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The Ubyssey Sep 7, 1990

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THEUBBSEY
I
N
Kurt
3
embarrasses
1
UBC,
E
again
Founded in 1918
Vancouver, Friday, September 7,1990
Vol 73, No 2
Having survived a hunter's bullet,
a wild eagle recovers In an animal shelter.
DON MAH PHOTO
AMS supports Rec-Fac,
seeks input with BoG
by Mark Nielsen
With the $40 student fee
increase for a new recreation
facility almost a foregone conclusion, the AMS students'
council started anglingfor some
control over how the money will
be used.
In giving approval in principle to the Board of Governors
(BoG) for the fee hike, council
added a list of recommendations, beginning with a request
that at least half of the management advisory committee
that will oversee the facility be
made up of student council
members.
Council also asked that the
money generated from the levy
be used for projects other than
sports facilities, including
renovations in and around the
Student Union Building.
Finally, ads are to be placed
in The Ubyssey at BoG expense
to make students aware that
the fee can be refunded at the
end of the year or when they
leave university.
BoG was made aware of
council's support and it's recommendations when board
members met Thursday for
their regular meeting.
BoG student rep Tim Bird
said the board reacted favorably
and anticipated that BoG and
the AMS would start discussing and planning the recreation
facility soon. UBC vice-president, Academic and Student
Services, K.D. Srivastava, could
not be reached for comment.
The proposed increase was
originally conceived by the
University Athletic Committee
and submitted to BoG for consideration. AMS coordinator of
external affairs, Jason Brett,
who sits on the committee,
supports the levy.
Although students turned
down a similar proposal in a
referendum last year, Brett said
he believes the outcome was
not a true reflection of student
opinion. He added that as few
as 20 per cent of students have
asked for a refund under similar circumstances at other universities where an opt out
clause was included in a fee
increase.
"Just maybe it's a chance to
see how many want to build an
athletic facility, and on the
otherhand, maybe so many will
want a refund that it's obvious
nobody wants one," Brett said.
A third referendum could
not be held because the proposal needs to be approved by
October 1 in order to get matching funds from the provincial
government through the 75th
anniversary fund raising cam
paign started last year.
Arts reps Mark Keister and
Helen Willoughby-Price opposed both the approval in
principle and the recommendations.
"It's anti-democratic in the
sense that it's reversing a
democratic decision made last
year, but more specifically, I
think the opting out clause
stinks because you don't take
money from somebody, take the
interest on it and then say they
may or may not give it out,"
Keister said. "It's not opting
out on good faith."
Keister also branded
council's stand on the fee levy
as "wimpy." "You either stand
up or secede, and they're taking
a very wimpy stand," he said.
Instead, Keister said
council should give BoG "a firm
and resounding 'no'" and hold
another referendum, after a
cooling off period.
Additionally, he said such
a fee levy could be used for
other projects besides a recreational facility, such as a
daycare or an expansion of
SUB.
Willoughby-Price echoed
Keister's sentiments, saying
that BoG should give priority
to more pressing projects and
not just focus exclusively on
sports-oriented facilities, year
or when they leave university.
Strike action feared
by Martin Chester
Students at Vancouver
Community College are facing
more labour problemsbetween
the college staff and the administration.
A strike by instructors last
spring threatened classes at
the end of term and, with the
current school year barely
started, the spectre of labour
disruptions once again looms
over the heads of students.
"The collective agreement
(the support staff) has with
the college ran out on March
31, 1989, at the same time as
the one with the instructors
did. We were not negotiating
with the college during (the
strike) period," said Vancouver
Municipal Employees Union
President, Michael Carney.
Carney said the union has
been negotiating with the administration ever since then,
but talks have broken down
recently.
Carney said the administration told the union they were
prepared to lock out the support staff on August 9th. "We
felt they were trying to
threaten us and bully us," he
said. "There has been no lockout notice given," said VCC
President Paul Gallagher.
"The mandate (warning)
is an indication that under
certain circumstances the college would be prepared to exercise our legal rights."
Carney said the negotiations have hit a sticking point
on the issue of money.
"Both sides said they could
not move anyfurther and talks
broke down," he said.
The union has lowered its
demands for a fourteen per
cent increase in each year of a
two year contract, while the
administration has improved
its offer of 6 per cent in each of
the two years of a new contract.
"We are closer than we
were two weeks ago," Carney
said. "At this point we don't
have any intention to give 72
hour strike notice."
Union members will vote
on the administration's latest
offer this week, but the negotiating committee is recommending again st accepting the
offer.
VCC Student Society
chairperson Tracey Weneberg
said students want to avoid a
strike and hope for a fair
settlement for the support
staff.
"It all goes back to the
underfunding of post-secondary education in B.C.,"
Weneberg said. "Students are
forced into conditions which
are not good enough and the
support staff is overworked."
"The strike we just had at
the beginning of the summer
made the students stick
around and miss the late summer jobs," she said, addingthat
this strike might affect their
transfers to other institutions.
"If it is only going to last a
week it won't be too bad, but if
it lasts a long time students
could be in trouble," she said. Classifieds 228-3977
RATES: AMS Card Holders - 3 lines, $3.00, additional lines 60 cents, commercial -3 lines, $5.00,
additional lines 75 cents. (10% Discount on 25 issues or more) Classified ads payable in advance.
Deadline 4.-00p.m,. two days before publication. Room 266, SUB, UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A7,228-
3977.
FOR SALE -
COMMERCIAL
ENERGY FOR LIFE
Super Blue Green Algae
Increased Energy
Improved mental and physical Performance
Wonder Food, Not A Drug
876-1406
11 ■ FOR SALE - PRIVATE
1986 HYUNDAI PONY, 5 sp. loaded,
102,000 km, $3350. 1982 Ford Escort, 4
sp., 97,000 km, $1850. Lv. message:
279-9991.
FUN AND INEXPENSIVE TRANSPO
HONDA 500
Magna V-30 1984, excellent condition. 5
Speed overdrive. $1600 (includes 2
helmets) Rick 736-0169 (leave message)
79 ACCORD 4DR; new engine, dutch +
tires; tp dk; 5 grs; 1 owner* asking $1850.
Ph. 736-4479. lv. message.
1983 TOYOTA COROLLA SRS LIB. New
brakes, shocks & muffler. $4500 obo.
1983 Honda CM45A. New in "85. Only
2700 Mi. Garaged. $1250 w/2 helmets.
228-1355.
78 FORD FIESTA HATCHBACK, sunroof,
well maintained, great for University
student $750. 940-9460.
1979 DATSUN 210,4 sp., AM/FM cassette.
Runs well. $1200 OBO. 261-9275.
77 HONDA CIVIC. Excellent condition.
Automatic. Must sell $800 OBO. Lv.
message 733-0930.
WORD PROCESSOR: Smith Corona PWP
system 14. 8 manual fuctions, editing
features, internal spelling corrector, &
many other features. Free software &
comprehensive user guide. 2 yrs. old. Was
$1400, now $600. Offers welcome. Call
Ric Demian at 737-8233 (eves) or 240-5341
(24 hrs.).
1988 DODGE ARIES LE 4 dr. sedan auto,
air cond., mint cond., must see. 28,000
kms, asking $7995 OBO or lease. Call
Mark 731-5101 (Mon-Fri 9-5 p.m.) or 222-
1004 (after 6 p.m. or any time weekends).
D8285.
1989 TOYOTA TERCEL 5 dr. hbk. auto.,
radio, exc. cond. Must see, 27,500 kms.
Balance of warranty asking $9,495 OBO or
lease. Call Mark 731-5101 (Mon-Fri 9-5
p.m.) or 222-1004 (after 6 p.m. or any time
20 ■ HOUSING
ROOM TO RENT. Fern. N/S, $386.
Arbutus & 33rd, sh. bath. sep. kitchen.
263-4355.
STUDENT HOUSING: Double rooms
available Sept. 2nd. On campus, TV, W/D,
fully furnished, full time cook, $395/month
room and board. Call Chris at 224-3335.
ROOM & BOARD offered to female
student in exchange for some child care &
light housekeeping. Eves. 734-5443.
25 ■ INSTRUCTION
PIANO/THEORY LESSONS. Help with
theory or harmony. All levels ofToronto
Conservatory studies or play for fun! 21
years experience, with L.R.S.M., M.Mus.,
R.M.T. Call Mrs. Okimi 228-9161.
Between
Deadline for submissions: for
Monday's paper is Friday at
12:45 PM. LATE SUBMISSIONS WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED.
FRIDAY, SEPT. 7
University Christian Ministries.
Lecture: "The Christian Mind:
A Contradiction in Terms?" by
Robb Powell. Noon, SUB 111.
Baptist Student Ministry. Foot
Rally. 7p.m., SUB 211.
Jewish Students' Association/
Hillel. "Welcome Back Complimentary Refreshments". 9 a.m. -
2:30p.m., Hillel House.
GUITAR LESSONS, Conservatory studies
or just for fun. Convenient, specialize in
classical. Call Dave 224-0448.
30 - JOBS
EXPERIENCED RESEARCH TECHNICIAN immediately required for part-time.
Person should have experience in animal
surgery and basic computer. Time and
hours negotiable. $ good. Call Dr. Tsang
524-9623 betw. 7-10 p.m.
STUDENT ADULT CARRIER
for West Vancouver/Horseshoe Bay area.
45-1 hr/afternoon, 6 days/week. Car
required. $325-$4O0 clear/month. Call
Mr. Manvrick, 732-2461.
LADIES ATHLETIC CLOTHING
& Footwear retailer req. a friendly,
outgoing, responsible salesperson for p/t or
Ct work. Exp. in retail clothing or
footwear would be an asset, but not
essential. Must be avail, for weekend
work. Call Bret 733-1173.
HOT HOT HOT???
Looking for p/t 12 hrs/week, $5O0-$20O0.
No tele marketing. 941-9114.
ATTENTION: DIET DISC, now on TV -
lose 10-29 lbs. per month. Ask me how &
earn extra $$$. 100% natural medically
approved. Toll free: 1-978-3090.
CROSS COUNTRY COACH
YORK HOUSE ELEM
2 Days a week 3:00-4:00 Honorarium.
Call Becky Willis 736-6551
or 946-3815
DO YOU LOVE GREAT COFFEE?
STARBUCK'S COFFEE
is hiring clerks.
Daytime availability preferred.
We offer, career potential,
competitive wages, RSP's,
Dental, Extended Health,
Life Insurance,
and most importantly...
GREAT COFFEE!
Leave or send resume to:
STARBUCK'S REGIONAL OFFICE
#160 - 601 West Cordova
Vancouver, B.C.
V6B 1G1
Attention: Randy
UBC DISTRIBUTOR WANTED
for Super Blue Green Algae
share Energy for Life with friends
and classmates and make $$$$
876-1406
NOW HIRING!
for Uniformed Security positions
throughout the lower mainland. Convenient job site, flexible hrs., interesting
work, industry wages, and a top notch
benefit plan. Must be bondable and
willing to share our dedication to services.
Exp. NOT essential. Pis. call 685-6011.
FURNITURE STORE, reg P/T person for
workshop, furniture deliveries & misc.
store duties. Apply in person to Form &
Function, 4357 W. 10th Ave. 222-1317.
CONTRACT DRIVERS $7/hr. cash & tips
paid nightly. Must have own car. Apply
in person at Domino's Pizza. 5736
University Blvd. or 11700 Cambie Rd.,
Richmond.
MONDAY, SEPT. 10
Japanese Legal Studies. Lectures: "Equality Rights and
Women in Japan". 2:30, Room
176 Moot Court Room, Curtis
Law Building.
Jewish Students' Association/
Hillel. Student Board Meeting.
12:30 p.m., Hillel House.
Opening Ceremonies Frosh
Week. 12:30, SUB Plaza.
TUESDAY, SEPT. 11
Jewish Students' Association/
Hillel. "Welcome Back Complimentary Refreshments."
All day, Hillel House.
PART-TIME EMPLOYMENT in busy
sporting goods store. Applicant must be
courteous, ambitious, and knowledgeable.
Resumes to 3355 West Broadway.
COMPETITIVE PRECISION SKATERS
NEEDED.
Preferably Ages 15 and Up.
For More Information Call:
Shawna 222-2522 or Holly 984-9465.
50 - RENTALS
TWO OFFICES FOR RENT.
Lutheran Campus Centre
One full-time, one shared.
$500 and $200, utilities incl.
Phone 224-1614 or 224-3328.
