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The Ubyssey Feb 11, 1992

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Array N
Cariboo nibbling
at the croquet
hoops
Lost since 1918
Vancouver, B.C., Tuesday, February 11,1992
Vol 74, No.3* 35
t-
Access rights questioned
The Supreme Court of BC ruled on Monday supervised access will continue to be granted to a man who
allegedly sexually contacted his daughter, during psychiatric evaluations ofthe three-year-old girl and her
parents.
by Frances Foran and Effie Pow
Linda Jackson, the mother,
successfully secured a child advocate (to represent the child's interests) who was appointed last
week by the Attorney General's
office.
"As soon as the accusation of
child abuse is brought to court
there should be an immediate
court assessment [so] that immediately the child is protected,"
Jackson said.
Assessments are available to
low income families, but Jackson's
$240 child benefits from a former
job disqualified her. Unless assessments are recommended by
the court, the cost is at least
$1,700. Jackson, on a disability
leave to deal with the case, is on a
fixed income of $1,647 a month.
Justice Peter Warren said the
father's maintenance payments
were unsatisfactory. Jackson and
her ex-husband will return to court
March 9 for the fourth hearing,
Linda Jackson
PAUL GORDON PHOTO
with financial reports.
Jackson was held in contempt
of court in December for refusing
her ex-husband access to the child.
In the December court appearance, justice Mary Ellen Boyd
ordered the father be granted nine
supervised hours of visitation a
week. Jackson now continues to
pay $780 monthly, through donations, for visits supervised by the
Greater Vancouver Mediation and
Conciliation.
The recent ruling upheld the
first report of recommendations
by John Gossage, a UBC clinical
assistant professor of pediatrics.
The report dated October 1991,
advised supervised access be
permitted.
But his views were modified
after a request made by the
father's lawyer, that Gossage
study further documentation. In
his second report, dated November 1991, Gossage noted "the
complaint [of sexual abuse was]
occurring in the context of an access dispute" and cited a negative
RCMP report as reasons to revise
his original recommendations.
(Her case was closed by the Mission RCMP in fall 1991, after an
unsuccessful interview with the
child by a male officer.)
Gossage wrote the girl
showed "no signs of traumatic
sexualization," and recommended
her father be granted
unsupervised access for eight
hours a week and undergo psychiatric attention, "particularly
surrounding problems of sexuality."
Gossage caused a media stir
last year when he said a woman
who accused her former foster father, John Golovin, of molestation
was "seductive, manipulative and
sexually precocious" as a seven
year old.
Golovin, 65, a friend of
Gossage, was acquitted of sexual
abuse charges but subsequently
sued for breach of trust by one of
the four foster daughters who accused him of six counts of assault
and rape.
A written evaluation of the
girl by pediatrician Heather Kee
was dismissed in court in the December hearing because Kee is
not qualified as a psychiatric
evaluator. Kee wrote, however, "I
am sure there has been some
fondling...a strong indication of
oral sex."
Jackson is soliciting help
from Joan Smallwood, minister of
social services and Penny Priddy,
minister of women's issues, to
make fundamental changes to the
judicial systemregardingthe protection of children. "Our children
have no protection, it's so difficult
to press charges when children
are under five," Jackson said.
"If you had asked me a year
ago I would have said we have a
system to protect our children.
The only people who know how
bad it is are those who are dealing
with it," Jackson said.
"The courts are forcing children to see these men, because
these men [who abuse children]
have rights as fathers," she said.
"To the court he is a vital part of
growing up."
Anne Dolina of Rape Relief
said the legal system is archaic.
"The system still believes that
violence within the family is a
family issue."
Jackson told her story to a
panel for Royal Commission on
Violence Against Women in January.
Resia
Its ofthe re<
cent BoC
lr and Senate elections
Board
Senate
oj Governors
Derek Miller
754
Jaret Clay
581
*
Senators elected
Wendy King
541
by acclamation
Gary Chan
421
Commerce Rep
The following facul-
TimLo
176
Michael Fuoss        61
Senators at It
%rge            Senators                             ties did not nominate
Spoiled
35
Tina Louie              46
from faculties                    new senators, so the
Spoiled                   1
Dave Dyment
Carole Forsythe
incumbents will con-
Agrlcultural Science              tinue in office:
Pharmacutical
Yuri Fulmer
D'Arcy Boulton
Science
Orvin Lau
Dentistry                              Applied Science
Emile Woo              58
Dean Leung
Bruce Burgess                        Dean Leung
Amin Janmohamed 33
Education                             Arts
Doug Adler                       Kari Bensen
Science
Forestry                               Law
Christopher Sing     96
Stephen Baumber                          L. Waldrun
Dennis Chow           39
Graduate Studies                  Medicine
Spoiled                    0
Brian Goehring                              S.H. Lu Classifieds 822-3977
RATES: AMS Card Holder* - 3 lines, $3.00, additional line*, 60 cent*, commercial - 3 lines, $5.00, additional lines
75 cents. (10% discount on 25 issues or more) Classified ads payable in advance. Deadline 4.00 p.m., two days before
publication. Room 266, SUB, UBC, Van., B.C. V6T 2A7, 822-3977. 	
10 ■ FOR SALE - Commercial
SPECIAL VALENTINES on sale to Feb 28
at Festive Fabrics, 3210 Dunbar at 16th.
This Vancouver Guild of Fabric Arts SHOW
and SALE features cards, silks, sculpture &
wall pieces. Open Thurs, Feb. 13 - 7:30 - 9 &
Mon-Sat 11-3. 736-1016.
WHOLESALE PRICES! High Quality
Blank t-shirts, 100% cotton. Black or white.
Phone Mark 420-3576.
11 • FOR SALE - Private
77 TOYOTA COROLLA. Excellent condition in and out. $950. 224-0776.
15 • FOUND (no charge)
LADIES BRACELET found, call to identify, 943-7554. Leave message.
20 - HOUSING
ROOMMATE to share large 3 bdrm home.
UBC Area. Avail, till end of June. $500.
Views. Call Francois 228-8824.
ROOMMATE NEEDED for Kerrisdale
house, $120 per mth, 261-6944.
ROOM FINDERS - 873-5020
Need a room/roommate? Call us!
Quality listings, quality people.
30 ■ JOBS
SAILING INSTRUCTORS.
Sea Wing Sailing School is seeking candidates for the 1992 Spring C.Y.A. Instructor's
clinic Successful candidates will be offered
emp. with Sea Wing. Call 669-0840.
INTERESTED IN RUNNING a business?
StudentSprinklers still has openings in B.C.
Last year our average manager made $7-
12K. For more info, call 944-6397.
ZALKO SPIRIT, 2660 W 4th Ave. opening
B.C.RPjV. aerobic inst course. Feb 13th,
iob guaranteed. Call 736-0341.
SUMMER JOBS!!
Earn money painting outdoors.
Good earning potential!!
Call Paige at 222-4121.
LADIES
Need help to pay for those school exp? Earn
Ct earnings for jVt wk. Sell undercover wear,
lingerie at home parties. Start Feb & receive
lingerie bonus. 432-7669.
EXP. SALES PERSON for established serv.
oriented bicycle shop. Sports minded bike
enthusiast preferred. Resume to 6069 W.
Blvd., Vancouver, B.C. V6M 3X2.
35 - LOST
SILVER BRACELET, Todd Field, Thure.
Feb 6th, 733-2623.
 70 ■ SERVICES	
GEOLOGY STUDENTS gold panning and
prospecting for other minerals. A field trip
to compliment your studies. Phone 597-
0286.
75-WANTED	
FEMINIST VOLUNTEER collective seeks
new members. Reliable women for all aspects
of publishing with 5-10 hra/week. Send cv to
Growing Room Collective, P.O. Box 46160,
Station G, Van. V6R4G5.
80 -TUTORING
ESL/ENG 100 Tutor, British trained, UBC
grad. Exp. Europe/Asia. Call Joanne 261-
7470.
85-TYPING
Deadline far submissions; for
Tuesday's paper is Friday at
3:30pm, far Friday'* paper,
Wednesday at 3:30pm.
NO LATE SUBMISSIONS
WILL BE ACCEPTED.
Note: 'Tfoon"m 12#0pm.
Tuesday, February 11th	
Hillel/Jewish Students' Assn. Famous Hot Lunch. Noon, Hillel.
Inst, of Asian Research. "Planning
for Hong Kong's Future: Role of
Port & Airport Devel. in this Strategy." Edward Pryor, Noon-2, Asian
604.
Art Exhibition, Imaginus: Valentine Show. 9:30-4:30 (M-F). SUB
Concourse.
Art Exhibition: Robert Goodall.
9:30-4:30 (M-F). AMS Art Gallery.
Inter-Varsity Christian Fellowship.
Prayer mtg. 7:30am, SUB 211.
WSO. Drop-in support: Mature
Women Students. 1.-30-2:30 (Tues)
or Noon-l:30 (Wed). Women
Student's Lounge-Brock.
Lesbian Survivors of the Mental
Unhealth Industry, Mtg, 7pm, SUB
130.
Black History Month- Video: "Sis-
ters in the Struggle." Noon, SUB
241K (Ubyssey Office).
Gays & Lesbians of UBCVFilmSoc.
"Apartment Zero," 7:30, SUB Aud.
Wednesday, February 12th
Medical-Legal Club. Speaker-Teny
White of Russel DuMoulin-lati-
gatingaMedical Malpractice Case."
Noon, Law Curtis 180.
Ankur Magazine. Evening of South
Asian poetry. 6:30, Asian 604.
Student Counselling & Resources
Ctr. Film: Resume Prep. Noon-l:20,
Brock 200.
* AMS WORD PROCESS-ZING •
DONT PANIC — ON CAMPUS
Don't waste your time running all over
town!
APA, MLA, theses, resumes ...
