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The Ubyssey Nov 13, 1964

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Array Take your
pick
THE UBYSSEY
Totem
or scabs
VOL. XLVII, No. 24
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 13,  1964
CA 4-3916
—don hume photo.
EAST MALL GUSHER, caused when fuel tank of moving van was ruptured by plank,
flooded pavement in front of Brock Thursday noon with 100 gallons of diesel oil.
Firemen were called  to flush  street to  ease danger of fire (story, page 3).
Seek ye book profits not
in Bookstore, says Hunter
Bookstore manager John
Hunter says the B.C. Student's
Federation should picket the
administration, not the Bookstore.
"It is the administration's
policy, not ours, not to release
the profit figures," Hunter said.
Small groups of picketers demanded release of profit information again this Thursday
noon.
Another demonstration was
held last Thursday.
Hunter said he would have
told the picketers this, but no
one comes to talk to him about
the situation.
Hunter criticized the BCSF
for urging a student co-op bookstore.
"Bookstore profits are being
used for student benefit right
now," he said.
Soap-boxer Ray Larsen, Arts
II, disagreed with Hunter.
"The BCSF is not necessarily
a student co-op," Larsen said
"We want the students to be
fully informed about just
where their money is going."
"Students aren't shown how
bookstore profits are going for
their benefit.
"We want concrete examples," Larsen said.
Larsen continued: "Anyone
can come to our public forums,
Thursday noons in front of
the library and say anything
they please."
"Unlike the AMS, we want
close contact with students," he
said.
Council meeting kayoed
by Lip Liston fisticuffs
A prize fight has knocked out Monday's student council
meeting.
The meeting was cancelled so councillors can watch the
Cassius Clay - Sonny Liston heavyweight championship
fight.
UBC's 27 sports-minded councillors will meet Tuesday
night instead.
Scab' claim
unjustified,
says editor
AMS officials said Thursday they don't consider the three-
year-old strike at Mitchell Press, Ltd., sufficient reason not to
have Totem printed there.
"We're   not   anti-union;   but
as far as we're concerned the
Mitchell Press strike is not
justifiable," Totem annual editor Scott Mclntyre said.
"Mitchell Press is breaking
their backs for us and their
work is more than satisfactory.
PRACTICAL
"Our reason for going to
Mitchell Press is strictly practical — money, quality, and
keeping the printing of Totem
in Canada," Mclntyre said.
Next lowest bidder to Mitchell was Intercollegiate Press
of Winnipeg.
The two city firms bidding,
Mitchell and Evergreen Press,
are -both considered scab shops
by the B.C. Federation of Labor.
Lowest of the two foreign
competitors was Yearbook
House of Kansas City, which
beat out Taylor Publishing in
California.
The Democratic Youth (New
Democratic Party youth)
charged Monday the AMS was
betraying the students and antagonizing the trade unions by
its choice of printers for Totem.
'SCAB-RUN'
They said Mitchell Press,
Ltd.  was "scab-run".
"In what way have we betrayed the students by getting
them the best price and the
best quality for the Totem possible?" asked AMS treasurer
Kyle Mitchell, (no relation),
Thursday.
"The union involved is not
out for the good of their membership; they are out to get
Mitchell Press."
The Young Democrats have
launched a campaign to protest
SEE: SCABS
(Continued on Page 2)
Drunk, say girls
Potted7 porter gets sent packing
By CAROLE MUNROE
A porter at the Lower Mall
girls' residence has been fired
after girls reported he was
drunk and abusive Monday
night.
The porter reportedly
shouted at a don and refused
to let girls into the dorms.
He also pounded violently on
the dorm's glass door.
The porter, whose name
The Ubyssey is withholding,
was taken away by campus
RCMP. No charges were laid.
Housing director John Kaar
said the porter was fired because he did not meet the
standards of his job.
One of the girls involved retold of the incident Thursday.
"We could tell right away
he'd been drinking," she said.
The porter was outside
when the girl and a friend arrived.
When they asked to be let
in she said he looked at his
keys and announced:
"I can't let you in with
these keys."
Then he laughed.
The time was about midnight and other girls began
to arrive back from dates.
Several went to wake up
the resident don in another
dorm.
The don arrived minutes
later.
"His behavior became
abusive," she said.
At first the girls tried to
help the porter find the key
to the door. They couldn't
find the right key on the
large key ring.
. Then some girls inside the
dorm, awakened by noise,
came down and let the porter
in.
But when he was asked to
let the girls in he refused.
"Don't you dare come in,"
he allegedly shouted.
The don then took the keys
from the porter and let the
girls into the lounge.
The porter began pounding
violently on the glass door of
the dorm, they said.
The don said she later reported the incident to Housing
administration.
CASTRO'S CRUZ
. . . pack 'em in
Cuban crush
twice as bad
as in camps
If Fort Camp students were
in Cuba, they'd be packed in
twice as tight.
Cuban ambassador Americo
Cruz made his comments after
a tour  of UBC   residences.
He said two, or possibly four
students would be bunked in
each Fort Camp single.
Cruz said rules of behavior
and studying are strictly enforced in Cuba. He said such
things as Totem's eight-foot
wall and buzzer-box system are
not needed.
"There are men's residences
and women's residences," he
said, "with only a road between.
"Students know they must
not cross the road.
"The philosophy of studying
appears to be quite different in
Cuba than in Canada. Here it
seems to be on an individual
basis," he said.
He said in Cuba huts in a
development like Fort Camp
would be set aside for group
study.
Roorns and residences are
used for sleeping only, with
mass areas set aside for washing and studying, he said.
Cruz said the Cuban government encourages students to
stay in high-rise apartments
similar to those in Vancouver's
West End.
(Continued  on  Page  2)
 SEE; CUBA. Page  2
THE     U BYSSEY
Friday, November  13,   1964
mil FDR SALE
APPLY VITHN
'ft"
WELL, THAT'S what it
says. Sign on lonely
phone pole on Chancellor Blvd. greets poolers every morning.
Court has egg on its face
conduct charge dismissed
Student court Thursday
found Donald H. Mackay not
guilty of conduct unbecoming
a student on a charge arising
from a Screech Day egg-throwing incident.
Mackay, Arts IV, was
charged after several sorority
pledges and bystanders were
pelted with eggs while participating in Screech Day activities in the auditorium cafeteria.
Court   ruled  the prosecution
failed to prove beyond reasonable doubt that Mackay was
guilty of the action charged.
Mackay was not present at
his trial and was not represented.
Student court automatically
entered a not guilty plea on
his behalf.
Two witnesses for the prosecution testified they saw two
persons run from the cafeteria
after the eggs were thrown.
Campus ambulance men
are waiting in wings
The fight for better ambulance service on campus will
be postponed until after a Lower Mainland government
committee studying ambulance problems brings down its
report, says first vice-president Bob Cruise.
The committee, made up of members from Vancouver,
Burnaby, North Vancouver and New Westminster, will
bring down a report next week on the whole civic ambulance system.
Cruise found out about the committee too late for the
AMS to present a brief.
Says Cuban
Reforms blocked
by Latin armies
By   BRENT   CROMIE
Revolution and abolishing large armies are the only
solutions to Latin America's problems, Cuban ambassador
to Canada, Dr. Americo Cruz, said Thursday.
"There  must   be a  great   re
form effected by the people,"
h lold about 300 students in
Brock lounge.
Cruz said the South American republics are being exploited by huge foreign companies.
These companies influence
elections, which often become
mockeries as a result, he said.
The army controls these
countries, and changes in government are merely changes of
power. They do not lead to
social  reforms, he said.
Cruz said Peruvian and Venezuelan oil, Chilean copper,
and bananas from the central
republics are examples of this
exploitation.
Nobel prize
man speaks
A Nobel prize winner will
lecture at UBC for three days
next week.
Professor Pollycart Kusch,
1955 Nobel prize winner for
physics, will give a non-technical lecture at noon next Thursday  in the  Hebb  threalre.
A technical talk for science
students only will be given at
3:30 p.m. Friday in the Hebb
Theatre.
Kusch will also speak
on Moral Obligation of the
Scientist at a Vancouver Institute lecture in Buchanan 106
at 8:15 p.m. Saturday.
He is on leave of absence
from Stanford University, California.
Form own
park sharks,
grad urges
Graduate students' president
Jim Slater said Thursday undergraduate societies should
have their own parking committee.
"We have formed such a
committee in Grad Studies,"
said Slater. "And we've speedily solved many parking problems with the Traffic Office."
Slater pointed out Grad students have more than minor
parking problems.
"We have about 800 cars
with D lot stickers and there's
only space for 400 cars."
However Traffic Director
Sir Ouvry Roberts was not in
favor of the idea.
"Heaven forbid!"  he said.
"We have close liason with
t'he AMS council and undergraduate groups now."
CUBA
(Continued from Page 1)
He said the apartments were
taken over after Fidel Castro's
revolution.
Utlra-modern homes were
also taken over for student use,
he said.
Fort Campers can sympathize with Cuban students. They
don't get their rooms heated
in winter either.
