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The Ubyssey Oct 24, 1986

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Array UBC Archives Serial
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXIX, No. 14
Vancouver, B.C. Friday, October 24, 1986
**$3..
228-2301
Socred win small hope for students
By JAMES YOUNG
Canadian University Press
The re-election of B.C.'s Social
Credit party Oct. 22 means students
will almost certainly continue to
face some of Canada's hightest tuition fees, debt loads and summer
unemployment, combined with the
country's worst student aid program.
But Marg Fartaczek, chair of the
Canadian federation of Students'
65,000 member Pacific Region, emphasizes the election of 28 new
Socred candidates is a possible basis
for positive change.
"We are looking at the committ
ment the Social Credit party made
for an open, consultative government and we are going to hold them
to it," she said. "1 don't see confrontation being a problem with the
introduction of these new people."
"We want to work cooperatively
with them and contribute to a
recovery program for education in
this province," she said.
The CFS, which worked with student societies to make education an
election issue, plans to begin the
consultative process by presenting
the new government with findings
of the recently-completed student
aid hearings and asking that the
premier's promise of an education
commission be expanded from one
person.
Fartaczek is worried, however,
by unconfirmed reports that college
funding could be cut again by five
per cent next year and the ministry
of post-secondary education could
be eliminated.
While B.C. premier Bill Vander
Zalm has repeatedly referred to a
"fresh start" and promised an end
to the governments' confrontational style, it seems doubtful
whether there will be any real gains
for B.C. education.
When recently asked about the
need for better regional post-
secondary facilities, the premier
suggested students should continue
their education in warehouses and
basements.
The Socreds, after running a
campaign based largely on the style
and smiles of charismatic leader
Vander Zalm, returned to power
with 49 of 69 seats, while the NDP
took 20, and the Liberals and Conservatives failed to win a single seat.
But the results for 13 ridings
could change Nov. 4, when officials
count sealed ballots from those people ommitted from voter registration, as well as those from mail-in
and advance polls.
In terms of the change in the
popular vote since the 1983 election, the Socreds received a comparable 50 per cent, the NDP dropped three points to 42 per cent and
the Liberals made a significant gain
from four to seven per cent.
During the campaign, NDP
leader Bob Skelly called for the
resignation of post-secondary
education minister Russ Fraser,
after Fraser had angered education
groups with the remark that people
"should put off their education if
they can't afford it."
Fraser later claimed he was
misinterpreted, but remained adamant the province would not return
to    the    student    grant    program
eliminated in 1984, making B.C. the
only province in Canada to have an
all loan financial aid program.
The sad facts describing B.C.'s
post-secondary education include:
* the lowest participation rate
in Canada for 18 to 24 year olds at
17 per cent, compared to a national average of 25.
* tuition fees among Canada's
highest, with university students
paying $1320 for first year arts, an
increase of 57 per cent over the
last four years.
* a 1985/86, provincial financial aid average of $66 per student, compared to a national
average of $689.
* an average debt load of
$15,000 among 1986 University of
British Columbia graduates, up
$12,000 since 1984, with loan
default rates of close to 20 per
cent.
* summer unemployment rates
for returning students over 18 per
cent, among Canada's worst.
One possible consolation for
students is premier Vandar Zalm's
promise to raise B.C.'s minimum
wage, currently Canada's lowest at
$3.65 an hour, to about $4.00 an
hour. Although the premier began
the campaign referring to the
minimum wage as "counterproductive" and spoke of
See page 2: SOCREDS
Societies worried
-   Susan bertoia photo
ARTS 20 RELAY participant takes a break from the competition to warm up. The intramural event is one of the
most popular held on campus with numerous competitors dashing through the streets of Vancouver in search of
glory.
By SVETOZAR KONTIC
The new Socred government
must make a lasting committment
to education, said UBC's Alma
Mater Society president Thursday.
"The Socred government has
been reacting to education on a
firefighting basis. When there is
trouble, they move to stamp it out.
What they need is goal management
and a long term plan," said Simon
Seshadri.
Seshadri said he was both surprised and disappointed at the size of
the Socred margin of victory.
Students give Socred candidate rough ride
By PETER BERLIN
Point Grey New Democrats
believe the UBC vote will put
Darlene Marzari into the legislature
when the final ballots are counted
on November 4.
Reports from Point Grey polling
stations indicate there was an
unusually high number of Section
80 votes this election — about
4,400. These ballots are cast by
voters who claim not to be
registered on the provincial voter's
list.
The NDP, which specializes in
mobilising voters, traditionally expects to do well in these.
"If there's an honest Section 80
count," said one pollster who did
not wish to be identified, "we'll
win," "but it will be tough. There'll
be a dogfight over every vote as the
Socred's lawyers challenge our
lawyers over the validity of every
possible vote. It could take four
days to count them."
Marzari offered a special thanks
to students.
"If we win it will be because of
students and Section 80 votes," she
said.
The party hopes that a high proportion of Section 80 votes will be
students who moved to their current
addresses  in  September  and  who
were not registered in the Point
Grey area.
NDP scrutineers at University
Hill School polling station reported
huge lineups of Section 80 voters.
The University Hill polls showed
some of the heaviest pro-NDP
scores in the Riding.
The most emphatic vote for the
NDP candidates in the Point Grey
Riding came from poll five which
includes the Acadia family
residences and the army camp.
Marzari polled 171 votes compared to Campbell's 27 and
McGeer's 22.
This area also showed the highest
vote for the People's Front candidate, Al Soroka who took four
votes.
In Fratland and the southern end
of campus, Marzari took 36 votes,
Gathercole 34, Campbell 10 and
McGeer 6.
The NDP took 79 votes and the
Socreds 52 and 43 on poll three B
which includes the University campus and the Western tip of Point
Grey.
Right across campus, the Liberals
ran neck-to-neck with the Socreds.
Liam McCaughey, who canvassed for the NDP in Acadia, said he
found many apathetic students, but
that those who were motivated held
a lot of resentment for the way
education had been treated in B.C.
Many workers agreed the unpopularity of Pat McGeer among
students was an influential factor in
voting.
Freyja Bergthorson, president of
UBC's NDP club, said/ "I'm
definitely dissapointed that people
care more about style than
substance." "I'm leaving the province."
r
Voter opinion mixed
A Vander Zalm victory was met with mixed feelings by UBC
students Thursday as the Socred populist topped the polls with a
whopping majority.
In an interview in SUB concourse Thursday, students voiced a
range of opinions. Bruce Arnold, Science 3, said he was disappointed
with the election results, but that the people of B.C. have decided on
Vander Zalm and "we'll have to see how it turns out." He said
education will "go down to the dumps."
Although he expected a Socred victory, he did not expect the party
to take such a large majority. He said he does not like the prospects
for the future of education in B.C., but that "out of the three
leaders, Vander Zalm may have been the best choice.
Rod French, Science I* said a Vander Zalm election will mean a
better education system is B.C. because there had been "too much
being wasted before.
"Although French said the election results were "great", he had
expected Art Lee to win a seat. He said Vander Zalm would
"definitely" make a good Premier.
Laurie Newell, Arts 1, was not particularly impressed with the
election outcome. She had doubts about the future of education and
said "from past policy I don't think he (Vander Zalm) will do us a lot
of good." She said she doesn't have a lot of faith in Vander Zalm.
"He will have to prove himself."
"I remember what happened
when the federal conservatives won
a huge number of seats. A large majority induces complacency," said
Seshadri.
Seshadri said the current post-
secondary education minister Russ
Fraser has shown a lack of
awareness concerning educational
problems.
"We need someone with a greater
sense of reality as to what's happening in the educational system. Its
been a long time since Fraser left
school and he is just out of touch,"
said Seshadri.
Seshadri said jobs were the most
important issue in the election but
that only "tackling jobs would be
like "putting out a single fire."
"The Social Credit has to take on
more than one issue at a time and
make plans for the province as a
whole," said Seshadri.
Tom Bowlas, academic affairs
co-ordinator for Langara College
students' union, said he was disa-
pointed with the outcome of the
election and is afraid for education
in B.C.
"We didn't see any real answers
to the questions on education.
Students are better off moving to
Ontario and getting their education
there," he said.
Bowlas said the Socreds were fully aware of the concerns many people in the province have about
education.
"Education is a priority for the
Socreds but behind many other
priorities. The real weight isn't
given to education," he said.
Allison Butt, internal relations
officer for Simon Fraser
University's student society, said
she is scared by the results of the
election because education will not
be the government's priority.
"We've worked and worked to
try and get funding for operating
grants and it has failed," said Butt,
adding she wants to finish her
education before it's too late." Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
"-"   »u
Friday, October 24, 1986
Socreds offering little solace
From page 1
eliminating it altogether for certain
jobs, he later promised an increase
after the NDP vowed a raise to
$4.65 an hour.
Asked about the timing of the increase, Vander Zalm said, "maybe
a day after the election, or two days
after, or a week, but not too long
after."
The campaign was marked by the
Social Credit's reluctance to debate
issues in all-candidates meetings, as
advised in a memo from party head
quarters.
During the summer Socred
leadership convention, the premier
said, "the smart candidate avoids
detailed policy statements, for they
rarely help and can do you
harm...your answers should concentrate on style."
And party president Hope
Wotherspoon was even more blunt
once the election was called,
"When we are the party in power,
we don't have to get involved in
public debates," she said. "We are
reluctant to participate because it
gives the other parties a platform."
In the campaign's final days, the
polls showed the NDP cutting the
Socreds initial lead from 20 to five
per cent of the popular vote, but
this didn't translate into seats in the
legislature.
Many observers argued the 12
new ridings outside the lower
mainland in areas of traditional
Socred strength — gave the party an
advantage from the start.
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Gerrymandering still suspected
By CASSANDRA FREEMAN
Eleven new seats added to the
B.C. electoral district by the Bennett government have been the subject of much criticism since Wednesday's provincial election.
Instead of creating new ridings to
correspond with the rise in the province's population, the Social
Credit Government increased the
number of seats in eleven already
existing electoral districts.
Ten of these now two-member
ridings fell to Social Credit candidates during the election drawing calls of gerrymandering
from the NDP, the press, and from
political analysts.
UBC professor Paul Tennant
said "the whole principle" of giving
ridings an additional new member is
"unfair". If the government had
created single-member ridings,
more New Democrates might have
been elected, he said.
Looking at the election results of
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the 11 two-member ridings, Tennant said. The Socreds deliberately
left the ridings' boundaries untouched because it was to their advantage to do so.