No problem. Miracles performed upon
request
Room 60, Student Union Building
Or phone: 822-5640
Mon-Thurs: 9 - 6; Fri: 9 - 5.
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST. 30 years exp.,
WD Process/typing, APA/MLA, Thesis. Student rates. Dorothy, 228-8346.
PROFESSIONAL WORD PROCESSING
Fast, accurate, reliable
Enhanced laser printing... 224-7860
WSO.Sexual Abuse Survivors
Group. 12-12:30, Phone 2-2415.
English & Creative Writing Departments. Janice M. Andrews
reading her short stories,
"Rapunzel, Rapunzel, Let Down
Your Hair." Free. Noon^Buch Pent,
Walter Gage Toastmasters. Mtg to
improve communication & thinking on your feet 7, SUB 205.
School of Music. Concert Series.
Jane Coop, piano. Noon, Recital
Hall, Music,
Assn. for Bahai Studies, Equality
of men & women: Bahai perspective. JimHydeima.Noon,SUB 111.
Hillel/Jewish Students* Assn. Jewish mysticism class w/ Rabbi
Dubrowsky. 5. Hillel.
Hillel/Jewish Students' Assn. Torah Study w/Rabbi Crandall. Noon,
Hillel.
Hillel/Jewish Students* Assn. Adv
Hebrew Class. Noon. Hillel.
Thursday, February 13th
Environ. Earth Sciences. K.
Flatcher, Environ. Geochemist,
UBC,*Cows&Strearas,"5:30,Geol.
Sciences 330A.
Christian Science Org. Mtg. All
welcome, 1:30, Buch B334.
Student Counselling & Resources
Ctr. Interview Survival, noon-l:20,
Brock 200.
WSO. Managing school related
stress drop-in group. Noon-l:30,
Women Students' Lounge, Brock.
WSO, Worrying about yourweight?
Drop-in support group. 4-6. Women
Students' Lounge, Brock,
Life Drawing Club. Weekly Drawing Session. Noon-2:20, Lasserre
204.
GSS & Faculty of Grad. Studies.
Writing a successful thesis. Noon-
2, Garden rm, Grad Ctr.
School of Music. Concert: Distinguished Artists. Soni Ventorum,
wind quintet. 7:15 Prelude lecture.
8pm Concert. Recital Hall, Music.
WORD PROCESSING ON LASER
736-1517
Papers, theses, resumes
Also tables, charts & graphs.
WEST END WORD PROCESSING/
Desktop Publishing from $2/double spaced
page. Fast and reliable, IBM compatible.
Scanning and graphics too - typeset resume
& 10 copies $25. Phone/fax Michael - 683-
6340.
CAMPUS WORD PROCESSING. Laser
print Fast professional service. Excellent
results. $2/pg. Phone 224-7860.
WORD PROCESSING
$1.50 per page
Call 224-9197.
WORD PROCESSING - Fast, accurate,
competitive rates. 875-0807.
PROFESSIONAL word processing. Convenient Broadway Skytrain location. Student discounts. 876-8222 or 351-1218.
99•PERSONALS
LOVE FOR SALE.
The Ubyssey is now accepting Valentine
messages for the Special Feb. 14th Valentine
Issue. Deadline is Feb. 12th. AVOID the
rush! Book your love now!
SNIPER
The time for hunting will be here soon. Just
waiting for you to say when the season opens
so I can perch on your arm.
Falcon
Progressive Zionist Caucis w/
Hillel/Jewish Students'Assn. Ruth
linn on "Moral dilemmas of Israeli
Soldiers* Noon, Hillel,
Intl. Socialists. Mtg: Why Socialists need a democratic centralist
party.
Ambassadors for Jesus. A Valentine for UBC. SUB 215. Noon.
Students for Forestry Awareness.
Herb Hammond—'Seeing the
Forest Among the Trees." Bzzr &
snacks. 3:30-5:30. Macmillan
Roots.
Students for Forestry Awareness.
Herb Hammond—"Forestry or
Forests: Role ofthe Forester in the
Future." Noon, Macmillan 166.
WUSC. "A Struggle for Shelter."
Problems of rapid urbanization in
Equador. Noon, Buch A203.
Hillel/Jewish Students' Assn. Beg
Hebrew Class. Noon, Hillel.
Pacific Rim Club. Wine & Cheese
w/ Lieut. Gov. David Lam & Dean
of Commerce, Michael Goldberg.
"Vancouver's Bridge to the Pacific:
Strategy for Success." 5:30-7:30,
Law Courts Inn, 800 Smithe St,
GDC. Org. mtg, Noon, SUB 100D.
Friday, February 14th
Student Counselling & Resources
Ctr. Job Search Strategies, noon-
1*20, Brock 200.
Youth Challenge Intl. Info mtg-
workin Costa Rica 3 months. Devel.
project needs vols. Noon, SUB
212A.
Students of Objectivism. Mtg-
friendship, love & sex. Noon, SUB
215.
Black History Month. Film:
MalcoImXSpeaks. GDC, Women's
Ctr, Anti-EHscrim Cmte. Noon,
SUB 241K (Ubyssey Office).
ON THE BOULEVARD
Hair Care Services
Esthetician
$2.00 off cut
with presentation of this ad
Offer Expires March IO*/92
Suntanning Special
10 sessions for $ J/
5784 University Blvd.
UBC Village
224-1922* 224-9116
BREACH
Healthy Eating
Clinic
Learn to
•Eat for good health
• Eat on the run
• Examine the fat/fiber
content in your diet etc.
Course starts Monday, February 17,
and runs for 4 weeks (1 hour/week).
To register call 822-3811.
Limited enrollment.
Upcoming Films:
Wednesday - Thursday (Feb 12 & 13)
7:00  Five Feminist Minutes
9:30 The Virgin Machine
$2.50 per
Show
Friday - Sunday (Feb 8 -10 )
o 7:00 International Rocketship
9:30 Animation Festival
$3.00 per
Show
Next Week: Strangers on a TVain
fllM
SCCItIV
All Screenings are in the SUB Theatre
Phone: 822-3697 for more info
THE UBYSSEY WOMEN'S CAUCUS
will meet on
Thursday, February 13,1992
to discuss, work on, contemplate
the Women's Issue.
Alma Mater Society
The Grad Class Council
is now accepting Proposals for the
1992
GRAD CLASS GIFTS
Proposals must:
1) Be as specific as possible
2) Include the following information:
• Name of group requesting funds
• Number of people working on project
• Name of a contact person (include telephone #)
• Who will benefit from the project
• Description of the project in detail
• A summarizing paragraph including the
most salient points
• The amount of money requested
• Sources of other funds if applicable
There is a limit of one proposal per particular group
of graduating students.
There is an upper limit of $3,000 for each proposal.
Each group must be prepared to give a short
presentation of their idea to the members of Grad
Class Council at the end of February.
The deadline for proposals is 4:00 p.m. Friday
February 14,1992 and is final. No proposal will be
accepted after this date.
Proposal applications are available
for pickup and drop off at the
AMS Business Office.
Please contact Caireen Hanert c/o SUB 246, 822-2361
if you have any questions.
<-H
2/THE UBYSSEY
February U, 1992 i v* wop— '' ■ vty&K
••yywwwysf—p—
NEWS
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Documentary looks at gay youth
by Rick Hiebert
A Toronto filmmaker is trying to strike a blow against
prejudice through a soon to be
released documentary on young
Canadian gays and lesbians.
One in Ten will provide an
empathetic view of people in their
late teens and early twenties who
are lesbians or gay men.
"The film is really an advocacy documentary. By that, Imean
that it takes sides and argues for
the people that it documents," director David Adkin said. "Our goal
is to provide a diversified and
positive image ofthe gay and lesbian community."
The National Film Board
movie is now done filming and
will be released some time this
fall. Adkin is excited about the
first Canadian documentary on
gays and lesbians who are our
age.
"There's really a need for information to get out there, for the
media to show positive role models for young gays," Adkin said.
"Students who are gay often
feel very alone, that they can't
talk about their feelings. In sex
education classes, discussions on
gays and lesbians are often inaccurate. Kids can make homophobic
remarks and teachers join in. It's
tough to be young and gay sometimes."
The film came about after
lobbying by the gay community of
the National Film Board. Adkin
was researching the issue of the
lack of gay oriented cinema for
the NFB, so he suggested the idea
of One in Ten as a starting point
for documentaries on the gay
community.
One in Ten tries to look at a
variety of young gays and lesbians. Those filmed include high
school, college and university students and white and blue collar
workers.
"We've had a very enthusiastic response from word of mouth.
There are lots of calls from youth
who want to be involved in telling
their stories to encourage others.
People are coming out earlier and
earlier, so we wound up talking to
a lot more people in high schools
than we thought we would," Adkin
said.
Adkin wishes the film had
been able to profile more gays and
lesbians in rural areas (which tend
to more conservative than urban
areas) and some who had just become open with their sexuality.
"We have people who aren't
activists per se and others who
are much more active. All are activists in the sense that they are
doing something, even in a small
way to change the world's attitudes," he said.
Adkin hopes the film will, as
well as going into general release,
be used in sex eduction and social
studies courses in schools.
Gay and lesbian students
think the documentary is a good
idea.
Jamie McEvoy, deputy chair-
elect for Canadian Federation of
Students (CFS), thinks One in Ten
will do much to show that gays
and lesbians cannot be stereotyped.
"We need to show as many
people as possible the human being that you don't see in the gay
stereotype. That's why gay people
'come out* to people that they
know...to show that there is a connection between us and them. We
feel pain and joy in the same circumstances as they, the same
Enjoying the Vancouver waterfront with a best friend.
PAUL GORDON PHOTO
happiness," McEvoy said.