But then, said Cruz, facilities in Cuba don't need heating:  just  aar .conditioning.   ,...,.
Kerry Egdell, Ars IV, identified one of the persons as
Mackay.
But neither witness could
identify Mackay as having
thrown an egg.
The original charge was laid
after a complaint bv AMS first
vice-president Bob Cruise.
Serving of the charge was
delayed when student court
could not locate Mackay.
SCABS
(Continued from Page 1)
the contract award, censure the
AMS and bring about a student
boycott of Totem sales.
"Labor has shown itself to
be a staunch friend of education, but the AMS actions are
endangering possible future
help," their release said.
"The university should show
some gratitude by not supporting scab labor and professional
strikebreakers."
The Young Democrats said
unions have worked for students through the submission
of briefs to the B.C. legislature
and by providing summer employment for students.
They also said the AMS decision might affect the B.C.
Federation of Labor's decision
whether or not to participate
in the Three Universities Fund
now underway.
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Brock Extension Friday, November  13, 1964
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
—ron riter photo
OFFICIALLY OPENING the $1 million biomedical library named for him is department
store magnate P. A. Woodward (left). Speaking at ceremonies were Chancellor Phyllis
Ross and  President John Macdonald.
Foreign cash
awaits scholars
Four $1,500 scholarships
will toe available this year to
graduate students who want
to study international or industrial relations.
The Mackenzie King Travelling Scholarships are for
students who wish to study
in either the U.S. or U.K.
Applications should be
forwarded to Dean Walter
Gage by March 1.
Watering
hole news
leaks out
By BRIAN STAPLES
Curling on UBC campus may
become a crocking sport.
An advertisement in The
Ubyssey has invited students
over 21 to join a Thunderbird
Curling Club.
"And there is likely to be a
bar in use at the club," club
president Bill Macdonald, Law
II, said Thursday. The club
was organized last spring by a
group of faculty and students
who desired to have a club to
promote curling as a social
sport, Macdonald said.
Macdonald said drinking itself on UBC grounds is not
forbidden if the sponsoring
body has the permission of the
Senate and complies with regulations.
The over-21 club has had
three curling sessions so far
this year.
Membership costs $10 and
members pay 50 cents for the
night's curling.
Over-21 observers believe
believe the club has been formed as the first step toward establishment of a general social
club with liquor facilities for
the campus.
Master plan
goes on sale
Guideposts to Innovation,
the recently-released report
by President John Macdonald and seven faculty members, is now on sale in the
_Ufig«*w»pkstQre, for,$i.. , .
Library opened
by chief donor
By PAUL WOOD
Chain department store owner P. A. Woodward officially
opened the $1 million Woodward bio-medical library
Thursday.
Woodward, who gave $440,-
000 toward construction of the
Library, unveiled a plaque and
declared the library open.
The ceremony was presided
over by Ian McTaggart-Cowan,
dean of Graduate Studies and
chairman of the UBC Senate
Library Committee.
Other speakers at the ceremony were Chancellor Phyllis
Ross, Dr.. W. C. Gibson and
UBC President Dr. John Macdonald, who thanked Woodward.
Dr. Chauncey Leake of University of California, San
Francisco, was a special guest.
UBC acquired Dr. Leake's
3,500 volume collection of rare
books on the history of medicine and science with a $50,000
gift from Mr. Woodward.
The Library will serve the
$18 million medical teaching
and research centre at UBC to
which Woodward contributed
$3.5 million.
Truck trips
to oily mess
A 27-ton truck was laid low
by a three-foot chunk of wood
Thursday at the rear of the
library.
The truck, making a delivery
to the Fine Art Gallery, was
disabled when the wood flipped up and broke a fuel line.
More than 100 gallons of
diesel oil gushed from the line
before the driver could repair
the break.
Firemen were later called to
wash down the fuel, which
flowed onto the pavement in
front of Brock.
Fire officials said there was
no immediate danger because
diesel fuel does not ignite
easily.
Combined committee
IRC offers pact
on housing beefs
Inter-residence Council wants to join the AMS to investigate housing problems. •
IRC president Derril Thomas
said in a letter to council:
"IRC wishes to propose a
joint committee with the AMS
to study problems of housing
—especially financial and living conditions."
NO SUCCESS
He said last year the Inter-
Residence Association tried to
investigate facts and figures on
its own, but had no success.
"Something like this can
only work if every one works
together," Thomas said.
He said the committee
should be made up of four IRC
members, one for each residence, and as many AMS members up to four as the AMS
wished to appoint.
He said a preliminary meeting might be hefd next week.
NO POINTS
"At present we have no
specific points to press for;
that is what the committee
will do. But we will try to get
the administration to realise
fees are too high for what we
are getting and that we don't
want them to go up,
"We also want the Administration to realize housing
should be paid out of capital
funds rather than students'
funds," he said.
Bloody trail
grows cold
BERKELEY, Calif. (CUP)—
A University of California
coed left for school Oct. 29,
1963, but she never got there.
One year later the girl, apparently murdered, is still
missing. The only clues police
have are her umbrella and a
few books. Both were found
stained with blood.
Figaro marries
at student rate
The Vancouver Opera Association will be selling student reserved tickets to the
opening night performance
next Thursday, of The Marriage of Figaro.
Tickets will be sold for $1
in the Special Events office,
Wednesday, from 12:30 to
2:30 p.m.
Regular price of the tickets is from $4.50 to $6.50,
Ouvry's army
bivouacked
in boondocks
The traffic office has been
banished to the boondocks of
Wesbrook Crescent.
The tiny hut near the Ponderosa cafeteria which was
once the traffic office is being
moved to the gardener's compound across from Totem Park.
The traffic office and the
rest of Sir Ouvry Robert's
Traffic Patrol, are now comfortably situated in the cabin
renovated by the Olympic
Hockey team last year, located
on Wesbrook Crescent south of
Carey Hall.
The traffic office is divided
from the Patrol Office by a
washroom.
The cabin, complete with
sundeck and knotty pine interior, was allotted to Sir
Ouvry by the UBC Board of
Governors.
"It is certainly a great improvement over our other office," Sir Ouvry said.
PICTURE WINDOW for Sir Ouvry is just one of the juicy
goodies provided for traffic and patrol squad in new
■quarters.. -Traffic' -offke- has .'been   relocated   in  former
—ron rtter phftv
Department of Transport wireless shacks and ex-Olympic
hockey team village. THE UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university
year by the Alma Mater Society, University of B. C. Editorial opinions
expressed are those ot the editor and not necessarily those of the AMS
or the University. Editorial office, CA 4-3916. Advertising office, CA 4-3242,
Loc. 26. Member Canadian University Press, Founding member, Pacific
Student Press. Authorized as second-class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies for general
excellence and editorial writing.
«V^" •■■\pMWS-w    "/ftf,,  tJ$rm t
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 1964
''Mi
Totem 'lost'
Totems are funny poles the Indians carve and big
books the Alma Mater Society piles.
The AMS piles them in a storage room just outside
our North Brock basement offices along with used
chairs, dust, bits of pipe and spiders.
There are 2,000 of the yearbooks sitting with all these
odds and ends — a very odd end indeed.
Half the dust-collecting collection goes back to 1960.
The remainder are the Campus Life section of the
1964 edition—nearly 1,000 books in all.
They are sitting unwanted and unloved because
callous UBC students don't seem to like yearbooks.
Last year we had 2,400 of the things printed by an
American firm in Kansas City which specializes in such
things.
These and the other section of the book (1,100 Grad
books which sold out) cost a total of $18,000.
Totem budgeted for a loss of $4,200 and ended up
with a whopping $9,300 deficit.
A healthy chunk of that deficit is sitting in the North
Brock basement.
A handful of these Totems have been given away
for public relations purposes.
But otherwise, AMS publications officials won't
give the books away and they won't sell them.
They said if the books are given away or sold at
a cheaper rate students will be discouraged from buying
this year's edition.
We fail to see how anything would hurt this year's
sales.
Only 250 of the general-interest Campus Life books
have been sold.
The figure for the Grad books—at 350—is not much
more encouraging.
Why not sell the remaining books for 50 cents, a
dollar?
Why not encourage the sale of this year's books with
the offer of a free 1964 Campus Life book for every
purchase of a 1965?
Let's try and get some of our money back, or at least
ensure we don't blow another $9,300 on something no
one seems to want.
And if the yearbook isn't supported this year it will
be senseless to continue pumping money into it.
Vigilance dept.
"Extremism in the defence of liberty is no vice," an
obscure Arizona department store magnate once said.
And the price of liberty is eternal viligance, according to two political science professors at an obscure
college in Baltimore.
Seems these two professors stuffed ballot boxes in
a mock pre-presidential election at the little liberal
arts college.
When they finished their stuffing, Goldwater had
won—in overwhelming fashion. Not even the Republicans believed it.
The professors didn't prove much in the eternal
vigilance department.
Rather, they neatly showed that in the defence of
liberty it is necessary to watch political science pro-
fe^oJ-;.
