs, designing programs for specific sports, isolation
exercises and how to get the most from a workout.
Introduction/Intermediate Weight Training
$20 for 2, 2 hour sessions on consecutive Monday evenings
5:30-7:30pm
Sept. 28 - Dec. 2/87 and Jan. 11 - Mar. 30/88
Page 16
THE UBYSSEY
September 18,1987

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