"I hope the film doesn't look
at the down side of being gay. The
media has a tendency to do that
right now by concentrating on the
problems of gay society. I don't
want people to pity us any more
than they would hate us—we just
need to educate and get the support of society at large."
Mike Kaminsky, a second-
year UBC arts student, agrees.
"I think that it is important to
reach people while they are really
young, before their opinions are
formed," he said. "Since film is a
powerful medium, this film will
be a powerful weapon in combating homophobia," Kaminsky sai d.
"The only time that homosexuality was dealt with when I
was in high school was in an AIDS
education film. That is a problem.
People have to learn about gays
and lesbians in other contexts than
in a context of discussing AIDS."
Leslie Fraser, a student government executive at Trent University in Ontario, said if there
had been a film like One In Ten, it
would have been easier for her to
come out as a lesbian.
"I had no contact with lesbians when I was growing up. I wish
that I had had a film like this to
counter the things that I was
hearing," Fraser said.
"It would be great to have
gays talk about gays other than
themselves for a change instead
of the stuff that the straight
mainstream media likes to talk
about often."
Lyndon Surjik, a former student politician at the University
of Regina who is now national
treasurer of the Canadian Federation of Students, said it is important for the gay and lesbian
communities to ensure that One
in Ten is watched.
"That's often the problem with
gay and lesbian oriented books
and films, they wind up being
placed in small or inaccessible libraries or stores, or in cities far
from rural areas where a film like
this could be really useful. The
gay community needs to ensure
that people watch a film like this,"
Surjik said.
"It can be tough not to feel
that one has a supportive community as a gay person. I did have
such a group of supportive friends,
both gay and straight, at the
University of Regina, so I was
lucky. Some don't have this support, so I hope the film makes
them feel that they are not alone."
Provincial government promises funding of
$7 million for school lunch programmes
by Sharon Undores
The provincial government is
providing funding for a
programme which will help some
of the estimated 146,000 BC
children who live in poverty.
After years of requests for
funding, it was announced in
January that $7 million was allotted for school lunch programmes
this fiscal year. The funding will
be retroactive to January 1 and
will be renewed next year.
The Vancouver School Board
recently told the provincial government, "It is estimated that one
in four Vancouver children live
below the poverty line, and rent
now consumes more than 50 per
cent of the income for almost
20,000 families. As a result, money
for food is diverted for housing,
and children are, in significant
numbers, dependent upon food
banks and other forms of social
services."
Jean Swanson of End Legislated Poverty (ELP) has been
fighting for lunch programmes for
five years. "On the whole, it is a
good first step," she said.
She recommended the
programme be expanded to include all schools and not just those
in low-income areas. "I imagine
there are low-income people in all
schools. It is also good for working
families [who don't have time to
prepare balanced meals]. We'd like
to see it expand to bottom line low
income."
The programme is set up to
be driven from local communities.
Kathy Stenton, a spokesperson
for the programme, said, "The dis
tricts will be asked to set up local
advisory committees with parents,
kids, school representatives, and
health staff. They will provide
direction and be involved in the
design and operation of the
programme at all stages. The idea
is for the programme to meet the
needs ofthe community."
Swanson would like to see a
provision for involvinglow-income
individuals in the implementation.
"If you look at the average
school board and who is involved
in decision making, the parents,
teachers, and school board members are almost all middle-income," she said. "Five years has
shown me that there are a lot of
times that they don't even see the
poverty, they are thinking of their
own families or they ask the kids
rWho didn't eat breakfast this
morning?' [and] no-one answers,"
she said.
The principle of not stigmatizing low-income people is a priority in making the programme a
success. The meals will be offered
to every child in the school and,
without identifying anyone, those
who can afford to will pay.
The advisory committees will
choose whether the lunch is cold
or hot. ELP recommends that hot
lunches should be mandatory.
Statistics from ELP show that 60-
95 per cent of students participate in hot lunches, while only 35-
60 per cent participate in cold
lunches.
Thirteen Vancouver schools
(12 elementary and one secondary) now have lunch programmes.
According to Linda Tupper, edu
cation assistant for Sunrise Area
of the Vancouver School Board,
roughly 13 more Vancouver
schools need programmes. She is
concerned about the starting costs
for equipment and renovations.
There is roughly $5,000 per school
allotted for starting programmes.
Under the plan, BC schools
will receive up to $112,000 depending on the number of students. The $7 million breaks up to
$5.9 million for elementary schools
and $1.1 million for pilot
programmes in secondary schools.
Stenton did not know on what
basis the funding was divided.
Swanson said, "There is no question that the high school drop out
rate (30 per cent) is related to
poverty. This is a total indictment
of the education system."
February 11,1992
THE UBYSSEY/3 WE NEED GOOD
PEOPLE LIKE YOU!
Do you have great organizational skills or creative Hair? Do you
have an interest in business or marketing? Would you like to make
contacts in the business world? Would you like to learn more about
marketing and how it applies to YOUR career? Whether it be in
sciences, the arts, education, commerce, medicine, law...
The UBC Marketing Association is looking for its 1992/93 Board of
Executives. Due to expansion to almost 400 members this year, we
need your help in running this corporate-sponsored non-profit
student organization. Positions are open to UBC students of ALL
FACULTIES (e.g., our President is from Arts). We welcome
everyone!. Volunteer where you'll REALLY tie appreciated!!!
Contact/applications available
at S.U.B. 216B. Please contact
us by February 15,1992.
Thanks!
UnlmtyofB-ltWiColimllia
arketing Association
SPORTS
Thunderbird coach vies for
place on Olympic team
J
r ANOTHER
BORING
•••
EUROPE ON SALE.
IITRAVELCUTS
Lower Level
Student Union Building
822-6890
by Dianne Rudolf
UBC women's basketball coach
Misty Thomas is shooting for the
Canadian Olympic women's basketball team.
Thomas feels prepared for try-
outs beginning in March, despite
serious knee injuries which forced
her to the sidelines.
"[My injuries] were the only
thing keeping me off the court for
the past two years," Thomas said.
"I never stopped training. I
stayed as fit as I could, cycling,
rowing and doing weights. This
past year I've felt better and better
until I told the coach last week that
I felt able to play."
Coaching for the third year at
UBC, Thomas seems restless and
eager to play, yet she will have to
keep a close eye on her physical
condition. She has the support of
her doctor and national team coach
Wayne Hussey, who encourages
her to do as much as she is able to
without overexerting her knees.
"[The coach sai d] to do as much
as I can in practice, other times
watching or helping out. Hell
budget in time off for me because
physically I'm unable to work myself as hard as I'd like.
"Fm really happy that the national team is accommodating my
injuries, otherwise there would be
no way I could play every day, even
if I can only put in thirty minutes a
day in practice."
Hussey will put herin the game
sparingly, at crucial times when
her particular strengths are
needed. "Other times, the other
players will have to carry the team
in these areas," Thomas said.
Thomas helped take Canada
to fourth place in the 1984 Olympics. She also played for the national team in 1988, which failed to
qualify at the preliminary tournament.
UBC women's basketball coach Misty
Thomas may soon be back on the floor as a
member of the Olympic team.
WONG KWOK-SUM PHOTO
The Lesbian, Gay and Bisexual issue of the
Ubyssey will come out on February 14.
Drop into SUB 241K if you would like to
contribute.
This time around, Thomas
feels confident she will be selected
as one ofthe twelve players comprising the national team.
A pre-Olympic tournament
willbeheldMay 27-June 7inSpain;
Canada must finish in the top four
to make it to the Olympics.
^pthe ubyssey loves you!
r-
Free
Spring Flowersf
'Bring this card and a friend
toS.ll.'B. Between 11:30 - 1:30 pm
andyou vAtteacfi receive a potted narcissus.
"Ihe &MS.
Valtntint 's fair
Student Union 'Building
JeBruary 12,13,14th.
Open from 9:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m.
(U*uitmipbmiptTp«rsmw(uUiupptuslast}
It's Clinique Bonus Time.
Six "Happy Surprises"
from Clinique to you;
in generous travel sizes:
•Semi Lipstick.
• Extra Benefits
Conditioner. 15 ml
•Dramatically Different
Moisturizing Lotion. 15 ml
•Serious-Hold
Hairspray. 25 ml
•Different Lipstick.
•Hair Brush.
Yours at no extra charge with any Clinique
purchase of $16.00 or more at Eaton's. Offer
valid from Thursday, February 13 through
Saturday, February 29,1992.
And while your there, talk to the Clinique
Consultant for expert makeup advice and have a
quick, complimentary skin-typing on the
Clinique computer.
One bonus to a customer, while quantities last.
'_!
EATON'S
Goods Satisfactory or Money Refunded
4/THE UBYSSEY
February 11,1992 SPORTS
THUNDERBIRD DROPPINGS
Relay team third at Millrose
Games
The UBC women's 4x800 relay team finished thirdinits event
at the Millrose Games in New
York over the weekend.
The team, consisting of Anne
Drewa, Lori Durward, Tammy
Brumwell and Susan Chalmers,
finished in a time of nine minutes
13.10 seconds.
Villanova was first in 8:51.58
followed by the Westchester, NY
Track Club at 9:01.90.
At the UBC Open, meanwhile, UBC's Larry Downie won
the men's 600 metres in 1:28.06.
UBC medal winners also included Sean Kelly, third in the
women's 60 metres; Diane
Osborne, third in the women's 60-
metre hurdles section two; Shaun
Lucks, third in the men's 1,000
metres; and Mike Dennison, third
in the men's 1,500 metres.
Swimmers upset at Can
Wests
The University of Alberta
Golden Bears upset the heavily
favoured UBC Thunderbirds to
win both the men's and the
women's divisions ofthe Canada
West swimming championships
in Victoria over the weekend.
In the men's, Alberta got 457
points to UBC's 425.3 and in the
women's, Alberta got 390.5 to
UBCs 344.3. UBCfinished second
in both divisions.