''L-.. ,.<■:  Mike  Horsey
?;ews     Tim Padmore
?/i,ir.n i;;,:.   ___  Janet Matheson
City         Tom Wayman
Art  Don Hume
Sport'   George  Reamsbottom
Asrt,  Managing    Norm  Betts
Asst. City   Lorraine Slice
Asst. News  -  Cfirole Munroe
Associate „   Mike Hunter
ATOOCfats,™j,;.i....'-^..-...  Ron Riter
M&gaztne _ __  Dave ADlett
Puff, puff, puff. Rag was unusually pink today with Cubans,
and a redshirt invasion. But retaining principles were: Ian Cameron, Al Birnie, Corol Smith, Brian
Staples, Paul Wood, Bob Burton,
Tim Roberts, Mona Helcermanas,
Robbi West, Carol Anne Baker,
Art Casperson, Carole Monroe,
Lome (wet pants) Mallin, Bert (i
got the picture) McKinnon, John
(s.p. of a.) Dilday, and Bob Weiser
Wieser (check one). Also Rick
Blair (pause was for emphasis),
and Brent Croniie. Survival of fittest good punchy ending but ear-
aihYStopplhir'i        	
"Look baby, I'm sorry . . .1 know I said we could go to
the Theta-Theta-Theta ball tonight but that student court
case — it just didn't work out — and I can't come up with
the $25.
Capital punishment
doesn't bury mistakes
By
WULFING VON SCHLEINITZ
The recent outcry over the
commutation of Kenneth
Meeker's death sentence to
life imprisonment shows the
viciousness still present in
most people's outlook.
Too many people wish to
see blood spilled. Perhaps
they would have us re-intr-
duce public executions (preferably by the guillotine).
The head of the executed person could then be displayed
on a pole at some busy intersection.
• •    •
I, for one, object to such
spectacles as not being in the
interest of justice and the
community.
The minus of the murder
and the minus of the so-called
murderer's execution do not
make a plus in the form of
justice having been served.
This seems an odd way to
bury one's mistakes.
Let there be no misconception, everytime society gets
rid of one of its members, society as a whole has somehow
failed.
• •    •
It is perhaps ironic that on
the same page of the newspaper (The Province of Friday, Nov. 6) which carries the
letters of public outrage, the
following biblical quotation
appears: "Bear ye one another's burdens, and so fulfil the "
law of Christ." (Galatians 6:2).
Capital punishment may be
the cheapest method of disposing of individuals. It is
also ■ the -most final solution.
From death there  is no reprieve.
The punishment must serve
some useful purpose other
than gratifying the pleasures
of moral indignation.
Arguments to the effect
that murdering the murderer
serves to deter future murderers seem hardly valid in view
of the fact that those countries
without capital punishment
are not plagued by more killings than those countries with
capital punishment.
• •    •
I would think that as far as
deterence is concerned we do
all right through our justice-
on-the-instalment plan by
which a convicted human being (Meeker is one, you know)
goes through months of agony
while his execution is postponed again and again.
There should be an immediate reappraisal of our attitude
on capital punishment.
Anyone with any intelligence would soon realise that
upholding the present situation is quite unwarranted. But
unfortunately there always
are those who like to see another person suffer, (e.g. one
need only look at the popularity of James Bond novels.)
• •    •
This is deplorable as in
other ways we show ourselves
more humane, e.g. Observe
the number of people willing
to protect animals. Animals
such as dogs which are put to
death for biting humans.
It seems the dog's life is
more valued than that of a
person.
One could, at least, demand
equality!	
^   from
the
join mi
kelsey
I took ballroom dancing to
get my P.E. requirement, although I think it is the most
elaborate form of ritualistic
nonsense man has ever devised.
The instructor is a dapper
gent with a fine moustache
and a charming accent—I
never did catch his name.
Very, verrry charming lad.
He is the subject of many
campus legends; I have no
idea how long he has been
chief twinkletoes.
After one set of organized
chaos, he calls for the gentlemen sitting out (There's never
a female surplus) to relieve
some young lady of her partner.
"Olright, naow, young lay-
dies move ahead one genius,"
he invariably says.
Between dances, he spends
his time telling the young
geniuses to take their hands
out of their pockets and to
stop looking at their watches.
Two cardinal sins.
But the killer is one tricky
little step in the—uh, rhumba,
I think. The young lady must
turn, and "it is the way of all
young ladies to turn the
wrong way. You, as a gentleman, must not allow this. You
must immediately ensure that
you are the mawster."
To facilitate domination, he
has worked out a very careful procedure, which he demonstrates on an innocent,
docile wench. Who always
wants to turn the wrong way.
"Hold her like this," he
says, holding her with his
hand in front of her so she
cannot, as yet, turn. "Naow,
instead of turning the young
lady by lifting your arm immediately over her head, giving her the opportunity to
turn the wrong way, hold
your arm at the level of her
neck. She cannot then, you
see, turn the wrong way without strangling herself and will
immediately be propelled in
the opposite direction."
As he says this, he demonstrates, and the young lady
does attempt to strangle herself and turns the other way,
gasping, and popping her
eyes as she lurches into the
next step—which any young
genius will have forgotten
after trying to remember how
to be boss.
The main thing wrong with
ballroom dancing is the method of arm holding, which
stifles every amorous male
ever to dance with a graduate
of the course.
The abominable man
teaches the young ladies to
hold the young geniuses on
the side of the arm, not on
the top of the shoulder, giving them enough leverage to
keep one at an unhealthy distance.
Twinkletoes is singlehand-
edly stifling the population
explosion,   goddam   his  eyes. Friday, November  13, 1964
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 5
lililii
All-wet debate
Editor, The Ubyssey:
On Thursday we, the undersigned, were participants
in a B.C. Student Federation
mass rally protesting the high
cost of textbooks.
The meeting was disrupted
by some engineers.
In the ensuing action,
which involved the thee of us
and about 50 engineers, our
clothes became very wet and
we became very cold.
To rejuvenate our blood-
flow we were forced to consume a cup of hot coffee and
a do-nut each.
(1) We demand that the EUS
re-imburse us for this expense.
<2) We three challenge the entire EUS to a debating
contest in front of the
Library next Wednesday,
if they can gather enough
courage for this. The topic
to be discussed will be: Be
It Resolved That All Engineers are Chickens.
GABOR MATE
JIM RUSKIN
KARL   DARWIN
Who, us? Dead?
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Is Remembrance Day a dead
day? From the attendance at
the ceremony in the gym on
Wednesday, one would think
so. (See Ubyssey editorial,
Tuesday, Nov. 10.)
Of an on campus population
of 20,000 persons, perhaps 50
students, excluding those enlisted in the armed forces
turned out.
Why this apathy? It was
people our age who went to
war to defend what they believed to be right. Twenty
years ago, before many of us
were born, they were fighting
and dying—so that we might
live in freedom.
Should we forget their sacrifice? Did they die for nothing? By Wednesday's performance, perhaps they did.
ALAN DAVIS
Science I
"Why didn't they fix this
holiday so that we could
"have a long weeftiJiHl?''
Iron chastity belt
Ea-iOr, *ine Ubyssey:
If any student wants to return books to the library after
hours, he or she better have
an acetylene torch ready. At
10 p.m. last night I went to
the new location of the after-
hours book return (right outside the main library doors).
An ancient black iron gate
with spikes on top confronted
me, which would have been
all right except that the gate
closes in front of the book
return. And that's not all—
in the daytime and up to closing time, that (censored) gate
is swung up against same
book return—so you really
can't get to it at all anytime.
Help!
MARK SMITH
Science IV
3r*    V    •!•
Profound absurdity
Editor, The Ubyssey:
The antics of the "B.C. Stu-
den Federation" would ordinarily merit little or no comment. However, some of its
recent actions and pronouncements have been so absurd
that I cannot allow them to
pass unchallenged.
The "B.C. Student Federation" has lately attacked the
Alma Mater Society for being
bureaucratic. "Bureaucracy",
although used pejoratively by
many non-thinkers, is in reality a synonym for "organization". Both require at a minimum: (1) division of labour;
(2) rational authority; (3)
hierarchy. All of these are
necessary for the accomplishment of goals by large groups.
A cursory examination of
the AMS reveals it to be most
"un-bureaucratic": it is a maze
of overlapping jurisdictions,
duplication of functions, and
unclear lines of control. Considering the fluid structure
of the university student community, this characteristic is
probably inevitable.
On what basis, then, does
the federation criticize the
AMS? If it is dissatisfied with
the organizational structure,
it could work to change it. If
it is dissatisfied with the goals
of the AMSj it could work to
change those goals.
The first actions of this new
campus clique (or is it new?
perhaps it is just an old clique
re-appearing in a new guise?)
have given us a clue.
Their efforts—the ludicrous
bookstore picket is a good
example — reveal an impatience with rational, methodical ways of solving problems;
they manifest a lack of understanding of complex situations;
they display a bizaare Jdnd of
Sartrian engagement — activity for the sake of activity.