70 - SERVICES
"HAPPY 75" UBC,
and welcome first year students from
"SECONDO", your KITSILANO music
store for all your musical needs: P
texts, sheet music, metronomes,
manuscript We buy/sell/trade 2nd
hand music.
"Come for a browse."
2744 W. 4th Ave. (at MacDonald).
Mon-Fri 10:30 - 6. Sat. 10:30 - 5.
734-2339.
80 - TUTORING
ENGLISH LITERACY TUTOR/
INSTRUCTOR invites enquiries from
people who wish to learn or improve skills
in reading, writing and speaking the
English language. Please direct enquiries
to The Welcome Mat, c/o Carnegie
Community Centre, 401 Main Street,
Vancouver, B.C., V6A 2T7.
85 ■ TYPING
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST, 30 years exp.,
word processing/typing. Student rates.
Dorothy Martinson, 228-8346.
ON CAMPUS WORD PROCESSING
Need the professional touch?... have it
done for you - you can even book ahead.
$27/hr., 6-8 double spaced pages of normal
text per hour, laser printer. SUB lower
level, across from Tortellini's Restaurant*
228-5640.
EXPERT WORD PROCESSING, desk top,
spread sheets. Exp. with typing papers
and theses. Call Bev at 590-9390.
WORD-PROCESSING. 2.50/db. sp. page.
Computers mi ths, 3726 W. Broadway at
Alma. New Grammar check.
224-5242.
NEED IT YESTERDAY?
Speedy Dee Typing Services
South Delta, Richmond area.
Call 946-7402.
JB WORD PROCESSING
Fast, accurate, reliable.
224-2678
BIND YOUR THESIS
Library quality hard cover books
$15 plus gold stamping,
anything in soft covers $1.99 + up
Call 683-2463 today.
TYPING TAPE TRANSCRIPTION A
SPECIALTY. Also papers, essays, editing
service as well. Very fast service.
224-2310.
Jewish Students' Association/
Hillel. "Famous Hot Lunch"
featuring Lasagna. 12:30,
Hillel House.
Lutheran Student Movement.
Co-op Supper. 5:30 p.m.,
Lutheran Campus Centre.
WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 12
Japanese Legal Studies. Lectures: "Equality Rights and
Women In Japan". 2:30, Room
176 Moot Court Room, Curtis
Law Building.
Jewish Students' Association/
Hillel. Torah Study Group with
Rabbi Philip Bregman. 12:30
p.m., Hillel House.
Theatresports. 12:30, SUB
Plaza.
ASHLEY'S BOOKS™*
PHILOSOPHY-HISTORY-
LITERATURE-ART-
MATH-MUSIC-SCIENCE
Religion-Travel-Psychology
Natural History
USED & ANTIQUARIAN
BOUGHT - APPRAISED
(No Textbooks, Magazines,
Coles Notes)
3712 w.ioth     228-1180
y/\     THE
/jt\    CAPTAIN
^   *-  Buys/Sells
Good*Used*Inexpensive
• Antiques   • Electronics
• Furniture   • TV's  • Stereos
• Musical Instruments
(CLOSE TO CAMPUS)
17th & Dunbar    222-2775
Student Representatives
FACULTY OF ARTS
Nominations are invited for
Student Representatives to the
Faculty of Arts:
a) One representative from students in Major or Honours
programs, in General B_V. concentrations, and in Graduate
Studies in each of the Departments and Schools of the Faculty
of Arts.
b) Two representatives from each of First and Second year Arts.
Student representatives are full voting members in the meetings of the
Faculty of Arts, and are appointed to committees of Faculty.
Nomination forms are available from School and Department Offices, the
Dean of Art's Office, the Faculty Advisor's Office, and the Arts Undergraduate Society Office.
Completed Nominations forms must be in the hands of the Registrar of the
University not later than 4:00 pjn. FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 21,1990.
NOTE: In constituencies from which no nominations have been received by
the deadline, there will be no representation.
WANTED
GAMES
MANAGEMENT
STAFF
Apply in person to
Dept. of Athletics,
Room 100
War Memorial Gym.
The Noddies nodded off, and
then there was one. Martin, all
alone. All by himself with a
paper to produce. No one ever
said it would be like this...
THURSDAY, SEPT. 13
Jewish Students' Association/
Hillel. "The Persian Gulf Crisis:
Israel and the Iraqi Threat" with
Prof. Noemi Gal-or, U.B.C. Poli
Sci Dept., 12:30 p.m.,
Hillel House.
MONDAY, SEPT. 24
Japanese Legal Studies, Faculty
of Law. Lectures "Abortion and
the Law in Japan". 2:30 p.m.,
Room 176 Moot Court Room,
Curtis Law Building.
WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 26
Japanese Legal Studies, Faculty
of Law. Lectures "Abortion and
the Law in Japan". 2:30 p.m.,
Room 176 Moot Court Room,
Curtis Law Building.
IHOT
I FLASHES
Are you outraged at the degree
of racism, sexism and
homophobia and other forms of
discrimination that exist in our
society?
Ifyou have any interest in
fighting against discrimination
on campus, please attend this
meeting.
Anti-Discrimination Committee
Thurs Sept. 13
SUB room 260
5 PM
Film Soc is back in action.
Thursday, Friday, Saturday
and Sunday:
7:00 Nuns on the Run
9:30 War ofthe Roses
Come hear our new sound
system!
2/THE UBYSSEY
September 7,1990 jfeMT
AMS brings B-lot barn back from the brink
by Mark Nielsen
Whether it will become a
legacy or just a large money hole
remains to be seen, but the AMS
wants to keep the lease on the
old barn standing in B-Lot going.
The AMS students' council
decided to pay off the $28,495 it
owes to the University for the
structure in hopes that one day it
may become useful.
In doing so, council also
approved $350,000 in
expenditures for utilities, fire
protection, sprinklers and
insurance within the next two
years.
The total cost of preparing
the barn for student use is
expected to exceed $500,000 and
will involve an estimated
$100,000 a year in operating
costs.
Funding for the improvements will come from the $15 fee
levied on students for capital
projects. The barn was one of a
number of projects the AMS
wanted to pursue after the levy
was approved by referendum in
1982.
Jason Brett, coordinator of
external affairs, pointed to the
Whistler ski cabin as an
example how the AMS can
benefit by not giving up on a
similar project.
While student societies at
the British Columbia Institute of
Technology and at Simon Fraser
University gave up on their ski
cabins several years ago, Brett
said UBC is now benefiting from
the cabin after sticking with it
through the tough times.
"For years it (the cabin) was
in the red, but last year we broke
even on it, and this year we may
be able to make some money," he
said.
With student housing being
considered for the lot around it,
the barn could be used a number
of purposes, including an after-
hours non-alcohol bar.
Brett conceded that the barn
could be very expensive, to the
point where it could take as
much as ten years to pay off the
costs.
"But, we will have it for 25
years minimum, and by that
time, when 25,000 of those future
students walk by, they'll say 'gee,
those guys sacrificed their time
and energy for this.'"
However, Board of
Governors rep, Tim Bird, and
director of finance, John
Lipscomb, believe the barn will
be nothing more than a sink hole
for cash.
Not only would the AMS be
$28,000 richer by giving up on
the barn, but the money that
would be spent on it could be
used for other projects, Bird
said.
"That barn is tying up the
hands of council to do other
things," he said.
Both Bird and Lipscomb
said that the money could be
used for daycare facilities or
expansion ofthe SUB.
Bigger SUB
on agenda
for the AGM
by Mark Nielsen
Students will be asked to
approve an expansion to the north
side ofthe Student Union Building
that could cost as much as two
million dollars at the AMS annual
general meeting today.
However, despite the high
dollar figure, AMS president Kurt
Preinsperg said the motion does
not concern a money issue because
fees won't be increased to pay for
the project.
Instead, the AMS wants
students to support extending the
mandate of the $15 students fee
approved by referendum in 1982
for capital projects to include the
expansion. At that time the levy
was intended primarily to pay for
an expansion to the south side of
SUB, completed last year,
although a number of other efforts
were included.
Preinsperg said that AMS
council could have allowed the
expansion without the vote, but
because it's the first project to be
considered for funding through
the capital project fee, it was
brought to a student vote.
"The motion simply tells
students that we need to expand
SUB and that we use that fee levy
for it, even though in 1982 it
wasn't topical because the south
side expansion was the main
objective," Preinsperg said. "The
time has come to say the focus is
now on the north side."
The AGM starts at 4 p.m.
today at Maclnnes Field on the
east side of SUB. It's being held in
conjunction with the annual AMS
barbeque because it is the only
way to bring enough students
together for quorum — ten per
cent of the student population —
to vote on changes to the AMS
contitution and code.
It is estimated that the 11,000
square foot expansion will cost
between 1.5 and two million
dollars. The capital projects fee is
expected to raise $390,000 this
year — based on a predicted
enrollment of 26,000 regular
session students.
Preinsperg admitted that if
students voted down the
expansion, council probably
wouldn't go ahead with it, but
because there is such a need for
club office space, the proposal is not
likely to attract much opposition.
Currently, there are over 200
clubs on campus vying for room in
40* offices located in the SUB.
Preinsperg said the expansion
would add at least 30 offices to that
total.
Additionally, the expansion
would allow easier access to the
SUB for students living in Gage
and people coming from the
parkade. This will be especially
useful when the Bank of Montreal,
which blocks the main corridor on
the lower level in the existing
configuration, is closed.
The expansion is the last of
five motions to be voted on. Here's
a look at the rest:
- As a result of problems with
the calculation of quorum for last
year's Student Recreation Centre
referendum, students will be asked
to vote on a clarification of the
definition of quorum.
The proposed change would
see the bylaw read "the active
members (of the AMS) who are
currently in good standing" instead
of "the Day Members at the Point
Grey Campus."
While this may clarify the
definition of quorum, it will also
increase the number of voters
needed to pass a referendum
because night school students
would be included in the
calculation of quorum.
- Next is a motion to allow
student representatives on the
Senate and the Board of Governors
to assume their seats immediately
after they are elected rather than
after their first meeting with their
respective body.
The motion is intended to
reduce a lapse between being
elected and beginning the term
that has lasted as long as several
months.
- Students will also be asked to
vote on changing the code and
bylaws to eliminate gender specific
language. For example, "his' will be
replaced by 'hers/his.'
- Finally, a motion to change
the AMS executive title of
'coordinator of external affairs' to
'director of external affairs.'
Nine year old Megan Tiede of University Hill Elementary School reminds motorists
that the fourth Avenue entrance is not a race track. Drivers who use this route are
asked to be more aware of the children In the school zone.
DON MAH PHOTO
"*"7*
...L'aL
TT?.
"VW' ygf''' vy 'i% '•^XL^_i« JiS'iliiL" 'f\
-W
CAMPUS BRJEFS
:i
SUB
shelter turned
down
The Alma Mater Society
students' council won't turn the
Student Union Building into an
emergency shelter for homeless
students after all.
Council turned down the
proposal on Wednesday night after
deciding that although it had good
intentions, it was unrealistic.
AMS director of administration, Roma Gopaul-Singh,
listed a number of problems with
the idea, including possible
conflicts with fire and health
regulations, and troubles with
security.
"It just can't be done in this
building," she said.
AMS vice-president, Johanna
Wickie, added that insurance
companies wouldn't underwrite
the scheme.
AMS director of finance, John
Lipscomb, came up with the idea
as a way to handle the student
ihousing crisis during the first few
weeks of September.
If council had approved the
plan, SUB would have become a
shelter of last resort for students
unable to find room in other
reasonable alternatives such as
the Hostel and the YMCA.
Arts representative Mark
Keister said that it was a good
idea, but was initiated too late in
the summer to allow for
preparation time.
Lipscomb, meanwhile, said
that maybe a shelter isn't needed
after all.
"No one's approached me
(about staying at the shelter)," he
said.
Bash to keep
tuffcups
Disposable tuff-cups and
napkins will be part of the AMS
Welcome Back Barbecue to be held
today at Maclnnes Field on the
east side ofthe SUB.
The AMS rejected a proposal
to replace the tuff-cups with
glasses because of safety concerns
and cleaning problems.
Although the tuff-cups can't
be recycled, the AMS was worried
about broken glass and saw
cleaning the old glasses as
unrealistic.
Instead, students attending
the bash will be allowed just one
tuff-cup each to cut down on the
number used.
AMS
supports
Mohawk
supporters
The AMS drafted a letter of
support to be sent to two UBC
students who were in Oka,
Quebec this week to support the
Mohawk blockade.
Jenny Jack and Beverly
Scow, both natives, went behind
the barricades as the Mohawks
continued their stand off with
the armed forces.
