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The Ubyssey Nov 29, 1985

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Array THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXVIII.No.24
Vancouver, B.C. Friday, November 29,1985
228-2301
UBC deficit climbs to $707,000
By STEPHEN WISENTHAL
Murphy's law has hit UBC's
already tight budget with a $600,000
run of bad luck this week, UBC's
financial and administration vice-
president said Thursday.
Bruce Gellatly said increased
heating and insurance costs and a
decrease in expected interest income
have raised UBC's budget deficit to
at least $707,000 from an earlier expected shortfall of $129,000 which
was to be made up by careful
money management.
He said the university has to bring the deficit to zero by April 30,
1986, the end of the current fiscal
year because provincial law forbids
universities to run deficits.
The Universities Council of B.C.
is still holding $940,000 in funds for
all three B.C. universities, said
Gellatly, adding he hopes "there
would be some of that" for UBC.
Funds are expected to be allocated
next month, he said.
He refused to speculate where the
savings to cover the larger shortfall
might come from, saying the recent
Godiva protested
setbacks had "all emerged in the
last two or three days "
"We've got to restrain expenditures in some ways," he said.
Gellatly cited these recent
changes in UBC's financial position:
• $330,000 in revenue lost in a
projected fall of interest income on
short term investments to $2.87
million from $3.2 million. Interest
rates are averaging 8.:5 per cent instead of the 10 per cent expected,
said Gellatly.
• $128,000 in increased casualty
insurance premiums covering fire
and accidental injuries or property
By DEBBIE LO
The annual engineering
undergraduate society lady Godiva
ride is "innappropriate" at a
university said the applied science
dean Thursday.
Axel Meisen said he has very little
authority to stop the EUS from
holding the event but added he has
tried to persuade the EUS to end
the February ride during engineering week.
UBC president David Strangway
has the ultimate authority to impose
any threat on the EUS to stop the
event but was away in Victoria
Thursday and unavailable for comment.
A group of concerned UBC
students have formed a coalition
against the ride because it is "offensive to some individuals and the
UBC community," said horacio de
la cueva, teaching assistants union
president.
But the engineering
undergraduate society president
says the coalition probably won't
succeed unless people within
engineering desire change.
"I would like to commend the
people (the coalition) for getting involved, but I don't think it will do
any good," said Nelson Borch. "It
will do more harm than good."
The coalition, formed in early
November, hopes to gather early
support to stop the ride and has
already contacted the applied
science dean and the EUS.
The coalition presented a motion
at the Wednesday students council
meeting, urging the AMS to
discourage the EUS from holding
the ride by threatening to suspend
their SUB booking privileges for
one year as a penalty, tkit it was
defeated.
Agriculture council representative Hedda Walter, one of the five
council members who supported the
motion, said it was important for
council to take a stand on the issue
which "degrades" women and stop
the ride now. Only 14 out of the 29
voting   members   present   at   the
meeting voted on the motion.
Dean Meisen said there is
evidence that the Godiva ride
discourages some women from
entering the faculty.
The first woman president of the
Ontario association of professional
engineers, Claudette MacKay-
Lassonde, who will take office in
April told the Globe and Mail
recently women's problems in
engineering are not due to problems
with math but are caused by both
subtle and obvious discrimination
by men. She cited engineering student newspapers as an obvious example.
She said the newspapers unconsciously screen women from
entering the profession.
The ratio of males to females in
engineering at UBC has risen from
zero per cent in 1970 to fifteen per
cent in 1985.
The UBC coalition plans to hold
a forum on the Godiva ride in
January to encourage student input
on the issue.
**"**
^•fc-^^X^to**
damage. The deductable on the insurance has increased to $25,000
this year from $10,000 last year as
well, said Gellatly.
• At least $120,000 from increased fuel costs because B.C. Hydro
has cut off UBC's natural gas supply as allowed by their contract with
the university.
Chuck Rooney, physical plant
director of plant operations, said
the "interruptable gas" is normally
cheaper for the university but in this
period of cold temperatures and
high demand for gas, the university
is burning oil with a $15,000per day
net cost increase. Oil costs twice as
much as gas, he said.
wWuijurt8MIS&
By yesterday, the eighth day of
"interrupted" gas, the university
had spent an extra $120,000 but
Rooney said with the cold spell not
expected to end until next Monday
at the earliest, the bill will certainly
go much higher.
"I expect that we won't get our
gas back until the weather breaks,"
he said.
The eventual state of the university's heating budget depends on how
the rest of the winter goes, he said.
Gellatly said he will continue to
"look at money we might be able to
get back."
"There is still a lot of uncertainty," he said.
— steve wou photo
REV US UP to warp six Scottie; the Klingon is gaining on us; cries Capt. Kirk, left. Klingon battlecruiser has new
frictionless nylon hull to make catching the Enterprise easier but it is only fitted with half the arm-aments.
Youth tell shocking tales from around world
OTTAWA (CUP) — Sixty kids
from thirty war-torn countries have
a lot of awful stories to tell. But one
of the most shocking comes from
the good old U.S. of A.
"East Harlem is a place where
people are really angry," said Nancy Veintidos, 17, who's lived there
her whole life. "You've gotta
always be really alert to what's happening around."
She lives in a 100-year-old tenement building, where the heat and
hot water work for a week, then
stop working, and then work again.
Nancy is one of 60 youth between
ages 13 and 19 who are touring
Canada to tell high school students
and others at church, synagogues
and community centres about their
lives and homes. Many of theyouth
had to lie to their governments
about   what   they   are   doing   in
Canada in order to get: safely out of
and back into their countries.
The International Youth for
Peace and Justice Tour, organized
through the Hillel Jewish students
society at McGill University in
Montreal with funding from the
federal Youth Secretariat and other
sources, spent three months
assembling the youth who arrived at
Mirabel airport last week. The
youth are from Sri Lanka, the
Philippines, South Africa,
Lebanon, the West Bank, Cambodia, Vietnam and Afghanistan
among other places.
Nancy continued her story. "My
aunt has gotten her jaw knocked
out by her husband right now," she
said. "We've gotten robbed a few
times."
Each    of   the    family's   three
B-lot theft reaches organized proportions
By MORGAN BURKE
A recent theft in B-lot has prompted one UBC professor to suggest organized thieves may be roaming
campus parking lots looking for valuable or hard-to-
find car parts.
Geography professor J. Lewis Robinson said the left
rear wheel and tire of his 1981 Pontiac Phoenix car
were stolen on the evening of Nov. 9. It may have been
the work of an organized group, working on consignment he said, after he found out the difficulty of obtaining another tire of the same make. In addition to
the tire and wheel, the nuts were stolen, but the hubcap
was left behind, said Robinson.
"Why my car? Why not a valuable wheel and new
tire? — Mine was neither," added Robinson, whose
car was parked in B-lot at the time of the theft.
Al Hutchinson, UBC Traffic and Security Director,
had no knowledge of organized thefts from vehicles in
UBC lots. Due to delays in installing lighting in b-lot,
patrols in those areas have increased, he said, adding
possibly because of this, the number of reported car
thefts have* generally declined recently. The additional
patrols were begun in mid-October and start at 4:30
p.m. every evening, said Hutchinson.
A university RCMP spokesperson knew nothing of
such thefts, adding crime of this nature is not a problem in Vancouver.
Professor Robinson encourages students to report
anything unusual to UBC Traffic and Security immediately. "If you see someone in the parking lots apparently changing a tire, watch carefully lo see whether
in fact they are stealing a wheel," he said.
children is from a different father,
but only one of her stepfathers still
visits, and sometimes to beat up her
mother. Nancy has never met her
own father.
"The pressure doesn't really let
up," Nancy said.
Frank Khasu, 18, lives in exile in
Namibia. He will be arrested immediately if he goes back to his
native South Africa.
When he was 16, Frank, who is
black, led his classmates in a
boycott of their high school.
"We went into the school and
broke the windows," Frank said.
Twenty-five students were expelled
from school and arrested. Frank
was in jail for four days.
"The policemen beat us up," he
said. "They said we should tell
them who got us to organise the
boycott. But no one did."
The students were angry because
the texts from which they learn are
less advanced than those of white
students.
Just before his court date, Frank
fled South Africa. Now he's studying at an African National Congress
(banned South African party)
school in Namibia. He has not seen
or spoken with his parents in two
years.
Justice Kagnwa, a 20-year old
from Zimbabwe, has a more
positive story. He works as a
regional youth co-ordinator for the
Catholic Youth Association in
Bulawayo, the second largest city in
Zimbabwe.
The project he started involves 20
boys and 12 girls. Kangwa found
the abandoned factory and put
them in business.
"All these different groups are
working in the factory," he said.
"The boys are producing coffee
tables, beds. The metal workers are
making gates, posts and studs. The
girls are making dresses, baby
clothes and crochets. Now they
have three electric sewing
machines."
Each participant gets about $20 a
month.
Yali Hashash from Israel, 17, just
graduated from high school. In
three months she's going into the
army. Service is compulsory: two
years for girls, three for boys.
"It's not exactly a pleasure but
it's a necessity," Yali said. "It's
something that's needed for Israel
to survive. A lot of times, duties are
not pleasant."
Asked if she was having a good
time in Canada, Yali said "Great!
Splendid! Wonderful!
"Just take all the adjectives in the
dictionary and put them together,"
she said.
The tour will split into three
groups to comb Canada. Participants will visit Montreal Nov.
25-27. In Ontario, they will be in
Hamilton Nov. 28, Sudbury, Nov.
29-30, Kitchener-Waterloo Nov. 29,
North Bay Dec. 1 and 2, Kingston
Dec. 2 and 3, and Ottawa Dec. 4
and 5.
In B.C., the groups will be in
Penticton and Nanaimo Nov. 27,
Port Alberni Nov. 28, Castlegar
Dec. 1, and in North Vancouver
Dec. 5. . Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
P.M. guilty of double-think
Friday, November 29, 1985
OTTAWA (CUP) — Brian
Mulroney took tips from George
Orwell's double-think philosophy
when he said no to official participation in the Strategic Defense
Initiative but let university researchers and businesses compete for
contracts, say peace protestors.
Police arrested 27 peace activists
in front of external affairs offices on
Nov. 18. The demonstrators, who
opposed SDI, were charged with
mischief and creating a disturbance.
"There's no doubt that Prime
Minister Mulroney's statement on
Sept. 9 was very Orwellian. When
he said no, he really said yes," said
Ken Hancock of Toronto.