The Thunderbird'sindividual
performances were highlighted by
two meet records on the men's
side, and six gold medals overall.
Kevin Draxinger's time of two
minutes and 11 seconds in the
200-metre backstroke and
Turlough Ollare's 1:50.94 were
Canada West milestones.
Draxinger also won the 100
backstroke in a time of 57.52 sec
onds, and O'Hare won the 400
metre freestyle in 3:59.57.
Anne Barnes won two gold
medals on the women's side — in
the 200 individual medley in
2:23.89 and the 100 backstroke in
1:06.08.
Men's hoopsters split with
Vikes
The UBC Thunderbirds remain on top of the Canada West
men's basketball standings despite
a 103-89 loss to the University of
Victoria Vikings in Victoria on
Saturday.
Cory Klassen led the Vikes
with 22 points while Tom Johnson
added 19. Jason Leslie scored a
game-high 33 points for the
Thunderbirds.
The Thunderbirds defeated
the Vikings 89-78 on Friday night
for an 11-5 won-lost record. Tine
Vikings improved to 7-9.
The Thunderbirds return to
UBC for their final home game of
the regular season when they host
the Lethbridge University
Pronghorns at War Memorial Gym
this Friday and Saturday nights.
Game time is 7:45 pm both evenings.
And Vikes sweep women
The No. 1 nationally ranked
University of Victoria Vikings ran
their won-lost record up to 16-0
with a pair of victories over the
UBCThunderbirdsinVictoriaover
the weekend.
On Friday night, the Vikings
jumped to a 42-23 halftime leaded
and coasted to a 78-63 victory.
Heather Bohez had 18 points and
Jenny Sutton 16 for Victoria.
Carrie Carlsen scored 21 for UBC.
And on Saturday, the Vikes
slammed UBC 107-58. Sutton got
29 points and Tara Gallaway added
18 for Victoria. Lisa Nickie led
UBC with 23 points.
The 9-7 Thunderbirds return
home when they play the
Lethbridge University
Pronghorns at War Memorial Gym
this Friday and Saturday nights.
Gametime is 6 pm both nights.
But Volleybirds sweeps
Vikings.
In Canada West volleyb^I
action, the UBC women swept the
visiting Victoria Vikings 3-1 on
Saturday and 3-0 on Friday, while
their male counterparts blacked
UVic 3-1 on Friday and Saturday.
The Volleybirds are in
Lethbridge this weekend.
Hockeybirds rebound to tie
The UBC Thunderbirds lost
one and tied one with the host
University of Alberta Golden
Bears over the weekend.
On Saturday, Grant Delcourt
scored a pair to pace the 8-12-2
Thunderbirds to a 2-2 tie.
On Friday it was Golden
Beras 6 UBC 2.
The Thunderbirds host
Saskatchewan at the Winter Centre this Friday and Saturday.
Gametime is 7:30 both nights.
Gymnast gets first all-
around
UBC student Len Chong was
the bronze medal all-around winner at the Surrey Gymnastics Society meet on Saturday.
Chong, a member ofthe SGS,
won three individual events: rings,
floor and vault, en route to a score
of 48.35. Teammate Tyler Farstad
was first all-around with 48.8
points.
UBC gym club member Josh
Lepausky placedfifth overall with
a score of 45.1. He was first on the
parallel bars with a score of 8.4
FRIDAY,
FEBRUARY 14th   £
Tickets at
A.U.S. Office BUCH A107
s?
HURRY! TIX
GOING FAST!
Tl
u
znzzMmm devils
m
CEO. GREEN
CAN YOU
ENROL FOR A McGILL C.A.?
You can, if you have an
undergraduate degree in any
discipline.
You may start in May, September, or January
on a full-time or part-time basis.
COME TO OUR INFORMATION SESSION
Monday, 24 February 1992
10:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon
Henry Angus Building
Room 109
OR WRITE OR TELEPHONE:
McGill University
Department of Chartered Accountancy
(514) 398-6154, Fax (514) 398-4448
Redpath Library Building, Room 211
3461 McTavish Street
Montreal, Quebec
H3A1Y1
McGill
Centre for
Continuing
Education
CHARTERED ACCOUNTANCY
OMBUBSPERSON
TUBS Applications for the
il/ 1992/93 Position for the
^M«w Ombudsperson at the
™^^ AMS Obudsoffice are
now being accepted.
Applications are available at
room 238 of SUB and any
questions can be
directed to Jerry Olynyk
(822-4846). Applications
are due by February 11,
by 4:00pm in room 238
Timsi
February 11,1992
THE UBYSSEY/5 ARTS
&
•3K35S VARSITY COMPUTERS
Uroac     SERVING VANCOUVER SINCE '87
/TRISON 386SX \    fTRlSON 386DX-25\      /TRISON 386DX-40\
• 20Mhz 386SX CPU
> 1 Meg RAM
• 12 or 1.44 Meg fleppy drive
• 1 s eriil, 1 parallel, 1 game pon
• 101 keys c-ohmced keyboard
> 52 Meg haid drive
• Mono monitor with Hercules
compatible! card
too
$85(f
■ 25Mhz 386DX CPU
■ 1 Meg RAM
■ 12 or 1.44 Meg floppy drive
• 1 serial, 1 parallel, 1 game port
■ 101 keyc eob-mced keyboard
■ 52 Meg bard drive
■ Mcdo monitor with Hercules
compatibles caid
$1000°°   j
• 40Mhz 386DX CPU
■ 1 Meg RAM
■ 12 or 1.44 Meg fleppy drive
■ 1 serial 1 parallel, 1 gome port
■ 101 keys mhanced keyboard
• 50 Meg bud drive
• Mcoo monitor wiih Hercules
compatibles caid
w^^w^M^m^^mwsm
by Paula Wellings
She is a pistol wheedling roadie with a drug deal in motion and a natural disinterest in social con'
Ontario town that dreams of musical fame while he lives a life of sensibility.
Together Jackie Bangs (Valerie Buhagiar) and Pokey Jones (Don McKellar) are in for a bizarre and fat
McDonald's Highway 61. .
FILM
Highway 61
opens February 14
Going Home for Reading Break?
Take it easy...
Take the
Greyhound!
Greyhound offers frequent, convenient schedules to destinations throughout
B.C. and Canada. Intercity Express trips between major centres feature
shorter travel times, extra legroom, on board movies and snacks!
Greyhound tickets are sold on campus at:
TRAVEL CUTS, SUB Lower Level
822-6890
' BONUS: N
A 20% Student Discount is available to Kamloops, Kelowna
and Calgary. Plus Greyhound is offering a special shuttle between
UBC and the bus depot! (See Travel CUTS for full details)
^TRAVELCUTS
GoingYourWay!
Greyhound
Canada*
When Pokey Jones discovers a dead boy in his back yard, little does he know that this boy has somms sou to mr;d«*.,    e ev*i,ge.iL«u o-«u. mu, «
supernatural ability for bingo. Nor does Pokey know that he will soon be carting the boy's body down to New Orleans filled with cocAine.
All SS Pokey knows is that he has been awaifltirSfradventure and will be delivering Jackie Bang's dead brother to New Orleans for a funeral-sounds
like both a noble trek and an opportunity to visit the lai^mgrfes of popular music's history^ along the way.
When Jackie Bangs discovers there is a dead boy in PokeyJones' back yard she believes she has found the ultimate vehicle in which to transport Jugs across
the border and down to a pay-off in New Orleans. Charming and manipulative, it is not long before Jackie has Pokey driving her down Highv-ay 61, McDonald s
tCZ^S^^cotiW s^li^SlSlks as they loumey southward. McDonald successfully creates the film's Canadian perspecl^e with characters who
could no ™oS% exisUn anyXrej but America; th! Watson family, Mr|kin, and the United States custom guards all emit a lack of sensibility that is dehciously capitalist
Mr"sidnTs0the most creative character if Highway 61. Slightly pathetkjut ever persistent, Mr. Skin travels the; country side in search of souls for sale and evangelizes to his
"■     r^^^^^SZSo^ ?is bfck P<Lh. In agplayful andl^Sre social commentary, it is not surprising that Mr. Skin is able to buy peoples souls for anything
'from a promise of fame and fortune to a beer pr $20. ._."'-''-.".
McDonald demonstrates his senses of humour in the casting of Jello Biafraas the US border customs officer.
1S3tSSrf*aractersand*^
Unfortunately, the final scene is a somewhat trite reconciliation between Pokey^Jackie, and nature that may leave some yearning for McDonald s more unsettling Roadtall.
Nonetheless, it must be said that the music fcs excellent, the scenery is      ^^fi^gs*^,
gorgeous, the story is absolutely amusing and I would go on any road trip Bruce /    _^_
McDonald proposed. Highway 61 is an engaging journey of both mind and body **^JX:
that kicks ass on anything that comes out of Hollywood, USA.
Gay and Lesbian Week 1992
Schedule of Events
Monday and Tuesday: Displays in Concourse,
10:00 - 2:00
Tuesday, 7:30 PM - Film: "Apartment Zero", in
35mm, SUB Auditorium. Not to be missed!
Wednesday: Gordon Price, 12:30 in the SUB
Partyroom.
Thursday: Living with HIV forum, 12:30 in the
SUB Auditorium
Friday: Emery Barnes, 12:30 in the SUB
Auditorium.
Saturday: Party time! "Bad at Heart", our annual
Valentines dance, 8PM - Midnight, SUB Ballroom.
if*t9£**+i+tKf~+- -■** •**
All that jazz and more...or less!