NDP Campaign Organizer John
Pollard said "every election they
(the Socreds) gerrymander a little
bit more."
According to Pollard, although
there are fewer people living in the
Central Fraser Valley riding than in
the Coquitlam-Port Moody electoral district. Fraser Valley voters
cast two votes Wednesday while
Coquitlam-Port Moody voters cast
only one.
Pollard also complained about
the provincial voter's list which
discriminates against people who
move frequently.
"The enumeration usually takes
place one to two years before an
election and a lot of people move
during that period," Pollard said.
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THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Voters wait for fresh new start
By EVELYN JACOB
B.C. voters will have their eyes
fixed on premier Bill Vander Zalm
in the next few months as the man
who took 50 per cent of the popular
vote struggles to give a "fresh new
start" to B.C.'s ailing economy.
Just two days into office, the
52-year-old millionaire businessman
and B.C.'s third Social Credit
premier already faces a barrage of
challenges, and the people who gave
him an overwhelming majority are
expecting results.
Vander Zalm, who promised on
election night an era of "open" and
"honest" government, inherits the
results of four years of severe
penny-pinching and confrontation
with health workers, teachers,
unions and anti-poverty groups in
B.C.
The man who ran a campaign
that   relied   almost   entirely   on
jfeftiii:
DARLENE MARZARI BIDS McGeer's brain for the world's largest hockey puck at Expo auction.
Marzari still hopes for seat
By PETER BERLIN
The Point Grey New Democrats
went round an emotional loop-the-
loop at the Billy Bishop Memorial
Legion Hall on Election night but
came out with Darlene Marzari still
a hopeful winner after the final
votes are counted on November 4.
"We've made gains right across
the riding," said Marzari's running
mate Dick Gathercole. He told the
crowd of supporters, "we're going
to get Darlene Marzari in Victoria
and retire McGeer."
"This is no longer a Socred
enclave. We've started the job and
we're going to finish it next time.
After another three or four years of
Vander Zalm we'll sweep the
riding," said Gathercole.
Marzari was more cautious.
"You're going to have to wait
until November 4 for the victory to
be certain. But the Section 80 will
carry us through."
The NDP hopefuls began the
evening desperately optimistic.
Misery came as the television
showed Socred triumphs on the early returns, with Kim Campbell and
Pat McGeer pulling away from
their rivals.
The mood darkened as the
scrutineers around Point Grey polls
started to call in with results. By the
time Bob Skelly appeared on the
screen to concede at 9:20, grim
silence descended on the now-
packed hall.
But by 10:00 p.m., the mood had
changed dramatically. Eighty per
cent of the polling stations reported
Darlene Marzari topping the polls.
Marzari and Gathercole gave victory speeches to celebrate the
riding's first ever NDP MLA.
"There's going to a open constituency office in this constituency
for the first time for all of those
people who have stood outside
McGeer's locked, unlit, empty office protesting education cuts,"
said Marzari.
When the last polls came in from
Kerrisdale and Southlands,
however, Marzari — once 1,000
votes ahead of McGeer — was nearly 300 votes behind in third, with
just the votes of the Section 80
voters to come.
The final count showed 15,681
votes for Marzari and 13,356 for
Gathercole, compared with 17,596
votes for Social Credit candidate
Kim Campbell and 16,331 for Pat
McGeer.
This means that Marzari has to
win about 70 per cent of half the
votes cast by Section 80 voters to
beat McGeer for the second seat in
the riding.
But there is still some chance
Marzari will be elected on
November 4, NDP campaigner
organizer John Pollard said.
He said NDP workers identified
10,000 unregistered voters in Point
Grey before the election and tried
contacting them all.
He said he is confident the majority of unregistered voters called
favored the NDP.
charisma and charm must now
represent B.C. in trade negotiations
with the U.S., which already
threaten potential job losses for
thousands of British Columbians.
He faces heated labor problems
with the International Woodworkers' Association, and the
Health Sciences Association of
B.C., disputes he now says will be
resolved free from government involvement.
And B.C.'s electorate are counting on new premier to provide
economic growth after Expo and
jobs to the province's 179,000
unemployed.
Vander Zalm has promised to
work hard to "pull together" with
business and labor, and provide
British Columbians with the "best"
social programs — including education.
He has pledged to remove confrontation from the politics that has
come to characterize B.C.
Vander Zalm began his career in
politics in the early 60's when he
was asked by a neighbour in Surrey
to prevent a local park from being
turned into a gravel pit.
In 1968, he won the mayorship in
Surrey at age 35. He ran unsuccessfully as a federal Liberal candidate in the 1968 federal election.
In 1975, Vander Zalm entered into Bill Bennett's government and
shortly after was appointed human
resources minister.
An outspoken individualist,
Vander Zalm has been called a
"maverick" who revels in controversy and "blunt talk." He has
also been labelled "dangerous," a
"man without philosophical commitment."
The Globe and Mail described
him as being "one quote away from
political disaster."
During his career as education
minister, Vander Zalm turned
teacher-bashing into a "martial
art," by aksing teachers to work
five days without pay. He drew
outrage from educators in 1982
when he said education in B.C. was
"very expensive and not too productive."
The Socred populist escaped the
roughest period of the Bennett era
when restraint measures were imposed by quitting cabinet in 1983
after calling his colleagues
"gutless."
Since Vander Zalm jumped back
into the political limelight, he has
tried to distance himself from
restraint and avoid his penchant for
controversy. He was hesitant to
criticize the Bennett government,
but he did anyway. "The restraint
package was too late and too
hard," said Vander Zalm.
But since taking office August 6,
Vander Zalm has already sparked
controversy and confrontation
through different aspects of government he said he will either change,
cut or introduce.
• His promise to review the stumpage fee level in B.C. angered many
who claimed that by hinting stumpage rates were too low, Vander
Zalm encouraged U.S. trade people
who have said for years rates are
too low.
• His promise to lower the price
of beer has been attacked by the
NDP who question Vander Zalm's
priorities.
• Suggestions that hospital committees approve abortions as a
means of birth control brought a
wave a criticism from womens' and
pro-choice groups.
• A promise to raise the
minimum wage in B.C. just before
election day was seen as fast footwork and imitated the NDP's promise to raise the wage by $1. to
$4.65 per hour.
• His refusal to negotiate with
the province's natives on the issue
of aboriginal land claims.
• Vander Zalm has also promised
to:
• Warn the U.S. that B.C. will
retaliate if import taxes are placed
on Canadian softwood products.
• Allow on a trial basis in some
communities people to divert their
property taxes to fund private
schools of their choice instead of
public schools.
• Expand Eastern markets for
B.C. products, particularly coal.
• Decentralize the Agricultural
Land Commission.
• Pressure the federal government
into giving B.C. shipyards a $500
million dollar contract to build an
ice breaker.
• Work towards the elimination
of restaurant meal tax.
• Look into changing the new
provincial electoral boundaries.
• Set up a royal commission on
education.
craig brooks photo
McGeer parties all night long
By TRISH WEBB
When the votes were counted Wednesday night,
Social Credit's rising star Kim Campbell had outstripped her long-time running mate Pat McGeer by 1,265
votes.
Campbell took 17,596 votes in the Point Grey
riding, McGeer, 16,331.
Trading compliments, McGeer urged the Social
Credit party faithful to welcome its newest member to
the club. Campbell said she wished McGeer would find
a way to transfer the knowledge he gained from 24
years as MLA, from his brain to hers.
While he recognized his constituents interest in
education, McGeer chose to enjoy his success at the
polls instead.
"Tonight is not the time to formulate policy. We'll
see to that when cabinet is chosen, not now," said
McGeer. "Tonight we want to celebrate."
But while current polling figures place Campbell in
the lead in Point Grey, there were 4,400 section 80
votes — which allow people who claim not to be on the
provincial voters list to vote — cast in the final ballot,
results of which will not be known until November 4.
If most of the votes are for the NDP, there is still a
chance McGeer may lose his seat.
Early ballots, mail in votes, and section 80's are not
included in totals until election officials can ensure no
one has voted twice.
NDP candidate Dick Gathercole predicted the NDP
will pick up two-thirds of the section 80 votes cast
which will push his running mate Darlene Marzari into
second place. Marzari is trailing behind McGeer by only 650 votes.
But ambiguous results did not spoil the party for the
Social Credit supporters.
Campbell, a former UBC political science professor,
said she will look into improving salaries for UBC's
faculty. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 24, 1986
Lessons
Thirty years ago yesterday, 3,000 university students began to
march on the Parliament buildings in downtown Budapest demanding that Hungary's communist regime begin to reform. By
nightfall, the march had developed into a demonstration of over
200,000 students and workers in downtown Budapest. When the
demonstrators reached the buildings of Radio Budapest, the
government answered the crowds' demands for radio time by
ordering the police fire upon the crowd.
The people of Hungary had had enough. Led by these same
demonstrators and students they seized arms, convinced many army units to join them, and rose up against their Soviet oppressors.
The Freedom Fighter regime of Imre Nagy came to power,
released the respected religious leader. Cardinal Mindszenty, from
captivity and proclaimed a return to multi-party rule and freedom
from Soviet control. For a few days, Hungary was on the brink of
becoming a free nation.
We would like to salute those who took part in the great
Hungarian Revolution of 1956. Those who realized that it is better
to die on your feet than to live on your knees show us all how
precious freedom really is.
The lessons? That we should never forsake those fighting to free
themselves from oppression, as we ignobly did in 1956. Hungary's
last free radio station pleaded for Western support and was ignored
as the Soviet tanks rolled in.
We, as students, should realize how precious our liberties are
and seek to preserve and protect them.
Finally, we must not rest until freedom and liberty reigns
supreme over all the earth.
The martyrs that gave their lives in Hungary 30 years ago demand no less of us.
Peruvians continue to suffer despite Garcia
Peru, despite having a new
government elected in 1985 on a
platform of social reform and
demilitarization, has continued
along its course of terrorism and
economic stagnation, with government policy controlled by the
military and the rich. Aside from
lowering Peru's foreign debt
payments, Garcia has not been able
to improve living conditions for
most people. Peruvians continue to
suffer from minimal incomes, increased food costs (requiring up to
60% of people's incomes), high
unemployment (50% of people un-
or under-employed), and substandard working conditions.