"What does no to Star Wars
mean? It means yes to businesses
... it means yes to university
reseachers on campuses. It's like
saying war is peace," said Richard
Sanders of Ottawa.
Sanders said the demonstration
challenged the government's ambiguous stand — "We want a real
no. We want Mulroney to actually
do what he says. We're judging the
government by their actions, and
their actions say yes to Star Wars,"
he said.
Hancock said the demonstrators
turned to civil disobedience because
discussion with external affairs officials yielded nothing.  "We had
tried everything possible, but
they've forfeited that relationship,
not us," he said.
Sanders' mother was also arrested, as well as another family of
three, a father, a mother, and their
12-year-old daughter.
The protesters, from Ottawa,
Montreal, Toronto, Kingston, and
Peterborough, face a court date
next summer. However, they say
the trial may turn to their advantage, as they hope to call Mulroney
and external affairs minister Joe
Clark to the stand.
"We want them to defend
themselves. We want to put them
on trial," Sanders said.
The demonstration pointed out
ironies in the arms race, Sanders
said. "We put our finger on the crux
of a contradiction. We're being
charged and punished while the
government participates in a programme that may destroy the
world."
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321-7144 Friday, November 29, 1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Council to promote Rhino proposal
By DEBBIE LO
After a short discussion council
defeated a motion to penalize the
engineering undergraduate society
by suspending their SUB booking
privileges one year for holding the
annual Godiva ride.
The coalition for ending the
Godiva ride, a group made up of
UBC student's women and men,
asked council to discourage the
EUS from holding the annual event
during engineering week, in
February which has in the past
displayed a woman naked or scantily clad while riding a horse to represent lady Godiva through campus.
The number of council members
who voted for the motion more
than equalled the number of people
voting for or against, five and nine
respectively, together.
Horacio de la cueva, teaching
assistants union president made a
presentation on the motion the
event should be stopped because it
is "sexist" and is an "illegal act of
public nudity."
AMS vice-president Jonathan
Mercer asked de la cueva, "has
tradition been taken into account?"
Coalition member Kyong-ae Kim
said the council was showing a
"very conservative."
"It was a tradition that women
didn't vote at one time," she said.
EUS president Nelson Borch
commended the coalition for bringing the issue to council. "It's nice to
get students involved," he said. "It
(the motion) would have done more
harm than good."
»    »    *
Council appointed AMS director
of administration Simon Seshadri
and president Glenna Chesnutt as
executive members to the university
athletic council. Don Holubitsky,
Bob Gill and Brenda Chan were appointed as the student representatives to the athletic council.
The council, which was approved
by the board of governors at their
September meeting, was set up to
allow student input into the
athletics budget at UBC after the
board unilaterally imposed the $32
per student athletic fee last spring.
Science representative Dave Kary
warned council not to appoint student representatives to the council
because written agreement with the
administration on the role of the
athletic council has not been reached yet.
*    *    »
After about 40 minutes of discussion council supported a motion to
aid Rhinoceros party agent Blair
Longley, in seeking endorsement
for his plan to aid students through
the election act and related tax
credit ammendments. He is asking
the public to allow the Rhinoceros
party to spend their party donations
for projects, such as tuition fees, on
their behalf and recieve the money
back as a tax deduction.
Director of finance Jamie Collins
said he could not believe council
supported the motion. "I think it is
a big scam," he said. "It is a conspiracy to defraud the government
and there are no securities for the
proposal." He added he thought
council supported the motion
because Longley was an entertaining speaker.
Science council representative
Don Mustard said the proposal is a
useful way to help students who
don't use the political body.
Socialize for books
An Alma Mater Society Committee wants students to get blitzed for
books.
The External Affairs Committee
(EXAC) is holding a bzzr garden to
raise money for UBC libraries.
"We are doing this to rescue the
desperately impoverished and crippled UBC library system from the
merciless and cold-hearted Scrooge
provincial government," Duncan
Stewart, AMS external affairs coordinator, said in an interview
Thursday.
Stewart added, "we also want to
let people know that EXAC (the external affairs committee) exists and
is doing something significant."
EXAC is a work and study group
designed to assist the external affairs coordinator.
The event will not raise a great
deal of money — "under $500,"
said Stewart, "but the amount is
symbolic, showing that students are
doing their bit."
University head librarian, Doug
Mclnnes, said the libraries "could
definitely use the help."
Funds to the libraries this year
have not been cut, but they have
not increased either; meanwhile
material costs go up about eight per
cent a year said Mclnnes. "We will
be forced to reduce the level of our
purchases next year," he said.
Mclnnes said the libraries need a
major funding drive, "going after
sources from outside the University," and added they have received
support from the university for this
idea, but the administration has not
determined how to go about such a
campaign.
Duncan Stewart said, "our
libraries are desperately underfunded and it's time for students to pitch
in and help the library buy books."
The event will be held today in
SUB 205 from four to eight o'clock.
— morgan burke photo
PROVINCIAL LIBERAL LEADER Art Lee spoke to about 40 students in Buchanan B212 Thursday noon, on the
future of B.C. and its Liberal party. B.C. Liberals are confident in their party's ability to succeed in the next general
Provincial election said Lee, adding that B.C. residents are tired of the climate of political confrontation which exist in the province right now. Political polarization in B.C. has gotten out of hand, and a third party would add
much needed stability, said Lee.
Hormone  pregnancy drug  DES affects  users' children
OTTAWA (CUP) — Severe
health problems plaguing women
and men whose mothers took the
hormone drug diethylstilbestrol
during pregnancy are now being
found in greater numbers, says a
DES daughter and activist.
Although U.S. health advocates
have been warning against the drug
for fifteen years, Canada is still in
the dark about the damage DES has
done, said Shari Ritter of DES Action Ottawa, a resource and education group.
"We don't know how many people have been affected. That's why
we are here," she said.
While up to seven million
American women may have had
DES prescribed to them, the
number of Canadians affected is
unknown, Ritter said. She says
500,000 expectant Canadian
mothers took the drug,
diethylstilbestrol, to prevent
pregnancy problems such as miscarriages.
Although sales of DES to pregnant women were banned in 1971
after thirty years of use, DES is still
sold under 32 different brand
names. It is present in milk suppressants, morning-after birth control pills, and is widely used as a fat-
tener for farm animals.
Ritter said DEs has entered many
levels of the food cycle. "Everyone
is affected now."
Most DES sons and daughters
will not develop serious problems,
Ritter said. "We're not out to scare
people. We're out to tell them
about DES. We want them to know
about it," she said.
DES daughters run a slightly
higher chance of developing a rare
form of vaginal cancer, and face
miscarriages, prematui
ectopic pregnancies,
across the country, oth
helping. Health an
Canada has publ
distributed pamphlet;
DES, and Studio D of
Film Board recently re
An Uncertain Legacy,
tary about the drug ai
quences.
e births and
Like    DES
er groups are
d    Welfare
ished   and
explaining
the National
leased DES:
a documen-
ld its conse-
sons, they also may encounter infertility and structural abnormalities in
their reproductive organs. Men may
also develop testicular cancer, Ritter said.
"It's hard to speculate, but we do
know there's also a higher incidence
of breast cancer for mothers," Ritter said.
While DES Action continues
educational  work   in  major cities
DES Action also received funding this fall from the Ontario
government to establish a DES
registry of mothers, daughters, and
sons. The heavy response has
shown the problem may be more
widespread than originally thought,
Ritter said.
"In just two months, 600 people
signed up. That says something,"
she said.
Carleton houses roaches
OTTAWA (CUP) — Cockroaches have found a comfortable
home in Carleton University's residence commons kitchen despite attempts by Saga food staff to evict them.
Dave Cole, a Carleton student living in residence, said lie met his
first cockroach while serving himself salad in the residence kitchen.
"1 felt this thing climbing up my arm and looked down and it was
a coackroach," he said.
Staff at Saga foods who refused to be identified said they've also
noticed an increase in the number of coackroaches. One Saga
employee said cockroaches have been sighted floating in the heating
tubs that keep food warm.
"1 remember one time when I was filling a plate and a cockroach
ran right across the counter. I almost died, 1 was so embarrassed,"
said the employee.
The cockroaches are frightening other more squeamish staff away
from the kitchens at night.
"I walked into the dish room one night to bring in some dirty
dishes and 1 turned on the light and saw four or five scampering
across the floor . . . One girl told me not to go in when it was dark
because it was 'creepy' and that's when they breed," said another
Saga staffer.
Four drunks assault SUB proctor
A Student Union Building proctor was attacked by an unidentified
man early Saturday outside' the
elevator on SUB's main floor.
Dennis Ackland-Snow said
Thursday he suffered a separated
shoulder and chipped bone when he
was knocked down by an unknown
assailant Saturday at 1:30 a.m. He
was taken to hospital in an ambulance and will have his arm in a
sling for six weeks.
He said he asked four people to
leave the building at closing time
but one them started urinating in a
garbage can outside the elevator.
Ackland-Snow tried to stop the
man but he said "the next minute I
was lying on the floor with a
dislocated shoulder."
He said the SUB security team
chased   after   the   four   but   was
unable to catch them.
UBC RCMP corporal Williams
said Thursday they had no leads in
the attack.
Student administrative commission secretary Martin Cocking said
the SUB security team and a
bouncer from the Pit pub will now
head up to the main floor around
the Gallery Lounge at 1:30 a.m.
every night to ensure the building is
cleared safely.
Acting proctor Sean MacDon-
nell, who was hit by a drunk bar
patron in SUB a year ago, said this
latest attack is the third one on a
proctor in three years.
"Normally we don't have any
trouble at all," he said, but "as
long as you have booze in the
building you're going to have trouble." Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, November 29, 1985
South African students fight apartheid
By BRENDAN WESTON
reprinted from the McGill Daily
Canadian University Press
Kate Phillip came home on July
22 to find her apartment ransacked,
it was the first day of the state of
emergency in South Africa and
Phillip was only one of many white
activists sought out by South
African police.
Phillip is an editor with the South
African Student Press Union
(SASPU) and the 1984/85 president
resistance. "We've been the only
organization banned since the state
of emergency, which reflects the
level of militancy. Furthermore,
more than half of all prisoners are
from NUSAS, and several student
leaders, such as Sipho Mutsi and
Nunu Kheswa, have recently died in
detention.
Daily: Could you describe education in South Africa?