The handful of people who
now comprise the federation
may derive some sort of ego
satisfaction from participation
in pickets, sign-waving demonstrations, and street - corner
harangues. If present indications mean anything, however,
the university community will
gain nothing from association
with this new grouping of extremist elements.
GORDON   GALBRAITH,
Graduate Studies^ y   . ;
BACKGROUND
All-year studies studied
By  JOHN  MacFARLANE
Canadian University Press
OTTAWA—Often conflicting facts and opinions on
year-round university operation were presented to an
audience of Canadian university administrators here.
Members of a five-man
panel each presented lengthy
papers to the National Conference of Canadian Universities and Colleges. The papers were based on factual
information and opinions on
th adpotion of the system.
•    •    •
The question of year-round
operation—that is, teaching
a full schedule of lectures to
full-time students for a minimum of 40 weeks a year—
is one, for the most part, discussed behind closed doors
in Canada. But, with skyrocketing enrolments and
financial problems, the question has forced itself dn the
attention of universities —
often meeting strong emotional opposition.
Four speakers appeared to
favor the year-round system,
although only two would admit to their opinions. Edison Montgomery, vice-chancellor in charge of planning
at University of Pittsburgh,
and Dr. H. D. B. Wilson,
chairman of a special presidential committee studying
the system at University of
Manitoba, openly favored
the year-round setup. Pittsburgh has been operating on
a year-round basis since
1959.
¥    ¥    ¥
Montgomery said the Pittsburgh   system   has   worked
and produced many  advan
tages, one of the most important being a thorough reexamination of courses and
curricula.
• • •
He reported a favorable
faculty reaction to the
switch and added that although professors are only
required to teach two of the
three terms a year, about
10 per cent have chosen to
teach year-round. The student response was also favorable, he said, and since
the change the university
has been attracting students
with higher standings in
high school.
But, many of the opinions
expressed or implied by the
Pitts burgh representative
were contested by Dr. B. A.
W. Jackson, a McMaster University English professor
and chairman of a Canadian
Association o f University
Teachers' (CAUT) committee which investigated year-
round operations.
He said the study revealed
that while administrators
from United States universities using the trimester system generally liked it, faculty members had reservations.
•    •    •
The strongest attack on
Jackson's report came from
D. C. Webb, director of research for the independently operated Canadian Foundation for Educational Development. After stating he
neither favored or disliked
the year-round system, Webb
said several misconceptions
exist concerning year-round
systems.
They included  the belief
1. Academic Goals Committee
A committee is being formed to stimulate discussion
of the President's Committee's report "Guideposts
to Innovation", among students on campus by
sponsoring talks, panel discussions, holding hearings and receiving briefs from individuals and
groups. This committee will also act in an advisory capacity and compile a report reflecting
student opinion to Students' Council.
Therefore, it is hoped that students from all walks
of campus life will apply. Applications should be
made in writing to either Jim Slater at the
Graduate Student Center or Marilyn McMeans,
Box 55, Brock Hall.
2. Returning Officer
The Elections Committee is now receiving applications for a Returning Officer for the A.M.S.
elections. Studehts who apply should be in third
year or above. They should also be mature,
responsible students who are somewhat aware of
student activities on campus. The Returning
Officer will be instrumental in forming the rules
and procedures for A.M.S. elections. Interested
students should apply to the Secretary, Box 55,
Brock Hall, no later than Friday, Nov. 20.
3. World University Service Committee
-Chile Seminar
Deadline for submission of applications, letters of
reference and transcripts is Friday, November
13, to the WUS Office, Brock Extension 257.
that summer schools and
graduate summer work constitutes full-time operation,
that faculty members would
have to teach year-round
and that students would be
expected to attend full-time.
• • •
He said it was equally
wrong to assume a year-
round plan would automatically mean enormous financial savings, although
over the long term, some
sums could be saved, particularly in the area of capital
expense.
VOLKSWAGEN
Repairs - Inspections
B A Service Stn.
Dunbar and 30th Avenue
CA 4-7644
\\
If
GLIDDEN
QUALITY
PAINTS
• Varnishes
• Clear Polyurethane
• Stains
• Brushes, etc.
Car pay Building
Supplies
4415 West 10th Avenue
224-4545
OF PLAIDS
The bigger they are, the
quicker plaid sport shirts
reign on campus. The proprietor's collection is
certain to be seen studying from coast to coast.
$6.95 to $9.95
Jack Elson Ltd.
Clothes for
Men and Young Men
545 Granville   MU 1 9831
,il^9J) 9,0,9.9 9 0 g,,9.9.P_pJtfljyAP Page 6
THE     U BYSSEY
Friday, November  13,   1964
The
LOOKING
GLASS
By CAROLE  MUNROE
All the buzzer boxes and
brick walls in the world don't
protect UBC's residence hall
girls from intoxicated porters.
Unfortunately, this was
proved Monday night.
For those who have not had
the dubious privilege of escorting a girl to a Lower
Mall dorm, let me explain
what is colloquially dubbed
"The Porter System". Or,
How To Get The Girls Into
Their Dorms Safely.
If a girl gets back to residence after closing (midnight
on Saturdays, 11 p.m. all other
nights), she leaves her date
at the Common Block and is
escorted to her respective
house by the porter on duty.
Here the porter unlocks the
door, signs her in and then
locks the door again.
A little prison-like perhaps,
but all very efficient.
• •    •
However   things   didn't   go
as planned Monday night. Human fraility y'know.
Instead of being met by a
business-like porter, with
keys, the girls were met by a
porter carrying peppermints.
But if the peppermints hid
the smell of liquor on his
breath, witnesses say his actions told the story with no
reservations.
At first the girls involved
thought the situation humorous. The porter couldn't fit
the keys into the locks and
he told them they wouldn't
get in until 4 a.m. A big joke.
But when they finally
found refuge in the Hamber
House lounge from the cold
and his actions—which were
by now somewhat less than
funny—they were scared.
The Hamber House Don,
Mrs. A. Butler, had locked
him out of the house because
by now he was obnoxious.
Finally the RCMP were
called. The man was taken
away. And everyone went
back to bed.
• •    •
? The porter has since been
Relieved of his post, according
to John Haar, director of
housing.
■ But the consequences of
this affair are still being felt.
; We all joke about the buzzer boxes, keys and walls
that guard our purity. But
we like them.
Panty raids and the like
are okay in their place. But
hone of us wants a situation
where males—pranksters or
otherwise — can traipse
around the dorms while we're
asleep.
It wouldn't have been hard
for something serious to happen last Monday night. Luckily the action of the girls and
Don involved organized
things pretty quickly.
But the incident points out
the fallibility of the porter
system as it exists now.
Mechanical inventions serve
a purpose but they are not
enough; the most important
link in the chain is the porter. We'd sleep more easily
if we knew we could count
on him.
Politically - minded Mike
gets lots of practice here
GEOLOGY department's new
head is Prof. William H.
Mathews, who succeeds V.
J. Okulitch, now dean of
science.
Committee grants
The AMS Finance committee
has granted $120 to two Anglican Theological students for
a trip to Edmonton. Radsoc
was granted $292 for expenses
at a Winnipeg conference.
UBC's most official student
has another one.
Office, that is.
Mike Coleman, chairman of
the Academic Activities committee, assistant treasurer of
the AMS finance committee
and justice of the Student
Court, has been elected president of Parliamentary Council.
Coleman was also Arts
Undergraduate Society president for two years in 1962 and
1963.
The first-year Law student,
a Liberal, was nominated for
the parliamentary council position by New Democratic party
president Everett Northop.
The Parliamentary Council
is composed of the executive
of the five political clubs on
campus — Liberal, Conservative, New Democratic, Communist and Social Credit.
Coleman said the Creditiste
Club,   which   has  made   over
tures to be recognized as a
legitimate political party, must
prove its seriousness before it
can join.
(A Creditiste club was formed on campus this fall. Organizers, who wear sweatshirts
labelled 'Je'suis Creditiste' say
they enrolled more than 100
members at a Clubs' Day drive.)
The council also runs Model
Parliament, a replica of the
House of Commons held annually in the spring.
In a campus-wide election
students vote for the party of
their choice.
Seats in the House are apportioned according to the percentage of the vote each party
receives.
Only thing hot in the caf
is the students  tempers
WINNIPEG (CUP)—Two cooks in the U. of Manitoba
student union cafeteria say students have assailed them
with obscene complaints about cafeteria service.
Richard Good, U of M student president, said his office
has received repeated complaints from the cafeteria staff
about students' use of obscene language.
The complaints were the latest issue in a growing hostility between students and the cafeteria staff.
NICKEL.. .its contribution is QUALITY
r
HOW INCO HELPED DEVELOP THE GAS TURBINE ENGINE FOR SPORTS CARS  J
There was a special entry in last year's world famous Le
Mans Grand Prix d'Endurance: a gas turbine powered Rover
BRM sports car. Only 14 cars of the original 49 starters
completed this gruelling test of man and machine, and the
Rover was one of them, at an average speed of 108 mph.