The state of emergency in the Andean areas of Peru is accompanied
by martial law and prevents the
election of decentralized governments accountable to popular
organizations.   The   anti-terrorism
law 046 is used to justify imprisonment and attacks on anyone alleged
to be a "threat" to the government
and/or the military. The alleged existence of Sendero Luminoso is used by the military to justify reprisals
on progressive communities and
organizations whose actions of dissent (e.g. strikes, demonstrations,
and land occupations) are labelled
as Sendero-inspired or Sendero-
supporting. The anti-narcotic and
Allies must cooperate with U.S.
In April American F-lll'sroared
off the ground from their bases in
the U.K. and flew around Spain to
drop their payloads on western
Libya. American Navy A-7 and A-8
attack aircraft struck eastern Libya
at the same time. Afterwards many
people stated that America and the
U.K. would be the target of renewed terrorism because of the raid.
Yet now, over five months later,
America and the British Isles have
been peaceful. Their citizens have
been unharassed by terrorists (except for Soviet actions directed at
Nicholas Daniloff).
In April France denied overflight
rights to the Americans. France did
not want to anger Libya. Today
France is rocked by terrorist bombs
and people such as the Pope must
be guarded by thousands of police.
The Americans asked to use certain bases for the raid. This disus-
sion with other nations is a healthy
development. As yet, most military
raids executed far from home require foreign bases. In times past,
land was seized and used for a base.
Today friendly states allow others
to establish bases on their soil.
Hence, instead of a nation carrying
out unilateral action, today action
must be carried out with at least
bilateral consent due to logistical
constraints.
In this case the British agreed,
and the French disagreed, with the
American plan. The problem with
the French response was that they
did nothing else. They refused to
enact heavier sanctions against
Libya or do anything substantial.
Soon, with advances in military
and transport equipment the U.S.,
and the Soviets and anyone else,
will have the ability to carry out
raids unilaterally anywhere in the
world — without the need of
overseas bases or entangling
alliances. With the loss of the need
for bases, so will vanish any say second and third powers (Canada for
one) have in what the superpowers
do.
While smaller powers have some
leverage through the bases, they
should support or at least offer
ideas and options to the Americans.
If the smaller powers just deny
America power and deny that it
should use it, then Americans will
become fed up and withdraw from
overseas bases. The time is coming
when carriers, landing ships, and
long range aircraft will eliminate the
need for overseas bases anyway.
When this time comes, the U.S. will
be able to act alone and not have to
inform and ask permission of her
allies.
Lastly, if the Americans decide
that they no longer require overseas
bases for their defence, then the
world will be a less peaceful place. I
am sure the American people will
feel that they could easily do
without the hassle of maintaining
overseas bases. Also, if America is
unable to use it's bases when it
needs them then it may conclude
that overseas bases are a one way
street, against itself, apart from Britain it seems that American bases in
Europe are there to protect Europe
and not to serve any American interests.
With America withdrawn from
world events most western nations
will lack the power to defend
against, initiate, or support military
action.  American use of military
power has been very limited and has
usually been done for the common
gpod. Without overseas bases it
will lack a useful avenue of advice
from it's allies. Perhaps if the
French had backed the American
raid on Libya there would be fewer
bombs exploding in Paris today. Or
maybe the French carriers Foch and
Clemenceau should launch their aircraft against whoever is behind the
bombings in Paris.
Scot Macdonald
arts 3
death squads do the "dirty work"
for the military, such as massacres,
concentration camps, torture, and
village destruction. Between 1980
and 1986, over 7,000 people (mostly
Quechua peasants) were killed and
over 5,000 have disappeared. People attacked include teachers, union
organizers, media figures, and
members of Parliament.
This state-sponsored attack on
the Peruvian people has been
resisted by popular organizations
through national strikes, public
denunciations, huge marches, legal
battles, factory and land occupations, and peasant milita. A leader
of such an organization will be
coming to Vancouver and to UBC
this month.
Rosa Duenas Morales began her
activities as an organizer of women
— helping to set up a refuge house
for battered women, serving as
municipal councillor on the Commission of Women, heading a project called "The House of Women"
(which offers women legal and
psychological services).
Two years ago, Rosa's son was
imprisoned on a terrorism charge.
She joined and now leads the Commission for the Families of Political
Prisoners. This organization, in
concert with the united left,
demands amnesty for all political
prisoners regardless of charges and
the abolishment of the anti-terrorist
law 046. While it works within the
parliamentary process, it believes
that only through united work by
the people will these objectives be
achieved.
Hear Rosa Duenas Morales speak
Thursday, October 23 at 12:30 in
Plaza North, basement of the SUB
at UBC. Hear about current conditions in Peru and current steps
taken by people to change these
conditions. This talk is sponsored
by the Committee for the Defense
of Human Rights in Peru and the
Latin America Solidarity Committee. For more information, call
Suzanne Rose at 734-0247.
Suzanne Rose
rhme 4
"Less able" graduates get jobs as T.A.'s
I wish to add a footnote to Kurt
Preinsperg's recent letter concerning graduate fellowships and
teaching assistantships.
At present UBC awards
fellowships to those graduate
students it deems "most able".
Such students are not required to
teach. Graduate students deemed
"less able", ie those who do not
receive fellowships, are offered
teaching assistantships. Thus UBC
hands over a good share of undergraduate instruction to persons it
deems less able.
This is folly for two reasons: (1)
In the absence of other criteria,
teaching should be the prerogative
of those who themselves are most
able in their field.
(2) Teaching is an excellent way
to deepen one's understanding of
any subject. UBC's supposedly
most able graduate students are being directed away from an experience which should be integral to
their own education.
I suggest the abolition of the present system of fellowships and
assistantships.   Replace  it  instead
with a unified system of well paid
junior teaching posts available to all
graduate students deemed sufficiently able to pursue their own
studies and assist in under-graduate
instruction.
Should  graduate  students  who
have theses near completion find
that teaching is taking up too much
of their time, a unified system could
allow a final period of remuneration without required teaching
duties.
Clive Mountford
graduate student
department of philosophy
THE UBYSSEY
October 24. 1986
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Friday
throughout the academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and are not necessarily those
of the administration or the AMS. Member Canadian
University Press. The Ubyssey's editorial office is SUB
241k. Editorial department, 228-2301/2305. Advertising
228-3977/3978.
Running happily through the flowers in the garden of Eden was Evelyn (Eve) Jacob and Peter Berlin
(would-be Adaml when the snake (James Young) tempted her with the apple of journalism. God
(Svetozar Konticl was pissed off. Jennifer Lyall IMaryl was pregnant by an angel of God. (Or so she
said). Her boyfriend Rick Herbert (Jose) married her anyway and Michael Groberman was born (J.C.
for short). Meanwhile Malcolm Pearson (King Dave) killed David Ferman (dumb soldier) off in battle so
he could have his wife and chattel, Janice Irving IBathsheba). Conine (David) used a divine slingshot
to off Cassandra Freeman (Goliath). Steve Chan (Zeus) threw thunderbolts at Scott Mclaren (Thor).
Roger Kanno (Apollo) kidnapped Patti Rather (Helena of Troy) and Trish Webb (Hercules) saved her.
And they all copulated happily ever after . . . Friday, October 24, 1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Powerful drama encourages kids to talk
By MICHAEL GROBERMAN
Drunk parents beating up their kids. Green Thumb Theatre for Young
People has tackled a heavy subject for its current school tour, and has succeeded with enormous integrity.
Liars playwright Dennis Foon (New Canadian Kid) has written a power-'
ful drama full of humour, sex, and compassion for the families portrayed.
Jace (Alan Zinyk) is a dope smoking, heavy metal fanatic who has little use
for school.  Lenny (Karin Konoval) is a conscientious, preppy, over-
achiever. Both go home to alcoholic parents.
Jace's dad (Kevin McNulty) is an unemployed laborer who drinks beer
and watches television all day. He is a single parent. Jace comes home from
school, seeking approval, and is accused of having stolen a screwdriver.
McNulty carries a life-size dummy of himself around the set, using the
dummy as a security blanket, a shield against his son's verbal abuse, and as
a weapon to strike out physically at his child. Such clever use of a prop is
refreshing and dramatically effective. The dummy represents a personification of the alcohol: a shield and weapon — and a different person from its
sober counterpart.
stage
Liars
By Dennis Foon
Directed by Keith Turnbull
Public performance in December
Jace and Lenny become friends at school, neither realizing the problems
of the other. Jace opens up first, complaining about his drunken father.
Lenny tells a story about her "friend." She finally admits her problem to
Jace, "I never talked to anyone about this before ... I feel as if I've said
something wrong," she says.
The message is clear and moving. Young people trapped in a home-life
with an alcoholic or otherwise abusive parent often live a secret nightmare.
This play encourages them to talk — to help themselves and to help their
parents.
Foon's script carefully outlines the fears of the young people, and the lies
handed them by their sick parents. To this Foon adds the humour and apprehension of sexual tensions to endear himself to his young audience. One
night in the park, Jace convinces Lenny to play truth or dare, and he dares
himself to take off his clothes, revealing his underwear-covered behind
before Lenny notices and insists he stop. The York House audience liked
this very much, as they did the final kiss.
Zinyk and Konoval, as Jace and Lenny, bring insightful portrayals ofthe
pain and confusion of adolescence to their roles. The relationship they
develop out of a mutual desperation for truth and understanding is real and
moving.
Director Keith Turnbull gives the play a quick "pace, and pauses in the
right places for the ugly moments at home, and for the reassuring moments
of love and understanding shared by Jace and Lenny.
In the press release, Green Thumb points out that one in three young
people goes home to a home where there is alcohol abuse by a family
member.
Theatre should be moving. It should speak to its audience. Perhaps the
big budget venues like the Vancouver Paracelsus Playhouse and the Neil
Simon Theatre on Granville Island could take a lesson and give general audiences the kind of high quality theatre which only school students get to
see these days.
ZINYK, McNULTY . . . Jace, Dad, and the dummy
Feminist photographer focuses on old issues
By SHARON KNAPP
Seeing Paul Perchal's
photographic series at the Pitt International Galleries is like leafing
through the early issues of Ms.
magazine.
Perchal's skill as a colour
photographer creates crisp and
brilliantly coloured images. Many
of his portraits are tightly and
cleanly composed and clearly he has
already mastered all of the latest
umfLuiini       w
-paul perchal photo
tricks    of   Saturday   Night's
photographic   crew.