Phillip: Well, first of all, it's
segregated.   As   official   policy,
Most Blacks receive no education
before the age of eight because the
authorities say there is no room.
Daily: Could you explain the
prefect system?
Phillip: The principal chooses
students to enforce the rules for
privilege, but students want student
representatives. The first strategy
was to ask the principal. That failed. Next they tried to form parent
committees. That failed too. Finally
they organized a boycott, and over
of the National Union of South
African Students (NUSAS).
She is currently on a tour of
Quebec speaking to Canadian
students about the role of students
in the struggle against apartheid.
Phillip visited the McGill Daily
before her speech at Concordia
University to talk about the student
anti-apartheid movement in South
Africa.
Daily: How does NUSAS fit into
the student movement in South
Africa?
Phillip: NUSAS is one of three
progressive student organizations in
South Africa. It is non-racial, but
based on white students. AZASO,
the Azaian Student Organization is
composed of Black university
students, while the Congress of
South African Students is based on
Black high school students. All
three are allied in support of the
United Democratic Front, on the
basis of its freedom charter, the
policy document of the (outlawed)
African National Congress.
Daily: What is the role of
students in South Africa's struggle
for progress?
Phillip: It has in many circumstances been student protest
which has been the catalyst in the
Whites are trained for power
privilege, management and professional positions. Blacks are trained
purely for roles as a cheap labour
pool. Ex-Prime Minister J. Allister
was quoted as saying "What's the
point of teaching Blacks math when
they'll never get a chance to use it in
the workplace?"
Daily: What are the demands of
students, as put forth in the Education Charter Campaign?
Phillip: We want all schools and
workers to discuss what education
should be and to draw up a charter
which is both non-racial and
democratic, so all people learn skills
to serve society as a whole, and not
just private industry.
In the short term, we want the
right to democratic association, and
an end to corporal punishment. According to a Soweto survey, several
students are admitted to hospital
every week after corporal punishment. We want access to textbooks,
where now there is often only one
text per hundred students, and no
pens, desks, or blackboards. We
want an end to sexual harassment,
where students no longer face expulsion if they fail to submit to
rape, or pregnancy if they do. And
we want better access to education.
one million students have been participating.
Daily: But effective opposition is
met with increased repression.
Phillip: In January, 1985, during
a student mass meeting in a
schoolyard, the principal called the
police. They drove a landrover into
the crowd, crushing 13 year-old
Emma Sathege to death against the
gates. The NUSAS secretary, Jabu
Khumalo, was found shot and kicked to death by police.
Daily: How are boycotts a more
successful tactic?
Phillip: During boycotts students
organize political education classes
on campus to teach the history of
the South African liberation movement, and other struggles. For
many students the only future with
the present government is as one of
the 50 per cent unemployed or as
exploited labour. Many leave to
join ANC army school in Tanzania,
rather than accept a situation where
the average worker supports eleven
people on their wages.
The situation has. become a battleground. Police shoot on people
who boycott. There is a cycle of
funerals — an average of eight people per weekend, with around
50,000 people attending. Its virtual-
*/&******# (foe4,*£tvef
This Week
November 26-30
CATFISH
WILLY
1010 Beach Ave.
683-1993
J
ly the only form of legal protest
available.
Daily: It must be impossible to
report on these events amid such extensive legal and paralegal repression.
Phillip: In the Police Act it is an
offence to publish anything which
casts the police in a bad light. The
State of Emergency gives power to
the minister to limit publication to
what is released. It is an offence to
pass on any information on any act
by any member of the police until it
has been released, punishable by up
to ten years imprisonment. They
have complete indemnity.
On the first day of the state of
emergency, white activists were
targeted. My flat was ransacked,
but I wasn't there.
Daily: Haven't the laws always
been that repressive?
Phillip: It was never possible to
publicize all police actions, but
previously people could learn
through the reporting on trials.
Daily: We hear about new
cosmetic reforms to the system of
Apartheid, amid reports of mounting violence. Many people here are
struck by this apparent paradox.
Phillip: Repression and reform
go hand in hand. They aren't introducing reforms because they
want to, or because they believe
Apartheid is wrong. They introduce
reform purely due to economic and
political pressure from the Black
townships and the ANC. Of all the
reforms they've introduced, not one
has given one iota of political power
to the Black population.
Daily: Often we get the impression from our media that violence
in South Africa is random and out
of control.
Phillip: In the South African
Press you read that students burnt
the principal's car, and it appears
like excess violence. But the reason
is that for six months students had
been forced to contribute to a fund
for science equipment they couldn't
afford and which didn't appear. It
was discovered the principal had
taken the money to buy a car. In a
context where two-thirds of Blacks
kids under the age of three die of
malnutrition,  this anger must  be
AFRICAN NATIONAL CONGRESS LEADER NELSON
MANDELA . . . currently in prison,
considered a natural response.
Daily: Do you consider divestment an effective measure against
Apartheid?
Phillip: There is no question that
Apartheid is hurting the South
African government, and that the
majority support it (divestment).
During the three-day general strike
in November 1984, 85 per cent of
the people stayed out. But it's called
'economic sabotage' (in South
Africa) to support divestment
abroad.
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By JAMES YOUNG
Art must mock the men and
strategies that mutilate and kill
millions while others are poor and
without education or promise — the
result of the greedy and cynical division and distribution of the
resources of an otherwise bountiful
and forgiving planet.
George Manupelli: Dean of
Visual Arts, York University
Imagine you need to choose two
ambassadors to explain what on
earth is going on down here to the
inhabitants of some far off planet.
You might choose Jake and Suzy in
Theatre Parminou's production of
Peacing It Together.
Peacing it Together
Le Theatre Parminou
Gilmore Community School
50 S. Gilmore Avenue, Burnaby
Friday, December 6th 8:00 p.m.
Jake (Rejean Bedard) and Suzy
(Nicole-Eva Morin) are a pair of innocent babes in the woods dressed
in boy scout/girl guide-type gear.
They open the play expounding
their perception of the world as a
fairytale paradise. They take a
whirlwind tour which confirms this
idea, but a longer and harder look
reveals flaws underneath their postcard vision.
For starters, Jake and Suzy find
the planet, so obviously a single er-
tity, has been divided into four
parts: east, west, north and south.
This is skilfully depicted by using
the audience to represent the four
directions.
Travelling east and west they encounter two nasty, angry old men
who are supposedly not talking to
each other. The patriarchs are big,
puffed up, wear silly hats and
medals and trip into psychotic
episodes as they pontificate on the
philosophy they have created, based
on blowing up the whole world.
Then a couple of umbrellas appear and twirl around their heads as
one of these foolish old fellows explains how he will replace the cur
rent reign of terror with a defensive
system in space. With acrobatic
flights of logic and fancy, the old
man tells how the new "shield" will
allow the arch-enemies to get rid of
their new-fangled weapons (which
kill everyone forever) and get back
to the good old-fashioned types
(which only kill some of the people,
some of the time).
Returning to the "true north
strong and free", Jake and Suzy
don't find the peaceful country they
thought they knew. Their leader is
"cruising" with the nasty old man
who represents the west and trusted
companies which make baby
powder and toasters are also figuring out new and improved wasy of
killing people.
How Jake and Suzy cope with
their new understanding of the
world is the reason you should see
Peacing it Together. In case you
haven't already guessed, Peacing it
Together is a play with a message, a
message which could become didactic and depressing. But that it
avoids this problem, that it succeeds
in finding so many occasions for
laughter and slapstick, is no small
accomplishment.
The acting is fast-paced and the
transitions as Jake and Suzy
become world leaders seem effortless and logical. The bare
minimum of props is ingenious and
perhaps necessary for Parminou's
tour of Western Canada, where the
play typically stays only a day or
two in each city. A rope serves at
various times as a telephone,
nuclear arsenal, a tight rope and a
compass.
PAGE
Ned's pals sing Elvis
By MARY McALISTER
The Savoy was almost empty at 9
o'clock on Tuesday night. Oh well,
so we didn't have to run 10 blocks
in the snow to try to beat the cover
charge — a few hot toddys made up
for it. Besides, any true fan of The
Handsome Neds shouldn't have to
pay a cover charge, right? Well
they did trickle in — the band that
is — and finally got on stage at
10:30.
The Handsome Neds are, well I
wouldn't say handsome, although
Ned himself is cute in a baby face
kind of way, but they are enthusiastic about what they're doing.
And what they're doing is country
music, hillbilly style.
If you like some of the less
popular songs of Elvis and Johnny
Cash, you'd probably like this band
from Toronto. Toronto? From the
way Ned kept going on about the
weather you'd think he'd never seen
snow. But things warmed up when
the band started playing to a small
but receptive audience. Yes, toes
were tapping but I think half of the
people there were old friends of
Neds. Even Aunt Martha from Surrey showed up.
Handsome did lead vocals and
acoustic guitar. I got pretty worried
when he started dancing. I thought
he was going to get tangled in the
cords and fall into his mug of beer.
Back in the shadows was J. D.
Weatherstone on drums.
Guitarist Steve Koch looked
thoroughly bored with the whole
situation but managed an occasional "Oh ya baby baby." The
bass player Rene Frattura resembled Herman Munster with a string
tie. He was either enjoying an extended religious experience or was
pissed from his cowboy boots up.
The name of their new single is
"In Spite of the Danger." You too
can hear this song and see the
Handsome Neds tonight and
tomorrow night at the Railway
Club.
U-
Toots a real lover
chris cameron photc
By PETER BURNS
TOOtS I last Thursday you
brought us out of the snow and
away to Jamaica — thanks.
You also brought your friend
Yellowman with you, the Jamaican
DJ-turned rapper — turned
pseudo-singer, we'll talk about that
in a second.
It was an innocent enough beginning to the evening. Snow covered
Granville Street. Vancouverites
were busy ascertaining the implications of British Columbia's
notorious start to winter. As one's
breath hung sleepily in the air, the
warm red confines of the Commodore Ballroom almost sucked us
in to the belly of the old hall. Inside, gorgeous Rastafarian colors
welcomed the eyes. The smell of
spliff was more ominous than the
ghandja intensified air which usually prevades Commodore concerts.
Anyways, the atmosphere was there
and the fun started.
Yellowman delivered the
calculated rapping he's known for,
but his sexist viewpoints at some
stages annoyed a few members of
the audience. Playing coyly with
one particular woman in the audience, Yellowman brought his
newer breed of rap-reggae to an appreciative crowd, yet at the same
time paying as much attention to
her as to his music. In between a
simplified and condensed (sic) explanation of his views on AIDS, he
propositioned this woman and
launched into Strong Me Strong.