The letters expressed
support for each of them, and
wished them a safe and prompt
return.
September 7,1990
THE UBYSSEY/3 n -fr*.  vv .■»*■. A •'V:
■X _
news
St. Marks
College
Roman Catholic Theological College
On U.B.C. Campus
Announces Courses
for 1990 - 1991
Graduate Courses:
1) Augustine: A Christian Transformation of Culture
Thursdays, 1st Term, 7:30 - 9:30 PM
2) Theological Themes in Literature
Mondays, 2nd Term, 7:30 - 9:30 PM
Non-Credit Courses
(normally six weeks starting week of Sept. 17):
1) The Book of Revelation
Mondays, 4:00 - 5:00 PM
2) Ethics of Daily Life
Mondays, 7:30 - 9:00 PM
3) Personalities In the Middle Ages
Mondays, 7:30 - 8:30 PM
4) Two Traditions of Prayer: Teresa of Avila, J. Main
Wednesday, 4:00 - 5:00 PM
5) Galileo, Science and the Catholic Church
Wednesdays, 7:30 - 8:30 PM
6) Thought and Spirituality of Thomas Merlon
Wednesdays, 7:30 - 9:00 PM
7) St. Mark's Little Theatre: 3 Productions from Beckett
Non-Credit Courses
(normally six weeks starting week of Jan. 14):
1) Paul, Prisoner ofthe Lord
Mondays, 4:00 - 5:00 PM
2) The Church in Today's World
Mondays, 7:30 - 9:00 PM
3) The Church in B.C. History
Mondays, 7:30 - 8:30 PM
4) The Religious Vision of Bernard Lonergan
Tuesdays, 7:30 - 9:00 PM
5) Canadian Catholic Religious Women
Tuesdays, 7:30 - 8:30 PM
6) Darwin, Evolution and the Church
Wednesdays, 7:30 - 8:30 PM
7) Jewish Christian Relations
Wednesdays, 7:30 - 9:00 PM
8) Faith and Post Vatican II Architecture
Thursdays, 7:30 - 8:30 PM
Pastoral Courses (both terms):
1) Fundamentals of the Catholic Faith
Tuesdays, 7:30 - 9:00 PM, starting Oct. 9
2) Pastoral Care of the Sick & Aging
Tuesdays, 7:30 - 9:00 PM, starting Sept. 11
3) Third World Immersion
Tuesdays, 7:00 - 8:00 PM, starting Sept. 18
& 4 weeks next summer.
Registration:
Registration for St. Mark's courses is normally done at the
first class.
For the fee schedule consult our Calendar. For course
descriptions consult the same Calendar.
ST. MARK'S COLLEGE
5935 Iona Drive, Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1J7
(604)224-3311
Ex-affairs budget
leaves Brett broke
by Martin Chester
If Vancouver is hit by an
earthquake tomorrow, the AMS
will be able to donate $50 for the
relief effort.
AMS coordinator of external
affairs has an external donations
fund to send money to help relieve
crises around the world. In
previous years the coordinator of
external affairs has brought all
requests before council for
approval.
Brett said he wanted to avoid
the red tape when a worth while
cause appeared.
"All the requests had to go
through council," Brett said, "this
is to streamline the process."
However, budget committee
has reduced the external affairs
budget by 60 per cent from last
year and Brett has had to
scramble to find money for the
fund.
"I can only find $500," he said.
In addition Brett can only spend
10 per cent at a time, or $50. "I'm
working with 60 per cent of last
years budget to do several new
initiatives," he said.
"There are two problems with
budget committee," Brett said.
"One is that the AMS does not
have enough money." Student fees
have not increased since 1982, he
explained, and inflation has
caused an increase of roughly 50
per cent in expenses. Students will
be asked to increase their fees in a
referendum this October.
"The other problem is the
manner in which the decision was
communicated to me," Brett said.
"All I received was a photocopy of
the budget I originally sent in. He
(director of finance John
Lipscomb) didn't have the decency
to explain to me what the changes
were," Brett said.
Lipscomb said budget
committee was involved in an
interna] debate as to whether to
present groups with specific line
item changes in their budgets or
with a lump sum that they must
stay under. He said this debate
has been causing some confusion
with the committee.
Even though AMS revenue
was up $38,000, the budget is tight
because of the number of new
organizations and programs
making demands on the AMS
purse.
UBC students active at Oka
by Chung Wong
Two UBC students were
among more than 100 Natives at
Kanesatake reserve who refused
to line-up to be identified by
Quebec Provincial Police after the
Canadian army tore down the last
of Mohawk barriers.
Jenny Jack, a Tlingit Native
from Atlin B.C. and President of
the UBC Law Students'
Association, and Bev Scow,
President of the Native Indian
Student Association, made the
journey to Oka, Quebec, to support
the Mohawk's land claim.
"I'd rather get shot by a bullet
than torn apart by one of those
dogs," Jack told Globe and Mail as
provincial police with dogs
searched areas that were taken
over by the army.
Police ordered natives in an
emergency shelter to line-up
outside so they could be identified
but they refused.
Last March, Jack presented a
speech to UBC's Board of
Governors concerning "racism on
campus."
She spoke after an
engineering   newsletter   (the
nEUSlettre) containing racist
comments about Natives was
published March 14.
Jack proposed that antidiscrimination courses be
established at UBC.
"I have a very high regard for
her sensibilty on that issue," said
UBC president David Strangway,
adding that both women were
responsible members of the
campus community.
Jack returned to Vancouver
on Wednesday but Native
officials on campus were unsure
of Scow's whereabouts.
Discrimination goes
unreported on campus
by Christina Chen
UBC students who have been
victimized by discrimination are
keeping their mouths shut, said
AMS ombudsperson, Carol
Forsythe.
"As a student, I can see that
problems of discrimination are
prevalent on campus, but as an
ombudsperson, I don't hear much
about it," Forsythe said.
"Many just suffer in silence."
In discrimination cases, the
ombudsperson presents a
complaint or concern to a
discriminating party, while
maintaining the complainants
anonymity. The Ombudsoffice
also provides counselling for
discriminated students.
The Ombudsoffice is the only
campus outlet which deals with
discrimination on the ground of
race, gender or sexual orientation.
However, the office has no
authority to deal with
administration or faculty.
"At present, the Ombudsoffice
is not recognized by the
administration," Forsythe said. "I
would like to see an Ombudsoffice
that is university— wide which
can deal with all any political
bodies— including BoG."
But the reluctance of students
to report incidences of
discrimination persists, said AMS
anti-discrimination coordinator,
Carol Hui.
"Many students feel nothing
can be done about it, or are afraid
to be associated with the stigma of
being a victim."
Hui's    summer   position,
Student writes on "wall" during last year's HATE
HURTS campaign
created after a racist newsletter
was published on campus last
March, terminates September 7.
The AMS will not create a
permanent position unless the
university administration
provides half the funding, Hui
said, adding that the total cost
would be $16,000 a year for a full-
time salary.
"But for now, anyone who has
been discriminated against should
go to the ombudsoffice," she said.
"Even though it's not recognized
by the administration, at least it
(the discrimination case) is
documented."
To take action against
discriminatory professors,
students at present would have to
go to the B.C. Human Rights
Association, Hui said.
This fall, a faculty task force
will investigate the severity ofthe
discrimination problem on
campus.
4/THE UBYSSEY
September 7,1990 SPORTS
Dinos feast on
'Bird meat
by Wayne King
It was a good news-bad news
scenario for the UBC Thunderbird
football team in their season
opening 34-15 loss to the
University of Calgary Dinosaurs.
The good news came in the
form of the T-Birds ability to put
points on the board with an
inexperienced offense. Fourth
year wide receiver Jason Walley
hauled in second quarter
touchdown passes of 7 and 14
yards as
UBC
jumped out
to a 15-0
lead.
24 carries and 3 touchdowns along
the ground and 81 yards on 4
catches through the air. UBC
running back Jim Stewart
countered with 54 yards on 19
carries while Walley pulled in 5
passes for 82 yards and 2 TDs.
The key to the T-Bird season
will be their ability to put points on
the scoreboard and now, with one
of the offense's four returning
starters out for the season, that
seems less likely.
Second year quarterback
Vince
Danielson
will try to
fill Lynch's
shoes and
lead the
young,
inexperienced
T-Bird
offense. A
graduate of
Vancouver
College,
Danielson
saw limited
action last
season
completing 7
of 11 passes
for 124 yards
and 1
touchdown.
Paul
Sheremeta,
who comes to
UBC from
Port Moody
the board at the 13 minute mark of via the University of Washington,
the second quarter with a 1 yard will serve as Danielson's back-up.
touchdown plunge and it was all The T-Bird defense features
Dinos from there on as they scored nine members from last year's
34 unanswered points to record team returning led by veterans
the victory. Matt Clarke, Roger Hennig and
The worst news for the T- Doug Shorman. Shorman has his
Birds came late in the fourth work cut out for him as he makes
quarter when quarterback Doug the transition from linebacker to
Lynch suffered a season ending defensive end.
knee injury. Lynch, in his second
year as the T-Birds starting pivot, The Simon Fraser University
finished the day with 14 Clansmen will be UBC's next
completions on 25 attempts for opponent as the T-Birds try to
220 yards, 2 touchdowns and 2 avenge their 41-27 loss to the Clan
interceptions. in last season's Shrum Bowl. UBC
Izquierdo, who was named will host the 1990 Shrum Bowl
the Canada West Player of the Saturday September 8 at
Week, led the Dinos attack. He Thunderbird Stadium with kick-
finished the day with 145 yards on off at 7:30pm.
Grid rivalry resumes
However,
that was all
the T-Bird
offense
could
muster as
a 1 1 -
Canadian
running
back J.P.
Izquierdo
and the rest
of the
Dinosaur
offense
took control
of the
game.
Izquierdo
put
Calgary on
Out for the season: injured quarterback
Doug Lynch
by Wayne King
Inter-university athletics in
B.C. has produced some intense
rivalries in recent years and
football's 1990 Shrum Bowl is no
exception. Provincial bragging
rights are on the line as the 1989
Canada West finalist UBC
Thunderbirds and the perennially
strong Simon Fraser University
Clansmen square off in the annual
Caravatta.
Both teams feature solid
veteran defences that should
control the contest. UBC's Doug
Shorman makes the move from
linebacker to defensive end and
will compliment an already
veteran T-Bird defensive unit
while SFU senior defensive end
Steve Grant anchors the Clan's
defensive line.
fall   classic   at   Thunderbird—       1989 Hee Crieghton nominee
Stadium this Saturday.
The Shrum Bowl was first
played in 1967 and in the 13
games since, the two universities
have reached a stalemate with
identical 6-6-1 records. UBC had
won four straight games before
last season's decisive 41-27 Clan
victory.
This season may best be
described as a rebuilding year for
both teams. With starting
quarterback Doug Lynch out for
the season with a knee injury,
UBC will have only three
offensive starters returning from
last year's squad. The SFU offense
will be hard pressed to fill the
voids left by second team all-star
running back Sean Millington
and starting quarterback Giulio
Jim Stewart will lead the UBC
running attack which should be
the pivotal element in this
season's showdown. UBC's
capacity to run the ball and SFU's
ability to shut Stewart down may
be the difference between a win
and a loss for both teams.
The game will be the Clan's
season opener while UBC will be
coming off a 34-15 loss at the
hands ofthe University of Calgary
Dinosaurs.
Not all the entertainment will
be on the field as the stands will be
alive with the rambunctious fans
that are always in attendance
when these two teams get
together.
Kickoff is at 7:30 at
Thunderbird Stadium.
TJL
nma
TA TRAINING DAY 1990
Friday, September 14th, 1990
Graduate Student Centre
The TA Union and Faculty Development Project have collaborated to design a series of seminars for TA's
on Friday, September 14. We invite you to take part. There is no formal registration procedures, so
please mark the date in your calendar.
AGENDA
9:00- 10:00 am
PART I: TA/faculty Teamwork
• Ken Stoddart, Department of Sociology
PART II: Equity in the Classroom
• Jon Shapiro and Margaretha Hoek
Advisor's Office, Sexual Harassment Policy
PART III: Safety in the Classroom
• Lindsey Martin - CPE 2278, Health & Safety Officer
• Terry Gomez - Bio Safety Officer, UBC, OH & S
10:15 -Noon
Facillitating Classroom Discussion
• Janice Flamengo, Department of English
• George Pavlich, Department of Anthropology and Sociology
1:00 - 2:30 pm
Student and Evaluation and Assessment
• Harold Ratzlaff, Facility of Education
• Linda Pashka, Department of English
2:45 - 4:00 pm
Preparing and Delivering Lectures
• Jane Flick, Department of English
• Dan Clayton, Deapartment of Geography
4:30 pm
Join us afterwards in Graduate Student Centre Beer Garden
Faculty members who work with TAs are invited to a no host social hour in the
Graduate Student Centre Beer Garden at 4:30 pm
For more information, please phone the TA office 224-2118
At Bank of Montreal, we do everything we can to help you get your money
quickly, simply and confidentially.