Despite his good intentions, his
work frustrates his female feminist
contemporaries because he focuses
on issues that were new in the
women's movement fifteen years
ago: the celebration of women's
history, the politics of housework,
portraits of women who fight to
enter the professions and joust with
the symbols of the patriarchy.
gallery
Paul Perchal
The Pitt Galleries
Perchal's intentions are still timely and necessary, however. He
wants "to present women in a
strong and active fashion," but
often his images do not carry it out.
One photograph shows an old
women sitting on her sofa holding
her carpet sweeper. A black and
white image of three old women is
superimposed on her t.v. screen.
Since the viewer does not get a sense
of personal strength from how she
holds herself, or by an arresting,
direct gaze, how are we to read this
photograph any differently from a
typical illustration of a homemaker
in a traditional women's magazine?
Similarly, Perchal sets women up
in relation to a male standard by
showing his women waving phallic
symbols, or gleefully dangling tiny
men for his camera. These cliches
don't help Perchal create a new
positive image of women. In fact it
perpetuates the stereotype that
feminists must be anti-men to be
pro-women.
Creating a new visual language to
represent women is a difficult task.
Other feminist artists and
photographers are wrestling with
the same issues as Perchal, and
sometimes   with   poorer   results.
However, his very facility at commercial photography which uses exaggerated scenarios has led Perchal
to express his ideas with cliches. If
he develops his equally first rate
skills as a black and white por-
traiturist, he will produce a subtler
and more satisfying elaboration of
form and content.
VSO needs unity for electricity
By ANYA WAITE
The Vancouver Symphony
managed another musically solid
and totally uneventful concert. Oh,
certainly pleasant, and with some
good moments — but uneventful.
Vancouver Symphony Orchestra
Conducted by Kazuyoshi Akiyama
The Orpheum
October 19
It was clear, however, that
Kazuyoshi Akiyama outshined Bar-
shai's conducting performance
earlier this fall — there was none of
the damning mediocrity of interpretation that flattened out
September's concert. And both
modern works, the Antiphonie by
Morel, and the Bartok Concerto for
Orchestra were handled with a certain finesse. The soloist, Janina
Fialkowska, left something to be
desired.
Morel's Antiphonie is a tone
piece, a melodic study of some
beauty and harmonic flow. A lovely
french horn opening led into a textured and occasionally very finely
shaped interpretation, with distant
overtones suggesting the sea.
The Brahms Piano Concerto
(No. 1 in D Minor, Opus 15), as
performed by Fialkowska, emerged
a puzzling mixture of virtuosity and
bland, toneless playing. Considering Ms. Fialkowska's reputation, it
was disappointing. She opened with
hard, bumpy playing and a percussive edge to the fortes, making
an odd fall to a dragged and sleepy
Adagio. There were wrong notes.
In many ways the orchestra
outplayed Fialkowska. The upper
strings gave some superb moments
in the second movement, and the
cello soloist was good.
The orchestra played well, but
there was no real distinction or inspiration in its performance. As
usual, there was some fine individual playing — an excellent
oboe duet in the second movement,
and clean, tight brass. But the orchestra needed to come together
more, to get away from these
isolated performances and achieve
some unity. It has a fine sound, but
it misses the unity of spirit that
would make it electric. Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 24, 1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
Photos by JENNIFER LYALL
Tunes totter on chaos
By PETER BERLIN
; Two of rock music's more
disreputable survivors brought, a
touch of autumn chill to the Town
Pump on Monday night.
While Stevie Wonder was up the
road at the Pacific Coliseum
celebrating the upbeat values of the
modern entertainment industry,
John Cale and his sidekick Chris
Spedding were confronting a much
darker, wintery side of human
nature.
music
CALE AND SPEDDING...searing music.
John Cale and Chris Spedding
The Town Pump
October 20
It is Cale's belief, as he sung on
Monday night that "fear is a man's
best friend."
Cale made his name as a founding member of the Velvet
Underground. Their continuing
cult-following has allowed him to
explore his own obsessions, releasing
a series of albums which exorcise his
demons in a very eccentric way. On
Monday he appeased the Velvets
fans with a crunching version of
Waiting for the Man on the first encore.
Spedding, the man without personality, is a perfect foil for Cale.
Spedding is the great pasticheur of
modern British guitar herds. He can
imitate anybody else's style
brilliantly but seems to have no real
style of his own.
His searing playing beautifully
enhanced Cale's songs. Cale, on
Yamaha organ or accoustic guitar,
carried his songs forward forcefully
on straightforward melodies and
strong, hoarse singing until they
disintegrated in the face of his self-
doubts and fears. Many don't end
with a neat chord but, shudder to a
halt. Spedding and Cale, are so accomplished that they can hold a
tune tottering on the knife-edge of
chaos.
Cale opened the evening with the
old dirge Bang the "Drum Slowly.
The show moved through subtle
changes of pace and mood to
Amsterdam,' a slow* death-of-love
song, onto Leaving it up to You, a
plodding pop song in form, but
with lyrics like "All feel safe like
Sharon Tate."
Other highspots were mercenary,
Cale's attempt -to get into the
psyche of the soldier of fortune,
Cable Hogue, a song inspired by a
Sam Peckinpah movie, is propelled
by some perfectly-judged power-
guitar from Spedding, to the final
emotional crisis as Cale, screeching,
beseaches the hero not to abandon
him.
The real show-stopper was Heartbreak Hotel, slowed down almost
to cardiac arrest, as Cale brought
out the jilted lover's true despair
better than young Elvis ever wanted
to.
Heartbreak Hotel also showed up
in the support set by another pair of
disreputable rockers, The Ubyssey
house band No Fun. The difference
between No Fun and Cale and
Spedding is 15 years of age and 5000
miles. Cale and Spedding are hardbitten Brits while Dave M and Paul
Leahy and fun-loving Surrey boys.
Their Heartbreak Hotel is really an
ad for Gorgo, the lime toffee pop
rock bar made with the secret ingredient black paste.
No Fun were, as ever, loads of
fun but didn't go down as well with
the cool crowd at the Town Pump
as they had with the rowdy rockers
at SUB 241K on Friday afternoon.
tight novel evokes nostalgia
By CATHY ROSE
Canadian author Matt Cohen's
new novel, Nadine, marks a milder
and more humanitarian turn in a
long and prolific career. The author
who in his drug-smoking, beatnik
youth was probing the fringes of
literary form has in middle age
become more interested in explor
ing people in traditional genre.
Some of his most popular novels,
the "Salem Quartet", The Spanish
Doctor, and now Nadine have all
shown this new concern.
Nadine is the life story of a
Jewish war orphan and her struggle
to come to some understanding of
the world after the Nazi holocaust.
The novel begins in the present as
forty year old astronomer, Nadine
Santangel, pieces together and
remembers her past. She tells her
story with the focus not so much on
time as the places that have shaped
the epochs of her life.
ARYOF
Nov. 1 - 29
DRESS REHEARSAL
(Students only) •"„•"    JHE      *•"•
OCT. 30th ::VANCOUVER::
$5 PREVIEW TICKETS                                     PLAYHOUSE
AT THE DOOR ONLY. " ...::
.•a*:::*>
•'   THE   •--
book
Nadine
By Matt Cohen
Published by Viking
1986
In a recent interview with Quill
and Quire, Cohem remarked that
originally he had felt the subject of
the holocaust had become too much
a cliche that "works against Jews
who are thinking about what it
means to be Jewish". He did not
write about Judaism at all until his
last novel. While working on it he
thought of the idea for Nadine.
Like The Spanish Doctof,
Nadine continues the author's interest in physically evoking different places and times and pondering the power they have over people.
The successful recreation of
several different contemporary eras
makes the novel very readable. Examined are occupied France and
dashing resistance heroes, suburban
Toronto in a 1950s childhood,
radical 1960s London and flower
power rebels, and the list goes on
until it reaches the modern day.
We see prosaic and forgettable
Canada described as a "secure
place where broken lives can be
made new."
Woven through the larger themes
of time and place are other ambitious commentaries on Romanticism, relationships, sex, death and
most interestingly on science and
the academic world. Yet what could
have been sentimental rambling is
treated thoroughly and with
understatement. Much credit for
this goes to the convincing female
first person narrative that distances
us from the actual events.
Nadine is not compelling reading,
but is is a top-rate light and contemplative story, with some very
appealing nostalgia about our own
times. It is smoothly written, carefully restrained, and at times almost
lyrical.
Freedom
By horacio de la cueva
and Barbara Stowe
A good political play must present and solve
at least one concrete problem of the society it
protrays. An Oath to Freedom neither
presented nor proposed solutions to the problems of the Philippines. Although the play
presented a good review of life under the Marcos' dictatorship, it failed to show how Cor-
azon Aquino is dealing with the problems left
behind by the previous regime.
Oath to Freedom
From the Philippines
The Waterfront Theatre
October 17, 18
stage
The type of audience that goes to plays that
deal with the political problems of a country is
not an uninformed or simple-minded audience. This public goes to show its solidarity
and sympathy for the Filippino cause.
We cannot deny that Corazon Aquino is better than Ferdinand Marcos, and because of
this fact we are optimistic about the new
government.
It is unfortunate that this good will is abused
by the play. We, as public, felt offenced by the
extreme simplicity with which the play
presented the Philippines. Characters came in
two flavours, good and bad, accompanied by
large television host smiles and melodramatic
weeping. Ferdinand and Imelda Marcos surfaced several times through the play, plastic
buffoons contrasted with a shining, but
plastic, Corazon Aquino. A theatre of
generalities is not a theatre of real life.
The artificial friendship solicited through
vigorous shaking of spectators' hands by the
actors reminded us too closely of some
political campaigners who have wandered the
province recently.
Issues dealing with life in the Philippines are
presented and brushed off to the side as nonessential to the play. At one point the fact that
there was a campaign to boycott the elections
came up. The reasons behind this boycott and
the Filippino public response to it are ignored.
Then, the defection of the military from the
Marcos' camp to Aquino's, a fact of tantamount dramatic importance to the outcome of
the presidential election and the problems in
the Philippines today, is treated superfically.
The brand new cozy relationship between Corazon Aquino and Ronald Reagan is treated as
a positive event for the future of the Philippines, as if the United States had no say in the
black history of this country.
This kind of non-critical non-political
theatre sends chills running up and down our
spines.
The play leaves the audience with a bitter
feeling that it has been sold cheap propaganda
about Corazon Aquino. We can only hope that
the Filippinos and their problems are being
taken more seriously by their government than
this play would have us believe.