While his delivery bordered on sexism, the strangeness of this man's
charm was felt.
Yellowman is a black albino whose
sensitivity because of this condition
is probably more intense than the
average man, but to pour his efforts
into singing what a great lover he is
strikes a somewhat hollow chord.
Yellowman's delivery of rapp and
rhythmi: conversation over thick
phrases of music from the band succeeded in Oooh We and Mi Believe
but the crowd that came to dance
were waiting for Toots.
Toots brought a host of musical
influences with him and showed off
their lineage and his in a fun set of
rock steady reggae. In his annual
visit to Vancouver, Toots and his
young, revamped Maytalls showed
that longevity is achieved by love
for the music and love for the peo
ple. "I love black people ... I love
white people, tonight we come
together in the spirit of happiness
and love ... I love you all — love
each other."
Cliche you might protest,
however, when Toots delivered this
midway through his set, the sense of
conviction and humanity in his face
told that he meant it. He backed his
convictions with energy and intensity in songs like Reggae Got Soul
and Hallejullah. 54-46; That's My
Number which was Toot's prison
number, revealed Toots' experience
in a Jamaican jail busted on a dope
charge and the anguish of life in
confinement.
Monkey Man kept everyone dancing; happy rhythms helped dispell
the cold outside in charged versions
of Louie, Louie and other fun
pieces.
It really was uplifting music that
left everyone beaming and laughing
out of the Commodore that cold
Thursday night — when Toots
finished his third encore at 12:30
a.m., a tired but satisfied crowd
had been exhausted of all negative
energies — the fun was over, yet the
fun really had just begun . . .
shari bte. abdllah photo By CAROLYN SALE
he Stratford'Festival has
a flair for comedy. Of the
two plays the troupe is
performing on its first
American tour, the production of
Twelfth Night has more spark and
vitality than of King Lear. The
company takes to Shakespearean
comedy like Vancouverites to the
beaches in summer. The actors
thrive on Shakespeare's humour and
deliver his wit as if the words are of
their own clever invention, cheekily
delighting in themselves.
Nichlas Pennel's performance of
Malvolio was superb. Malvolio's
mere arrival on stage is sufficient to
generate a burst of laughter. His
sleep disturbed by the drunken midnight revels of Sir Toby Belch and
the foolish knight Sir Andrew
Aguecheek, Malvolio appears at the
rear of the stage, ready to descend
upon the pair in anger, the audience
greets the night-capped and robed
figure with mirth to which Malvolio
responds with preening.
Pennel creates a bond betweo
the actors and the audience that
uses    to    arouse    empathy    fc
Malvolio.   When  the  man  stand
destroyed in front of the whole ci
at the play's end, the audience «yn
pathizes   with   the   plight   of   tl
bureaucratic prig.
The strength of Pennel's perfo
mance draws the audience into
darker side of Shakespeare's con
edy.    In    sympathizing    wit
Malvolio, the audience must que-
tion the motives of those who sha'
tered   his   dream   of   obtaining
Olivia's love along with his sell
illusions.    The   plot   successful
reveals the undertones of darkness
implicit in Twelfth Night, without
losing any of the lightness of tK
comedy.
Unfortunately, the companv
seems unable to achieve an equalh
powerful effect on its audience in
the tragic arena. Like befuddle
Vancouverites imposed with a col
der than normal winter, they an.
not quite sure how to deal win
tragedy. The group seemed almost
uncomfortable with the depth ot
emotion King Lear calls upon them
to portray.
The    play    depicts    a    corrup'
violent    world,    a    world    when,
children will betray parents, throw
filial devotion and love to the wincU
to seize power. To feel and unders
tand   the   torment   of   Lear   and
Gloucester,   the   audience   has   t '
share vicariously in the physical an
emotional violence to which the
children subject them.
Lear's daughter, Regan, played
by Maria Ricossa is unconvincing as
a sadistic bitch. Ricossa, shied awav
from    Regan's    nastiness;    consequently her performance, and thi
play as a whole suffers the gouginu
of Gloucester's eyes by  Regan
perhaps  the  singularly  least  ade
quate scene in the play, for not on
does Regan perform the deed as if r
were  no  more than  a hard  slap
across the face (which would indeed
have  had  more  impact   than  tra
wimpish tearing out of his eyes) but
Gloucester gives us no indication
that   the   deed   causes   him   anv
physical pain.
Cordelia has very little time on
stage so, necessarily, the actress
must endear herself quickly to the
audience to make it aware that
Lear's youngest daughter, at least,
truly loves him. Seana McKenna
treats the scene where Cordelia
panics over what to say to her
father to assure him of a lovi.
greater than that of her false sister -
almost flippantly. She displays n<>
anguish over her dilemma. Her in
ability to express herself loses her a
father.
The production lacks in dramatic
force: it is competent but hardly
brilliant. The cast leaves Douglas
Campbell as Lear stranded, his portrayal of Lear potentially would br
ing the audience to tears with tlu
right background support. But ons
man cannot sustain the tragedy ot
King Lear on his own, no matte
how powerful his characterization
Page Friday 2
Nicholas Pennel, who takes the
part of Lear's fool, attributes the
drawbacks of the production to the
director John Hirsch's stark vision.
The audience is overpowered by the
immensity of the set, and unfortunately the actors let themselves be
dwarfed by it. They make no struggle to command the space of the
stage to parallel their characters'
struggle to control the vastness of
their world, or at least, maintain
their control over their small portion of it.
Lear was not cathartic, but the
sheer delight of Twelfth Night
redeems the tour. All the players do
far more justice to their roles in
Twelfth Night especially Seana
McKenna as Viola Cesario. She
manages to capture the duality of
he role, swinging easily from the
playfulness and will required as the
young man Cesario, to the pain of
Viola, wooing another woman for
the man she loves.
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, Nover Canadian audiences?!
•'.*%*^ • <2*r**r
■%a*si^,*stS3P
^^P"
By LAURA BUSHEIKIN
\^f ast week, four enthusiastic UBC students bundled
I j|| up to go see Canada's premier theatre company,
mil the Stratford Festival, perform Twelfth Night and
I JlLdKing Lear. So they headed to Seattle.
Seattle?? Do Canadians have to go to the United
| States $b see Canadian theanrelft its best?
Yes. If any Western Canadians have seen the Strat-
Iford Festival in the last ten years, it hasn't been here at
home. The last time the Stratford Festival performed in
B.C. was 1975. The government prefers to send them to
such places as Moscow.
Even though the Stratford
Festival is coming within 150 miles
of Vancouver on their present U.S.
| tour, they aren't playing here. No
tour of western Canada is planned
for the foreseeable future. "It's
very  sad  that  we  aren't   touring
I Canada — that's what we really
ought to be doing," says Nicholas
[Pennel, one of Stratford's leading
(actors.
To tour Canada, the Stratford
| Festival must obtain funds from the
Canada Council, while the Department of External Affairs pays when
;:hey tour abroad. The Department
of External Affairs has a large coffer of funds, whereas the funding
for the Canada Council has been
frozen for some time. It appears
that the Government would rather
send our culture abroad than
showcase it at home.
It also appears that the
Americans are much more willing
| to take financial risks to bring Stratford to their cities: each of the six
I cities where Stratford is performing
is paying the Company a
guaranteed weekly fee. Stratford is
1 widely recognized as one of the best
theatre companies in the world, a
fact the Americans are more excited
I about than we are. There is
something profoundly wrong with
Canada's attitude towards its own
culture.
"Part of the reason for Stratford's undertaking this tour is the
-calization   that   their   ability
hri\e   rests   on "Spreading - an
.iwareness   of   themselves",   says
Rick Bectel, spokesperson for Stimp-
ion    \ssociated,   the   company
esponsible for bringing Stratford
o Seattle. "L.A. is the most impor
tant stop on the tour, because it is
such a big media centre — Stratford
feel they need the recognition that a
successful trip to L.A. would
bring," he continues.
Anyone who saw Margaret Atwood speak on Canadian literature
at UBC several weeks ago will be
familiar with the idea that Canadians must look outside of their
own country for recognition of
their own art. Perhaps once L.A.
has given Siratford its stamp of approval, Canadian institutions will
be willing to shell out some money
and take a risk to bring Canadian
theatre to Canadians.
Certainly the B.C. government
isn't willing to gamble on Canadian
culture. The Expo administration
initially invited both the Stratford
Festival and the Shaw Festival
(from Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario) to come perform at Expo. 1
They also invited England's Na-1
tional Theatre. However, the|
amount of money offered to support these invitations was, in the
words of Pennel, "ludicrous".
None of the three companies found
Expo's offer enticing. "On that sort
of budget we could maybe have
brought a bare two hander with no
set," says Pennel.
"1 can only assume the funding
was   mishandled",   Pennel   says.
"No major company could have af-1
forded to come — you certainly |
cannot bring Shakespeare on such a |
to 1 budget. We all wanted to come. §
»The festival was very committed to
'coming.   They  waited   past  three|
i deadlines and were bending over
backwards,   but  when   the   final
budget came out, it was out of the
i question. I'm surprised that no one
4; "■*
■#"".' *'■■ ■ ':^di'   ..■.- ,..--,...,.,.:,.<■,:"■■¥«■;„.,
at Expo planned ahead and thought
of arranging a tour before or after
the Expo performances, sort of like
what we are doing now with our
American tour".
Pennel is certain that the Stratford festival would fill the theatres
in Vancouver. Yet Brian Jackson,
former designer at Stratford, now
designer at Freddy Wood, UBC, is
not so sure. "Certainly there would
be a core of people who would go,
but Vancouver audiences are not
very adventurous ... I would
hesitate to use the word provincial,
yet ..." he lets his voice trail off.
Pennel is deeply concerned about
the degeneration of society's attitude towards the arts. "We are
facing a crisis in the arts and the
funding for the arts that is going to
escalate," he says. "Unless there is
some concerted effort on behalf of
both the federal and the provincial
governments, we are going to see a
situation in twenty or thirty years
where we'll be saying to the next
generation, 'I'm sorry but we let the
opera and the symphony and the
ballet and the theatre — the performing arts — go because we didn't
give them enough money to keep
them alive.'