Bring your completed student loan application to any Bank of Montreal
branch or the Student Loan Centre and you will receive priority service.
In most cases your money will be available the next business day.
• Ffi$T Ef\$Y access to your student loan
• COAA/£AJ(£A/Tday and night banking through Instabank*
• LOW-COST chequing & savings accounts
STUDENT LOAN
CENTRE
390 Main Street
Vancouver, British Columbia
665-3768
OR CALL YOUR LOCAL BRANCH
tt
Bank of Montreal
September 7,1990
THE UBYSSEY/5 MAJORS 	
and
GRADUATE STUDENTS
in the
DEPARTMENT
-Of ASIAN STUDIES-
There will be a meeting on
Thursday, Sept. 13 at 12:30 pm
in the Asian Studies Lounge lo
discuss student activities for
the coming year and to elect
student representatives to the
Faculty of Arts and to the
committees in the Department
of Asian Studies.
%
P
I
warn
UBC THEATRE DEPARTMENT
GENERAL
AUDITIONS
For the
Frederic Wood Theatre
  Season 	
on Saturday, September 8th
and Sunday, September 9th
228-3880
Info. & Appointment
That's right! A 10" cheese Pizza
for only   2.
Clip coupon along dolled line
Additional toppings only $1
00
Pick up only... No deliveries at these prices. Expires
Thursday, September 27, 1990. Not valid with any other
offer. Limit 10 Pizzas per order, please.
Additional Toppings
Ham
Pineapple
Mushrooms
X-tracheese
Bacon
Onion
Salami
Pepperoni
Sausage
Tomato
Green Peper
Black Olive
Hot Pepper
X-tra Dough
Ground Beef
OPEN FOR LUNCH
224 - 1030
Domino's Pizza
5736 University Blvd.
In the Village
VISA
I
V/.
Now Hiring Inside and Delivery Personnel
Japan's Daito University hockey team is currently
holding a pre-season hockey school at UBC.
MIKE COURY PHOTO
UBC hosts Japanese
university hockey team
by Michael Booth
For almost 30 years, the UBC
Thunderbird hockey team has
maintained a close relationship
*_th teams from Japan. The latest
manifestation of these ties is the
presence of players from Daito
University at UBC for a pre-season
hockey school.
Daito, a "B" division team in
Japan's university league, came to
Canada through the efforts of UBC
assistant coach Herb
Wakabayashi.
"They came here to improve
themselves for a shot at "A" division," Wakabayashi said. "They
used to be in "A" division but in
recent years they have slipped to
the second or "B" division. Their
biggest recruiting problem, much
like UBC's, is the difficulty of
finding good hockey players whose
grades are good enough to get into
the university."
Hockey is a sport on the ascent
among Japanese fans. The top
league encompasses six teams, fed
by two divisions of university teams
and leagues at the high school and
club level.
Television has also contributed
to the sports' burgeoning popularity.
"The Japanese league games
are televised nationally and in the
mid-70's it was the most televised
national sport in Japan,"
Wakabayashi said. "They have
started to televise National Hockey
League games on a television station with access to an English
language satellite feed and apparently ifs getting a pretty good
response."
UBC has played a large role in
teaching the sport to the Japanese.
Father David Bauer, an instructor
at St. Mark's College (Vancouver
School of Theology) and the coach
of the Thunderbirds in the early
1960's, set the tone for future relations between UBC and Japan.
"When he (Father Bauer) was
at St. Mark's College, for 20 years
he came over to Japan every year
to help out," Wakabayashi said.
"Through Father Bauer, many
UBC players ended up in Japan;
players included (current
Thunderbird head coach) Terry
O'Malley, Barry Mackenzie, Doug
Bucannan, Ross Cory and Bill
Holoway.
"Father Bauer recogni zed that
you needed character players to
play in Japan and that's why these
players were recommended."
Wakabayashi is himself a part
ofthe UBC-Japan connection. Born
and raised in Ontario,
Wakabayashi attended Boston
University on ahockey scholarship.
After graduation in 1969 he went
to Japan where he spent 20 years
with the Seibu team in Tokyo, first
as a player, and later as a coach.
Planning to get out of hockey,
Wakabayashi returned to Canada
last year only to find himselfbehind
the bench with the Thunderbirds.
"I decided I wanted to get out
of hockey and into something else
so I came to Vancouver," he said.
"Dave Hindmarch was UBC's assistant coach at the beginning of
last season and he couldn't put the
time in due to other commitments.
I told Terry (O'Malley) that I would
help out and I ended up here the
whole year."
In addition to serving as UBC's
assistant coach, Wakabayashi
represents a Japanese company
with an interest in promoting
hockey skills to Japanese players.
"The company I represent
wanted to have hockey schools in
Canadafor Japanese kids,"he said.
"We decided to go ahead with them
back in February so we didn't have
much time."
Daito represents the third
Japanese group to come to UBC
this summer. The interest in the
program is high and already
Wakabayashi i s prepari ng to bring
between six and ten groups next
year.
"A lot of kids want to come,"
Wakabayashi said. "In fact, the
UBC hockey school already has a
lot of Japanese kids taking part."
Hey sport!
Want to do more than just sit on the sidelines? Cover
the sports on campus for THE UBYSSEY.
WE NEED PEOPLE WHO GET EXCITED BY SPORTS.
There is always a game going on somewhere.
Do some serious Bird watching!!!
Call The Ubyssey at 228-2301 or drop by the office,
SUB 241 K.
WE COULD ALSO USE
SPORTS PHOTOGRAPHERS.
6/THE UBYSSEY.
September 7,1990 SPORTS
Intramurals: something for everyone
by Paul Abbott
Intramural Sports offers
awide variety of activities to U.B.C.
students. The program is designed
to accommodate all sporting interests, from running and racquetball to broomball and badminton. Regardless of the constraints put on your timetable,
whether your interest is solely
recreational or if your nature is
more competitive, Intramurals has
something for you.
UBC Intramurals Director Nestor Korchinsky called the
program "unique in Canada" in its
breadth and scope, stressing the
importance of the 110 student
volunteers who make Intramurals
possible.
"The total university experience offers an incredible
amount of opportunities," he said.
"Students must first be made
aware of these opportunities, and
then they must get involved. We're
encouraging students to get involved in the university".
Highlighting the Intramural program are the numerous
special events. Our own "Storm
the Wall" i s the bigge st intramural
event in Canada. Last year close to
500 teams of five participated in
the annual relay-triatholon which
culminates with each team scaling
the twelve foot wall.
Prom November 12 to 16,
"U.B.C. Invades the Dome". This
event brings together several aspects of the program, including
soccer, field hockey, running, bik-
ingand volleyball, all in the friendly
confines of B.C. Place Stadium.
Other special events include "The Day of The Longboat",
the U.B.C. Triatholon, the Arts 20
Relay, the Centipede Road Race
and other events designed to get
students involved in both the intramural program and the U.B.C.
community.
For students interested in
team sports, Intramurals offers
structured leagues in a wide variety of activities. Teams are organized through faculty, residence,
club and fraternity/sorority. Furthermore, students may organize
and enter their own teams. Leagues
are organized into men's, women's
and co-rec, and are separated into
divisions to recognize different
levels of play.
Team sports offered include soccer, field hockey, ice
hockey, ball hockey, basketball,
and volleyball, with soccer and fiel d
hockey being offered in first term
only.
If you are interested in
being a referee, and picking up
some extra cash to boot,
Intramurals is accepting applications, and offers first aid and orientation clinics.
For those of you whose
interests lie elsewhere, intramurals
has organized events and tournaments on a one-time, and semi-
regular basis for sports both obscure
and commonplace. Racquet sports
include tennis, badminton, racquetball, table tennis, and squash,
with several tournaments organized for each over the course ofthe
year.
Cyclingenthusiastswillbe
pleased to note the schedule of road
and mountain bike races runs from
September to March. Regular
events are held on campus, with
special races to be held in B.C.
Race Stadium in November.
A regular feature on campus are the noon hour runs. Here
againaregular schedule of Tuesday
and Friday runs is spiced up with
the occasional "special event".
These include such strangely titled
events as the "Hash House Harrier",
and "Reach for the top ofthe Dome".
Registration is required only for
the special events.
Other sports included on
the Intramural agenda include
volleyball and badminton on a
regular drop-in basis, softball,
curling, walleyball and broomball.
Ifyou wish to inquire further, the Intramural office is located
at SUB room 66 on the lower concourse. Office hours are 10-5 Monday, Tuesday, Friday, and 10-8
Wednesday and Thursday. For 24
hour information, call 228-6688.
Speatemf
UBC's Student Run Peer Counselling
& Information Centre
Is now accepting applications
for volunteer positions.
All training will be provided.
Application blanks are available at
the Speakeasy office, SUB 100B.
PLEASE NOTE: Deadline for application
is Friday Sept. 18th, 1990.
BHJ
B.C. TEACHERS CREDIT UNION
Tired Of Line-ups?
AT TCU, WE TRY TO ELIMINATE THEM!!
EVERY ONE IS WELCOME TO TRY OUR:
• Fast Friendly Personal Service
• Cash Cards
• Saturday Hours
• Toll Free Telephone Banking
• Competitive Interest
• Low Service Charges
Visit one of our 5 Branches soon.
BRANCHES NEAR UBC
DUNBAR
4445 Dunbar Street
Vancouver, B.C.
V6S 2G4
Telephone 224-2364
OTHER BRANCHES
Surrey, Burnaby, Victoria
Toll Free in B.C.
1-800-663-3345
OAKRIDGE
5594 Cambie Street
Vancouver, B.C.
V5Z 3Y5
Telephone 324-6655
Runners at last years Arts 20 Relay
DAVID LOH PHOTO
Free activities abound on campus
The UBC campus presents
many opportunities for casual
recreational enthusiasts to partake
in the sports of their choice without being burdened by the rigidity
of organized schedules.
While Intramurals manages
to address the needs of those who
enjoy structured events, those who
like to go out and do something at
the drop of a hat will be pleased
with the variety of activities possible on campus and in the surrounding environs. Best of all, the
activities are FREE.
Hiking, Mountain Biking
The UBC endowment lands
(A.K.A. Pacific Spirit Park) are
riddled with trails that take you
deep into the forest in a matter of
minutes. Trails start in the woods
behind Fairview Crescent residence and along the 16th avenue
approach to campus with other
trails located along the 4th avenue
approach. Hiking can be done on
most trails but mountain bikers
should watch for signs telling them
which paths exclude their use.
Wreck Beach,
Tower Beach
Located directly below the edge of
campus, these beaches are popular
for those interested in just getting
away from it all for a while. The
real exercise here comes when you
decide to return and have to climb
a rather unforgiving hill. Trails
down to the beaches are located
near Place Vanier residence, behind the Museum of Anthropology
and across from the Vancouver
School of Theology.
Cycling
The long roads connecting
UBC with the rest of ci vili za tion as
we know it are great for cycling, as
is North West Marine drive which
encircles the bulk of the campus.
16th avenue is probably the best
with its long, flat straight stretch
and wider than average bicycle
lanes.
Hockey
The Winter Sports Centre offers free drop-in hockey for students everyday until 12:30. Between 12:30 and 4:30 students can
play for a nominal charge per
hour.The games are informal and
whoever shows up gets to play.
Since it is unorganized, there are
often players with years of experience playing along side of players
just learning the game.
Swimming
The Aquatic Centre was built
with studentmoney and is the only
athletic facility on campus where
stu dents have a say in its operation.
It offers free swimmingfor students
at several times during the day,
but often at less than convenient
hours. The centre also has a weight
lifting area. Drop by the centre to
find out when the pool is available.
/_■
*V'l
\
Fire up
your Fridays
at the Fireside
Under New Management
„ licensed Bar & Snacks
** *      ^ '^ ■•      *■
■'^\     m with
^*- ■*-*"* -^ ^    ***, „   . •-
-Roots Round Up-'
8 pm, September 14, 1990
(no cover for Graduate Students,
and guests; $3 for others) \ *
^<t\
On Stage at \   s *
the Graduate Student dentre
6371 Cresent Road\    %
All Welcome!