Inco worked with the Rover Company in the development
of this gas turbine engine, and towards means for large
scale production of both radial-flow and axial-flow types
of turbine. Heat-resisting alloys containing nickel were used
extensively in this revolutionary auto engine's turbine rotors
and nozzles, hot gas inducting pipes and in other essential components. This work was another example of
Inco's continuing research contribution which, for some
sixty years, has led to improved techniques and products.
THE INTERNATIONAL NICKEL COMPANY OF CANADA, LIMITED
55 YONGE STREET, TORONTO Let's have some more blasphemy — Page 2 pf
NOVEMBER 13, 1964
ON THE COVER: Paul Clancy,
Totem's fine photographer, captured Vancouver Symphony director Meredith Davies in action
during performance in Auditorium Thursday, then added a few
effects in the darkroom.
SOUTHERN
Editor:  DAVE ABLETT
Current Affairs   - ._.    Peter Penz
Criticism . John  Kelsey
Books,  Films ,,        Graham  Olney
Artwork _ Jeff Wall,
Gerry Ehman, Al  Hunter
On the pages of Page
Friday this week:
Well, Ron Riter — he's
really Ron Quixote—leads
away. Typically, he's angry; typically, he's sacri-
ligious.
Also typically, he says
he has no desire whatsoever to be profound. Accompanying his article, a
little bit of history about
Al Forrest — the editor
whose underlings were
REALLY sacriligious.
Across the way, on Page
3, Susan Adams provides
a profile of Ian Smith —
the George Washington
of Rhodesia; and a writer
takes issue with a previous article in PF.
On Page 4, Beverly Bie
reviews Agaguk; Mike
Horsey releases an unr
suspected lode of critical
talent as he reviews Bird
Calls; and on Page 5, Phil
Surguy looks at Candy —
who, in the case of author
Terry Southern, is quicker — Uh, faster — than
liquor; and Ian Cameron
looks at The Phantom
Tollbooth.
Skip over the IBM ad
in the middle and Jackie
Foord and Ian Cameron
(again) look at the Nude
in Art. Ed Hutchings (on
Page 9) looks at and
listens to The Silence,
plus music by Dave Nordstrom and Michael Gideon.
There's more back there
somewhere.
ARGUMENT
Nothing Is Sacred in college
journalism EXCEPT religion
— an indignant editor cries
out in the wildnerness tor
a little more blasphemy
PF Two
»?*5**i.' ._"*^i*i"iaWfc-W5i«ak-< ,*&£><&. W.' .'J a*j*!-azi# «. ^
By RON RITER
MOST cherished among
myths and traditions of
the college newspaper is that
Nothing Is Sacred.
Nothing, that is, except
religion.
Christianity, you should
pardon the pun, is the
sacred cow of university
newspapers — as, indeed it
is of all Canadian news and
entertainment media.
Certainly, religious faiths
and beliefs are attacked,
scorned and condemned in
student publications. But
there is one facet of college
journalism from which
Christianity is very, very
immune.
Significantly, it is the field
in which university writers
are said to excel — satire.
Satire can be barbed or
heavy depending on the
satirist, but it is almost always devastating.
And   that  devastation,   it
seems,   the  Christians   can't
bear.
Observe. In the interest of
perpetuating the angry-
young-man - cum - intellectual
image of the university student, a naive college publication decides to mock Christianity.
The publication is printed
and released.
- Allow five seconds for
steam to build up — then
stand back.
"Outrage," howls the
wounded clergy.
"Heresy," cry the indignant devout.
•'Poor taste," pronounce
ubiquitous arbiters of
society's tastes.
"Fire them," dictates a
fluttering university administration, with one eye on the
old public image barometer.
And down the road go the
hapless student journalists.
The example comes to
mind of The Ubyssey's 1959
Goon Edition featuring a
special Easter page of three
photographs and one article.
One picture, of a cheerleader with arms outstretched before a totem pole, was
captioned "Look at those
nail holes in His hands".
The second was of a power
shovel at a campus construction site, encaptioned "The
tqmb is empty!"
The third photo, coupled
with the article satirizing
the Easter-egg-and-religious
celebration of Easter, depicted a young girl — apparently grieving — in the
middle of a flock of chickens. The caption read: "What
have you done with Him?"
The ensuring furor splashed across Canada on the
wire services.
The university administration suspended The Ubyssey's Editor-in-Chief from
class attendance for one
year.
THE WRITER
The writer is Ron Riter,
pronounced right-er, and he
claim* he's all three—writer, Riter and
right. Twem-
ly-o n e years
old, he's Associate Editor
of The Ubyssey.
Last year
he was Critic's Editor
and also foisted off on the
paying public his own peculiar brand of insanity in the
weekly Ron Quixote column.
He returns today on his
horse Indignation to lake
a tilt at religion, college papers, and related windmills.
Several editorial board
members were banned from
Alma Mater Society activities for life.
The paper's advertising
dropped off sharply, and
succeeding editors spent the
better part of two years trying to live the incident
down.
Why?
Why should such a kick—
admittedly childish — at
Christianity be met with
such harsh and hide-bound
condemnation?
Under the freedoms of our
enlightened society, opinions
on any matter pertinent or
basic to our way of life are
expressed through countless
literary devices.
Sex and politics are discussed in manners ranging
from humorous  to  vulgar.
Religion is as contentious
an issue, certainly, as sex or
politics. Witness the divisions between those professing Christianity and those
advocating atheism. Witness
the bickering among different churches of the Christian
faith.
Why can't religion be
treated in the sapie way anyone — including the college
press — is allowed to treat
sex and politics?
In the interests of continuing and extending the
freedoms and enlightenment
of our society, let's throw
Christianity into the same
arena of fair and unfair
play.
Let's have a little more
"blasphemy".
And what
happened to
the last guy
who tried it?
Postscript to a blasphemy:
Al Forrest, rightly or
wrongly, took the blame
for the infamous 1959
goon edition of The
Ubyssey.
But how times change!
A few might remember
the turmoil that rocked
the campus, Blanca, West
Tenth and Georgia and
Burrard that day in 1959
when the edition hit the
streets.
Blasphemer, they cried.
Al? Well, he was about
15 miles away while his
loyal but sacriligious underlings were putting the
goon together. But being
the editor, and thus an
honorable man, he took
the blame—and a suspension that went with it.
The other day a clipping from the Red Deer
Advocate landed in the
office of The Ubyssey.
But to let the Advocate
tell about Al.
"Since moving to Red
Deer four years ago, he
has been active in various city organizations.
He has served as president
of Parkland Toastmast-
er: . . . and chairman of
the Junior Chamber of
Commerce baby - sitting
course, for which he received a trophy when it
was judged the best-
chaired course of the
year."
Sacred teas — to step er net to step? OVERSEAS
A Rhodesian
reactionary
leads the way
against U.K.
By SUSAN ADAMS
Rhodesia, at the moment,
is being the typical adolescent rebelling against her
parent Britain and annoying her elder sisters of the
Commonwealth by threatening to declare unilateral independence from the 'mother country'. A move which
has been described by Harold Wilson as treason.
An unusual situation has
been created not unlike that
of the American colonies in
1776.
And who is the George
Washington? To his white
followers it is the Prime
Minister of Rhodesia, Ian
Douglas Smith.
The first Rhodesian-born
Prime Minister of his country, Ian Smith spent his
early life in the small
chrome-mining centre of Sel-
ukwe, 150 odd miles from
the capital, Salisbury.
Son of an early settler,
schooled in Rhodesia and
possessor of a B.Com: degree
from Rhodes University in
South Africa, Smith was
well adjusted to enter Rhodesian affairs.
Following in father's footsteps he became a cattle-
rancher, and now owns two
farms in the vicinity of
Selukwe. His home is a typical old Rhodesian farmhouse—part corrugated-iron,
part brick which has been
added to over the years.
And here his short, attractive wife Janet, his three
children and his dogs live.
When Ian Smith became a
member of the Southern
Rhodesian parliament, before the Federation of Rhodesia and Nyasaland was
created, he was one of the
youngest MPs.
His elders predicted a
bright future for the young
man, but it seemed as if they
consulted the wrong stars
for no bright future appeared.
On the birth of the federation, Smith became a member of the Federal House
but despite his long experience he was never promoted
to ministerial rank.
His eclipse, however, was
not permanent. The change
came at the height of Roy
Welensky's (prime minister
of Federation) and Whitehead's (prime minister of
Southern Rhodesia) party
power.
At their party policy conference (1961) a new Southern Rhodesian constitution
was introduced. By white
Rhodesian standards the proposed constitution was liberal and progressive.
Smith fought a reactionary one-man battle within
the party demanding its rejection. But he failed to get
a seconder to his motion.
He subsequently took his
dissatisfaction outside the
party circle and refused as
a member of parliament to
give support to his Southern
Rhodesia leader, Whitehead.
He narrowly averted being expelled from the party
by submitting his resignation.
Ian Smith then helped
form a front of the existing
reactionary parties under
Winston Field who became
prime minister in  1963.