"Quite rightly the majority of
people are worried about
unemployment, about putting food
on the table. But at the same time,
while people must have food on the
table, they must also have spiritual
food which the arts supply, because
otherwise, we'll be sitting next door
to a country that's spent so much
money on its defense budget that
we'll be under some kind of great
defense umbrella, but we'll be living
in caves with no culture at all. And
that is crazy.
"The English language is shrinking — every year three words are
lost. By keeping Shakespeare's alive
we are keeping alive the richness of
the English language. This is why I
have stayed at Stratford so long — I
believe strongly in the value of what
they are doing".
A sympathetic government policy
is crucial for the well-being of the
arts; "The Tories are notoriously
poor in funding for the arts", says
Pennel, "A more socialist orientated government is more likely to
give funds for the arts because of
the princile of saying that the arts
should be available for everyone —
not only the rich. This is a principle
that I strongly believe in.
"The Conservative government
are saying you've got to get more
money from the private sector.
However we can't always go on taking the bucket to the well because
one day the well will run dry.
"A clear cut arts policy has to be
put in place. There was not one in
the last federal election. There were
rumours about Canada Council and
CBC cuts, but none of us really
knew what was going to happen. If
there's a clear cut arts policy and
it's one the electorate don't agree
with, it's our democratic right to
say we don't agree with it."
Our cultural malaise is mirrored
in our educational system; whether
the sick chicken came before the rotten egg or vice-versa is uncertain.
An alarming number of students
graduate from high school semi-
literate and with a disregard for
culture instilled upon them by
mediocre teachers. Pennel has
taught in universities and is disturbed by what he sees: "Some of the
spelling is simply atrocious — even
in M.A. students," he says.
Jackson says: "So many people
won't go to see Shakespeare
because they were put off of him by
their teachers. The way
Shakespeare is taught in most
schools is terrible. The plays are
taught as dry academic artifacts,
rather than living pieces for the
theatre."
The four university students who
travelled to Seattle last week
managed to graduate from high
school without losing their yearning
for aesthetic sustenance, but they
find themselves in a world where
food for the spirit is increasingly
hard to find.
er29, 1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page Friday 3 Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, November 29, 1985
Support the 18
Ignore a problem and it will go away.
Not if the problem is Haida Indians fighting for their
aboriginal rights on an isolated island covered with
virgin timber.
Our esteemed premier and the Social Credit government are abusing the trust and privilege vested in a
governing party as they try to steamroll over the protesting Haidas on Lyall Island in the Queen Charlotte
Islands.
The issue is native land claims and preservation of irreplaceable natural environments. The Socreds want
to reduce it to an effort to preserve the right of fine
upstanding businesses to make money at all costs.
They appear unable to percieve any issue from a moral
or aesthetic standpoint. Could it be they consider
financial profit to be the singular moral imperative?
Against mounting pressure from almost every group
involved in the dispute, the Socreds are using the
judicial power they have to bludgeon sincere people
making a legitimate protest.
Nobody who values freedom and essential moral
principles can rightly avoid joining the call from all
three national parties and scores of other groups for a
cessation of the travesty being perpetrated by the
Socreds as they try to crush the Haida protesters.
Victory to the Lyall Island 18.
They mustn't be ignored any more.
Letters
CMMkCi THE TURKEY
Letters
AMS parties for books
One of the many committees of
the AMS is the external affairs committee. This committee is chaired by
the Coordinator of External Affairs, and the committee has several
important and interesting functions. Its most important function
is acting as the political wing of the
AMS. In all issues, ranging from
South African boycotts to government protests, EXAC plays the key
role.
However, not all of EXAC's activities are radical or confrontational. If you are interested in
preparing a research brief for the
provincial government on some
aspect of educational policy, then
EXAC is for you.
We can always use more
members of the committee, so if
you are interested consider yourself
invited to the External Affairs
BZZR Garden this Friday from 4-7
p.m. in SUB 205. This is not only a
get-acquainted session, it is also a
benefit for the UBC libraries.
All proceeds from the BZZR
garden   will   assist   the   financially
Petition not
UBC PC clubs
We're just a couple of UBC Progressive Conservative Club executives who would like to emphasize that our club has taken no
part (as an AMS club) in the anti-
Ubyssey petition being circulated
around campus.
The reason why we have taken
the trouble to make this emphasis is
that a small number of our club
members have involved themselves
in the circulation of the petition.
We heard this afternoon that one of
The Ubyssey staffers recognized
one of the petition distributors as a
member of P.C. Club.
These individuals, we wish to bring to The Ubyssey's attention, are
acting as UBC students, and not as
members of the UBC P.C. Club.
Russ Brown
second vice-president
Rob Murdoch
president UBC P.C.
strapped libraries in buying new
books. Come out and support your
External Affairs Committee as well
as the UBC library system.
Duncan Stewart
AMS Coordinator of
External Affairs
Survival good
On behalf of the First Year Student's Committee, we would like to
thank all of you who came to our
"Survival Dance." It was a huge
success! Any comments or suggestions you may have about the dance
or future dances would be appreciated by the committee. Please
address your comments to: FYSC,
Box 113, SUB, and leave them in
the AMS Business Office.
Remember, we are a committee
for you — the first year students.
You are more than welcome to join
our meetings which are held on
Thursdays, between 12:30 and 1:30
in SUB Room 260. Thank you
again for your support.
Jeffrey March
president
Karen Fong
Vice-President
We want your wonderfully wise
words of wovely wit written (typed
triple space on a 70 character line).
Please, no racist sexist or
homophobic stuff. The Ubyssey
maintains the right to edit for brevity and libel. Deadlines for letters
are noon on press day and are extremely painful.
AMS Christmas
Craft Fair
Nov. 25-Dec. 21
Mon.-Fri.
SUB Main Concourse
A Variety of Handcrafted,
Low-Cost Items
Come and Take A Look!
FANSHEN
a play by David Hare
directed by Jane Heyman
The story of how (he peasants of a remote
Chinese village built a new world
NOV. 29-DEC. 8
Tues.-Sun. 8 p.m.
(Sundays 2 for 1)
SPECIAL STUDENT RATES
Warning: some coarse language
RESERVATIONS
324-5227
Langara Campus, 100 W. 49th Ave.
THE UBYSSEY
November 29, 1985
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Friday throughout
the academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the Universi
ty of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff
and are not necessarily those of the administrataion or the
AMS. Member Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey's
editorial office is SUB 241k. Editorial department,
228-2301/2305. Advertising 228-3977/3978.
"The socialist hordes are at the gates!" yell Peter Burns and Morgan Burke "So let them in!" respond
Stephen Wisenthal and James Youny. Ronald Stewart, Lise Magee, and Jennifer Lyall walk in. "You
aren't the hordes,' exclan" Debbie Lo and Mary Mcalister; "What's a horde?" query Charlie Fidelman
and Laura Busheikin. Camile Dionne shrugs her shoulders while Dan Andrews and Caroiyn Sale
reclose the gates. "Will the hordes ever come?" ask Shan Bte   Abdullah and Chris Cameron.
RED LEAF
RESTAURANT
Luncheon Smorgasbord
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LICENSED PREMISES
VI,,,, Fri 11 30 4 00 (> rv.
CLOSED SATURDAYS
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GRADUATION
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Phone now for your complimentary sitting, free 4"x5" color photo,
choose from   18 previews (proofs)
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Please clip and send coupon to:
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75 University Avenue West
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N2L3C5 Friday, November 29, 1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 9
Cable TV is changing university sport
By KEN MAGOR
Ontario Bureau Chief
Canadian University Press
Where college football, basketball, hockey and other sports
regularly pack'em in the United
States, and millions more tune in on
television, Canadian collegiate
events tend to attract about as much
interest as a grade five field day.
While college classrooms are overcrowded, rinks, gyms and stadiums
remain mostly empty. Perhaps
that's fitting, since the Canadian
emphasis on academics is often
cited as a reason why collegiate
sports here don't create the kind of
excitement they do in the states,
where huge amounts of money are
spent on athletics programmes.
"Ten or 15 years ago, I walked
into a meeting of CIAU people and
put a cheque for $100,000 on the
table as downpayment for a
million-dollar contract. They laughed at me, they gave it to the CBC
for nothing."
CTV sports executive Johnny
Esaw uses his abbreviated negotiations with the Canadian Interuniversity Athletic Union for a
television deal as an example of the
often-backward state of collegiate
athletics in the Great White North.
"By all standards, the U.S. takes
a different view of college sports —
they look at it in a completely different way," says Esaw, familiar to
many Canadians as a veteran television sportscaster. "Universities in
Canada are just coming out of the
Dark Ages in sports in my
opinion."
Athletic officials in Canada are
beginning to change their approach.
Canadian universities can now offer
sports scholarships, the schools are
beginning to hire publicists trained
in sports marketing, and college
games are receiving more extensive
coverage than they ever had before
on Canada's new, all-sports pay TV
channel, The Sports Network
(TSN).
With the exception of a few
schools like the University of Victoria, whose basketball team (according to one sportscaster) is better promoted than many pro teams
in Canada, universities have spent
little time on effort generating interest in their games.
"The problem you have is that
the universities don't know how to
promote on campus," says TSN
sportscaster Peter Watts, a
graduate of Queen's University.
Watts is TSN's big man on campus
sports, broadcasting football,
basketball and hockey, and hosting
the weekly half-hour anthology,
Canadian College Magazine.
According to the CIAU's television coordinator, some of the institutions are doing just that. "The
universities are starting to understand how to market and how important marketing is, not only
regionally, but for their national exposure," says John McVagh.
When St. Mary's University in
Halifax was featured on a recent
TSN football telecast, athletics officials held a Banner Day to attract
high school students and promoted
the event on a local radio station.
The result was more people in the
stands, banners that livened the
telecast and a half-time show that
featured a parade of the banners
around the stadium.
At the same time, attendance at
Canadian college events has been
increasing steadily. CIAU
marketing director John Mc-
Conachie predicts attendance at
football games this season will
reach a record 500,000 — an increase of 100,000 over 1982 and
double the total for 1977. The
Vanier Cup national football championship has become a mini-
extravaganza and about 700,000
Canadians now tune in to watch the
annual event on CTV. The CIAU
hockey and basketball finals attract
television audiences of about
400,000 and 300,000 respectively.
"There's been a significant increase
in awareness (of college sports) in
the last five years," says Mc-
Conachie.