For more information call
SepV§rnberlV:_$95
THEUBYSSEY/r "V **,**.■■ ■■■■.■■
?H£ FRlNOE FiSf W&L
THE FRINGE FESTIVAL
THE FRINGE FESTIVAL
Youth
experiences
explored
irect action, the Fringe approach
by Harald Gravelsins
a     UBC Theatre profs
/\  advice to David L.
^_LYoung in second year was
to find some other career
interest.
"(He told me) I was a
detriment to young people
and a detriment to the
education system."
FRINGE THEATRE
Nuclear Family
Mount Pleasant Community
Centre
Sun-Tues, 5:45 p.m.
Jim
Vancouver Little Theatre
Sun-Tues, 8:45 p.m.
Young graduated with
majors in theatre and history
and is currently enrolled in
UBC's education department.
He is participating in his
fourth Fringe as the
playwright of Nuclear Family
and the director of his brother
Mark's Jim.
Young is a theatre
company director with the
confidence, thick skin and
grant-winning ability to
present issue-oriented,
socially critical theatre.
Nuclear Family is a play
with a hard edge. It is
concerned with incest, drug
abuse and alcoholism. The
playbill includes a caution to
the public about the subject
matter. Young has advised
his own mother that it's not a
show she would want to
attend, although she is
looking forward to seeing
Jim. At each performance,
Young expects at least a
handful of members to walk
out.
Young's objective is not
to annoy his audience; he
wants to move people to
action by presenting
evocative material grounded
in social, and especially local,
concerns.
"I want change through
provoking thought, through
images on stage that will
send you home in a state of
shock, in a state of
discomfort."
Young has collaborated
closely with director David
Secunda to develop the
texture ofthe dialogue into a
tight, carefully-paced, sixty-
minute show. Nuclear Family
forms part of a trilogy with
the 1989 Fringe Production
Visions of Prostitutes and a
planned 1991 Fringe
production.
Jim was written four
years ago as a gift to Young
by his older brother. The
elder Leiren-Young is a freelance journalist based in
Vancouver and author ofthe
acclaimed political satire
Escape From Fantasy
Gardens and Beacon Hill.
The script for Jim was
reworked for its mounting at
the Fringe by the Impulse
Theatre Company. Impulse is
the only youth theatre
company in Canada that pays
its performers. Under the
leadership of David Young, it
recently moved into its own
building, The New Space,
located at Selkirk and 72nd
Avenue.
The inspiration for the
play was Young's own
adoration for the music of
The Doors and for Doors'
leader Jim Morrison. It
explores the phenomenon of
worshipping rock stars as
heroes, and how such an
obsession affects young
people's perceptions ofthe
world and their place in it.
Jim aims to entertain as
well as to present material of
contemporary interest to the
post-yuppie generation. The
play features Justin Clow as
a young man on a pilgrimage
to the Paris tomb of his idol,
Jim Morrison. Student
admission is $4.00.
Venues for The Fringe
VENUE 1 Arcadian Hall 2214 Main St.
VENUE 2 Main Dance Place 2214 Main St.
VENUE 3 Anza Club 3 West Sth Ave at Main
VENUE 4 Underground, Broadway & Kingsway
VENUE 5 White Crane Studio, 2440 Main St.
VENUE 6 Cinderella Ballroom, 185 E. llth Ave.
VENUE 7 Heritage Hall, 3102 Main St.
VENUE 8 Vancouver Little Theatre, 3102 Main St.
VENUE 9 Cambrian Hall, 215 E. 17th Ave.
VENUE 10 Mt. Pleasant Community Ctr, 3161
Ontario St. at 16th
TRANSIT  Number 9 (Broadway) to Main Street
Number 3 (Main)
Focus on The Fringe
by Harald Gravehins
The Fringe is taking
Vancouver by storm. And
the reason is obvious.
Access.
Access is seeing and
being seen. It's hearing
and being seen. It's hear
ing and being heard. It's
being there and taking
part.
The Fringe is about
access. For performers
and audiences to each
other and among
themselves, ofthe city to its
people and of people to the
culture of their place and
time.
Access makes all the
difference. It brings out
feelings and ideas that
otherwise might have little
place to take expression. It's
a lot of fun, honest, often
unpredictable, and at least a
little bit risky.
Now is your chance to get
caught up in the whirl of
passions and energies of
living, breathing, daring,
accessible culture.
It's a great time.
It's affordable.
It's not a stuffy night out
with the tux and tiara crowd.
It's real and its happening;
it's for you and it's worth
going to.
In this issue and
continuing next week, The
Ubyssey brings you reports
on the shows, the actors,
the directors, the audiences
and activities that make up
the Fringe. A good number
of participants in the
Fringe are UBC students,
faculty and alumni, some of
whom are previewed on
these pages. Be a part of it.
Make the scene. Summer
gets carried over at least as
long as the Fringe lasts
(until next Sunday).
Fairy tale adopts
a modern setting
by Nadene Rehnby
GUENEVER is a fairytale—a
beautiful, sad fairytale of
queens, kingdoms and evil
sorceresses.
Playwright Jason Smith has
based this, his "absolutely very
first play" ("I never even toyed
with the idea of writing a play
before...") on the Arthurian
stories ofthe Knights ofthe
Round Table and on the tales of
love and betrayal surrounding
Queen Guenever, her husband
the King, and her lover, Sir
Lancelot.
FRINGE THEATRE
Guenever
Heritage Hall
Mon.-Wed., 6:15p.m.
Thurs.-Fri., ll:30p.m
The result is an enchanting
piece that carries its audience to
another time and place, a feeling
that will only be improved upon
when the company moves out of
their rehearsal space and into
the enchanting atmosphere of
the Fringe's Heritage Hall.
But there is more to this
story than your typical fairytale.
Smith has challenged the ideas
of knights in shining armour
arriving to save damsels in
distress, ideas that were the
framework ofthe fairytales we
knew as children. He has
carefully interwoven this
fairytale with twentieth century
realities, issues such as moral
obligation and the constraints of
our social structure.
"Ifs becomes more obvious
when you look at the language,"
says Kathy Duborg, a UBC
Bachelor of Fine Arts graduate
who plays the magical Vivien.
"As a woman, Guenever's
responsibilities, her duties, are
pressed upon."
Lisa Beley, who plays the
Queen, finds an important
example of this in the make-up of
her character. "She feels guilt at
her inability to conceive, as if by
being unable to fulfill her duty as
wife and mother by bearing a
child, her life is a failure."
The tragic tone ofthe play
reflects the way these ideas
become destructive to all people.
The work has been written
and rewritten on a workshop
basis, counting on the
collaboration of Beley and
Duborg in their roles as
Guenever and Vivien, and by
Michael Cavers, who is playing
Sir Lancelot. MFA directing
student Gerald Vanderwoude
joined on as the play geared up
for its opening at the Fringe.
The idea for Guenever came
up when these five artists were
studying theatre at UBC. Smith,
who also acts in the play, feels
the inspiration to write
Guenever came out of a "total
frustration with a lack of
anything theatrical to do. I
wanted to act, and if no-one has
anything for me to do, fine, 111
write it myself." And though he
feels there is a lot of good current
Canadian work, he claims he is
"certainly not made aware of it,"
and applauds the Fringe for
providing the opportunity.
In fact, the entire company
is quick to credit the Fringe
Festival for providing them the
opportunity to develop their own
work. "It would have been almost
impossible for me to have done
this without the Fringe," claims
Smith, calling the Fringe
"invaluable to theatre in
Vancouver."
The au pair man
dines out
By Leah Hudson
IN anticipation ofthe sixth
annual Fringe Festival, The
Ubyssey spoke with actor
John Murphy, a graduate of
UBC's BFA acting program. He
is appearing in two Fringe plays:
The Au Pair Man, by Irish writer
Hugh Leonard, and Beyond The
Night Cafe, a new play written
by fellow UBC BFA graduate,
David Mackay.
FRINGE THEATRE
The Au Pair Man
Vancouver Little Theatre
Fri-Sat, 6:30 p.m.
Beyond the Night Cafe
Cinderella Ballroom
Tues-Thurs, 10:00 p.m.
The Au Pair Man, written in
1969, explores the relationship
between a young Irish boy,
Eugene Hardigan (played by
Murphy), and his British
employer, Mrs. Rogers (played by
Margaret Gobie).
The play operates on all
levels, examining the political,
social and personal ramifications
ofthe antagonism between
_?__tei.n and Ireland. But, says
Murphy, "there's alot of comedy
in it. It mixes (elements of)
drama, farce, tragedy and
comedy, which is something Irish
playwrights are very good at
doing."
Beyond The Night Cafe, says
Murphy, is "completely different.
It's about Van Gogh, Strindberg
and Nietzsche, and the different
types of madness they have and
how it relates to their creativity.
It's set in the 1890's...the
beginning ofthe modern age, the
first time in history where man
said there is no God, there's
nothing, what do you do?"
Murphy was drawn to the
plays because, though very
different stylistically, they both
examine the necessity for self-
awareness: "We put on these
masks and think we're becoming
grown-up...and then something
happens to make us feel like a
little kid again. I guess the point
is that no matter how hard you
try you can never avoid pain. It's
stupid to try to. It's avoiding the
truth."
For Murphy, as a young
actor, the Fringe offers valuable
time to push personal and
artistic boundaries, an "on-the-
edge" experience. He describes
the Fringe as "a perfect
opportunity...for new artists to
show their work. It's also an
opportunity for me as an actor to
look at a play that I've always
wanted to do."
As in the case of The Au Pair
Man, he says "I see a lot of
myself in it. My parents are Irish
so I want to learn more about the
situation between Ireland and
Britain. I find it fascinating."
And in a world of theatre
that seems increasingly director
oriented, Murphy feels that the
Fringe is "a chance for actors to
be the directors...I think theatre
should be put back in the hands
ofthe actors...theatre happens
with the actors, between the
actors. It's a chance when you
love a play, and you want to do it
for people. (The play) has more
meaning, you feel like ifs more
your own."
Staff picks for The Fringe
Ubyssey staffers Greg
Davis, Harald Gravelsins,
Leah Hudson and Brenda
Wong list some possible
choices for this weekend.
Swize Bansi Is Dead
Fri-Sat, 9pm, Sun-Mon,
6:15pm
Arcadian Hall, $7
Subject: South African
Apartheid
Comment: Presented by
New Jersey's African Arts
Ensemble; a classic piece in
the theatre of cultural
emancipation. (HG)
Mump and Snoot in
"Caged" with Wog
Fri-Sat, 4pm
Heritage Hall, $7
Subjfect: What clowns do,
but directed at adults.
Comment: Sophisticated,
ecstatic, irreverent and
highly acclaimed; 1989 Best
ofthe Fringe. (HG)
A Florentine Tragedy
Fri-Sat, 6:15pm
Heritage Hall, $7
Subject: Renaissance Italy
through the eyes of a
Victorian decadent.
Comment: A rare staging of
this Oscar Wilde play; lust!
jealousy! violence!
Performed by the Adelphi
Screamers who received
1989 Best of Fringe for Lady
Audley's Secret. (LH)
Summit Conference
Sun, 6:45pm, Mon, 4pm
Underground, $5
Subject: Eva Braun and
Clara Peracci have tea while
Hitler and Mussoloni plan
their conquests in the next
room.
Comment: While Hitler and
Mussolini are the two most
notorious dictators in
history, little has been
revealed of their lovers.
Bound to be full of dark
surprises. (GD)
A Resounding Tinkle
Fri-Sat, 11:30pm, Sun-Mon,
4pm
Vancouver Little Theatre,
$7
Subject: Something to do
with elephant trunks and
snakes. Sounds rather
phallic.
Comment: If your mind is
as wild and cluttered as a
jungle, this play may be a
good bet. (GD)
Mahararini and the
Maple Leaf
Sat-Sun 12:15 pm, Mon,
4:45pm
Cindrella Ballroom, $7
Subject: Culture clash
between East Indians and
Canadians.
Comment: Intriguing and
definitely off the beaten
track. (BW)
A Pheonix Too
Frequent
Fri-Sat, 11:45pm.
Cambrian Hall, $7
Subject: A young woman
decides to die in the tombs
only to have her plans
altered when a soldier
guarding the bodies
stumbles upon her.
Comment: According to
actress Sarah Rodgers, the
play celebrates the "joy of
life."(BW)
The Bronte Brothers
Sat-Sun, 2pm, Mon, 11pm.
Heritage Hall, $7
Subject: Wuthering
Heights and Jane Eyre are
acted out with a gender
twist, exploring madness
and creative genius in
Victorian England.