Field's moderate leadership was unsatisfactory to
Smith and others. Consequently Field resigned to
make way for Ian Smith as
prime minister and party
leader.
Smith could not be described as being an inspiring
speaker—just deliberate and
sound. Neither has he an
outstanding appearance.
The London Times has described him as "seldom smiling with a smooth forehead."
He underwent plastic surgery when his face was badly
burned in a plane crash during the Second World War.
This accounts for the lack of
smiles   or wrinkles.
At last Ian Smith is on
the crest of the wave but
can he avoid the looming
rocks?
The crisis made Smith—
it may also break him.
Algeria faces
major threat
— 63 per cent
illiteracy rate
By SHEILA DYER
Education is perhaps the
gravest of the problems facing the two year old Algerian republic.
After the 7V2-year revolution there is another, a cultural revolution in progress
now which, according to Ab-
derrahmane Benhamida,
Minister of Education, "will
not be any less extensive
than the socialist revolution,
nor any less equalitarian
than the economic recovery."
The problems which challenge the newly formed Algerian Ministry of Education are many and difficult.
Analphabetism, the illiteracy of a shocking percentage
of the adult population of
Algeria (63 per cent) is a
problem as serious as unemployment.
The education of the masses and the formation of professional and technical
cadres have an importance
comparable to the economic
and political reconstitution
of the nation.
After the departure of the
French, there was a gaping
vacuum. Technicians, doctors, teachers gone (7,000
French teachers were among
those who left) Algeria had
to create, somehow, its own
cadres.
Neglecting that, it would
remain forever a country in
the backwaters of a dynamic world.
Another problem which
troubles the Algerian Ministry of Education is the vast
system of depersonalisation
which, for the 130 years of
French rule, reduced the
Arab tongue and the North
African culture to a position
of inferiority.
Arabic was treated as a
foreign language. The geography and history taught
before 1962 were primarily
French. By means of a process known as Arabization,
or, better still, Algerianiza-
tion, the ministry of education hopes to kindle an
authentically national spirit.
An interesting effect of
this Arabizing movement is
the fact that it is now compulsory for the student to
study Algerian history.
Regionalism is another obstacle which hinders the
struggle against Algerian illiteracy. Algeria is a vast
country and the various ethnic groups which make up
its population (Mozabites,
Shawia, Berber) are far from
homogenous.
Different tribal structures
and different regional
customs, evident especially
in the desert regions south
of the Saharan Atlas mountains, pose intricate problems
to Algerian educators. In the
south, in the Mozabite region of which Ghardaia is
the principal town, the challenge of regionalism is readily evident to the observer.
There, in the ancient and
walled "villes saintes", life,
in many ways, seems to have
been little interrupted since
th 15th century. And this society will be hard to change.
A sweeping program of
reform has been initiated to
fight illiteracy. The National
Commission for the Fight
against Analphabetism, presided over by the minister of
education, comprises representatives of the major national organizations.
By means of the press,
educational television, radio
and movies, the campaign
against analphabetism is being extended to a greater
percentage of the Algerian
population.
The "bibliobus" or mobile
library is penetrating the
countryside. Cafes and public places are being transformed, at certain hours,
into schoolrooms while students are recruited, during
their vacations, to carry the
movements to the "fellah"—
the small farmer.
But the teacher shortage
continues to worsen with the
growth of tthe Algerian pbp-
ulaion and with the loss of
many university graduates
to other professions.
The campaign against illiteracy means more than
teaching the fellah to write
his name for its outcome will
determine Algeria's place in
the modern world.
Without the development
of its own technical and
scientific frameworks, Algeria's industrial and economic potentials will be crippled
and it will never be able to
play a decisive role in the
future.
Eastern, Western and Arab
countries are offering scholarships to Algerian students.
And although a shocking
percentage of students fail
the mid-year exams at the
University of Algiers, the
government hopes to make
it the intellectual centre of
Africa.
DISSENT
'Challenger's
arguments are
traught with
illogicalities'
By W. H. YOUNG SOON
As a member of a minority ethnic gr( jp, I am
prompted to make a comment on Mr. Barry Challenger's article "U.S. supposedly democratic but Civil
Rights Bill isn't," (PF Nov.
6) because in my opinion,
this article is grossly misleading,
In all fairness, I must say
that I did not get the opportunity to read Mike Hor-
sey's article (Oct. 16).
But I wish to point out
some of the illogicalities of
Mr. Challenger's article. He
says: "I neither advocate nor
condemn integrations as I
feel there is no solution to
the problem at the moment,"
yet he strongly criticizes the
civil rights bill as regards
to integrating restaurants.
He argues that a person
who may spend 10 to 20
years of his life blood,
sweat, toil and tears building
up a business, surely has the
right to choose who may
enter his place. Yet he says:
"Segregation of public
places, I grant you,  cannot
Sir Ernest MacMillan discusses The Bard and Music
at Vancouver Institute Saturday 8:15 p.m. in Bu. 106.
be allowed to exist because
these places are built, and
maintained by the contributions of people of all colors
and nationalities, as in the
case of the United States."
Not only does he contradict himself, he also fails to
make a distinction between
prejudice and discrimination.
He "compares" home with
business using a completely
irrelevant, and inapplicable
argument. In addition, he
makes no distinction between a private home, and a
private "public" business—
I quote his argument: "Surely existence is the pursuit of
happiness and escape from
boredom. This has to exist
in both places, otherwise
one balances out the other
and the person involved is
left in a confused and frustrated state."
He says that a law of this
sort would seem very unreasonable and a violation of
basic human rights. I ask, is
it not a basic human right to
be treated as a human being? I definitely agree with
him when he says that no
one can force his beliefs
down another person's
throat. I also strongly believe that it is a person's
privilege to be prejudiced.
In fact, I think it is a human
right. But here again, my
learned friend confuses prejudice with discrimination.
I do not agree with Mr.
Horsey's observation that because the Negro in the Mississippi is refused paying
jobs, he will continue to live
in a "filthy manner"; nor do
I agree with Mr. Challenger's rebuttal.
I believe there is much
more involved than jobs. At
the same time, I would
recommend that any conscientious person wishing to
learn more about the Indian
people read "Race and Ethnic Relations" by Brewton
Berry (Houghton Mifflin Co.
Boston 1958).
I agree with Mr. Challenger's statement: "I think one
has to live with the people,
to fully appreciate the white
man's resentment" but with
one reservation, I would replace "white man's resentment" with "the Indian's re
sentment" and/or "the Negro resentment."
PF Three BOOKS
Agaguk's an obscure novel
in places but this may be
in its favor — after all,
obvious things aren't tun
By   BEVERLEY  BIE
"The wind!" he cried. "It
is stronger than I am. Nothing must be stronger than I
am."
This cry is a pivotal point
for the conflicts in the story
of Agaguk, an Eskimo who
moves outside the confines
of his community of one
hundred tents to take up a
solitary existence in the
Northern Canadian tundra.
Corrupt society is not so
easily escaped. Agaguk returns to barter furs with a
bootlegger, black market
trader, is taken for a long
ride, and in the night revisits the trader to snatch
back his bundle of furs and
turn the tent of the sleeping man into a flaming pyre.
"Nothing must be stronger
than I am."
The defining quality of the
Eskimo male is "Inuk", or
"Man" in the sense of manhood. No Eskimo would
ever use the word to describe a non-Eskimo. Other
homosapiens, including women, belong on a lower rung
of the scale of being.
The "Inuk" concept has its
most basic expression in the
sex act. And it is in the ideal
of male-female relationships
that Agaguk deviates from
the Eskimo norm. At the
outset  Agaguk, as   the  rest
AGAGUK, Yves Theriault,
translated into English by
Miriam Chapin, (first English Edition). Ryerson
Press, 1963.
of his community, believes
that the woman's role is passive. She is anf'object, a possession like any other pot or
pan. She is only slightly
more useful, since she can
provide him with more
pleasure than the average
pot, and even, on occasion,
with a new caribou jacket or
a male baby.
Agaguk's sense of the fitness of things is violated
•when Iriook assumes a more
equal sex role. He is almost
defeated as "Inuk" when he
realizes that Iriook is physically and mentally as capable or more capable than
he: "They stood side by side,
the woman it seemed taller
than the man, stronger,
filled with a silent triumph."
Theriault tells the story in
simple, popular language.
One of the strongest passages in the book is the description of the birth of Aga-
uk's first son. Iriook is, perhaps, "possessed brutally"
once too often, but the fault
in expression could be one
of translation.
Theriault, a French-Canadian writer, shows strongly
the influence of naturalism
in   his   novels.   In   Agaguk,
there is a tendency to documentary presentation. "Agaguk, like all Eskimos . . ."
inevitably heralds a passage,
albeit skillful and always
interesting, on the habits,
mores and environment of
the Eskimo.