But football — traditionally the
premier college sport — will have to
make up some yardage before it attracts the kind of interest it enjoyed
in its heyday of the 1950s and, according to a university official,
maintained even a decade ago. "If
you went back 10 or 12 years," says
University of Toronto athletics
director Gib Chapman, "you'd get
full crowds at Varsity Stadium and
you'd have a picture on the front
page of The Globe." The stadium,
home to the U of T Varsity Blues,
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can seat 21,000 of the university's
55,000 students, but the football
games are averaging a paltry 3,000
fans this year.
Like many connected with
university athletics, Chapman
thinks college games, if promoted
properly, are exciting enough to attract a lot of fans. "What university
sport needs now is exposure," he
says. And although Chapman worries that TSN's coverage of two U
of T games this fall cut into gate
receipts, he welcomes the publicity.
He, like others, is learning the equation professional sports organizations memorized a long time ago —
that media coverage equals bigger
crowds.
SPORTS
The camera zeroes in or the far
side of the basketball court, where a
white-clad Acadia Axeman has
stolen the ball, and pans to follow
the action as he lofts a pass to teammate open downcourt. "Quick
break to Sumner," exclaims TSN
play-by-play man Steve Cooney, his
voice rising a little. "In with the
jam ... no mistake tha; time."
F.ash to a shot of jubilant Acadia
fans on their feet. Cut to an instant,
slow-motion replay of Sumner
dunking the ball.
TSN's college broadcasts are
every bit as slick and filled with
special effects as those devoted to
pi"ofessional sports. However, people at the network don't pretend the
Canadian college broadcasts have
nearly the same following. While
they're reluctant to say how many
of their 700,000 subscribers tune into college sports, Peter Watts con-
Students Only
25% Discount
on any body wave
and highlights
(with this ad)
Super Style Cut
at a
Super Price
DINO HAUTE
COIFFURES
4532 W. 10th
224-7440
Jaw appointments Thursday
ami Friday evenings
Ol-1 LK L:\P1RKS DEC.   .5. S5
cedes, "I don't think it's
widespread ... I think there are
pockets of enthusiasm across the
country." It's a safe bet that the
Canadian college offerings, which
include 31 basketball, six football,
eight hockey and five volleyball
games, attract considerably less
viewers than the U.S. college broadcasts on TSN.
However, executive producer
Peter Allies says he believes the audience for the Canadian version in
growing and considers TSN's
coverage of university sports as "an
investment in the future, rather
than an experiment." Allies is proud of what he calls TSN's "committment" to college sports, although
others at the station say TSN needs
that programming to fill its 24-hour
broadcast day, and more importantly its Canadian content requirements. Apart from the three
championships carried by CTV,
TSN televises most college games
broadcast nationally.
When the partnership between
TSN and the CIAU began Sept. 7,
1984 with a football game between
the universities of Calgary and
British Columbia, both the pay network and the schools had to adjust
to the relationship. With the first
anniversary come and gone, both
parties say the wrinkles mainly
logistical ones — have largely been
ironed out. Yet for TSN, covering
university sports still gives rise to
two enduring problems. First, many
campus facilities lack enough
lighting for television. For instance,
the network's choice of which
games to cover because only about
seven football stadiums have sufficient lighting.
The second problem is the often-
pitiful crowds at university games.
If television is pictures, as the folks
in the trade are fond of saying, it
just doesn't look good if the players
outnumber   the   spectators.
A typical crowd might be the one
that turned up at a basketball game
at Toronto's Ryerson Polytechnical
Institute last year. There were so
few people that TSN officials had
all the spectators move to one side
of the gymnasium to at least give
the appearance of a crowd.
No one knows exactly how
university sports will fare in the next
few years, although many people
suspect they are on the brink of a
revival. In addition to increased
media exposure, there were indications even this fall that on-campus
interest is up: 16,500 fans showed
up at the annual Panda football
game between Carleton and Ottawa
U., 12,000 spectators cheer on a
Queen's-McGill contest, and 10,000
in London saw Western Mustangs
take on last year's national champion, the Guelph Gryphons.
The CIAU's John McVagh notes
that in the Canadian Football
League, people are more appreciative of the college ranks.
"The play-by-play men are starting
to say the players are from Bishops
or from McGill. They never used to
say that," he remarks.
Peter Watts, for his part, thinks
the potential is there to build a TV
audience for Canadian college
sports — all that's needed, he says,
is competitive play and time to
allow sporting traditions to take
root.
Colleague Steve Cooney agrees.
"If you have teams that are evenly
matched it can be exciting at any
level. It's that Canadian inferiority
complex that leads us to believe that
Canadian sports aren't worth watching." 	
GOT A PROBLEM?
NEED TO TALK?
SPEAKEASY
UBC's Peer Counselling Centre
Confidential Anonymous
Mon.-Fri.: 9:30 a.m.-9:30 p.m.
SUB CONCOURSE
228-3700
Coming Soon To Vancouver
The University of British Columbia
ENGLISH COMPOSITION TEST
The English Composition Test Will Be Held on
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1985
From 8:30 a.m. to 11:00 a.m.
(Room assignments are listed on the exam timetable)
Every student must attach to the examination booklet EITHER a "Fee
Waived" sticker (to be used by those taking the exam for the first time) OR a
"Fee Paid" sticker ($10), which must be purchased from the Department of
Finance. Students currently enrolled in English 100 will receive "fee waived"
stickers from their instructors.
University regulations state, "Each person taking the exam should be
prepared to produce, upon request, his or her Library/AMS Card."
Students are permitted the use of a dictionary
The dates for the next two open sittings of the ECT are Friday, 21 March
(late afternoon/evening) and Friday, 18 July, 1986 (7:00-9:30 p.m.) Page 10
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, November 29, 1985
f*4jieafi
TODAY
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Beginners Cantonese conversation class, noon,
Buch. B317.
UBC STUDENTS FOR PEACE AND MUTUAL
DISARMAMENT
SCAMM    Star   Wars   abstract    —    writing
workshop, noon, SUB 205.
UBC DANCE CLUB
Dance practice, noon, SUB party room.
UBC SOCIAL CREDIT CLUB
Planning session, noon, SUB 213.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
Lunch hour meeting, noon, International House
lounge.
FILM SOCIETY
Film: Never Cry Wolf, 7 p.m., E.T., 930 p.m.,
$2.00 each, SUB auditorium.
ARTS UNDERGRADUATE SOCIETY
Bzzr garden, pre-exams bash, 4-9 p.m ,  Buch
lounge.
UBC DANCE CLUB
Special practice, noon, SUB party room.
UBC WINDSURFING CLUB
Drop  by  and see  us about joining  for spring,
noon, SUB 57.
HISPANIC AND ITALIAN STUDIES
Lecture by Prof. Bernard Chandler it), nf Tnrnn   •
mi   "The author, the material and ihe reader in  I
Promessi Sposf by Alessandro Manzom" noon.
Buchanan B212.
CAMPUS CRUSADE FOR CHRIST
Women's coffee party,   topic:  Outer and  inner
beauty, 4:30 p m , SUB 125
PSYCHOLOGY STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
General   meeting.   Ski   info ,   nnon,   Buchanan
A100.
UBC STUDENT LIBERALS
Policy committee meeting, noon,  SUB 215
SATURDAY
CHRISTMAS HOPE
Carolling and public rally (sponsored by Intervar-
sity   Christian   Fellowship),   12   p.m.,   Robson
Square ice rink.
UBC DANCE CLUB
Christmas party, 8 p.m., SUB ballroom.
AMS ROCKERS
Jam  session and  beer garden,  6:30-12 p.m.,
SUB party room.
UBC SHOTOKAN KARATE
Regular practice,   10 a.m.,   Paula Ross Dance
Studio, 3488 West Broadway.
FILM SOCIETY
Film: Never Cry Wolf. 7 p.m., E.T., 9:30, $2.00
each, SUB auditorium.
SUNDAY
FILM SOCIETY
Film: Never Cry Wolf, 7 p.m., E.T., 9:30, $2 00
each, SUB auditorium.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Worship service, 10 a.m., UBC day care gym
SPARTACUS BOOKS
Film and forum, 8 p.m., Le Quena,  1111 Com
mercial Dr.
MONDAY
FILM SOCIETY
Film: King Lear, 7:30, $2 each, SUB auditorium.
CHINESE STUDENTS ASSOCIATION OF UBC
Beginners Mandarin conversation class,  noon,
Buch B317
UBC DANCE CLUB
No practices this week
TUESDAY
UBC SHOTOKAN KARATE
Regular  practice,   6:30-8:30  p.m.,   Paula   Ross
Dance Studio, 3488 West Broadway.
CHINESE STUDENTS ASSOCIATIN OF UBC
Beginners Mandarin conversation class,  noon,
Buch B317.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION
Weekly meeting, all welcome, noon, SUB 215
ima
Mi
THE
AMS OMBIIDSPERSONS OFFICE
IS NOW CALLING FOR
VOLUNTEERS
TO HELP IN ITS DAY TO DAY OPERATIONS.
VOLUNTEERS WILL BE REQUIRED TO DEAL
WITH COMPLAINTS AND STAFF THE OFFICE
DURING THE WEEK.
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE ASKED TO
SUBMIT THEIR NAME, YEAR, AND PHONE
NUMBER BY JANUARY 10, 1986, TO:
KEVIN KENDALL, AMS OMBUDSPERSON
SUB 100A, 228-4846
OR
JONATHAN MERCER, AMS VICE PRESIDENT
SUB 248/238, 228-3092
\\\ Oh What A Fun ///
V\ PLACE TO BE ///
■   ■■■■■■■■
CNECKED5
Thru' Nov. 30th —David Domino
Dec. 2-7 —Richard Stepp
(Home of the Frosted Mug)
12
77m»
oz Burger on a
(Share it with a friend)
10    Bun
$575
Overlooking English Bay
xr   Corner Davie & Denman
By The Sea
(Valet Parking)
UNDERWATER HOCKEY
Practice,   everybody   welcome,   7   p.m.   UBC
Aquatic center.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Bible study and discussion, noon. Brock hall 304.
UBC SPORTS CAR CLUB
Meeting, 7 p.m., SUB 213.	
PANGO PANGO (UNS) —
Hairy Puce Blorgs on this tiny
island kingdom rejoiced today as
candidates made rash declarations
in Absolutely Muddled Society spring egg-and-spoon races. Slimin So-
sad-to-see-ya and Talkathon Merciless plan to face off for absolute
power. Windy Bugle and Neckins
Again in Vermont wanted to run
vice. Startin' Copulating was dead
on arrival with no early competition. Will Donkey Stewmeat externalize himself again and who the
fuck wants to embezzle, cried the
assembled blorgs.