McGill
MANAGEMENT
SUMMER SCHOOL
ABROAD
Earn undergraduate degree credits
abroad this summer
The McGill Faculty of Management will offer a
selection of undergraduate management courses
this summer in the following locations:
France
Japan
China
Thailand
Cuba
To obtain a brochure with details on locations and
courses to be offered, call, fax, or write us at:
Summer School Abroad Program
Faculty of Management
McGill University
1001 Sherbrooke Street West
Montreal, Quebec H3A 1G5
Tel: (514) 398-4068
Fax:(514)398-3876
LesB-allfrtb J.4ZZ Up fttoftUi <il <>p< nt d with Muml.i1
ChRifsthw*otara|jh*'il«-Lyrin layl-u CmUIt iind
nmmc ly Andrew Lit*?*-! Wetn-r The cwnpunv «h-hr.-U. d
jts 2uih anniv<*r-*ftr> wHh a programme thai --Tiiiwi.--4.ri
thfte roojtit work*.
THe mood ww perfey and playful a* the gann Im „• i n
wt£h tstgHf tisK^r.-t aftd >tx drnflfs
t-*-*-Hllll.lilil-*-i*--*lilllill.i.-i.-----« mil in-ill-— ■-*Jnnwp»-« i      ...	
DANCE
Lett Bafl-Pt* Juz* d* yfvhtvtml
Q-aeftn Eltwib^th Theatre
iVbrtiinry -S-8
Mimical Cliairb w«f«« abmptt} interrupted b> a ar-n*-)
of unrelated viyiu-tu-a, including-a scjuliy ,i unpuui
baton twfrfcr whow hdfo-n kept growing uptit nugitalK,
it w*i# bigger than htni; a. st-H pa? de deux, ami an
«£j*re>&»ive nwaa^je a tfsh*-.
The -dma-a retarfted aa the fun ended, and thi.- must*.
Jopcsg-BB Ermi-tied us the- guine turned row a battle
K**ihR£ dtiartd sounded nw-ittttfog an tia* dwnrf +*, hkf
pttppt $■*„ Jwrasw* intri-aMn^ly dgil«b.-£, tiMtihing and
ji-jrfclngjn nervous ujttvul-Bv*? movement-*.
Km* «md Fall fttHnwpd, a ^nteti H-dlei thureo-
grajjJif-d by David Pai'ton^. lit -oiu-ti* l»v tht> Turtle Island
-Quartet. The ymtafirf ton* «* a rainbow of vitaantty
uduwfdl c«iSu/nM. Like note* on a -sutli the dan-wi *
aWt-Aded and dtsurendr-d with th*' -fnu^je, toilnpwnR vtt *
heap whenever it stopped. Most of them moved with the
rhythm, but now and again a dancer or two would
■'trike a lonesome discordant not*-* by themselves.
Tense and dramatic, Bad Blood by Ulysses Dove
w«is an obvious hit with the audience. A powerful,
■m nsuous portrayal, it started in a hushed silence of
u'ntorted movement. An eerie voice intoned, "This is
the picture of evil," as the dancers alternately clung to
one another and then hurtled themselves apart against
a l>ackdrop of knotted ropes.
Recontres by Margo Sappington, the closing piece,
w is brought to life thanks to some scintillating live
music from the Francois Bourassa jazz trio. Silvery
tinkling sounds brought a marvellous moonlit quality to
the semi-darkness, compensating for the lacklustre
c horeography which after a point was boring and
rt petdtive.
, AJ1 in all, the performance was fun if not particu-
■H^jS^QJ^Hg or expressive. The strength of modern
dt^ie&||:lt^ -ability to evoke images through shape and
Sw^^^jaB; fes&mate, informal ambience between
ppf-lb^^KSIinst audience—an atmosphere difficult to
«rt&£*3&i&* ^yeeftBUfcal^th Theatre.
Wk$& ^^Mij^^^y^liisd in technical sophis-
tKf&ptf &S 4mi*m Qm&l ffl^fSi^aJ performances by
V&Mg% lift.d«&y i^d Hft^Tlfr^-ttf^ilKgnewhat made up
fi-*y^^ax^««E^ evening's
vv&temimit iid as $mi&mli^w&fo &%^qae fusion
«*r f^iB^NiiJ Mile* *ftd m&m40®&fo4% i«#sd synergy
an$ 4%$$% l«a.vbgf««»-wil^ Ute i®p«aS«d«ili^bi#«ome
THE 1991-92 UBYSSEY
EDITORIAL ELECTIONS
for posting position papers is
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 18.
Late papers will not be accepted. No exceptions!
Coming soon
Jam Night
with a band and you
Thursdays
Alternative Music
Student Nite
3 Bands
Hfcfa/
4 Live Metal Bands '
99.3
The FOX &
Timesless
Productions
Friday & Saturday
Live Entertainment
Feb. 14&15
Young Gun
Valentine's
. .     Party on     * ,
|>f February 14th |<J
¥■
Saturdays
Ladies' Nite
Doors open at 8:00
Superb Food &
Friendly Staff
Recommended by
James Barber's
"Best Eating"
Takeout
Wedding parties
Anniversaries
Birthdays
Try Our
Daily Specials
Sun-Thurs
llam-mldnlght
Fri. &Sat. 1 lam-lam
2272 West 4th Ave.
736-2118/736-9442
SILKSCREENING
(1 WEEK DEUVEEV OK STOCK ITEMS)
T-SHIRTS
Other styles, colours & fabric contents available.
* Based on 25+ units *
TERMS AND CONDITIONS: Price includes 1 colour
print, choice of ink colour, screen set-up &
artwork. No hidden charges. Options: flashcure-
add .38«/print (for solid coloured fabric) & puff
.',-,"* - ^dd 75e/piint. S-M-L-XL sizes only. XXL
by quotation only. Additional colours by
(nictation only. PST & GST added where
applicable.
Call the:
KENNY OYE SPORTSWEAR HOTLINE:
875-1245
Our netienteiunce is domstairs M side of hotel
FfU5er AW5 Hotel IISO S.t ffaM Dr. Yaamr - 26/72n
f   X
■p. :
' --—, 11 (-•<-» •
Prices For Every Taste And Budget
Hundreds of Reproductions $3.00 - $8.00
Over 400 Exhibition Posters - Most Far Below List Price
Date: Feb. 12-14
Place S.U.B.-1st floor
Hours: 8-7
Last Day: 8-5
6/THE UBYSSEY
February 11,1992
February 111992
THE UBYSSEY/7 TOWARD
A CAREER IN TAXATION?
Your undergraduate degree in law,
accountancy, economics and other
degrees will get you started.
Enrol in a three-semester qualifying program at
McGill, follow through with three terms in tax
specialization, and you'll be ready for a career as a
tax practitioner — a profession much in demand by
chartered accountancy firms, legal firms, and
government.
This McGill program is unique in Canada and leads
to a Graduate Diploma in Taxation. You have the
choice of taking it on a full-time or part-time basis,
and of starting a semester in either January, May or
September.
COME TO OUR INFORMATION SESSION
Monday, 24 February 1992
10:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon
Henry Angus Building
Room 109
OR WRITE OR TELEPHONE:
McGill University
Department of Chartered Accountancy
(514) 398-6154, Fax (514) 398-4448
Redpath Library Building, Room 211
3461 McTavish Street
Montreal, Quebec
H3A1Y1
LETTERS
\*K
McGill
Centre for
Continuing
Education
CHARTERED ACCOUNTANCY
STUDENT ADMINISTRATIVE
COMMISSION
The AMS is now accepting applications
for the Student Administrative Commission. Applications are available in room
238 of SUB. Any questions or queries can
be directed to Tim Lo or Caireen Hanert in
SUB Room 246 or 822-5466.
Applications are due by Wednesday, February 19 by 4:00 pm
SUB room 238.
Save the French
As a graduate ofthe UBC French
Department (Ph.d-'75) I was upset
to read about the proposed elimination of the department's orally based
courses. These coursesrepresented
an original, balanced and democratic response to one knotty problem of teaching French in a special-
case situation, ie. as one of the
country's two official languages.
In my view, the argument that
such sources are not, or cannot be,
challenging enough is simply false
and bespeaks bad faith. There is in
factnogood reason why such courses
cannot provide the perfect pedagogical context for the introduction
ofhighly sophisticated, critical skills
through a variety of formats—debate, round-table discussion,
expose^ interactive learning, etc.
It is of course the students who
will lose the most by the elimination of these courses. Only their
strong voice can force the powers-
that-be to reconsider this regressive and elitist decision.
David Walker
Associate Professor
Dept. of French Studies
York University
Israel bashing
I must admit that I was not at
all surprised to find yet another
attempt of Israel Bashing" in the
media. W. Mark Roberts did just
that in his letter "Ungrateful distortion'' (Ubyssey Feb.7) by trying
to prove that Zionism is a form of
racism. Mr. Roberts is correct to
think that something is distorted,
but little does he know that ifs his
views thatare distorted—extremely
distorted! I think that ifs about
time for people such as Mr. Roberts
to clue in to the realities of the
world and the Middle East.
Israel's very existence is a thorn
in the side of every anti-Semite.
Today, Israel knows this to be true
just as it did in 1967 when Nasser
called on the entire Arab world to
annihilate Israel and to "push the
Jews into the sea." The Arab countries responded by massing hundreds of thousands of troops to
completey surround Israel. (People
who believe that the Palestinians
WZZZZZZZZZZZ6X^//^/<^
ASSISTANT DIRECTOR
OF FINANCE
The AMS is now accepting applications
for the position of Assistant Director of
Finance. Applications are available in
SUB Room 238. Any inquiries can be
directed to Bill Dobie in SUB Room 246,
822-2361 or Ranjit Bharaj, SUB room 258,
822-3973.
Applications  are  due in SUB  Room
238 by Wednesday, February 19 at 4:00pm
fy///////////////////////////////////////////////////?/
were not an eagerly active part of
the Arab plan are greatly misinformed.) As it turned out, Israel
had once again successfully defended itself and won some land in
the process. The Jewish state then
realized that this land was essential to secure its borders and to
inhibit any further attacks. Mr.