Comment: A farce which is
both funny and solemn,
questioning how a society
defines mental disorder.
(BW)
Sex Maniac
Mon, 4pm
Heritage Hall, $7
Subject: A crazed professor
is attracted to three very
distinct women.
Comment: Approaches the
theme of madness in a
more light-hearted nature;
In Tuesday9s issue of
The Ubyssey
■ Reviews, interviews and commentary
■ From the Streets - Audience Response
■ Staff Picks for September 11-13
■ Photos, graphics and more
8/THE UBYSSEY
September 7,1990
September 7,1990
THE UBYSSEY/? LOOKS LIKE THIS.
_&,
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SOUNDS LIKE THIS.
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THE ARTS
Celtic- folks send it up
fey Colin Maycock
The Cruel Elephant,
a recently opened
club at the seedier
end of Granville, is,
rather unfortunately,
not the greatest place to see live
bands. This, I'm convinced, is
due to its rather odd layout and -
the fact that the stage, as well as
the dance floor, is noticeably
lower than the rest ofthe club.
Perhaps if the Cruel Elephant
were an amphitheater this idea
would work better both acoustically and visually.
MUSIC
The Stoaters and The Clansmen
The Cruel Elephant
August 31
As the venue is only licensed as
a lounge, food is supposed to be
consumed by those drinking.
This also means that it closes
early, so the evening's entertainment begins a lot sooner than
most other establishments. All
of which means that it's a good
idea to arrive while the evening
is young and your stomach is
empty.
A decimated version of The
Clansmen started the night off
with a short set of Scottish love
songs, traditional jigs and Irish
rebel tunes. Butchering the line
up, now consisting solely of
guitar, mandolin and violin,
seems to have given the band a
stronger focus and demonstrates
just how superfluous the other
five members actually were. The
Clansmen are a basic, upbeat
Celtic folk group. The songs are
simple and affecting, mainly due
to the singer's tar textured voice.
It's his raw edged vocals that
transform the most sickeningly
sentimental lyrics into truly
moving poetry.
After a short intermission The
Stoaters strolled on to the stage,
exuding confidence that initially
seems a little misplaced, emanating as it does from a bunch of
people dressed in rather silly
sailors'suits.
The first song, Lord
Donal's Wife, a delightful ditty
concerning adultery, death and
revenge in medieval Scotland,
quickly dispels the feelings of
incongruity. The drums and bass
glisten and roll like a thunderstorm in the tropics, while the
guitar, accordion and penny
whistle provide the aural
equivalents of forked lightning in
the dark sky and the sparkling
delight of a soft, sunny summer
shower.
The sinewy rhythms
and shimmering melodies
continue as the band mix
revamped, revised and turbo-
charged traditional folk tunes
with a number of their own
excellent songs.
The Stoaters' own brand of
folk-rock is dance music that is
also wonderful to listen to, a
musical achievement that is all
too rare these days. Not only do
the boys in the sailor suits know
what they're doing, they do it
remarkably well. Don't miss
them—they're as good as they
think they are.
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Roots Roundup enthralled crowds in front of the SUB Wednesday
during a noon time show. With good natured comments about having
to go back to school they kicked off the new year with a great set and
a lot of energy on a beautiful sunny day.
VV=
3737 W. 10th Ave.
(10th and Alma)
Vancouver, B.C.
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10/THE UBYSSEY
September f, 139G tHiAim
Sharing the dance
by Effie Pow
11T   might have shown you the
J_ discrete transmission of a
right angle, but what ifyou
were looking at the hair in my
armpits?"
The right angle ofthe
body is what Jennifer Mascall
ponders aloud in her dance
piece, Cathedral. Mascall
combines dance with text,
presenting intriguing contrasts
in sight, sound and movement.
DANCE
Dancing on the Edge
Firehall Arts Centre
September 5 to 15
The Mascall Dance is
one ofthe numerous dance
companies and individual
performers participating in
Dancing on the Edge, a festival
of contemporary dance. The
festival opened Wednesday
night and will run until next
Saturday at the Firehall Arts
Centre, with satellite venues at
Tamahnous Studio and the
Storefront on Commercial
Drive.
"The body is built like a
cathedral, but where is the altar
and how many dancers ever find
it?"
This is Jennifer Mascall
speaking again.
Mascall's piece effectively conveys the relationship
between dancer and audience,
expressesing her desire as a
dancer for the audience to
understand her movement.
She wants us to see and
feel the right angle in the crook
of her elbow in the way that she
does.
Mascall's piece exemplifies the need to make contemporary dance accessible to audiences. Her words reduce the self-
indulgence of some performances—when there is no story
being told or emotion shared and
the audience is isolated.
With sixty-five choreographers and in its third year,
Dancing on the Edge provides an
array of styles in dance. Alternating presentations between
the theatre and courtyard stage,
the Firehall Arts Centre provides
a pleasurable venue for the
energy that will be generated for
the duration ofthe dance
festival.
—Rhodes Scholarship —
for 1991
The Rhodes Shoarship is tenable at the University of Oxford. Application formis for 1991 are now available in the UBC Awards Office. The
scholarships are normally granted for two years and the value is at least
£12,000 per year.
Candidates mush
• be Canadian citizens or persons domiciled in Canada
• have been born between October 2,1966 and October 1,1972;
• be unmarried; and
• have completed at least three years of University training
by October 1991.
Successful candidates will have demonstrated literary and scholastic
attainments, fondness of and success in outdoor sports, qualities of
truth, courage, devotion to duty, sympathy for and protection of the
weak, kindliness, unselfishness and fellowship, moral force of character
and instincts to lead and take an interest in their contemporaries.
Deadline for completed applications: October 26,1990
& TOC Crjrtetran
Htsftence
We invite you to Join us by
starting the year in
iWot-Slii
P
Speaker:
MICHAEL GREEN
Date: This Sunday, Sept 9,9:30 -10:30 pm
Place: V.S.T. Vancouver School of Theology, Chapel of the Epiphany
Organized by the Student Residents of Carey Hall
Worship for Students, By Students.
Are you literate? Could you fool
people? Join the hordes of revolutionary news maggots. We meet
regularly at noon on Wednesdays
in SUB 241K, also known as hell.
iid_r©ri© irm
110-11180 Voyageur Way, Richmond, BC, V6X 3N8
Phone: (604) 278-5151       Fax: (604) 278-5122
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The Ubyssey
is looking for computer -
literate individualsWho are
interested in typesetting a
newspaper. :
Come receive traifti rig on
spanking hew equipment.   *
Hell, maybe you can teach
us something about it (at
five in the morning with the
paper only half produced...)
Don't wait for club days!
SUB241K
UBCs Graduate Student Society
presents
Eugene Ripper's
Fast Folk Underground
Live in Concert, every Friday starting September 7th
The Nyetz (Sept 7th)
Roots Roundup (Sept 14th)
Bruce Jay Paskow
from the Washington Squares (Sept 21st)
On Stage at
the Fireside
Graduate Student Centre
6351 Crescent Road, UBC
228-3203
Foot Stompin9
Down Home
Funkin' Fun
*?
.-•
^
SHRUM
BOWL
'fg    SEPT. 8
^^     7:30 pm
UBC SFU
THUNDERBIRDS VS   CLANSMEN
THUNDERBIRD STADIUM    RESERVED SEATS $10.00
HILLSIDE $6.00
TICKETS AVAILABLE AT AMS TICKET OFFICE
September 7,1990
THE UBYSSEY/11 NOTICE OF SPECIAL GENERAL MEETING
September 7, 1990 at 4:00 p.m.
Maclnnes Field, east of the Student Union Building
University of British Columbia
 yC	
Johanna Wickie, AMS Vice President
PROPOSED AMENDMENTS TO THE BY-LAWS OF THE
ALMA MATER SOCIETY TO BE BROUGHT FORWARD AT
THE SPECIAL GENERAL MEETING.
A.  AFFECTING QUORUM AND MEMBERSHIP STANDING.
BE IT RESOLVED By Special Resolution of the Active Members, that the By-laws of the ALMA MATER
SOCIETY be amended as follows:
1. Bylaw 2 shall be re-written to add the following clause:
"4. Standing
A member shall be deemed to be in good standing until they cease to be a member ofthe Society
pursuant to Bylaw 2."
2. Bylaw 3(4) shall be re-written altering:
"(a) A quorum at an annual general or special general meeting is achieved where the number of active
members present at such meeting is equal to or greater than 10 percent (10%) ofthe Day Members
at the Point Grey Campus of the University."
to read:
"(a) A quorum at an annual general or special general meeting is achieved where the number of active
members present at such meeting is equal to or greater than 10 percent (10%) of the active
members who are currently in good standing."
3. Bylaw 4(4)(b) shall be re-written altering:
"b. the number of votes cast supporting the referendum is equal to or greater than 10 percent (10%)
of the active members of the Society who are Day Members at the Point Grey Campus of the
University."
to read:
"b. the number of votes cast supporting the referendum is equal to or greater than 10 percent (10%)
of the active members of the Society who are currently in good standing. 'Supporting' shall be
defined as voting in favour ofthe referendum.".
4. Bylaw 19(1)(a) shall be re-written altering:
"(a) a Special Resolution of the Society passed at an annual general meeting or special general
meeting of the Society where there is a quorum of ten percent (10%) of the Day Members at
the Point Grey Campus of the University, or"
to read:
"(a) a Special Resolution of the Society passed at an annual general meeting or special general
meeting of the Society, or"
B.   AFFECTING STUDENT MEMBERS OF THE BOARD
AND COUNCIL SENATORS.
BE IT RESOLVED By Special Resolution ofthe Active Members, that the By-laws ofthe ALMA MATER
SOCIETY be amended as follows:
1. Bylaw 5(2) shall be re-written altering:
"(0 The student members of the Board of Governors shall assume their seats on Council at the first
Council meeting after the Board of Governors meeting where they first sit as voting members.
(g) Council Senators shall assume their seats on Council at the first Council meeting after the Senate
meeting where they first sit as voting members."
To read:
"(0 The student members of the Board of Governors shall assume their seats on Council at the first
Council meeting after they commence their term of office on the Board. The term of office as
voting members of Council shall be concurrent to their term of office as student representatives
on the Board of Governors pursuant to the University Act.
(g) Council Senators shall assume their seats on Council at the first Council meeting after they are
elected Council Senators by Senate Caucus pursuant to Bylaw 6. The term of office as voting
members of Council shall be at the discretion of Senate Caucus, PROVIDED however that said
Council Senators shall continue to be student representatives on the Senate as defined by the
University Act."
2. Bylaw 6 (3)(a) shall be re-written altering:
"(a) The Senate Caucus shall hold regularly scheduled meetings at least once each month between
the months of September and May inclusive. The first meeting of Senate Caucus shall be held
within fourteen (14) days before the Senate meeting at which they first sit as voting members."
To read:
C.  AFFECTING THE COORDINATOR OF EXTERNAL AFFAIRS.
BE IT RESOLVED By Special Resolution of the Active Membefs, that the By-laws of the ALMA MATER
SOCIETY be amended as follows:
1. Bylaw 1 (2) shall be re-written altering:
"Coordinator of External Affairs - shall mean the Coordinator of External Affairs of the Society"
To read:
"Director of External Affairs - shall mean the Director oi External Affairs ofthe Society"
2. Bylaw 5(3)(a) & (b)(i) shall be re-written altering:
"(a)   EXECUTIVE OF COUNCIL
The Executive of Council shall be:
i) The President;
ii) The Vice-President;
iii) The Director of Finance;
iv) The Director of Administration; and
v) The Coordinator of External Affairs.
(b)    ELECTION OF EXECUTIVE
i) The President, Vice-President, Director of Finance, Director of Administration and Coordinator
of External Affairs shall be elected by and from the active members of the Society in a general
election which shall be held during the month of January in each year, and in no case less than
fourteen (14) days prior to the annual general meeting. Regulations for the conduct of general
elections shall be set out in the Code."
To read:
"(a)   EXECUTIVE OF COUNCIL
The Executive of Council shall be:
i) The President;
ii) The Vice-President;
iii) The Director of Finance;
iv) The Director of Administration; and
v) The Director of External Affairs.
(b)     ELECTION OF EXECUTIVE
i) The President, Vice-President, Director of Finance, Director of Administration and Director oi
External Affairs shall be elected by and from the active members ofthe Society in a general election
which shall be held during the month of January in each year, and in no case less than fourteen
(14) days prior to the annual general meeting. Regulations for the conduct of general elections
shall be set out in the Code."