^ STATIONS
INT
:>OBAH^ ■£
•pn JEWRV
, i§Sl^BOGBAMSAMS w lSB,EL poR puRTHER
► UNWEBSM INFORMATION
^ Network call
---■-•> a 224-2512
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: AMS Card Holders — 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; Additional lines, 60c. Commercial —
1 day $4.50; Additional lines, 70c. Additional days, $4.00 and 65c.
Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 10:30 a. m. the day before publication
Publications, Room 266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
Charge Phone Orders Over $10.00 - Call 228-3977
COMING EVENTS
SAT. NOV. 30 GIANT BOOK SALE. 30,000
books   Most at $.50 each   10 a.m.-3 p.m.
Kerrisdale School. Carnarvon fcr 41st.
THE VANCOUVER INSTITUTE
Free Public Lecture
Saturday, Nov. 30
Dr. Gerhard Herzberg,
Nobel Laureate,
Herzberg Institute
of Astrophysics
on
THE SPACE BETWEEN
THE STARS
Lecture Hall 2, Woodward
Building at 8:15 p.m.
11 - FOR SALE - Private
AIR FARE TO MONTREAL. Departure Dec
17 a.m. Return Jan. 8, 1986. $350. Phone
2519793.
CALGARY: return airfare $125. Dec. 20-Jan.
2. Call Ann 731-3611 eves.
CHEAP ONE-WAY flight for female to
Toronto. Leave Dec. 4. 736-5139.
BALDWIN ORGAN MODEL 210-2 keyboards, 25-note pedal board. $2500. Call
925-2376.
KITS — Wanted mature N/S student to
share deluxe townhouse, cat lover, $375 incl. util. 733-0671 after 5 p.m.
URGENT: Large furnished 1 bedrm. avail, to
sublet Dec. 9-May, $325/mo. all incl. 10th
& Ontario, 873-5610 or 732-5916 ask for
M.J. Call immediately.
AMIABLE PERSON to share pleasant family
home. Near UBC gates, 1 block from beach
& walks. Pleasant den. Quiet vicinity. $450.
224-0584.
BEAUTIFUL character suite in Kits. Shared
2 bed., view, furnished, mature female student pref. 738-6937.
25 - INSTRUCTION
FORMER LANGUAGETEACHER wisTiis to
exchange English conversation/iessons for
French. Tel. James, 734-4128.
25
INSTRUCTION
LET US PREPARE YOU FOR THE
FEBRUARY 15, 1986 LSAT
on January 21, 25, 26, 1986
For information call free
LSAT/GMAT PREPARATION COURSES.
1-800-387-1262
30 - JOBS
1986 B. COMMERCE
AMIS GRADUATE
If you are interested in working
in a small but growing office of a
national accounting firm send a
copy of your resume or application for employment to
Peat Marwick
Suite 212-4800 #3 Rd.
Richmond, B.C.
V6X 3A6
Attn. D. Wootton
AIR FARE TO MONTREAL. Departure Dec
17 a.m. Return Jan. 8, 1986. $350. Phone
251-9793.
15 - FOUND
26 PAIR HOT PINK UNDERWEAR (male?),
various sizes & conditions, (mostly small).
Location: outside SUB. Would owners
please claim ASAP. Could this be you St.
Andy's?
20 - HOUSING
ACCOMMODATION is available in the
U.B.C. Student Residences. Fairview Crescent, 'J.B.C.'s newest residence facility, is
accepting applications from students who
are 23 years of age by December 31st, 1985
or who are graduate students. Totem Park
and Place Vanier Residences have immediate vacancies for men and women of
any age for room and board accommodation. Come to the Student Housing Office,
2071 West Mall, or phone 228-2811, for
information.
KITS. Accom. 35th & Dunbar. Room &
board with sports family, N/S, priv. ent. &
drivew., washer & dryer, $400 incl. all meals
& util. Call Helen 263-0075.
APPLICATIONS are now being accepted for
a delivery man with some "shop" experience. Applicants must have a truck or
large car and be able to work two mornings
(4 hrs.) per week. This position is only open
to registered UBC student. Applications
can be picked up and returned to SUB
Room 266.
35 - LOST
HELP!
I lost my father's tan sheepskin coat week
of Nov. 10. Sentimental value. Reward of
fered. No questions asked. Phone 925-2993
anytime.
26 PAIR MALE UNDERWEAR. If found call
St. Andy's Hall, 224-9921 or 224-9927 or
deliver to 6040 lona Dr., UBC. P.S. We're
desperate.
70 - SERVICES
RESPONS., PROF, working woman will to
housesit hse., t.hse., condo. Avail. Jan. for
3-4 mths. Good with pets. N/S, N'drinker.
Refs. 274-4081 aft. 6 p.m.
University Hill United
and Presbyterian
congregations
invite you to join us in
worship Sunday mornings
at 10:30 a.m. in the Epiphany
Chapel Vancouver School
of Theology
6050 Chancellor Boulevard
80 - TUTORING
TUTORING IN
|
ENGLISH
|
Private
Assistance for s
tudents
!
at all levels.
W.S.
Parker, B.A.,
M.A.
733-4534
FIND A TUTOR
BE A TUTOR
Register at
SPEAKEASY
Mon.-Fri.
9:30 a.m.-9:30 p.m.
Main Concourse
Phone 228-3777
85 - TYPING
WORD    PROCESSING    SPECIALIST.    U
write,   we   type   theses,   resumes,   letters,
essays. Days, evgs., wknds. 736-1208.
WORD WEAVERS - Word Processing.
(Bilingual) Student rates. Fast turnaround.
5670 Yew St. at 41 St. Kerrisdale 266-6814.
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST. 30 years ex
penence. Student rates. Photocopier.
Dorothy Martinson, 228-8346.
UNIVERSITY TYPING-Word processing.
Papers, theses, resumes, letters, P-U &del.
9 a.m.-11 p.m   7 days/wk. 251-2064.
WORD PROCESSING IMicom). Theses
rate. $1.50/dbl. sp. pg. Tables & equations
(Chem., Engineering, etc.) at $14/hr.
201-636 W. Broadway. 876-5333 (Jeeva).
WORDPOWER-Editing, proofing & word
processing professionals. Xerox copies,
student rates. 3737 W. 10th Ave. (at Alma)
222-2661.
EXPERT TYPING: Essays, t. papers, fac-
tums. letters, mscpts, resumes, theses.
IBM Sel II. Proofreading. Reas. rates. Rose
731-9857, 224-7351.
JUDITH    FILTNESS,   quality   typist.   3206
West 38th Avenue. 263-0351.
WORD PROCESSING: Spelling, grammar
expertise. Days, eves., wkends. Student
rates. Call Nancy 266-1768.
MINIMUM NOTICE REQUIRED. Essays &
resumes, 222-4661 (before 1 p.m.) 732-0529
(5-7 p.m.).
GEETECH WORD PROCESSING. Student
rates. Fast turnaround. 7 days-24 hrs.
Kingsway/Fraser, 879-2027.
TRI WORD SPECIALISTS-Word process-
ng experts; student rates, pickup &-
delivery. 438-0737
TYPING IBM SEL II. Essays, term papers,
theses, mscpts. $1 per page. 263-4036
261-7320.
TYPING & W/P: Term papers, theses,
mscpts., essays, tech. equa., letters,
resumes. Bilingual. Clemy 266-6641.
YOUR WORDSWORTH word processing on
Wang Professional System by B.A.
English. Dictate letters, papers, etc to dictaphone or Strop off   Set rates. 980-2868.
ADINA word processing. Student discount.
High quality work. 10th £? Discover. Phone
222-2122.
TYPiNG: Professional presentations fur term
papers, resumes, etc. Competitive rates.
734-0650 (24 hrs).
TUTOR AVAILABLE for Japanese 102. Student rates. Call Terrie after 9 p.m. at
874-8398.
SPEAKEASY TYPIST REGISTRY. Find a
typist or register as a typist. No rharge.
SUB Concourse.
WORD PROCESSING SERVICES
Papers,   letters,   theses  &  resumes,   day,
evening & weekend. Tel. 872-3263. Friday, November 29, 1985
THE    UBYSSEV
Page 11
Koko Taylor and her Chicago Blues
Machine, a rompin', stompin' good time, at
the Town Pump (in Gastown), November 29
and 30.
Writers and Performers for Nicaragua,
poetry, dance, live music and (last but never
least) refreshments, at the Western Front
(303 E. 8th Avenue, 291-3136), December 5th,
at 8:30 p.m.
K.D. Lang and the Reclines, yahoo with
K. D. and her special guests the Yo-Dells, at
the Commodore (870 Granville, 681-78381,
November 29 and 30.
Wildroot Orchestra, at the Landmark
Jazz Bar (Robson at Nicola, 687-9312),
December 4 through 7.
Bim, the guy from Dawson Creek with the
electric repertoire, at the Vancouver East
Cultural Center (1895 Venables, 251 13631,
December 4-7 at 8:00 p.m.
A Jazzy-Folky Christmas Sing-along, at
the UBC Museum of Anthropology,
(228-5087), December 1 at 2:30 p.m.
Meg Walker, jazz vocalist from
Australia, at the Classical Joint (231 Car-
rail Street, 689-0667). November 29 and 30.
Ruth Beer, shadows and archetypal forms,
at the Contemporary Art Gallery (555
Hamilton Street, 687-1345) until Decembr21.
Flown, paintings universale, an exhibit
by Nicholas Fiwchuk, at Pots, Stews and
Fondues (1221 Thurlow, 681-9862), until
November 30.
Arthur Erickson, a display of architectural
drawings and models, at the Vancouver Art
Gallery (750 Hornby, 682-5621), until January
12.
Vancouver: Six by Six by Six, first annual
national exhibition of fine crafts, at the Cartwright Gallery (1411 Cartwright, 687-8266),
until December 8.
Martin Honisch: Paintings, at the Surrey
Art Gallery, (13750-88th, 596-7461), until
January 5.
Night With Guests, an aduit nursery
rhyme reminiscent of Kabuki and Punch and
Judy, Firehall Theatre, (280 East Cordova,
689-9026), until November 30 at 11 p.m.
Trial, a theatrical adaption of Kafka's novel
with a woman's perspective, Vancouver
East Cultural Centre (1895 Venables,
254-9578), until November 30 at 8:30 p.m.