A few aspects of the novel
are obscure; this may be in
its favor (obvious points are
no fun). Is Iriook Theriault's
archetypal woman, stronger
in the final analysis than the
man she loves (the New
Feminism?) It is more probable that Agaguk's acceptance of a new role for the
woman is only one example
of his removal from the
thinking that the norm of his
society is the only acceptable and admirable one.
Fledgling IBM
somehow lacks
the touch
ot humanity
By MICHAEL HORSEY
Bird Calls, the first work
of fledgling author IBM
7040, is a sane and somewhat logical book.
Starting from a well-defined point, the letter "A",
the author moves forward
with tenacity and fortitude.
Dealing with the names,
phone numbers, residences
and faculties of 15,600 students is indeed a difficult
task.
And as the story develops
the reading becomes a trifle
heavy.
But the heaviness is brok-
BIRD CALLS, by IBM 7040,
published by Alma Mater
Society of the University
of B.C., Vancouver, 228
pp, 75 cents (soft cover).
PF   Four
en by staccato bursts of
humor.
Like the time when AMS
second vice-president Byron
Hender has his phone number listed incorrectly. One
has to laugh at all the people
phoning the wrong number
and asking for Hender.
The logicality of the book
is broken toward the end—
in the "z"s when the author
inexplicably repeats all the
names of students from Za-
bawa to Zoerb.
And the bit about Zoerb;
it is disappointing to note
this is the last name. The
edition of the same book
two years ago had a Zyerb
for the last name.
The ending somehow lacks
the punch required but on
the whole, the book is a fine
example of mid-20th century   computerization.
Like much of the mid-20th
century culture it lacks the
. human jtpuph,.,,.., v, v,
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FINAL 3 PERFS.
Tonight 8:30 p.m.
Saturday 2:30 & 8:30 p.m.
THE DMMATtC HIT
DESIRE UNDER
THE ELMS
BY EUGENE O'NEILL
STARRING DAVID HOOKS
DIRECTED BY CYRIL SIMON
Q.E. PLAYHOUSE
Tickets for all performances
Available at'
Van.  Ticket Centre,  Ma 3-3255
All Eaton's Stores (Charge It)
Modern Travel,  2292 4. 41st
COMING
Nexl Wednesday—Nov. 18
JACQUELINE BROOKES
in
Wm. Shakespeare's
THE TAMING OF
THE SHREW
Directed by
JOHN BROCKINGTON
Q.E. PLAYHOUSE
BOX OFFICE NOW OPEN
THE PLAYHOUSE
THEATRE COMPANY
Artistic Director—Malcolm Black
TONIGHT
the return af the
Clown Prince
Also
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By PHIL SURGUY
One cannot review Candy
without raising the question
of censorship—and wondering where the unemployed
bishops and anti - smut
leagues were when the book
was published. All the Main
Street Gomers were probably out plumping for Barry
G. and had no time to keep
up with the latest literary
developments. O r perhaps
Putnam's is happy with
people who read book reviews and are buying enough
copies to keep it on the bestseller lists. They don't want
to get anybody excited until
the time comes for mass
paperback sales.
Candy Christian's adventures start in Racine, Wisconsin and end with a
double-barreled climax in a
Buddhist temple in Tibet.
She is a sweet, young co-ed
side-tracked from college by
CANDY, by Terry Southern
and N a s e n Hoff enberg,
Putnam's   Sons.   195    pp.
the libidinous advances and
peculiarities of the males
she encounters. Uncle Harry
makes the first real penetration of her virtue under
her father's hospital bed.
Daddy is there recovering
from a frontal lobotomy performed by a gardener with
a trowel after he found the
latter in bed with, and aoout
to violate, his daughter. A
hefty nurse, breaking up the
scene under the bed, manages to get Daddy, his bedclothes and mattress, and
herself wrapped around
Uncle Harry and Candy.
Candy and Daddy split.
Nurse and Uncle Harry remain entangled among the
sheets and mattresses.
"Your warmth!" he cried,
unaware of his fatal error.
"Give me your ■warmth!"
Gripped tightly between his
legs he held the nurse's
upper arm which, because
of its corpulence, he took
to be Candy's thigh. "Now!
Now give me your
WARMTH!" he gasped as he
strove through the final ineffable seconds of his ecs-
tacy.
Our heroine then goes to
New York. One day she encounters an imbicilic, humpback dwarf she calls Derek.
With him she finds a wild,
stimulating, physical and
spiritual rapport which is,
for the most part, unprintable in a family journal—
there's always some student
who takes his/her college
stuff home for momma and
the family to check. Her affair with Derek over at 5:30,
she is out for a needed drink.
In a bar she meets a gynecologist. Minutes later, both
are in the men's washroom
and he, among other things,
is giving her a free examination. More minutes later,
both are in a cop car and
one of the arresting officers
is stuffing Candy's hand into
Flamenco guitarist Carlos
Montoya appears in Auditorium Tuesday at 8:30 p.m.
Student price, 75 cents.
his open fly. Seconds later,
the car plows into the front
of a bar inhabited by two
hundred and seventy-five
homosexuals. There she
meets Pete Upsy who gets
her to join the Crackers
Foundation and she is off to
meet Grindle the mystic and
finally to Tibet and the end
of the chronicle.
The book is satirical, funny, fast moving, hilarious,
ribald, bawdy, more hilarious and the most refreshing
book to ever come my way.
A lot of its impact must be
credited to the taboos dealt
With and the audacity with
which the authors handle
them. There is an unfounded
anticlimatic feeling after
each adventure; but throughout, the pace hardly slackens.
However, co-author Terry
Southern is perhaps being
prematurely hailed as a
comic genius. His previous
work is a group of essays
and short stories, part of
Dr. Strangelove — Keenan
Wynn's "perverts" lines and
a bit more, and two books;
The Magic Christian and
Flash and Filigee.
The Magic Christian is
similar in style to Candy
and it illuminates Mr. Southern's basic weakness. He
piles one humorous incident
upon another, yet never
really involves himself with
the people he is writing
about. In Candy it doesn't
matter because the events,
dealt with in such detail, are
new to comic literature. A
very rich man in The Magic
Christian spends his time
seeing how people will degrade themselves for part
of his money. It is a good
theme and an excellent
chance for incisive and satiric comment on modern
North America. Southern
wasted that chance with disappointing trivialities. One
almost wishes that he had
sold his plot and theme to
Joseph Heller, John Schneider or Max Shulman; men
who could have done something more with them.
But back to Candy. It is,
as I said, hilarious and delightfully written. A good
buy around exam time and
a sure cure for seasonal de-
H you don't
understand it
— give it to
your professor
By IAN   CAMERON
For the benefit of everyone who has read, reread
and reread Alice in Wonderland, hope is here.
Hope, in this case, is spelled
The Phantom Tollbooth, and
and it was written by Jus-
ter. The illustrations are by
Jules Feiffer, which should
give you an idea of the type
of book it is.
It's listed as a children's
book, and so far my copy
has been read and enjoyed
by four members of the UBC
English department, which
gives you an idea of the mental age of the English faculty as well as that of your
reviewer.
The story line is weak,
but what can you expect
from a children's book. It
concerns a boy named Milo,
whose life is dull. He is in
the throes of depression,
when  he discovers a  pack-
THE PHANTOM TOLL-
BOOTH, by Juster. Random House of Canada,
225 pages, $3.95.
age in his room that is "larger than any other package
of similar size, but smaller
than some other, larger packages."
He opens the package and
discovers that it contains a
toll booth. When he drives
past this toll booth, he finds
himself in a world that has
been plunged into gloom
because two princesses
named Rhyme and Reason
have been banished by the
king.
Milo sets out to rescue
these two in company with
a spelling bee, a large insect that spells incessantly
and a large bug named the
humbug (no relation to Don)
whose favorite word is balder shash!
On the way they have
interesting experiences, such
as the time they get caught
on the island of conclusions
(which they reach by jumping over the sea of knowledge) and have a hell of a
time getting off.
They also meet people
who grow down, and others
who have families consisting
of average people (two and
a half people, the half person being a little boy, who
has a lot of trouble eating
with half a mouth).
After many such experiences, Milo rescues Rhyme
and Reason, and everyone
lives happily ever after.
Buy the book. If you
don't like it, or can't understand it, either your English
prof, or your little nephew
will be glad to have it.
PF   Five
WE NEVER HAVE EVERY PAPERBACK THAT
YOU NEED . . .
BUT     WE DO HAVE MORE TITLES THAN
ANYBODY ELSE IN WESTERN CANADA
So for paperbacks
Try
Duthie Books Ltd.
UNIVERSITY BRANCH — 4560 WEST 10th
DOWNTOWN — 901 ROBSON
pression.