Roberts argues that Israel's occupation ofthe Territories (WestBank,
Gaza) is completely illegal because
it hinders the freedom ofthe Palestinians. He pretends, or somehow
believes that Palestine was an autonomous state before Israel won
the West Bank in the Six-Day war.
If people like Mr. Roberts would
check the facts then they would
find out that the Palestinians have
been under foreign control since
1517, when the Turks conquered
Palestine (the region was later
taken over by Britain after WW1,
then Trans-Jordan, and of course
Israel in 1967).
I am amazed at the stupidity of
people who constantly critcize
Israel's policies when it is so obvious that its policies came to be as a
result of the Arab world's never-
ending goal to destroy the Jewish
state. Maybe Mr. Roberts thinks
that the Palestinians would be
treated more fairly by dictators like
Assad or Hussein, both of whom
have gassed and massacred thousands of innocent Arabs.
Mr. Robert's attempt to label
Zionism as beng racist and to attribute Zionism as the reason for
Israel's control over the Territories
is absurd and non-sensical. His
writing is typical ofthe many ignorant and uninformed journalists
who jump at the chance to write an
"Israel bashing" article without
having the slightest understanding of how or why the Israelis and
the Palestinians have come to be in
the position that they are currently
in.
Adam Rabiner
Arts 2
'Geers not that
silly
I would like to respond to the
article written by Rick Hiebert and
the Editorial in the Friday, Feb
ruary 7 Ubyssey. Both of these articles are examples of one-sided
journalism (what an oxymoron).
These articles focus on the negative
aspects ofthe abduction ofthe Rose
Bowl trophy and not the humorous
aspects of this grand theft. Imag- *-
ine amedium-sized university from
Canada going into the US and
stealing what could be considered
a national symbol.
Rick Hiebert elaborates on the
possible ramifications that these
individuals could face had charges
been laid. He describes the individuals responsible for the theft in
a manner that portrays them in a
very negative light instead of young
adults indulging themselves in a
"silly stunt." Similar negative imagery is found in the editorial.
The catchy editorial headline
"University Breeding Criminals"
and its following prose are used
not only to describe the individuals who where involved in the theft
but the engineering body as a \
whole. I think this is stereotyping.
Another disturbing point is
that the UBC administration feels
that it has to flex ifs [sic] muscles
by talking about disciplinary
hearings to punish the thieves even
when the U of W, the Canadian
RCMP and the American police
realize that this was a joke and no
charges werelaid. I do not condone
the destruction of the U of Ws
property and agree that if the U of
W wanted some form of payment
for the damage then it should be
given.
In my two years at UBC Ihave
yet to see a [sic] article in the
Ubyssey that describes engineering students in a positive light. A
newspaper that continues to publishes [sic] lopsided articles shows
irresponsible journalism. I hope
that this will change.
Carlton Joseph
Graduate Student
Electrical Engineering
THE
THUNDERBIRD
SHOP AT UBC
With 3 days'til
Valentines
Do you know where
your *P is?
Why not try the
Thunaeibird (Shop?
Everything your heart desires!
LOWER LEVEL
STUDENT
UNION
BUILDING
224-1911
Mon-Fri 8am-6pm
Sat 10am-5pm
Sun        Noon-5pm
8/THE UBYSSEY
February 11,1992 NEWS/OPINIONS
Arab awareness initiated
,^    by Nadine Araji
"' The Arab Student Society will
host UBC's first Arab Awareness
Week—February 17 to 19—concentrating on 21 Arab countries.
"We want to let the student
^   body be aware," said Lina Nahhas,
the group's president. "We hope to
>   initiate discussions so that Arab
issues become clear."
Hanadi Loubani, an awareness week committee member, said
that the present is a very important time for Arabs because ofthe
*"" situation of the Arab countries af
ter the Gulf War and during the
peace conference with Israel.
"The individual opinions of
Arabs have always been expressed
at UBC," Loubani said. "But presently, our opinion should be expressed collectively."
Arab Awareness Week will
present lectures, films and displays
covering a range of issues.
"Arab feminism, which is one
of our lecture topics," Loubani said,
"is something many don't think
exists, but it does. And we hope to
present other issues such as the
use ofthe Arabic language and of
course the peace talk progress will
be examined." According to the
group a knowledge of the Arabic
cultural background is important
in order to understand the Arab's
point of view.
The event will not concentrate
on particular countries but "conditions pressure us to explore regions such as Jordan, Lebanon,
Palestine and Iraq more carefully,"
Nahhas said.
The society will conclude the
event with a cultural night that
will offer a middle eastern atmosphere where all are welcome.
rf
Arab feminism
For many centuries, the Arab
woman has been portrayed by
western scholars and artists as
the carrier of ideas rather than
their creator and as the
submissive follower of
other people's decisions
rather than a leader or a
pioneer.
These false images of
Arab women are the end
product of both sexism and eth-
nocentrism. Women in general
are devalued and discriminated
against and Arab women in particular, like other women of colour, are perceived as culturally
primitive and politically immature.
A simple look at the available literature and movies will
prove the fact that those who de
pict Arab women in subordinate
roles by far exceed the number of
those reflecting the true reality of
Arab women's lives.
Perspective
Despite the reality that they
suffer from the burden of triple
oppression on the basis of sex,
ethnicity and class, Arab women
have struggled to liberate their
own societies from colonialism,
occupation and foreign dependency.
They have pioneered the
struggle for social, political and
economic change within their own
societies. Arab women have organized themselves to fight oppression and inequality without isolating the issue of women's equality from the issues of national liberation, independence, social justice and
democracy.
No doubt that the goal of
freedom and equality is far
from being reached but
there is no doubt in my mind that
Arab women are qualified and
capable of achieving equality for
they are well aware of their major
role in the eradication of all forms
of oppression and in the building
of a new Arab society.
Lina Nahhas
w#k$
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have worked their shortlived magic...
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The Arab Student Society of the AMS
Proudly Presents
1st Annual Arab Awareness Week
February 17, 18, 19 1992
A three-day event of various cultural and educational activities.
An exciting display of literature, folkloric art crafts, music and videos.
Arabs:  By Their Modes of Expression Ye Shall Know Them
Dr. Hana Kassis  Ph.D. Religious Studies
A lecture on the importance and effect of language on East-West communication
Monday- Feb. 17th Timet 12:30pm     Place: BUCH D323
Women ofthe Arab World
Dr. Rabab Ward Ph.D. Electrical Engineering
Hanadi Loubani 4th year U.B.C. student
A lecture on the role of Arab women, their challenges and future prospects.
Tuesday: Feb. 18th Time:12:30pm      Place:BUCH D323
The Peace Process:   What Prospects^
Dr. Hani Faris, Asian Research Centre U.B.C.
Dr. Adel SaJty, Education Dept. U.B.C.
The developments of the Peace Conference and its implication from Arab Perspective
Wednesday: Feb. 19th     Time: 12:30pm       Place: SUB 205
Wedding in Galilee
A movie by a Palestinian director which unravels a modern'fable around a
folkloric wedding that becomes the stage for political and social struggle.
Commentators:    Dr. Mordecai Briemberg, Douglas College.
&      Hanadi Loubani
Tuesday: Feb. 18th Time: 6:30pm       Place:SUB Auditorium
Arab Cultural Night
An evening of Arabic music, dancing and food
Wednesday: Feb. 19th    Time: 8:00pm- midnight Place: SUB 207/209
Tickets: $ 5  (available on display in SUB or at the door)
For more information & tickets call Lina at 922-2938 or Manal 986-2348
V
•^
^
WIN A FREE
FLIGHT TO
EUROPE
with Travel CUTS during the...
Big Balloon Bash!
February 10-14
"Pop a Balloon and you could win!"
To be eligible, just come in, pay a deposit and book your flight to
London, oranywhere in Europe between February 10 and 14.
Then pop one of the balloons in the office to see what you win.
There is a prize in every balloon...maybe your balloon will give
you a chance to win your flight free!
See TRAVEL CUTS for full details:
TRAVELCUTS
GoingYourWay!
Lower Level,
Student Union Building
822-6890
LATE NIGHT BITES.
Subway's got the best tasting subs under the stars. Ail your favorite
meats piled high on fresh baked bread — topped with free fixin's.
Want a late night bite? Make it Sub vay tonight.
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■ 222-0884
(IN THE VILLAGE)    offer Expires: Feb 25/92 Valid at this location only
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Mon/Tue/Thu/Sun: m
10 am    Midnite    I
Wed'rUSat:      ■
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February 11,1992
THE UBYSSEY/9 PRIORIZING     THE
AMS    BUDGET.
Budget, schmudget!
The AMS has budgeted a $7,904 increase in
spending over the past year. A $3,754 decrease in
revenue from student fees and $5,031 slump in
business revenue has also been budgeted.
All this is within the realm of reason: the AMS
can afford this.
What is frightening are the changes to line
items, especially the apparent emphasis on new
line items and entertainment at the expense of
services to students.
New line items include:
* $6,360 for a summer mailout of AMS information—available in the Inside UBC in September—
by a Toronto marketing agency that sold advertis-
•j-np* ill tnft DflCjCflfiTG
* $1,272 for the Votemobile and $3,885 for the
referendum committee—attempts made last November to reach quorum on referenda. Only one of
the two questions reached quorum.
* $13,000 for a researcher to aid AMS executives—
covering about two months salary and office set-up
costs—"vith increased funding next year.
Notable increased line items:
* $27,130 increase to AMS Programs, which provides entertainment for students.
* $1,219 increase to combined Frosh Week and
First Year Students'Program. Interestingly, Frosh
Week entertainments cost more than the entire
programme last year.