:.:-■■ -W 1" ii f -" c" *fc:#-'^I:
*>
"XI
Photos by STEVE CHAN
Love & Rockets sublime
By TONY ROBERTS
It was an instant of sublime sub-
conciousness. For a fleeting
moment, perhaps even a minute,
Love and Rockets painted a different face on reality. Yet like so
many things, that beautiful state of
surreal escapism soon faded to the
conventions of utility and artistic
complacency. * "'
music
Love and Rockets
The Town Pump
October 19
A pity, because although there is
genuine talent here, one senses the
desires of a band willing to sacrifice
integrity for financial success.
Love and Rockets don't seem to
mind. They'll play an intense, jagged, dreamlike tune and then follow
it up with an innane pubescent pop
ditty.
Case in point is "Yin and Yang,"
a splendid melodic mumbo-jumbo
dance track that would suggest
Love and Rockets have some good
ideas; but plastic doggeral like
"Seventh Dream of Teenage
Heaven" is about as contrived and
stupid as its title would suggest.
David J., Daniel Ash, and Kevin
Haskins are at their best when they
revert to gut wrenching dirge a la
Bahaus, the band that spawned
Love and Rockets. At their peak
Bahaus produced music as
relentless, absorbing, and superbly
depressing   as   Joy   Division   (the
standard to which all gloom music
must ultimately be judged).
Love and Rockets' inconsistency
is frustrating, but what do you expect? The band wants to reach a
wider audience than the bangle-
laden black brigade, without insulting the sensibilities of this
faithful unit.
In this sense they've succeeded.
The stage front was painted black
with balding armchair punksters in
beer-stained, black T-shirts. Then
feet and ten years behind we have,
(oooh!) the Channel One Kluyb
proteges wearing their, you guessed
it, matching black outfits and brandishing those ever present "I've suffered therefore I'm art," stares.
Somewhere in between are the folks
who shop at Sears. All fans, no
doubt.
Love and Rockets' calculating
approach is implicit in their appearance. On guitar we have the an-
drogenous jelly head, David Ash, a
perfect marketing decoy. His image
brings to mind other corporate investment pretty boys with nice hair
and no talent. Fortunately, for the
whole world, himself included, his
musicianship far surpasses vapid
bop-tarts like Platinum Blonde,
Canada's leading process cheese —
food distributors.
Good points? 1) They're all undoubtedly fine musicians; David J.
(bass) and his brother Kevin
(drums) provide one of the
strongest rhythm sections heard in
recent memory 2) They unload a
devastating version of Ball of Confusion 3) David J. has cool shades,
and 4) they definitely have their
moments . . .
LOVE AND ROCKETS... hot
Fast Eddie Felson still a hustler
By PETER BERLIN
It's 25 years since they broke the
kid's knuckles. He's been out of the
game since then, he had no choice,
but he's made a mint selling booze.
He hasn't touched a cue but at
heart he's still the hustler, and what
matters most to him is the color of
money.
One day Fast Eddie Felson, cooly
played by Paul Newman, sits in a
bar haggling over business with the
owner, who also happens to be the.
woman he loves, when the local
pool hot-shot gets his clock cleaned
by a new kid. Felson knows talent
when he sees it and moves in first
persuading the youngster's  hard-
nosed woman friend Carmen, and
then Vincent himself, that he'll take
them to the riches.
film
YOU COULDNT FIND the big time with a street map," Fast Eddie Felson (Paul Newman) tells Vincent (Tom Cruise) and Carmen (Mary Mastrantonio).
The Colour of Money
Directed by Martin Scorsese
Vancouver Centre
"You couldn't find the big time
if you had a street map," Felson
tells the couple. They need him he
says, because he is a student of
human nature. The three set off to
win their fortunes and the hustle is
on.
The chief hustler is Martin
Scorsese the director. Until the last
15 minutes when he begins to lose
his footing, the film is a bravura
display of the director's art backed
up by script and acting that gives
him plenty of human nature to
study.
The unusual camera angles, aggressive editing, and pounding
soundtrack turn all the pool games,
but the last, into exhilarating, and
brief, explosions of action, colour,
and tension. Scorsese shows he can
outpace those two-bit hucksters
from Miami Vice anyday.
The high spot is Tom Cruise as
Vincent smashing his way through a
frame in sync with Warren Zevon's
song Werewolves of London. The
mild-mannered kid who played for
kicks has begun to turn into a
money-making monster.
The scene in which Eddie uses
Carmen, played by the incandescent
Mary Mastrantonio, to persuade
Vincent to make the jump to full-
time pool, is an electric display of
fast camera work and pared down,
surefooted script-writing.
When the hustle is on, Fast Eddie
never lets up, and neither does Fast
Martin behind the camera.
They even dust off some of the
same scams Fast Eddie first pulled
in the original movie The Hustler.
But this time they are spiced up with
a simmering sexual chemistry and
the blazing music orchestrated by
Robbie Robertson, aided by blues
greats Willie Dixon and B.B. King.
In the end neither Fast Eddie nor
the script writers can resist any
longer. Fast Eddie must take up the
cue and challenge his protege in the
Big Tournament. The confrontation lacks tension, and the double
whammy ending leaves the audience
saying "So what?".
Even so, the Colour of Money is
well worth the ticket to see two old
masters, Martin Scorsese and Paul
Newman, on top of their game, and
to see two of their young contenders, Cruise and Mastrantonio,
match them shot for shot. Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 24,1986
vista
stage
Many theatre tickets can be purchased for
half-price on the day of the performance at
Front Row Centre (1025 Robson, 683-2017).
Brighton Beach Memoirs, once again the
Arts Club leaps to the cutting edge of contemporary performance art, this time with Neil
Simon, at the Arts Club Granville Island
(687-1644), Monday to Friday at 8:30 p.m.,
Saturdays at 6:30 and 9:30 p.m., Wednesday
matinee (2 for 1) at 5:30 p.m.
Ain't Misbahavin', the longest running
musical ever in the history of the free world, at
the Arts Club Revue Theatre (Granville
Island, 687-1644), same times as Brighton
Beach, above, until the end of time.
Sex Tips for Modern Girls, the witty
musical that Touchstone wisely unloaded on
the wit-barren Arts Club, so that Touchstone
could get on to new things, at the Arts Club
Seymour Street (1181 Seymour Street,
687-1644), same times as Arts Club shows
above.
Mr. Poe, a Theattrical Performance,
local playwright Douglas Bankson's
monologue purports to chronicle the events
of the night Poe wrote The Raven, at UBC's
Dorothy Somerset Theatre (behind Freddy
Wood, 222-5261), Hallowe'en night, October
31, at 8 p.m.
Sisterly Feelings, silly British comedy by
Alan Ayckbourn, the first even production of
Catherine Caines and Antony Holland's new
theatre school that was supposed to present
exciting, innovative theatre but chose British
comedy instead, at Presentation House (333
Chesterfield Ave., 986-1351), tonight at 8
p.in., Saturday night at 6 p.m. and 9 p.m.,
closes Saturday.
Les Belles Soeurs, Michel Tremblay's collection of gossip, hypocrisy, faith, and ever-
changing kitchen loyalties and domestic
alliances, at SFU Centre for the Arts
(291-3514), at 8 p.m., matinees Tuesday and
Wednesday at 12:30 p.m. are free, until
November 1.
Paracelsus, the play that proves George
Ryga has a sense of humour, at the Vancouver Playhouse (Hamilton at Ounsmuir),
at 8 p.m., matinee Saturday at 2:30 p.m.,
closes Saturday night.
Dreaming and Dueling, by John Lazarus
and Joan Lazarus, at Studio 58 (Langara College, 100 W. 49th, 324-5227) at 8 p.m., closes
Saturday.
Two Gentlemen of Verona, A rock and
roll adaptation of Shakespeare's play, at Richmond Gateway Theatre, Studio B (6500
Gilbert Road, 270-1812), November 4-8 at 8
p.m., Saturday matinee at 2 p.m.
Theatresports, competative im-
provisatonal theatre, UBC Graduate Centre
(228-3203). Thursdays at 8 p.m.
Scared Scriptless, improvisational theatre
at the Arts Club Revue Theatre (Granville
Island, where Ain't Misbehavin' lives), Fridays
at 11:30 p.m.
The Bear and A Marriage has been arranged, Chekhov and a British play, by
Coconut Theatre, at Heritage Hall (3102
Main Street, 984-8454), until Sunday, and October 31 to November 2, at 8 p.m.
Gala Opening at Queen Elizabeth
Theatre (Hamilton at Georgia) October 24.
Jazz/Fusion at Queen Elizabeth
Theatre, October 25.
Folk and Traditional at Queen Elizabeth
Theatre, October 26.
Rock at the Commodore Ballroom (870
Granville), October 29.
Jazz at the Commodore Ballroom, October 30.
Rock at Queen Elizabeth Theatre October 31.
Pacific Celebration at Queen Elizabeth
Theatre October, November 1.
Vancouver Symphony Orchestra, with
pianist John Browning, at The Orpheum
(Smithe at Seymour, 280-4444), October 25 at
8:30 p.m. and October 27 at 7:30 p.m.
Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds, swampy-
blues-rock at the Town Pump, (66 Water
Street, 683-6695), October 30.
Talking Freds, political satire, at La
Quena coffeehouse (1111 Commercial
Drive, 251-6626), October 24 (tonight).
James Cotton, The B-Sides, and Focus
3. a Hallowe'en costume ball at the Commodore Ballroom (870 Granville Street,
681-7838), October 31.
Purcell String Quartet, Beetoven's string
quartet in C Minor and more, at Vancouver
East Cultural Centre (1895 Venables,
294-9578), October 26 at 2:30 p.m. and8 p.m.
Ozzy Osbourne, mellow rock influenced
by Perry Como, at The Pacific Coliseum
(P.N.E. grounds, 280-4444).
The Screaming Blue Messiahs, gutsy
modern R and B is on the cutting edge of the
UK rock scene, at the Town Pump (66 Water
Street, 683-6695) October 27.
Mya Max, Techno pop with strong African
influence, Arts Club Granville Island
Backstage Lounge, October 24, 25.
Jason Grant's Birthday Party, Arts Club
Seymour Street Lounge, October 24, 25.
dance
Goh Ballet Company, a programme of
mixed repetroire including the premiere of a
new work by Choo San Goh, at the Vancouver Playhouse (Hamilton at Dunsmuir),
October 26 at 8 p.m.
Montanaro Dance, a multi-media performance company from Montreal will perform
East of Egypt at the Firehall Theatre (280 E.