2.     Bylaw 5(3)(d) shall be re-written altering:
"(v)  The Coordinator of External Affairs shall:"
To read:
"(v)   The Director oi External Affairs shall:"
D. AFFECTING GENDER SPECIFIC LANGUAGE.
BE IT RESOLVED By Special Resolution of the Active Members, that the By-laws of the ALMA MATER
SOCIETY be amended as follows:
1. Bylaw 1 (1) shall be re-written deleting the phrase:
and words imparting the masculine gender shall include the feminine gender,
To read:
"In these Bylaws, unless the context otherwise requires, expressions defined in the Society Act,
as amended from time to time, shall have the meanings so defined in that Act. Words imparting
the singular shall include the plural, and vice versa, and words imparting persons shall include
bodies corporate."
2. Bylaw 3(1)(a)(iii) and 3(1)(b)(ii); Bylaw 5(2)(h), (i) and (j); Bylaw 5(3)(d)(ii)(7), S(4)(a)(ii)(1) and
S(4)(b)(ii); Bylaw 6(3)(b)(i); Bylaw 12(5); Bylaw 14(6); Bylaw 16(2); and Bylaw 21(5) and 21(5)(f)
shall be re-written replacing the words "his" with the words "her/his" throughout. Bylaw
5(4)(b)(ii) shall also be re-written replacing the word "himself with the word "herself/himself.
Bylaw 6(4)(b) shall be re-written replacing the word "him" with the word "her/him".
PROPOSED MOTION TO BE BROUGHT FORWARD AT
THE SPECIAL GENERAL MEETING
A.     BE IT RESOLVED By Resolution of the Active Members, that the following motion be adopted:
"Be it resolved that the mandate of the 1982 fee levy referendum which added a $15 fee for
capital projects onto the AMS Annual Membership Fee be extended to allow this levy to be used
for student union expansion and renovations in and around SUB.
"(a)  The Senate Caucus shall hold regularlyscheduled meetings at least once each month between the
months of September and May inclusive. The first meeting of Senate Caucus shall be held within
fourteen (14) days after the beginning of the term of office as student representatives on the    Note: The SUB Southside expansion which was specifically mandated by the 1982 referendum was
Senate pursuant to the University Act." completed several years ago, and funds are needed now for a Northside expansion."
—|   Held in conjunction with the AMS Annual Barbeque, Noon to 8:00 p.m., September 7, 1990
12/THE UBYSSEY
September 7,1990 Natives protest while
DON MAH PHOTO
the cops keep watch
MIKE COURY PHOTO
A
l««lll«
WEST
POINT
CYCLES
UBC Student Counselling
& Resources Centre
Room 200, Brock Hall ♦ 228-3811
DEDICATED TO CUSTOMER SERVICE
& QUALITY PRODUCTS SINCE 1930
September
Special
:Di
'BEST SELLER"
SIERRA
$439.00
REG. $469.00
FUSION
$840,00
"FOR THE SERIOUS RIDER"
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any bike purchased
TUNE-UP SPECIAL
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SALE ENDS SEPT. 30TH
ALL YEAR STUDENTS' DISCOUNT with VALID STUDENT CARD
• 5% on Bikes and Helmets • 15% on Parts and Accessories
PT. GREY
224-3536
3771 W. 10 Ave. (10th & Alma)
KERRISDALE
263-7587
6069 W. Boulevard (by 45th)
September Workshop Schedule
All workshops are from 12:30 -1:20
September 10 Skills for Academic Success
September 11 Goal Setting
September 17 Motivation
September 18 Transition
September 18 Combating Student Blues
September 20 Study Skills Strategies
September 21 Time Management
September 24 Academic Skills for
International Students
September 27 Skills for Academic Success
September 28 Self Esteem Enhancement
September Films
Wednesday Noon 12:30 -1:20
September 12 Well Aware:
Stress Management
September 19 Anorexia and Bulimia
September 26 Everything to Live for (Suicide)
Preregistration Required (Limited Enrollment)
For more information or to register for these workshops call 228-3811.
Watch this space for news on October's workshops.
September 7,1990
THE UBYSSEY/13 Kurt, you're an
embarrassment!
In yesterday's Province newspaper, Kurt Preinsperg
offended and embarrassed women, men, the AMS and this
university.
In an amazing, and not unprecedented, display of bad
taste, poor judgement, and complete ignorance, Preinsperg
had published "31 hints to get you off to a better start with
the woman of your choice."
"How to deceive women in order to get laid" would have
been a better headline.
According to Priensperg's article, UBC is a "hunting
ground" where men can practice the "game" of manipulating women (who are mindless, faceless, servile beings) to
achieve what should be the primary goal of every college
student: Sexual intercourse. He presents everything else
related to social interaction between men and women as a
set of mandatory conditions that men must learn to tolerate.
In one mindless action he has:
1. Escalated peer pressure for achieving sexual conquests on campus;
2. Declared a woman's value to be subject to the way
men perceive her, claiming for men the responsibility for a
woman's self image;
3. Deteriorated human contact to a simple set of instructions, where adding liberal portions of flattery, and
counting on mindlessness will lead to the removal of a
woman's skirt;
4. Cheapened the importance of sincerity, dignity, and
individuality in human relations;
5. Presented to the general public an image that UBC
is a place where people spend their time not studying, but
trying to get women into bed;
6. Misrepresented the student body of UBC; and,
7. Alienated both women and men from the AMS
President's office.
Are women going to want to talk to this man about
anything? Are men going to want to be associated with
Kurt's offensive and destructive sexism? We must then ask
ourselves, who is left for Kurt to represent?
Kurt justifies his offensive piece, calling it "advice,"
claiming that, "had I known in my first year at UBC what
I know now, I could certainly have avoided painful setbacks
and loneliness." If after 11 years this pathetic display is all
that he has learned, any future possibility of Preinsperg
joining the human race looks very bleak.
It is difficult to discern what is the worst part of this
incident: that a piece so blatantly sexist could ever have
been written in the first place, that Kurt Preinsperg signed
his name to the piece, or that he chose to have himself
identified as "University of B.C. student president".
Possibly it is that this all happened in a newspaper
with the second largest distribution in this province.
There may be something to be thankful for in this
tragedy. Perhaps the UBC student body will face the reality
of an incompetent president who has lost touch with the
people he is there to represent.
It is the sincere hope of the women and men of The
Ubyssey that Kurt Preinsperg see his reign of embarrassment come to an end— soon.
September 7,1990
The Ubyssey is published Tuesdays and Fridays by the
Alma Mater Society ofthe University of British Columbia.
Editorial opinions are those ofthe staff and not necessarily those of the university administration, or of the
sponsor. The Ubyssey is published with the proud
support ofthe Alumni Association. The editorial office is
Rm. 241k of the Student Union Building. Editorial
Department, phone 228-2301; advertising, 228-3977;
FAX# 228-6093
Martin Chester sat at the computer very late at night. Or rather early in
the morning, said Mark Neilson, who was quickly corrected by Michael
Booth wha said it was in fact late morning. Greg Davis grunted, so did
Nadene Rhenby. Ernie Steltzer left with the key, so Ted Aussem was
woken up. Leah Hudson had no sympathy for the whole situation for she
had been up all night watching Brenda Wong and Colin Maycock giggle
themselves into little pools of jello. Paul Abbot became hungTy, and Hoa
Li hit him when he mentioned it "It wasn't hard," reported Christina
Chen, eloquently, "no, it was just a tap," Effie Pow confirmed. "He should
have given him a good totalitarian whap." said Harald Gravelsins. Mike
Coury nodded, and just kept nodding. Hoa Li and Paul Dayson butted
heads over who was cooler until they were both shamed by the
AWESOME presence of Don Mah being lifted up over Chung Wongs head
by Rebecca Bishop. Matthew Johnson just shook his head. Mike's was
still nodding. Wayne King giggled, but only softly, all night watching
Brenda Wong and Colin
Editors
Rebecca Bishop  •  Michael Booth  •  Martin Chester •  Paul Dayson
What's with the suiti j\of
Going on vacAtionf
Arc you kidding?
I'm going fo  fhe bookstore line-up.
Graphic. Gateway
Letters
Working
students want
aid
One of the things that
has FINALLY tested my
patience is the amount of
bureaucratic bungles associated with university life.
In the summer, students who
reside in residence go home
and work hard at their
summer jobs to make enough
money to carry on their
education. Many students
apply for student loans to
make up the deficit between
their net income and their
fees and living costs. The
irony of it all is, that the
harder one works, the
smaller the loan is to cover
expenses. To make it plain
and simple, students are
penalized for working hard
in the summer. By being
unemployed for the whole
summer and volunteering a
fewhours a week to a specific
cause a person is rewarded
for their irresponsible lack
of money motivation by receiving a generous, if not
excessive student loan. On
the other hand, a student
who works almost 75 hours
a week at minimum wage
for the entire summer and
almost makes enough money
to cover school expenses (but
not quite enough), is rewarded with little or noloan.
Both the provincial and
federal governments are
PAYING students to literally
become unemployed bums.
One might deduce that the
sedentary students will still
have to pay back huge student loans and thus the
motivated students will
graduate at an advantage as
their loans will be smaller.
Unfortunately, this deduction is false! Students who
applyfor large student loans
at the beginning or their
schooling may get a large
portion of their total loan
forgiven if they simply
The Ubyssey welcomes letters on any Issue. Letters must be typed and are not to exceed 300 words in length. Content
which is judged to be libelous, homophobic, sexist, racist or factually incorrect will not be published. Please be concise.
Letters may be edited for brevity, but it is standard Ubyssey policy not to edit letters for spelling or grammatical mistakes.
Please bring them, with Identification, to SUB 241k. Letters must include name, faculty, and signature.
graduate! In some faculties
such as education, government COMPLETELY pays
loans for graduates who
teach in select areas over a
specified time period. Government is paying for these
people to sit on their posteriors and contemplate their
navels. How these lazy navel
contemplating jerkoffs feel
about taking advantage of
working folk is anyone's
guess. How this kind of irresponsible funding goes on
is anyone's guess. I sincerely
respect those who work hard
all summer and really do
need a large student loan.
However, the lazy mon-
eygrubbing couch potatoes
that suck the government
for all it is worth any way
they can have no place in
this system. Thisinequitable
program shows just how ineffective the social funding
of today really is. Realistically speaking, this is just
the tip of the iceberg. The
whole structure of student
loans, grants, work-study
positions, etc... needs a
complete facelift, andnotthe
nosejob thatgovernmentand
U.B.C. financial serviceshas
been giving it. As students,
we should hasten to express
our displeasure at the way
things are done. This is not
some kind of socialistic out-
cryfor more funds. The point
of it all is that our tax dollars
can and should be more efficiently and equitably allocated and not caught up in
the red tape we call government.
Darryl Scheck
Arts
Managers are
nice
I quote Richard Flint,
editor, The McGill Daily, as
he is cited in The Ubyssey,
Sept. 4, 1990, as part of an
advertisement for that paper: "Managers are parasites
who create and produce no
wealth, but live on the back
of people who do..."
This notion is so grotesquely irrational that it can
neither be accidental nor
mistaken; it must be the
product of an informed and
malicious consciousness,
whose precepts are socialist
and whose goal is the undermining of a free society
through an attack on its most
productive though least defended minority. I have not
the space for an attack on
socialism, so I will merely
attack one of its precepts,
the one forwarded by Mr.
Flint, the idea that businessmen are looters who
extort wealth from men who
would have produced it
without them.
Who produces an automobile, the man who pounds
the steel to fashion it, or the
man who designs it? The men
under Henry Ford pounded
outadozen separate designs,
each of which produced no
significant wealth, before
pounding out the Model T,
the product of Ford's mind
and ambition, which were
the sources of the wealth
produced. The men on Henry
Ford's assembly lines could
never produce an automobile, if he did not provide
them with the blueprints and
the means. They owed their
living to him, and he pro-
videditin exchange for their
service. This is the nature of
trade in a free society, and it
is the indecency to assume
that the creator, the innovator, the founder of a business leeches off his employees, or that they leech off
him.
This is not only true
where invention is involved;
who would keep a restaurant in supply, or who would
run a dairy farm or a
clothier's or an optician's
laboratory? Who would be
responsible when machinery
broke down, or when the
power bills were not paid, if
not for some individual of a
supervisory nature? Show
me a successful business
which you feel has no management, and I will show
you that it has.
Michael McAree
Arts
Kurt at large
Good things do happen
sometimes.
"So, Kurt, what have
you done for students
lately?" Whenever I get
asked this question, it's easy
to boast about all the lobbying, liaising, speechmaking
and organizing I get to do as
AMS president. But if s nice
to point to something more
tangible for a change.