To pay for this, as in any budget, there have
been cuts made. One place the AMS has chosen to
chop its budgetary allotment is to Service Organizations—a drop of $19,656 in funding to Service
Organizations, while AMS expenditures have increased.
Large Service Organization cuts:
* $2,215 cut from the Disabled Students Association—a cut of over 50 per cent.
* $18,609 cut from the winter Ubyssey—again a cut
of over 50 per cent.
Questions to ponder:
* Why is less than one-tenth of the AMS budget
directed to Service Organizations?
* Why was the allocation to Service Organizations
being cut by $19,656 this year?
* Whyis the allocationfor Student Council—$91,180
and $144,000 for administration—$105,962 more
than for Service Organizations? And why has it in
past years been climbing?
We suggest if the AMS really does exist to
support students, it should look to providing services and funding the organizations doing that.
the Ubyssey
February 11, 1992
The Ubyssey is published Tuesdays and Fridays by the
Alma Mater Society ofthe University of British Columbia.
Editorial opinions are those of the staff and not necessarily those of the university administration, or of the
sponsor. The editorial office is room 24 IK ofthe Student
Union Building. Editorial Department, phone 822-2301;
advertising, 822-3977; FAX 822-9279.
The Ubyssey is a founding member of
Canadian University Press
It was one of those days when you just cant help
being bad and mom can't help being mad: Dianne Alberta
Rudolf take those thirty toads out ofthe toaster, take Effie
Maria Pow down from the ceiling and go to your room! Raul
Alejandro Peschiera I've had enough of your continuous
chatter, fill your mouth with marshmellows! Sharon Anne
Lindores have you been spitting on poor Paul Nicky Dayson
again? Paul Gordon Thompson stop uncapping the salt shaker,
Paula Colleen Wellings take those veggies out of your
bellybutton, Tigger Mathew Johnson stop pulling Carla Jean
Maftechuk's hair. J ana Jean Dionne take the beetles outside,
Yossarian Yggy Joe King wipe that smile offyour face and put
the moon back in the ; ky. Ted Fred Ing wipe those gummie
bears hanging from your nostrils. Sage Einstein Davies quit
doing cartwheels on the ceiling, Ellen Gertrude Pond don't
pierce any more nipples. Hao Elvis Li stop experimenting
with Lucho Napleon Van Isschot's toes, Sam Justine Green
eat those green eggs and ham. Rick Dennis Hiebert don't
throw those stink bombs! Nadine Araji wind up the cuckoo
clocks. Frances Foran dont saw Mark Nielsen in half.
Editors
Paul Dayson • Sharon Undorsa • Carta Maftachuk
Rafil Paschisra • Efflo Pow
Photo sdltor • Paul Gordon
Letters
The Ubyssey welcomes letters on any Issue. Letters must be typed and are not to exceed 300 words In length. Content
which Is Judged to be libelous, homophobic, sexist, racist or factually Incorrect will not be published. Please be concise.
Letters may be edited tor brevity, but It is standard Ubyssey policy not to edit letters for spelling or grammatical mistakes.
Please bring them, with Identification, to SUB 241k. Letters must Include name, faculty, and signature.
Edible undies
Re: Editorial ofthe February 7th issue of the
Ubyssey,"University Breeding Criminals." EAT MY
SHORTS!
Eric Zutter
Chem Eng. 3
Dictators under
the bed?
1 am once again astounded by the Marxist
rhetoric emanating from
John Lipscomb. His latest
story in the Jan. 28 Ubyssey
(Gigantic Nauseating Party)
tells us how capitalists (and
their stooge government)
have somehow hoodwinked
the populace and imposed
an evil, destructive system
which without election tricks
will be voted out and somehow replaced by his "egalitarian economy^.
One disturbing assumption he makes is the level of
intellect ofthe voting public.
Anyone who believes the
reason we have a certain
political system (basically
since 1867) is because ofthe
capitalist government's
"growth" election tricks,
cannot have much trust in
the electorate's ability to vote
in their best interests.
I believe the reason the
main political parties appear
to favour (in varying degrees)
"growth" and relatively free
markets is that the voters
recognize the superiority of
capitalism over the alternative. They recognize thatthis
"egalitari in economy" is an
idealistic pipe-dream, which
if it occurs will likely be highjacked by dictators. The decades long disasters in the
former USSR and Eastern
Europe bear testament to
this. Indeed, some of the
worst environmental catastrophes have occurred in the
socialist world.
Mr. Lipscomb would have
us poor, manipulated voters
register our vote of no confidence in capitalism by ignoring the media's urge to
"consume to get the economy
moving." He says he hopes
the GNP will later plummet
as then "every measure of
health and happiness" will
grow. In reality falling GNP
will result in unthinkable
hardship and pain (just ask
ex-citizens ofthe USSR).
Without the solid base of
capitalism and the resulting industrial technology,
there would be an archaic
health
system, mass starvation
from ineffidentfarming and
our export products would
be rapi dly superceded by our
more pragmatic trade competitors.
Justin Elvin-Jensen
Commerce 3
Awareness
necessary
When I sat down to write
this letter, I kept in mind
that many will regard it as
offensive but the truth is often so.
I write directly to those
people who stay ignorant to
this day—to those who ask
why "racism* against Israel
or Zionism exists.
When I lived in Lebanon
in 1982, my country was invaded and destroyed, my
friends killed, my family
separated and my rights
taken. When I asked, they
told me it was the Israeli
soldiers. When my people
were suffering, my name insulted and my beliefs rejected, I asked and was told
the Zionists. That is what
Israel is to me; I didn't read
it or hear it.. I saw it. But I
don't ask for sympathy; instead I ask for an awareness.
Israel is not a victim and
neither are^he Arab countries. When we speak of Israel we speak of a political
union not of a people. It is
when the Jews support what
Israel does that we
disriminate against them.
Jewish people should stop
their self sympathy for a mo-
mentand realize what Israel
has done and what it is still
doing. Israeli soldiers still
occupy the South of Lebanon as the government
brings in settlers on Lebanese land. Palestinian
youths are denied an education and a future because
they struggle for their existence and Syrian land is
still illegally under Israeli
army's control.
Educate yourselves and
look for the facts, open your
eyes and ask why. It is when
you remain ignorant about
your beliefs that you find
many ignorant about you.
Nadine Araji
It is not often that one is
given a decent reason to
mix the movements of night
and day into one moment of
perpetual twilight. Do you
awaken in the middle of the
night and have no one to
talk to? Do you have your
deepest and most profound
thoughts as a mixed up
world slumbers in motionless exhaustion?
If life is passing you too
quickly, too slowly, too
madly, it's time to change.
Join The UBYSSEY production Monday and Thursday
nights at SUB 241K from
5:30pm to eternity. Rejoice!
Never rest again!
The following pec
THE 1991-92 UBYSSEY STAFF LIST
>ple have made three or more contributions to The
Ubyssey and are c
ligible to vote in the elections for Editors:
Sharlene Azam
Rebecca Bishop
Graham Cameron
Steven Chan
TenieChan
Martin Chester
Graham Cook
Franka Cordua-von Specht
Mike Corny
Sage Davies
Greg Davis
Paul Dayson
Bill Denham
Jana Dionne
Frances Foran
JanForder
Yuri Fulmer
Michael Gazetas
Charlie Gillis
Paul Gordon
Sam Green
Anthony Grieco
ElaiSne Griffith
Rick Hiebert
Ted Young-Ing
Lucho van Isachot
Glnna Jemal
Gerry Johnson
Matthew Johnson
Yggy King
KarlynKoh
Yukie Kurahashi
Hao LI
Sharon Lindores
Robert MacDonald
Morgan Maenling
Carla Maftechuk
Don Mah
Nikola Marin
Andrew Mattel
Matthew Martin
Charles Nho
Cheryl Niamath
Mark Nielsen
Sara Patton
Tanya Paz
Raul Peschiera
Ellen Pond
Effie Pow
Helen Willoughby-Price
Nadene Rehnby
Dianne Rudolf
Martina Sea iff
Paula Wellings
Johanna Wickie
Chung Wong
Victor Chew Wong
The following people have made two contributions to The Ubyssey
and are currently ineligible to vote in
the elections for Editors:
Sky Anderson
Ellen Antoine
Laurel Bischoff
Sandy Bucifal
Stephani Cameron
Jennifer Charbonneau
Mark Chester
Dawn Clements
Adrienne Copithome
Tim Crumley
Hiroshi Earle
Doug Ferris
Abby Fitch
Johanna Gislanson
Harald Gravelsins
KenHegan
Cayjatsby
Suzanne Johnson
TabeJohnson
Lynne Jorgeson
Simon Knight
Wayne Kwan
Chris Lasko
Melissa Lemieux
Yau Soon Loo
BerniceMa
Michelle Mason
Patrick McLouglin
Joanne Nelson
Diya Nijhouse
Nigel Porter
Ro6e Anne Prokopetz Nicole Sandinsky
RajSihota
Lisa Tench
Hamish Wilson
Karen Young
PhilZiikwitz
10/THE UBYSSEY
February 11,1992 THE ALMA MATER
SOCIETY OF UBC
1991/92 BUDGET
AMS
BUDGET
90/91
ACTUAL
90/91
BUDGET
91/92
BUDGET
EXPENSES
OVERVIEW
Anti-Discrimination Program
Art Gallery Committee
3,622.00
3,825.00
568.00
4,183.00
0.00
7,533.00
Ask Me Program
662.00
376.00
0.00
Club & Constituency Account Admin.