Cordova St., 689-0926) October23, 24, and25
at 8 p.m.
Mozaico Flamenco Heresy, a four-night
Hallowe'en fiesta, invites you to come in
costume as your favourite saint or heretic and
join the dance, at Vancouver East Cultural
Centre (1895 Venables, 294-9578), October
30-November 2 at 8:30 p.m.
Miryam Moutillet and Barbara Bourget.
a Montreal dancer and Vancouver
choreographer showcase new dance at the
Firehall Theatre (280 E. Cordova), October
30, 31, November 1 at 8 p.m.
Rebound Dance Collective, presenting
four works including two new ones, at the.
Firehall Theatre (280 E. Cordova) October 31
and November 1 at 11 p.m.
film
Mishima: a life in four chapters, an examination of the life and works of the
Japanese author who committed ritual suicide
in 1970, at SUB auditorium, October 29 at 7
p.m. and 9:30 p.m.
Vengeance is Mine, a Japanese film of a
legendary cold-blooded killer who brazenly
eluded police dragnets all across Japan, at
Vancouver East Cinema (7th Avenue and
Commercial Drive, 253-5455), October 24-30
at 9:30 p.m.
The Claw and the Tooth, an extraordinary
documentary about animals on the East
African plains, at Vancouver East Cinema
(7th Avenue and Commercial Drive,
253-5455), October 24-26 at 7:30 p.m.
Kerouac: The Movie, a documentary
combining archival footage, photographs, interviews, and staged sequences with a
Kerouac look-alike, at Vancouver East
Cinema (7th Avenue and Commercial Drive,
253-5455), October 27-30 at 7:45 p.m.
Running Scared, with Gregory Hines and
Billy Crystal, at SUB auditorium, October 24
at 7 p.m. and 9:30 p.m.
Ruthless People, with Danny DeVito and
Bette Midler, at SUB auditorium, October
25, 26 at 7 p.m. and 9:30 p.m.
F/X ... it means special effects, at SUB
auditorium, October 30 to November 2 at 7
p.m. and 9:30 p.m.
music
Steve Winwood. one of rock's classic
vocalists, at the Pacific Coliseum (P.N.E.
grounds, 280-4444), October 30.
Banaras Youth Quartet, a lecture
demonstration of Hindustani (North Indian)
classical music, Asian Centre auditorium
(UBC Asian Centre, 228-3131), October 30.
Pacific Wave Festival, Vancouver's international youth festival featuring outstanding
groups and soloists from around the Pacific
Rim: (685-0110).
* BARGAIN' *
BAZAAR
October 27-31
9 a.m.-5 p.m.
SUB Main Concourse
228-2348
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then embrace political causes that harm it.
Censorship. High taxes. Protectionism.
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Only worse. That's why there's a Libertarian
Party of Canada. To give people like you a
platform to speak up... a chance to meet
others of similar feeling:.. a chance to make
a difference.
We know how you feel about freedom.
There are others like you right on campus. Let's
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Because together, we're going to go places.
□   YES! I want to make a difference!
Send me more information.
NAME	
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POSTAL CODE
PHONE NO.
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A symposium on
RELIGION and ECONOMICS
Finn-Est Institute
How To Close Food Banks
Tuesday, Oct. 28, 2:30 pm, Buchanan B327
Finn-Est Institute
A New Business Paradigm
Wednesday, Oct. 29, 2:30 pm,
Buchanan Penthouse
Canadian Farmworkers Union
A Time To Rise
Wednesday, Oct. 29, 2:30 pm, Scarfe 208
Finn-Est Institute
How To Make The Economy Work Better
Thursday, Oct. 30, 2:30 pm,
Buchanan Penthouse
A
sponsored by
UBC CHAPLAINS and
FINN-EST INSTITUTE
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Guys 9:30 p.m.
Applications now being
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THE    UBYSSEY
Page 9
Walker recommends free enterprise economies
By RICK HIEBERT
Both the newly re-elected Socred
government and the federal government in Ottawa should pursue more
conservative economic policies, the
head of the Fraser Institute said
during a visit to UBC Wednesday.
Michael Walker, president of the
influential Vancouver-based conservative think-tank the Fraser Institute, told 50 students in Angus
323 that The best government is one
that's "creatively inactive."
"Government can't do nothin',"
said Walker. Walker talked about
the economic policies the Fraser Institute hopes the new Socred
government will put into effect.
"We have been concerned about
the kind of mega-project mentality
on the part of the (Socred) government," said Walker. "Our advice
to them would be to stay away from
that kind of mentality. You don't
create growth by pouring concrete;
unless that concrete is being poured
by someone whose own money is
being used to pour it."
Walker said the Socreds should
cut taxes and balance the budget.
The level of taxation and the level
of the deficit in B.C. continue to be
a problem," he said.
Walker didn't think much of the
NDP's proposed policies and advised the Socreds not to support them.
He said "They (the Socreds) should
stay away from the long list of program extensions and expansion proposed during the election by Mr.
Skelly. The demand driven nature
GRADUATION
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8 & 10 p.m. Tonight
Call 278-5161
For Tickets
SKYLINE AIRPORT
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3031 No. 3 Road, Richmond
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of those programs would greatly
enhance the size of the public deficit
ofthe province, said Walker. "That
is something we simply should
avoid."
Walker recommended the
Socreds look at innovative ways of
approaching education. He said 30
per cent of the educational cost per
student could be saved if students
transferred from the public to the
private school system.
"An overhaul of education on
the basis of this privatization principle would not only reduce the cost
of the total education bill in the
province but also, perhaps, improve
the standard of education as well,"
said Walker.
Walker said the Tory government
in Ottawa is improving its economic
policies, but still has room for improvement.
"The current government has not
done a lot of conservative things. In
fact, they've done a number of
things that can only be described as
philosophically promiscuous," said
Walker. "There has seemed to be
no philosophical core to what they
have been doing," he added.
Walker attacked the Mulroney
government's universality policy on
Unemployment Insurance.
"U.I., which was designed as a
safety net, has turned into a hammock," said Walker. "More than
half of the payments of Unemployment in Canada go to families
whose incomes are above the national average," he added.
Critics of U.I. reform, continued
Walker, would argue such reform
would shut the Maritimes down.
"Well," said Walker, "Maybe
that's true, but maybe that's a good
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come and see . . .
Tfee
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& The Red Caboose
This year for October only:
A Whole Specialized Store at
1025 WEST BROADWAY
1023 W. BROADWAY
Broadway & Oak
733-6116
also as usual at -
The Red Caboose
Kids Only Market
Granville Island
682-1544
554 W. GEORGIA
(Georgia & Seymour)
681-8757
idea." He defended his assertion by been   reduced   to   wards   of  the
adding that "welfare saps the moral state."
fibre of the people." Look at the Removing   the   temptation   of
poorer parts of the  Maritimes," u.I., according to Walker, would
said Walker, "you can see a very cause these virtues to be strong
proud, self-resilient people that has again.
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/aware nTTs7    263-0878
Thunderbird Athletics
<€
CORKY'S
^0
CORKY'S FROSH AWARD
Awarded seasonally to outstanding freshman male and female
Thunderbird athletes
Winners September to October 15
MALE
FEMALE
KEVIN COLBOW-SOCCER
A graduate student in Physics who
comes to UBC from SFU, Kevin is a
key member of the Thunderbird
Soccer Team's defensive back row
which has allowed just two goals in
nine league games. The undefeated
'Birds attempt to make it 10 wins in
a row this Saturday at 2 pm when
they play the Victoria Vikings at
O.J. Todd Field.
Nominees:
Steve Burns —Soccer
Ron Crick —Football
Matt Fitzpatrick —Football
DARCY VOGEL-
FIELD HOCKEY
A first year athlete out of Kelowna,
Darcy had a very good season in
goal with the Thunderbird varsity
field hockey team. She allowed just
three goals in nine league games
and backstopped the Thunderbirds
to a 0-0 tie with the number one
ranked Victoria Vikings last
Sunday.
Nominees:
Zabeen Jan Mohammed-
Soccer
Cutting, styling, perms, for Gals and Guys.
Call 731-4191 3644 West 4th Ave. (at Alma).
THE FROSH AWARD: each male and female frosh award
winner receives  $20 worth  of hair  care  products,  free
hairstyling plus a CORKY's t-shirt. Nominees also receive a
t-shirt.
UNIQUE... ANY WAY YOU SERVE IT Page 10
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 24, 1986
tween dosses
TODAY
GAVS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Bar garden, 3:30 p.m.-7 p.m., SUB 212.
UBC PROGRESSIVE CONSERVATIVE CLUB
Bzzr and pizza evening, 4:X p.m.-8 p.m., SUB
206.
UBC MAIN UBRARY
Tour of the main library, noon, meet at the main
library entrance.
AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL OF UBC
Bzzr garden, everyone welcome, 4 p.m.-8 p.m.,
SUB 211.
UBC FILM SOCIETY
Film: "Running Scared", starring Billy Crystal, 7
p.m. and 9:30 p.m., SUB Aud.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
Conversational   meeting,   noon.   International
House.
DEPT. OF POLITICAL SCIENCE
Lecture:   "Citizens'   Peace  Movement  in  the
Soviet Baltic Republics", Prof. R. Taagepera,
noon, Buch. B320.
UBC SCHOOL OF MUSIC
University Wind Symphony — Martin Berin-
baum, director and trumpet soloist, 8 p.m.. Old
Aud.
POLITICAL SCIENCE STUDENTS'
ASSOCIATION
Bzzr garden, 4 p.m.-9 p.m., Partyroom.
THUNDERBIRD HOCKEY
Canada West home opener vs. Manitoba Bisons,
7:X p.m., Thunderbird Arena.
UBC SCHOOL OF MUSIC
UBC Stage Band — lan MacDougall, director,
noon. Recital Hall, Music Bldg.
CIRCLE K COMMUNITY SERVICE CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 215.
UBC STUDENTS' FOR PEACE AND
MUTUAL DISARMAMENT
"What About the Russians?", talk by Simon
Dolby, SFU. noon, SUB 205.
THUNDERBIRD VOLLEYBALL
UBC   Boys  and  Girls  Jr.   High  School  Tour-
naments, all day. War Memorial Gym.
SATURDAY
THUNDERBIRD VOLLEYBALL
UBC boys and girls jr. high school tournaments,
all day, War Memorial gym.