The new conversation
lounge upstairs in SUB - on
the north side adjacent to
the partyroom and courtyard - i s no great monument:
just an attempt to make SUB
a bit friendlier and more
inviting for student use.
The robust yet comfortable furniture marks off an
attractive square for students to read, talk, study,
relax, snooze and get
aquainted. The light coming
from the courtyard adds to
the attractive setting of this
satellite conversation
lounge. Come, check it out.
Renovations Committee deserves credit for
unanimously approving the
idea on August 21. This is
one small example of how
the AMS endeavors to improve SUB tangibly for student use. The next major
improvement will be the
SUB northside expansion, a
$2 million project designed
to alleviate the acute shortage of adequate meeting and
office space for our 200 student clubs.
See you at the AMS
Welcome Back BBQ on
Maclnnes Field on Friday.
Kurt Preinsperg
AMS President
14/THE UBYSSEY
September 7,1990 The culture shock of a southern brother
by Matthew Johnson
A sad fact of life is that most
Americans are kept amazingly in
the dark about there two closest
neighbors!. Nowhere in my years of
schooling have I been taught
anything about Canadian history,
economics, culture, anything. I at
least know who the Prime minister
is. We are kept amazingly in the
dark abou t Mexico, except, of course,
that tequila is cheap and plentiful in
Tiajuana.
In or der to get this piece off on
the right foot, I have to start by
outlining a few basic American
misconceptions about Canada, (at
least myself, and most people I know
think like this). First, it is exactly
like the United States. Let's face it,
Canadians, by and large speak
english, eat pizza, watch T.V. You
use dollars and cents, rather than
some strange currency. Second,
eventually, especially since your
prime minister and our president
are such good pals, Canada will pull
up its bootstraps, and become the
fifty-first state, (all except Quebec,
the United States doesn't need
multi-culturalism). And third,
though you Canadians are just a
little inferior to us good 'ol
Americans in just about all aspects
of life, you Canadians are pretty
much O.K.(Note:We're Americans,
you're Canadians.)
I came to the University of
British Columbia on the advice of a
mentor of mine who received her
MFA in directing here. I, like most of
my peers, had absolutely no
knowledge of what Canada is like. I
knew who the prime minister was, I
knew that Quebec was about to
secede, and eventually parts of
Canada would become American, I
knew that it was north, and that we
(The Americans) fought and beat
Canada in the Revolutionary war. I
was filled with all the
aforementioned misconceptions,
stereotypes, and bull that a lack of
knowledge, and I admit, interest,
most Americans have.
Then I arrive to find just how
different things are here. First,
though I can now drink, I can't get a
telephone. O.K., so I'm a few months
shy of Canada's drinking age. So I'm
a few months shy of being able to get
a phone. Apparently, Canada is not
like the United States, where
corporations are only happy to
extend enormous globs of credit to
anyone willing to indebt themselves
for life. Amend that. In the U.S., the
age of the person in debt doesn't
really matter as much. For example,
from the States I have a Mastercard,
American express, and an AT&T,
MCI, and Foncard, and can go into
extreme poverty on all three. In the
United States a pack of condoms
costs over twice as much at the local
Seven-Eleven than I've found here.
And there is socialized medicine.
Like, only people in California have
socialized medicine, everyone else
has to try and find affordable
medical insurance somewhere,
except for the bums who are thrown
out of hospitals literally because
they can't pay.
Another startling thing is this
Mohawk crisis. Your government is
TALKING to these people! Even
more astounding is that there are a
group of Native Americans who are
standing up for their rights publicly,
and getting away with it. Hell, I just
know that the U.S. National guard
would've had those blockades down,
most likely forcibly.
And the press wouldn't have
reported it. Biggie here. In the
United States, if a school
administrator, or a corporate
executive, or a politician, wants a
story killed, more likely than not
that story is killed (or "spiked" as
they say in the biz.) I read the school
paper here, and there's a vicious
critique of administrative figures
right inside The Ubyssey's covers. I
loved it, but was shocked that the
paper's advisors let it be printed.
Surely, seeing as how Canada is just
like the U.S., some gross censorship
and stifling of free speech would
have taken place.
Tilings like the bus, and food,
and just about everything is more
expensive here. There's a lot of
French printed on things, (in the
U.S., for example California or
Boston, even the mention of being
bi-lingual causes the racists and
bigots to fight with all their might)
and though French-Canadians are a
minority, they still have their
identity and respect intact.
Otherwise, yeah, we're
basically the same. We want to have
fun, don't like the idea of nuclear
Armageddon, would be really pissed
if the Greenhouse Effect changed
the globe, are faced with
homelessness, unemployment,
AIDS, and other problems, and don't
think much about it as we go
through our daily lives.
Am I adjusted? Yeah. I've got a
$50 dollar bus pass, know my way
around campus, and know that the
Globe and Mail isn't the end all-be
all of Candian journalism. Oh, and
pit night is on Wednesday.
"We aren't in Kansas anymore,
Toto." In Boston, even the mention of
being bi-lingual cause of the likely
consequences which this action will
bring about.
*T*CE-X-C
•E • L-L-E-NvT) ^r
1H E
EAT ER I
rKbb
GOURMET BURGER
(Beef or Tofu)
OR ENTREE
The good deal is, your least expensive meal is Free when two or more of the
above items are ordered. Not valid with any other coupons. Dining in only,
please. Valid only when this ad is presented prior to placement of order.
3431 WEST BROADWAY 738-5298
The University of British Columbia
Frederic Wood Theatre
• • • presents • • •
A View from the Bridge
by Arthur Miller      Directed by John Juliani
September 19-29
Special Preview - September 19
2 For tHe Price of 1 Regular Admission
Curtain: 8 pm
 STUDENT SEASON TICKETS	
"90-91 Series of Four Plays ($20)
A View from the Bridge
/Vf/7/er September 19 - 29
You Can't Take It With You
Kaufman & Hart November 14 -24
Our Country's Good
Wertenbaker January 16 - 26
Hamlet
Shakespeare March 6-/6
Box Office  • Frederic Wood Theatre •  Room 207
Support Your Campus Theatre
The* Fir e side
S       I       N       C       E      ♦      1       9      6       1
GRAND OPENING
■^     Sept. 4th
228-3203
Weekly Lunch Service
11 am - 2 pm
Licenced Bar & Snacks
OPEN
11 am-11 pm Mon-Thurs
11 am-Midnight Friday
GRADUATE STUDENT CENTRE
Students •Faculty ♦ Staff
ALL WELCOME
SERVICES AND RESOURCES
Personal Counselling
UniversityCalendars
Disabled Student Services
WORKSHOPS (12:30-1:20 PM)
Career Counselling
Career Resource Centre
Self-Help Books
Old Exams
STIIDKNT
I'OIINM'.IJ.INI.
Ai KIXIUKCIS
CKNTKK
EDUCATIONAL SKILL ENHANCEMENT
Study Skills Strategies Sept. 20, Oct. 19, Nov. 19
Skills for Academic Success Sept. 10, 27, Nov. 16
Overcoming Test Anxiety Nov. 8, 26
Reducing Test Anxiety Oct. 16, 29
Time Management Sept. 13, 21, Oct. 1, 25, Nov. 22
Procrastination Oct. 12, Nov. 5, 23
Motivation Sept. 17, Oct. 4, 22, Nov. 29
Goal Setting Sept. 11, Nov. 13
Decision Making Nov. 6
Transitions: College to UBC Sept. 18
PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT
Self Esteem Enhancement Sept. 28, Nov. 27
Stress Busters Oct. 9, 30, Nov. 1, 20
Loneliness G sessions) Oct. 16, 23, 30
Surviving Relationship Breakup Oct. 2, Nov. 2
Social Assertiveness Oct. 18
Combatting Student Blues Sept. 18, Oct. 22
CAREER WORKSHOPS
Skills Assessment Oct. 11
Resume Preparation Oct. 29
Interview Survival Nov. 15
MATURE STUDENT
Skills for Academic Sucess Sept. 25
MARITAL- COUPLES AND FAMILY
Dual Student Couples Sept. 25
INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS
Academic Survival  *. Sept. 24
Effective Class Presentations Oct. 15
Aids and the Heterosexual Oct. 31
Rape: An Act of Hate Oct. 3, Nov. 14
Anorexia and Bulimia Sept. 19, Oct. 17
To A Safer Place (Incest) Oct. 24
Incest Nov. 21
Well Aware: Stress Management Sept. 12, Nov.28
Everything To Live For (Suicide) Sept. 26, Nov. 7
Self Esteem Oct. 10
To pre-reglster for workshops/films or for further Information
call 228-3811
FILMS (12:30-1:20 PM)
"ieptember 7,1990
THE UBYSSEY/15 <^"_!*<
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SPORTS
^ Basketball 'Birds find new
Jobs Available coach in former teammate
&^o_&fc?$*S„&«__i_!x;x&_^^^
SSsSSHSSSSS:
Production, Activities, and Survey Assistant jobs for
the Graduate Student Society have been approved by UBC's
Financial Services. Job postings go up this month at the
Employment Centre in Brock Hall. Production Assistant
will work closely with GSS publications such as the monthly
newsletter and annually survival handbook. Activities
assistant will work with GSS programs, and Survey Assistant will conduct surveys in relation to graduate students
and their concerns. You must have a B.C. student loan to
apply for these jobs, but you do not have to be a graduate
student.
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HIGHLIGHTS
Welcome Back Everyone!
HilleVs Famous
Hot Lunch
Tuesday,  Sept. 11,  12:30 PM
by Mark Nielsen
Coaching your former
teammates may not be the easiest
thing in the world, but Kevin
Hansen, the newest addition to
the coaching staff of the UBC
Thunderbirds men's basketball
team does have one distinct
advantage - even as a player the
rest ofthe squad looked up to him.
Hansen, who joined the team
earlier this month, was team
captain when the Thunderbirds
ended the seven year reign of the
University of Victoria over
Canada West with a victory over
the Vikings in the 1987
championship game.
Moreover, the Thunderbirds
went on to reach the final game of
the Canadian university
championships where they lost by
eight points to the University of
Brandon Bobcats.
The otherwise successful
season capped a five year career
with   the   Thunderbirds   for
Hansen, who graduated with a
degree in physical eduction and
went on to become an assistant
coach at both Simon Fraser
University and Vancouver
Community College.
"One time last year I was
thinking that it would be neat to
come back in five years and coach
the guys you used to play with, and
see how they've changed since the
first year they were here," he said.
And how have they changed?
"Basketball players are all
the same, they're like kids," said
Hansen, laughing.
Interim coach Vic Pruden
invited him in on the advice of
assistant Perrie Scarlett after the
26 year old Hansen helped coach
at the Thunderbird's summer
basketball school this year.
"Perrie was very positive
about him, and while he wasn't the
most talented when he played, he
was aggressive and worked hard,"
Pruden said.
In other words, as a player
Hansen fit the coaching mold.
Pruden, meanwhile, will only
be coaching until Christmas when
the Thunderbird's head coach,
Bruce Enns, returns from a four
month term as coach ofthe Syrian
national and junior teams.
Pruden and Enns go back a
long way — to high school in
Winnipeg — and have worked
with each other at various levels,
including a spell as coach and
assistant, respectively, for the
national junior women's team.
Just as significant, Pruden
has been somewhat of a guru for
Enns, who has based much of his
style of play on a system his
mentor has developed.
"By me coming here, it
provides some continuity in terms
of the system that is used here,"
Pruden said.
The 55 year old Pruden added
that because he's retired from full-
time coaching, Enns knows he
(Pruden) won't be after his job.
Wednesday. Sept. 12
12:30 PM
Torah Study Group Begins
This week's guest:
Rabbi Phillip Bregman
Hillel is located on the North Side
of SUB Plaza next to the Parkade
For more info: 224-4748
Thursday. Sept. 13
12:30 PM
"The Persian Gulf Crisis:
Israel and the Iraqi Threat"
Speaker:
Prof. Noemi Gal-Or,
Poli. Sci. Dept., UBC
Presented by PZC and Hillei
Danny Sullivan rounds the hairpin turn enroute to a second place finish at the inaugural
Vancouver Indy. Al Unser, jr. took the top spot for his fourth consecutive Indy CART victory.
DON MAH PHOTO
COMMUNITY SPORTS
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Sept. 7-Sept. 16,1990
Reg. *2199s
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PROFESSIONALS IN TEST PREPARATIOtf
16/THE UBYSSEY
September 7,1990

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