95,304.00
97,926.00
96,000.00
Colin's Smile
0.00
0.00
1,000.00
BUDGET
ACTUAL
BUDGET
Copies of the Code
1,619.00
693.00
2,000.00
90/91
90/91
91/92
General Admin, for Student Council
142,957.00
146,890.00
144,000.00
DRAAC
2,775.00
2,998.00
1,990.00
External Affairs
8,042.00
7,520.00
9,115.00
AMS Fees from Registrar
FROSH Week
0.00
0.00
7,196.00
$827,535.00
$834,896.00
$828,750.00
(see First Year Students Program)
except athletic fee
Homecoming
5,310.00
6,327.00
3,815.00
$32.50x26,000 students
$827,535.00
$834,896.00
$828,750.00
Inside U.B.C.
-1,366.00
-582.00
-135.00
Job Link
16,019.00
17,102.00
17,667.00
Leadership Conference
420.00
501.00
213.00
REVENUE
Programs
40,000.00
23,630.00
67,130.00
Referendum Committee
0.00
0.00
3,885.00
Building Operations
338,250.00
353,355.00
341,437.00
Researcher
0.00
0.00
13,000.00
Film Soc Auditorium Rent
5,500.00
0.00
0.00
SAC
66,985.00
65,344.00
66,932.00
Investment
190,000.00
221,726.00
180,000.00
(includes $5,000 for elections from Council)
Whistler Lodge
100.00
43.00
919.00
Student Council
95,634.00
91,220.00
91,180.00
Word Processing Service
-7,800.00
-22,431.00
0.00
Student Court
1,390.00
180.00
1,325.00
Total Operating Revenue
526,050.00
552,693.00
522,356.00
Summer Film Series
8,372.00
8,172.00
0.00
Contingency
37,225.00
38,688.00
38,500.00
Summer Mailout
0.00
0.00
6,360.00
(5% of operating revenue)
Summer Projects
30,206.00
30,642.00
30,532.00
Survey
3,530.00
3,513.00
0.00
Total
$488,825.00
$515,562.00
$483,856.00
Used Bookstore
(20% sales commission)
-3,864.00
946.00
-125.00
Votemobile
0.00
0.00
1,272.00
Transfers
Walk Home Program
8,110.00
5,532.00
6,210.00
75th Anniversary Committee
0.00
54.00
0.00
Art Gallery Restorations
0.00
0.00
5,000.00
Art Purchasing Fund (404)
1,500.00
5,500.00
1,500.00
Total
$529,552.00
$513,735.00
$578,095.00
Bursary Fund (222,228 - 9)
15,900.00
15,000.00
5,000.00
CPAC Reserve (117,223)
381,939.00
383,897.00
382,500.00
($15 per student)
Service Organizations
CiTR High Power Reserve Fund (225)
20,000.00
20,000.00
0.00
(No longer collected)
CiTR Radio
77,000.00
77,773.00
77,395.00
Emergency Student Loan Fund (227)
10,000.00
10,000.00
10,000.00
Disabled Students Association
3,405.00
2,430.00
1,190.00
(Funded from Blue Chip)
First Year Students Program
8,240.00
6,380.00
2,263.00
Intramurals (217,885-90)
114,582.00
120,809.00
114,750.00
(this includes Frosh Week)
($4.50 per student -
Gays & Lesbians
1,178.00
1,178.00
1,375.00
UAC provides a further $188,800)
Global Development Centre
0.00
0.00
1,000.00
Programs Reserve
0.00
18,000.00
0.00
Intramurals
0.00
0.00
0.00
Registration Photos
5,600.00
6.000.00
6,000.00
(see transfers section)
SUB Management Fund (212)
12,731.00
22,004.00
14,000.00
Ombudsoffice
2,877.00
2,771.00
2,620.00
($.50 per student)
Speakeasy
5,105.00
5,493.00
6,000.00
SUB Repairs & Replacement Fund (215) 46,000.00
46,000.00
53,500.00
Student Environment Centre
831.00
831.00
2,000.00
(Interest from the fund itself I
Ubyssey, Summer
11,490.00
8.751.00
15,110.00
WUSC Refugee Student Fund (224)
17,731.00
17,748.00
12,750.00
Ubyssey, Winter
33,493.00
28,497.00
14,884.00
($.50 per full time equivalent -
Volunteer Connections
2,883.00
2,795.00
2,556.00
includes 1 time $5,000)
Women's Centre
2,372.00
2,157.00
2,825.00
Total
$625,983.00
$664,958.00
$605,000.00
Total
$148,874.00
$139,056.00
$129,218.00
AMS
BUDGET
90/91
ACTUAL
90/91
BUDGET
91/92
BUDGET
SUMMARY
REVENUE
Fees
Plus Business Revenue
Total
EXPENSES
827,535.00
488,825.00
1,316,360.00
834,896.00
515,562.00
1,350,458.00
828,750.00
483,856.00
1,312,606.00
LessTransfers
Less Expenses
Less Service Organizations
625,983.00
529,552.00
148,874.00
664,958.00
513,735.00
139,056.00
605,000.00
578,095.00
129,218.00
Total
1,304,409.00
1,317,749.00
1,312,313.00
YEAR END TOTAL
11,915.00
32,709.00
293.00
February 11,1992
THE UBYSSEY/11 r-?r
NEWS
. 'f i.y.Ni.i,...i,.yo.n.ii.;N
Valhalla map outlines plan for increased wilderness protection
by Mark Nielsen
The Valhalla Wilderness Society released the second edition
of its Endangered Wil derness Map
late last month, in order to inform
the new NDP government of its
concerns.
The map is a comprehensive
park and wilderness plan which
specifieshowtoincrease protected
areas from the existing 5.2 per
cent to 14 per cent.
The first edition, published in
1988, was intended to urge the
Social Credit government to increase protected areas to 13 per
cent.
Since that time, the Canadian House of Commons and both
the BC NDP and Liberal parties
have endorsed increasing the
protected areas to 12 per cent, a
target suggested by the UN
Brundtland Commission in 1987.
But VWS chairperson Collen
McCrory says action on the matter must be taken up soon.
"Although the federal and
provincial governments have
promised to meet the 12 per cent
target by the year 2000, we simply
don't have that much time left,"
McCrory said.
"One-third of the areas proposed for protection have either
already been invaded by logging,
or are scheduled for logging development within the next three
River and trees.
RLE PHOTO
years.
The map has been refined to
incorporate information from scientists, pilots, satellite photography, native Indian bands, concerned citizens and environmental and community groups across
the province.
Although the percentage of
proposed protected areas has been
increased slightly from 13 to 14
per cent, the VWS claims the impact upon the forest industry will
remain about the same.
The VWS cites a 1989 Simon
Fraser University study indicating that implementation of the
proposal would require a 3.5 per
cent reduction in the provincial
annual allowable cut.
The study also indicated that
jobs lost from this reduction can
be more than offset by increasing
value added to forest products, by
replanting and increasing production efficiency.
"We urge the government to
do two things," McCrory said.
"First, we must immediately and
permanently protect the areas
which have been proposed and
studied for years, areas such as
the Khutzeymateen, the Stdkine,
the Stein and Meares Island.
"Second, the remainder of the
proposed areas must be protected
from resource extraction until
proper studies can be undertaken,
studies to be completed within two
years.
"Failure to take this action
means that most of our best opportunities to save a representative
legacy of beautiful BC will be lost.
to all future generations, forever."
Copies ofthe map can be purchased at the Western Canada
Wilderness Committee store at 20
Water Street or by writing the
VWS at Box 224, New Denver, BC
VOG ISO.
Proceeds from map sales go
the VWS and other wilderness
groups.
George Morfitt, FCA, Auditor General of British Columbia
Watchdog of the public purse. The man our
provincial government is accountable to on all fiscal
expenditures.
His clients are B.C.'s taxpayers. His job is to make
certain the province's $13 billion budget is spent
economically and efficiently.
The responsibility is enormous. But George excels
at turning challenging assignments into successful and
rewarding opportunities.
He has worked in many areas of business finance,
which led to his previous position as Vice-President and
Chief Financial Officer of The Diamond Group of Companies. He's been Chairman ofthe University
of British Columbia's Board of Governors and
the Universities Council of B.C. A municipal
alderman. President of the Institute of Chartered
Accountants of B.C. And inductee to the province's Sports
Hall of Fame.
George's CA has opened many of those doors.
"You can use the discipline, training and approach gained
from your professional designation to take leadership
roles throughout the fabric of Canadian society."
George Morfitt, CAand public watchdog.
If you're looking for a career with multiple
opportunities, write the Institute of Chartered
Accountants of B.C.
Our standards are higher.
Institute of Chartered Accountants of British Columbia
1133 Melville Street. Vancouver, B.C. V6E 4E5
Telephone: (604)681-3264 Toll-free 1-800-663-2677
George Morfitt's CA
introduced him to
3 million
jy^sfsp--'
v--.;??.v*s?;*s5*',*s
FACT OR FICTION
presented by
United Church Campus Ministry and
the Student Christian Movement
EVERY TUESDAY 1:30 • 2:30 pm
Feb. 11  Virgin Birth?
Feb. 18 Jesus Sinless or Human?
Feb. 25 Jesus' Followers: Called for What?
Mar. 3   Healings/Exorcisms
Mar. 10 Jesus vs. Ihe Pharisees?
Mar. 17 Kingdom of God: What is it?
Mar. 24 Aires'. Trial and Crucifixion
Mar. 31 Resurrection?
AN INTELLECTUAL AND
OPEN-MINDED INQUIRY
INTO THE PERSON OF JESUS
WHO WAS HE?
Tuesdays, Lutheran Campus Centre
1:30 - 2:30 All Welcome
For information: call 224-3722
GMAT    LSAT
GRE
Weekend Test
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Next seminars:
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GRE: Mar. 27-29
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PROFESSIONALS IN TEST PREPARATION
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3PEN7 DAYS,
,1-TH 8-9 FRI 8
12/THE UBYSSEY
February 11,1992

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