ASSOCIATION FOR BAHAI STUDIES
Potluck dinner and discussion on introduction to
Bahai faith, 6 p.m., 4285 W. 29th Ave.
THUNDERBIRD SOCCER
Last Canada West game vs. Victoria Vikings, 2
p.m., OJ Todd Field.
UBC FILM SOCIETY
"Ruthless  People" starring  Danny  DeVito,  7
p.m. and 9:30 p.m., SUB Aud.
Theatrical
Make-up &
Dance Supplies
VOIR HALLOWEEN
^  HEADQUARTERS
MASKS • WIGS • NOSES
MAKE-UP* HAIR SPRAY
WARTS • COSTUMES h
ACCESSORIES   ETC
(Qualified Witches to
Assist You)
1061 Marine Dr.   606 Robson St.
N.V. 985-4316 687-0737
GENTLEMEN like Leonard Grogan and son
William make Jack Daniel's Tennessee Whiskey.
They also make good country music.
And while they know their music
is much appreciated around Lynchburg,
they're equally proud to know that
the Jack Daniel's Tennessee Whiskey
they help make is much appreciated
in Canada. You see, as Mr. Grogan
tells it, there are lots of boys
who make good country music.
But only a few who have the
knack of making Jack Daniel's
Tennessee Whiskey
JACK DANIEL'S TENNESSEE WHISKEY
If you'd like a booklet about Jack Daniel's Whiskey, write us here in Lynchburg, Tennessee, 37352, USA
THUNDERBIRD HOCKEY
Canada West game vs. Manitoba Bisons, 7:30
p.m., Thunderbird Arene.
UBC INTRAMURAL SPORTS
Alpa Squash Tournament, register Oct. 7-17,
Thunderbird Winter Sports Centre.
SUNDAY
UBYSSEY SOCCER
Soccer match, 11 a.m., 16th and Macdonald.
MOTORCYCLE CLUB
Sunday ride to Whistler (weather permittingl,
10:30 a.m., meet at the North end of SUB.
CIRCLE K COMMUNITY SERVICE CLUB
Extended Care Unit Chair-a-thon, 9 a.m. Kerrisdale Community Centre.
UBC OANCE CLUB
Practice session, noon, Bellroom or Party room.
BOTH POINT GREY SEA SCOUTS
Car wash, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., 10th and Discovery
Shell station.
UBC SPORTS CAR CLUB
Car rally (Monte Cario style), 2 p.m.-10 p.m.,
start at old bus loop.
MONDAY
GRADUATE STUDENT SOCIETY
Movie night, showing "Outrageous" and "Insignificance," 7:30 p.m.. Graduate Student Centre, Garden Room Lounge.
UBC DANCE CLUB
Practice session, noon. Ballroom or Party room.
STUDENTS FOR A FREE
SOUTHERN AFRICA
General meeting — everyone welcome, noon,
-   Graduate Student Centre.
TUESDAY
PREMEDICAL SOCIETY
Lecture on cancer by Dr. Osoba, noon, Wood 1.
UNDERWATER HOCKEY
Drop-in   game,   all   welcome,   7   p.m.,   UBC
Aquatic Centre.
UNITED CHURCH CAMPUS MINISTRY
Informal worship,  all welcome  regardless of
denomination, noon, Lutheran Campus Centre.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Bible study and discussion, noon. Brock 304.
hot flash
Local playwright John Lazarus
who wrote Dreaming and Duelling
and The Late Blumer, will give a
public reading at the Grad Centre
today at 1 p.m.
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: AMS Card Holders — 3 lines, 1 day $2.75; Additional lines, 60c. Commercial
1 day $4.75; Additional lines, 70c. Additional days, $4.25 and 65c.
Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 10:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications, Room 266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
Charge Phone Orders Over $10.00 — Call 228-3977
5 - COMING EVENTS
40 - MESSAGES
THE VANCOUVER
INSTITUTE
Free Public Lecture
Saturday, Oct. 25
LASERS AND MAN
Prof. Arthur Schawlow
Physics, Stanford University
Lecture Hall 2,
UBC Woodward Building
at 8:15 p.m.
10 - FOR SALE - Commercial
VANCOUVER
FUN MARKET
"A FLEA PLACE TO SHOP"
703 TERMINAL
e,ast of Main St. Skytrain Stn.
8-4 SAT., SUN., HOLIDAYS
*Bargains
*Bikes
*Clothes
*Furniture
685-0666 Info & Bookings
Free Admission With Costume And Ad
11 - FOR SALE - Private
76 VW DASHER Good running condition
$1500 o.b.o. Will take quality home stereo
components on trade 224-4049.
1981   HONDA  CX500  custom   motorcycle,
fairing, raingear. Offers on $975. 685-5343.
15 - FOUND
FOUND - ladies watch at pool Oct. 17. Call
738-8432 after 9 p.m. with description.
20 - HOUSING
STUDENT
HOUSING
Available in Fairview Crescent, U.B.C.'s
newest single student residence. Occupancy from November 1st. Situated
just behind the University Village, all 4-,
5-, and 6-bedroom townhouses are completely furnished and rent includes all
utilities. Amenities include dishwashers,
deluxe furnishing and satellite television
reception capability. Prices start as low as
$250 per month and applicants must be at
least 21 years of age by December 31st,
1986 in order to qualify. Please apply at
the Student Housing Office, 2071 West
Mall (weekdays 8:30 a.m.-4:00 p.m.), or
call 228-2811.
A MESSAGE TO whoever took an
Australian felt hat at the Agriculture Barn
Dance. The Campus Police and RCMP have
been notified. You will be prosecuted
unless the hat is returned to the Agriculture
Undergrad Society.
REWARD offered to anyone with
information leading to the return of an
Australian felt hat that was taken from the
Agriculture Barn Dance on Sat., Oct. 18.
Please contact Shenton Tan at 228-3471 or
421-2107.
THE KID. I'm not sure about the feed
machine but Van sounds groovy for collecting
shells. D.H.
ALPHA PHI PLEDGES: You guys are the
greatest! Have a super time at P.O.P.!
The Actives.
70 - SERVICES
UNIVERSITY HILL
UNITED AND
PRESBYTERIAN
CONGREGATIONS
invite you to join us in worship
Sunday mornings at 10:20 a.m.
in the Epiphany Chapel,
Vancouver School of Theology
Young Adult Groups Sunday
or Monday evenings.
PHONE 224-6377
6050 Chancellor Boulevard
THE ANGLICAN STUDENT
MOVEMENT AT UBC
and
ST. ANSELM'S
ANGLICAN CHURCH
present
CHORAL EVENSONG
7:30 p.m.. Alternate Sundays
SUNDAY, NOV. 2nd
following the service.
The Rev. Canon
DAVID HOLETON
-  will lead a forum on
WORSHIP in the
20th CENTURY
Everyone is Welcome
ST. ANSELM'S CHURCH
 University Blvd.	
ROOM AND BOARD. West 19th Ave. &
Arbutus. Furnished rm. full bathroom,
available imm. Ph 731-8702.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: For quiet friendly
4-person house near 8th & Bianca. Phone
228-5088, 224-7660. Rent $275.
M/F TO SHARE 4 BR. hse. with 3 grads.
$250/mo. + util. 2725 W. 8th Ave. (Kits).
Ph: 733-5179. Ed/Greg; 222-2199, Tom.
GAGE, TOTEM PARK. PLACE VANIER Er
FAIRVIEW CRESCENT: room and board,
and room only: Available for men & women
in the student residences. For information,
apply at the student housing office, 2071
West Mall, Ponderosa Bldg., or call
228-2811. Weekdays: 8:30 a.m.-4:00 p.m.
35 - LOST	
WOMAN'S gold-coloured Seiko
watch w/brown strap, in or near UBC
Hospital - great sentimental value. Reward.
Call 738-9734.
DO HEALTH FOOD PRICES make you ill?
Cheque out AGORA FOOD CO-OP at Dunbar & 17th. Save $$ Makes -
HEY PUMPKIN! Own a piece of the pie. Join
AGORA FOOD CO-OP, Dunbar & 17th.
Authentic 24 carrot value.
PROFESSIONAL RESUMES
at a reasonable cost
tel. 736-9351
A 1 VANCOUVER INSURANCE BROKER.
Autoplan, Medical Ins. for students, tenant
insurance. 2065 W. 4th Ave. 731-3164.
PREGNANT?
Free Tests ■
731-1122
Confidential Help
CRISIS PREGNANCY? Birthright offers
alternatives to abortion. Call 687-7223 (free
pregnancy tests).
70 - SERVICES
16,278 to choose from—all subjects
Save Time and Improve Your Grades!
Order Catalog Today with Visa/MC or COD
EfS^213-477-8226 V9
O' "JSh $2 00 to: Research Assistance
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Custom research also available—all levels
75 - WANTED
GOALTENDER for UBC intramural hockey
superleague team. Contact Philip at
922-7282, A.S.A.P.
80 - TUTORING
ENGLISH TUTOR: G. Russell
(Ph.D in Eng) will tutor or give help with
essays. $10/hr. Phone: 520-5892 after six.
SPANISH TUTOR. Latin American,
T.A. at UBC. Experienced in teaching
grammar, conversation Et translation
733-0441.
85 - TYPING
MINIMUM NOTICE REQUI RED -Essays,
term papers, resumes, theses, reports,
UBC location (Village) 224-2662.
ADINA WORD PROCESSING for resumes,
essays, theses. Discount for students. 10th
Et Discovery. Phone 222-2122.
JUDITH FILTNESS. quality typist. 3206 West
38th Ave. 263-0351.
WORD   PROCESSING   SPECIALIST.    U
write,  we type theses,   resumes,   letters,
essays. Days, evenings, wknds., 736-1208.
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST. 30 yrs. exp.
Wordprocessor & IBM typewriter. Student
rates. Dorothy Martinson, 228-8346.
TYPING? YOU BET! Theses, papers,
essays, whatever Experienced, reasonable.
Short notice. Kits area. June 738-1378.
24 hrs.
WORDWEAVERS — word processing
(multi-lingual). Stud, rates. Fast turnaround. 5670 Yew St. at 41st. Kerrisdale.
266-6814.
ACADEMIC and BUSINESS WORD
PROCESSING/TYPING. Quality work,
very reas. rates. Days/evenings. 263-4862.
STAR   SECRETARIAL   SERVICES  for  all
your word processing needs. 299-3061.
WORD PROCESSING - term papers, reports, etc. Will edit grammar & punctuation. Reas. rates, ph Betty 421-7101 or
689-3122.