The Curse of the Werewolf, a 1920's style
comedy/musical spoof, Douglas College
(700 Royal Avenue), until November 30 at
8:00 p.m.
Season's Greetings, a real funny
Christmas tale, Queen E. Playhouse
(872-6622), until December 29.
Peacing It Together, a date with peace
and laughter, Gilmore Community School
(50 Gilmore Ave., Burnaby, 733-0141),
December 6 at 8:00 p.m.
Bubble Memory, a whimsical musical for
the whole family. Arts Club Granville
Island, starting November 30.
Going Down for the Count, a satirical
fantasy set in the tightly laced post-Victorian
society, at the Firehall Theatre (280 E. Cordova, 689-0926), until December 7 at 8 p.m.
The Nuns, a poetic drama of great intensity, at Kits House Hall (736-3580), until
December 7 at 8:00 p.m.
The Music Man, a holiday treat for the
whole family, Richmond Gateway Theatre
(270-1812), opens December 4 at 8:00 p.m.
Fanshen, the story of Chinese peasants
coming to terms with Communism, Studio 58
(100 W. 49th Ave.), opens November 29 at
8:00 p.m.
Welcome to the Planet, a musical
celebration of mankind and the vision of
humanity's benefactors, at the Arts Club
Theatre (687-1644), opens November 29 at
8:00 p.m.	
ibtffateS
David Strangway, who became
UBC president on Nov. 1, will be
ceremonially installed Dec. 3.
Hon. Robert G. Rogers, B.C.'s
lieutenant-governor, will ask Dr.
Strangway to take the oath of office as president during the
ceremony, which will be presided
over by UBC's chancellor, W.
Robert Wyman.
The ceremony in UBC's War
Memorial gym begins at 2:15 p.m.
and will be followed by a reception
in the ballroom of the Student
Union Building. It is a public event
and anyone may attend.
Following his installation, Dr.
Strangway will give an inaugural
address. Another feature of the
ceremony will be greetings brought
from other universities and from
UBC's faculty, support staff and
students.
Hell Wwkanii on Preppielitfand: "Bum, baby. .. burn!"shouted Kevin, nonoh»)»nt[y dbu*|fl9tt>8 cempfire with keroeene. Muffy poured water
all over him, shouting something about ttie wicked wtteh of tit* we^t,
Meanwhile, Barbie and Skfppy threw TV Ginsm knisms at Ducky while Stiff looked gaily on.
Nobody does it fresher!
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UNIQUE... ANY WAY YOU SERVE IT
The Arts Club Theatre's
mum
NIGHT
by William Shakespeare
Directed by Larry Lillo
Starring: NORMAN BROWNING, JOHN MOFFAT,
JAY BRAZEAU, SIMON WEBB
••An effervescent, beguiling show. "THK EDMONTON JOURNAL
ONE PERFORMANCE ONLY
Thursday, December 5th, 8:00 p.m.
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
Tix: Arts Club Box Office 687-1644
With the assistance
l\^
tan.ee  ^/aVVV^Vt^. oftheCanacki
of the W&f ^ Council
W
£\Sf CHAIR.
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3618  W. V* KGftR mma     758-05^1
OPEN EARLY
OPEN LATE
• passport pictures
* specialty papers
* volume discounts
kinkes copies
5706 University Blvd. 222-1688
M-Th 8-9       Fri 8-6       Sat 9-6       Sun 11-6
E
I
TALK Of THE TOWN   ^.
  'Wr
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SUN-WED. 10% U.B.C. STUDENT CARD DISCOUNT
2043 W. 4th AVE, Page 12
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, November 29, 1985
Varsity basketball hoops victory
The varsity men's basketball
team registered their first victory of
the season last week, defeating the
University of Regina Cougars 75-56
in the War Memorial Gym.
Although the Birds were unable
to capitalize on a number of opportunities and could not assume control of the boards, they managed to
only be trailing by two points at the
end of the first half.
UBC played far more aggressively and consistently in the second
half. They controlled the defensive
boards and came away with 17
steals. With a series of quick moves
to the hoop, initiated by both Ken
Klassen and Paul Johansson, the
Birds led 49-48.
In the final 10 minutes Regina
was unable to recover, as UBC increased the defensive pressure and
scored 12 points, ending Regina's
hopes for victory on the road.
The Birds travelled to Victoria to
UBC women's
volleyball kills
U of Saskatchewan
The UBC women's volleyball
team played the top ranked University of Saskatchewan on November
15th. UBC took the first game with
a score of 15-7. The University of
Saskatchewan then turned around
to win the next three games, 15-8,
15-12, 15-9.
Tara Senft led the UBC team
with 15 kills, followed by Sheila
Jones with 12 kills and Kelly Wright
with 10.
Their next match was at the
University of Alberta on November
16th. It was the first win of the
season for the Birds who took the
match three games straight (15-8,
15-9, 15-10). Sheila Jones finished
the match with 15 kills, Tara Senft
followed with 11 and some im-
presive blocking was performed by
Trina Hewlett.
UBC lost to the University of
Lethbridge on the 22nd of
November (16-18, 6-15, 15-8, 15-11,
8-15). The Birds also lost to the
University of Calgary the following
day. Sheila Jones led the team with
nine kills.
UBC's last match before the
Christmas break is against the
University of Victoria on November
30th at 6 p.m. in Victoria.
compete in a pre-season tournament over the weekend where they
did not fare quite as well. They lost
by slim margins to the Seattle
Brewsters (118-106) to Western
Washington (89-78).
Coach Bruce Enns is happy with
their 1-6 record. The Thunderbirds
appear to be on their way to playing
quality basketball.
The Birds final home game
before Christmas is scheduled for
December 6th at 8:30 p.m., when
they host Multnomah College from
the teams play thus  far,  despite     Portland, Oregon.
Intramural points to you
INTRAMURAL SPORTS
UNIT POINT STANDINGS
Effective as of: November 27. IS
(excluding Soccer Bowl)
WOMEN'S UNIT
1 EUS
2 Physical Education
3 Forestry
4 Arts
5 VST
6 Phrateres
7 Rowing
8 FNSc.
9 Alpha Gamma Delta
10 Delta Gamma
11 Medicine
12 Swim Team
13 Kappa Kappa Gamma
14 Science
15 Ski Team
16 Vanier
17 Ballet/UBC Jazz
18 Gamma Phi Beta
19 Education
20 Rehab Medicine
21 Centre for Cont   Educ.
22 Tennis Club
23 Nursing
24 Alpha Delta Pi
25 Regent College
26 Grad Studies
27 Delta Phi Epsilon
28 Sub Bound
29 Pharmacy
30 Agriculture
31 Recreation
32 Japan Exchange
33 Gage
34 Commerce
MENS UNIT
1 EUS
2 Beta Theta Pt
3 Science
4 Forestry
5 VST
6 Physical Education
7 Medicine
8 Rowing
b Cycling Club
10 Fiji
11 Arts
12 Phi Delta Theta
13 UBC Fire Dept.
14 Commerce
15 Grad Studies
16 Kappa Sigma
17 Chariots of Manure
18 Dekes
19 Law
20 Zeta Beta Tau
21 Orienteering
22 St. Andrews
23 Totem Park
24 VOC
25 Rehab Medicine
26 Psi Upsilon
27 Zeta Psi
28 Gage
29 Education
30 Tennis Club
31 Third Salish Alumni
32 Field Hockey
33 Subterraneans
POINTS
1309
1276
717
608
574
500
391
365
256
234
227
215
201
185
156
145
133
131
95
80
64
61
55
31
22
21
15
15
0
0
0
0
0
0
POINTS
2634
2083
1217
866
806
778
730
612
419
405
400
348
317
289
265
242
238
197
190
187
171
160
156
134
108
93
86
73
69
65
60
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
Regent College
Sigma Chi
Roma
Ski Team
Alpha Delta Phi
Nakusp
Ski Club
IVCF
Dentistry
RCMP
Agriculture
Pharmacy
Vanier
41
40
32
29
15
5
3
1
1
0
0
0
The great water sport Inner Tube
Water Polo had their playoffs on
Monday, November 25. First place
was captured by Kappa Sigma
defeated Beta/Phrateres in the final
by 17-7. In a brilliant effort in the
overtime semifinal, Beta/Phrateres
edged Aggies 14-11.
I KA(,Llr MANDlNf,
Overall Standing:
1 Kappa Sigma 5  Bclas.'Phraieres
2 F'ortMiv f, Amcullure
.1   Mech   Nursing 7  Kappa. Fiji
4 tianima Plii/Dcke" 8 Civil/Nursing
Aijiha Oamma
Individual leagues:
1 Kappa Sigma
2 lorcMiv
.1   Agnui'unc
4 Civil. Nursing
I]
1 Mech  Nursing
2 (iP IX'kos/AG
1 Hctas'Phralcres
4  Kappa/ Fiji
Stand Out and Be Counted
Suki's Advanced Hairdressing School is now accepting models for our advanced cutting classes. 16-35,
male or female — if you're interested in creative,
high-fashion haircuts our teachers want you to have
the style of the 80's which suits you best.
We're open Monday to Friday, 9-5. We'd love to see
you, so give us a call, 738-0519.
$5.00 Cut $20 Color $30 Perm
"Remember It's The Cut That Counts"
Suki's Advanced Hairdressing
School Int'l Ltd.
3157 Granville St., Vancouver, 738-0519
Our  Art   Director  is also  interviewing  hair models  with  potential  for
photographic and demonstration work.
"The Grouse Mountain Campus Pass /s Here!'
//
Your Intramural Sports Program, in cooperation with
Grouse Mountain Resorts Ltd., is pleased to bring you
The Grouse Mountain Campus Pass"
Buy your ski pass at the Intramural Sports office
before December 20, 1985 and, for $100, you will get:
unlimited day and night
skiing until January 5, 1986
(every day through the holidays!)
./yt
v. y< i
4^-
/A
dd \V
unlimited day and night skiing
Fridays to Sundays from
January 6 to season's end
50% off ski ticket prices
Mondays to Thursdays
from January 6 to season's end
This is the best ski pass offer you will find anywhere so, for a frugal
holiday season of unlimited skiing, get your pass early! After
December 20, passes will cost $130 and will be available at Grouse
Mountain only.
Passes available now at:
The UBC Intramural Sports office • Room 66 •
Lower SUB Concourse
Phone 228-6688

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