WHY HAVE YOUR ESSAYS TYPED when
you can have your words processed?
$1.50/pg. Copies free. Editing service avail,
for $5/page. 877-0848. Gary.
ACCENT    WORK    PROCESSING    -
278-0764.  Francais  —   English   —  Italian.
Delivery on campus — letter quality.
W/P & TYPING: Term papers, theses,
mscpts., essays, tech. equations, letters,
resumes. Bilingual. Clemy, 266-6641.
TYPING. Quality work at reasonable rates.
Fraser-Kingsway area. Paula, 873-2227 24
hours.
TYPING/WORDPROCESSING. Seventh &
Vine, 731-9955.
YEAR-ROUND. Expert essay, theses, typing
from legible work; spelling/grammar corrected. 738-6829, 10 a.m.-9 p.m.. King Ed.
bus route.
TYPING. Fast and accurate. $1.50/pg.
Rachel, 224-0866 or 228-3881. Satisfaction
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STUDENT/FACULTY RATES
$1.50/pg. dble. spaced text.
Equations & tables: $14.00/hr.
Resumes: $5.00/pege
50 personalized form letters only $35.00
Cerlox binding & photocopying.
Fast, professional service.
Jeeva's Word Processing
«--. „201   (36 W. Broadway
876-5333 M/c & visa
USE UBYSSEY CLASSIFIED Friday, October 24, 1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 11
Female snubbing consistent with Socred policy
By PATTI FLATHER
It's still a guy's game in B.C.
That's the message of the B.C.
Social Credit Party and Premier Bill
Vander Zalm.
It's also the message of the hundreds of thousands of men and
women who gave them a majority
government Wednesday.
We just elected a government
with fewer women MLAs in percentage terms than in 1983. With unofficial results, there's seven women,
holding 10 per cent of the 69 seats,
compared with six women, holding
12 per cent of the 52 old seats.
In that case
Ronald Stewart notes astutely
(The Ubyssey, Oct. 17) that Lawren
Harris's work in the AMS Gallery
has "a strong Group of Seven influence," but that "she has to
develop her own style."
Unfortunately, I feel I must tell
Ron that further developments in
Mr. Harris's style are no longer
possible. He is now dead, so I'm
afraid his work when he was one of
the Group of Seven will just have to
stand for itself.
Jamie Andrews
science 7
'     UNIVERSITY OF     V.
BRITISH COLUMBIA
FACULTY OF
DENTISTRY
J.B. Mcdonald Building
EMERGENCY CLINIC
is open to
FACULTY, STAFF AND
STUDENTS
for the treatment of
DENTAL PAIN,
INFECTIONS, SWELLINGS,
LESIONS, TRAUMA,
AND SORE TEETH/GUMS.
Diagnosis and Treatment is done
by Fourth Year Dental Students
for a nominal fee.
PHONE 228-2112
^ for an appointment       ^
DEYONG
Four Socred women — Grace
McCarthy, Rita Johnston, Carol
Gran, and Kim Campbell — and
three NDP women topped their
polls. There would doubtless be
more women elected if Social Credit
nominated more than six female
candidates. Only two women ran
for Social Credit outside the Lower
Mainland.
The Social Credit policy, as
stated recently by president Hope
Wotherspoon, is to avoid encouraging women because that would be
unfair to men.
Few would argue that a candidate
should be nominated or elected by
virtue or their sex, but it's incredible that Social Credit couldn't find
more than six talented women willing to run.
There were many strong candidates among the 21 women the
NDP fielded and the  12 women
RENTALS
• Party Systems
• Disco Systems
• Components
• Lighting Effects
873-3841
Mention this ad and
receive 10% off rental
271 East 2nd Ave. Vancouver
nominated by the Liberals. More
than any other party, Social Credit
is sending out the message that
representation of women in their
party isn't important.
But the snub Social Credit gave
women with their choice of candidates obviously was not an issue
^freestyle)
with the men and women who reelected this government.
Nor was the record of Premier
Vander Zalm and the government
on issues concerning women
enough to defeat Social Credit.
Vander Zalm hasn't said much
about what his government will do
for women, but whenever he does
open his mouth he puts women
down.   He   says   he   wants   more
?*&
rag) CO-OP OUTDOOR
ML'  OT.AV CUrAD
GEAR SWAP
Here's your chance to get rid of those
boots that seem to have shrunk a
half size or that pack which just
isn't big enough anymore or
maybe pick up some
experienced Tele skis.
The Co-op's Fall 86 Outdoor Gear Swap is the answer.
Call 872-7858 for more details.
P.S. you don't have to be a
Co-op member to
participate.
Win a
Pentax
Binocular
When you come to the Gear
Swap be sure to enter to win a
Pentax Mini Binocular to be given
away at 3 PM the day of the Gear
Swap. No purchase necessary to
win. Binocular is courtesy of
Pentax Canada Inc.
MOUNTAIN
EQUIPMENT
CO-OP
Gear Swap
Sunday, Oct. 26, 10 AM-3 PM
428 W. 8th Ave., Vancouver
IHHH»IIIllllimillI3D
INWS1ED1
WEIGHT TRAINING?
Want to work on those muscles? Come to the
UBC Aquatic Centre. We are offering introductory weight training classes. Classes will be weekly Monday & Wednesday from 5:30-7:30 p.m.
Cost: $20 for 4 hours of instruction.
Registration: At front desk of UBC
Aquatic Centre.
Maximum class size: 6 people.
Classes will cover basic concepts, exercises and
techniques with emphasis on using weights effectively and safely. Starts Oct. 27, 1986.
REGISTER NOW!
Yeah, Yeah, Yeah!!! I hear what your're saying
— I mean I hear it everyday and I just don't believe
a thing you're saying to me. We here at The
Ubyssey have so many people coming in and
writing letters and long letters. I mean its great
that you're coming in and writing these opinion
pieces because you want to let people know what
you think.
And we've got like just a humungous amount of
people writing entertainment and an oddball crew
of former heroin addicts that listen to old
depressing Springsteen music in dark Kitsilano
basement suites, writing sports. I mean that is
wild, funky, cool, groovy and downright out of
sight but like we have this serious problem at the
Ubyssey and we think you can help, kids.
We are in absolutely desperate need of people
Join
women in his caucus because they
have "intuition" and would
brighten up the decor.
A staunch Roman Catholic, he
suggests some women may be using
abortion as a form of birth control.
In the past he has opposed sex
education in schools. He has said
woman make better housewives
than plumbers. And so on.
Vander Zalm successfully
distanced himself from Bill Bennett
during his election campaign,
although the new premier was in the
Bennett government for several
years. There is no indication that
Vander Zalm will reverse the
restraint program, which affected
services such as transition houses,
rape crisis centres, and childcare.
Maybe   Bill   Vander   Zalm  will
push for an active government role
addressing the unequal position of
women. Maybe his government will
try to reduce the gap between the
amount men and women are paid,
or bring back the Human Rights
Commission.
Maybe. Let's hope so.
Retiring NDP MLA Rosemary
Brown, a long-time advocate for
women, said in an interview Thursday she thinks the new government
will be a disaster for women. "It
didn't happen. Women didn't vote
women's issues," she said. "Now
we're just going to have to take
what comes."
Patti Flather is a gung ho student
who believes a woman's place is in
the house, or at least the senate.
UBC
H E    EAT E RY
JL
1 FREE LUNCH
DAILY
SPECIAL'
%
This is a terrific deal! Bring a friend or a sweetie, purchase 2 of
the daily specials and receive the least expensive one FREE.
This coupon applies to daily specials only, isn't valid for takeout or with any other coupon. HAVE A GREAT DAY!
3431 WEST BROADWAY
738-5298
"    &£§) ON THE BOULEVARD      I
, hair and suntanning co.   ■
W>   20 SESSION - $69   wolwsys^m   ^
fa 20% Student Discount /j\
I on Hair Services j
I 5784 University Blvd. 224-1922 |
j (in UBC Village) V2 Blk. away 224-9116 |
I "Offer valid with presentation of this ad! ,- », „  .
I                                                                          Exp. Nov. 8 I
I J>^ 1
d
A
I
AUDITIONS  AUDITIONS  AUDITIONS
THE SCHOOL FOR WIVES
BY Moliere
(to be presented January 14-24)
AUDITIONS
TIMES: MONDAY, OCTOBER 27-      12:00-2:00 p.m.
4:30-6:00 p.m.
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 28-       2:00-5:00 p.m.
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 29-2:00-5:00 p.m.
PLACE: Frederic Wood Theatre, Room 206
(OPEN TO ALL UBC STUDENTS, FACULTY £t STAFF)
Audition material available in Room 207 Frederic Wood
Theatre or Phone 228-3880 to arrange an audition
appointment.
AUDITIONS   GETINTOTHEACT  AUDITIONS
^«   ii   ii   ii   ii   ii   i i   > <   »«■
to write news. Now I know what you're saying.
News is boring and it's really hard to write and you
have to phone all these people up and be rude.
Well let me tell you kids, that's not true. Now
you think I'm going to give you some line about
how you're going to uncover huge scandals and
uproot society.
You may do that but more importantly you'll acquire a tremendous skill and you'll become a better  human  being  for you're  efforts.
LWUruWur      V...V*      ..*,      ■.1,11,1.      JUU      ««..      ..v,.K,      ...W.J.
We are in absolutely desperate need of people vbbm     a   ■ W^^flE* j>ji%j
I thought news was really boring but more importantly I thought that I just couldn't do it but
hey, I did. And even more important than that is
the fact that you can write news whoever you are
and we really need you. All joking aside, if you
have any inclination at all to write news and to improve you're writing skills please come in and let
us know.
Everybody is welcome to The Ubyssey office
and there are always stories to be written. So
come in and introduce yourself to the wild and
crazy gang of four.
Don't be intimidated or shy. It takes a little time
to learn and once you do you'll be glad you did.
We'll be expecting plenty of enthusiastic (Not
like Earl's) people to come in and write news for us
in SUB 241k. See you soon.
t
t
t Page 12
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 24, 1986
THAT'LL STOP YOU
NO.      3 IN A SERIES
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MOLSON
6
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1
., mouk*"
fmm
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7
3
.,   MOLSQH
LCVNADI
m
yg
8
MOLSOK   .
9
V"*iiSi
MOLSON     ,
.CANADIAN
5
10
Only two ofthe ten numbered drawings are exactly alike. See how quickly you can find them!

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