SPECIAL EVENTS
^Montova
**£&>•"
Next Tues. at 8:30 p.m. -Auditorium
Students 75c — $1.25 at AMS
VANCOUVER TICKET CENTRE or AT THE DOOR
•   •••■••
Coming —
RAVI SHANKAR
INDIA'S GREATEST MUSICIAN
Avoid Disappointment — Reserve Now at AMS
SPECIAL STUDENT RATES
to the Vancouver Opera Association's
"77ie Marriage
Of Figaro'
(in English)
PLAN TO ATTEND THE OPENING NIGHT
Thursday, November. 19 - 8:00 p.m.
or Sal.. Nov. 21—Tue., Nov. 24—Thur., Nov. 26—
Sat., Nov. 28
*•••••
At 7:45 p.m. any performance night all unsold seats
will be available at the Q.E. Box Office at $1.00 each
To   bona-fide   U.B.C.   students
on presentation of official student card
First  come—first served
ONLY ONE TICKET PER CARD HOLDER
ATTEND THE OPENING NIGHT
TO BE SURE OF A GOOD SEAT
Thursday—Nov.  19th—8:00 p.m.  These
new people
at IBM
have
advanced
degrees
Share with them the climate
of intellectual vitality they enjoy.
Many new employees at IBM have
advanced degrees. They represent many
different fields of knowledge. This
breadth of academic background, as
well as the emphasis on problem-
solving at IBM, helps account for the
climate of intellectual vitality.
Whatever their main interests, our people
enjoy tackling problems that require
an imaginative approach.
We welcome ideas, talent and ability.
We offer the individual who has them
the opportunity to move ahead rapidly.
The climate at IBM has been called one
of "professional achievement." It is an
ideal embracing your environment,
security and career goals. If you are
eager to make a significant contribution
to human progress, you'll find room
for your talents at IBM.
IBM's expansion has come through
continuous innovation and through
new ideas and products.
Few companies offer such high
opportunities to play vital roles in
helping man gain greater knowledge
and control of the world around him.
We have a brochure describing career
openings. Consult your university
placement officer. He can also put you
in touch with our career representatives
when they visit your campus. But, if
you prefer, contact:
Mr. W. E. Redpath
1445 West Georgia Street
Vancouver 5, B.C.    682-5515
IBM
TRADE MARK
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MACHINES COMPANY LIMITED ART
Ian gives nod
to nudes but
the program
led him astray
By   IAN   CAMERON
Anyone with 50 cents and
a date would be well advised to see the self-styled
Nude Exhibit at Vancouver
Art Gallery.
Richard Simmins, the new
(more or less) director of the
gallery has collected representative (more or less)
works of the painting schools
through the ages with the
central theme of nude art.
There are many excellent
paintings, most of which are
typical of both their specific
period and the artist.
The paintings and the
sculptures are arranged in
chronological order around
the walls, from the etruscan
to pop art.
At this point it might be
in order to note that the
program is a frustrating
thing, because the numbers
don't fall in sequence at
times, and trying to follow
both the program and the
paintings is most annoying.
I spent 20 minutes looking
for a Gauguin billed in the
program  in  glowing  terms,
hleptune, by Benvenuto Cellini, of the Florentine school.
Bronze, 9V2" tall, circa 1560.
PF   Eight
but when I found it, it was
neither as good as the program said nor was it an especially representative Gauguin.
The early Italian and German schools are well shown,
as are most of the rennais-
sance schools. Especially notable in this part of the dis
play  is   the Cellini  bronze,
Neptune.
The best part of the show
is the 19th > century exhibit.
Millet, Cezanne, Rodin and
Degas' are well displayed,
but Renior owners must
have been loath to display,
for the Renoirs are of mediocre quality. (Mediocre for
Renoir, that is.)
Maillol is well done by,
and immediately after his
works is an oil by Toulouse-
Lautrec that shows excellent facial development, one
of the few paintings in the
show that is notable for
something other than anatomy.
Matisse gets space for six
paintings, which is nice if
you like Matisse.
The late British painters
are well shown, but I was
disappointed that only one
Paul Klee was shown. In
fact, the Swiss school was
almost  entirely unshown.
Picasso is well represented, both in numbers and
quality. Had other artists
been as well shown the exhibit probably would never
have been shown in Vancouver, as the shipping and
insurance would have prohibited it.
In the American section,
the best is Rivers' Portrait
of Birdie, one of his last
non-pop art works.
Itis easy to slight the exhibits offered in this show,
but the fact that the show
is here at all indicates just
how far the new spirit in
the gallery has come.
Last year such an exhibit
would have been impossible,
or at least improbable.
Opening night
dahling. was
just simply
mahvellous
Jackie's average spectator at
the Nude in Art show—or is
she an artist, a model, or
just plain lumpy?
By JACKIE FOORD
"In the room the women
come and go
Talking of Michelangelo"
HE: By the way, where
IS   the  Michelangelo?
SHE: Really darling,
this is Vancouver, not
Valhalla. We can't have
everything, you know.
HE: Bui we could have
al least some of the great
masters.
SHE: Well darling, I'm
satisfied. Look, here's a
Matisse.
HE: It doesn't look
very much like a Matisse
to me. At least I don't
think it's a very good Matisse.
SHE: But darling, ifs
uncharacteristic!
HE: Oh, is that what
you call it.
SHE:   Look! Here's an
Apsetti statuette.
HE: It's lumpy.
SHE:   But it's   an   Apsetti!
HE: It's still lumpy.
Who axe you waving at?
SHE: Oh, I don't know,
but he looks awfully arty,
don't you think? Look at
these Epstein sculptures!
HE: These are tremendous! The whole concept
is terrifically exciting,
don't you think?
SHE: I like the dimples.
HE: Let's get something to eat, shall we?
SHE: Alright, Where's
the   refreshments?
HE: Over there, right
under the picture of the
lumpy Doukhobour women. Where shall I put this
empty glass?
SHE: Oh, right here
beside this Leonard Bas-
kin. I'm sure nobody
would mind.
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GATES & SNACK BAR
6.30 SHOW AT 7.00 P.M.
SAMUEL
PRESENTS
SOPHIA LOREN
STEPHEN BOYD-ALEC GUINNESS
JAMES MASON • CHRISTOPHER PLUMMER
THE FALL
TECHNICOLOR'5
JOHN IRELAND ■ MEL FERRER - OMAR SHARIF
anthonTquayle
Directed b, MTTHOOT MAIM • «uw by HMIB TOttM
ULTM-PAMVISttM* E CINEMA
Sound in the
Silence was
Ed scratching
his head
By ED  HUTCHINGS
Bergman's Silence is a
critic's nightmare, and I just
can't come up with an analysis of this show on short
notice. But a couple of reactions emerge: Bergman is
definitely not losing his
touch as a director; however
he may be losing touch.
The film is as well constructed and its resources
are as well controlled as anything Bergman has made. I
was always completely convinced, (except for one of
the erotic bits) that Bergman
was getting exactly the effect he was after. The dramatic aspect of the thing is
just amazing. Two of the
characters are more or less
certif iably insane — the
parts are carried with no
trouble at all.
The film's situation starts
where Marienbad left off,
but Bergman had me swallowing the whole thing;
there were none of those
moments a la CBC Television when you realize you've
been had, and ache to fracture the picture tube.
THE SILENCE, produced
and directed by Ingmar
Bergman. Photography
Sven Nykvist. With Ingrid
Thulin (Ester). Gunnel
Lindbolm (Anna) and Jor-
gen Lindstrom (Johan).
It's when we get to what
Bergman is trying to say
that I start to put down the
phone. This is yet another
film on alienation and noncommunication. There are
three main characters, and
they sit about and non-com-
municate.
The communication of this
non-communication (pardon
the expression) is managed
with some depth—more than
in the films of Antonioni,
though he's fashionable now.
In fact there's a real feeling of inevitability about
the thing, a suggestion that
you are really looking down
an airshaft of Hell.
And right there I withdraw my support. This is
Bergman's third film on this
theme, and if I am going to
remain interested in Bergman, either I will have to
assume his mood, (Ye Gods!)
or he will have to justify
his ideas.
It may just turn out that
Bergman is a first-class director whose philosophy just
doesn't add up. This is the
usual complaint about Chaplin, but Bergman may eventually be regarded as the better example.
At least Chaplin's naive
idealism doesn't seem to
bother him, but Bergman's
line of thought seems to
leave him defenceless
against every kind of morbid
speculation. Soon the question arises: is Bergman's
emotional commitment genuine, or just the desperate
dither of someone trying to
convince   himself   that   his
• $■ v v v i «- i- V if i * v ,• i ii » i.» t »■ * i v «  . »
obsession is strictly rational?
Orwell gets into a state
like this, in 1984, and you
long to kick him.
Why must we assume that,
because an idea is suitably
grim and presented with
self-control, that it is rationally impeccable or even moderately honest?
Bergman may be one of
the great pessimist philosophers. On the other hand,
he may be an idiot, and I
do not intend to give him
the benefit of the doubt until he lets me in on what's
going on.
Borodin Four
work as one
controlled
instrument
By DAVID NORDSTROM
Vancouver was honored
last Monday and Tuesday
evenings by the sole Canadian appearance of the
Borodin Quartet, sponsored by Friends of Chamber
Music.
The first phrases of
Borodin's Quartet No. 2
hinted at what was to follow: smoothness of phrasing, fullness of tone, precision of balance and
interchange and mastery
of dynamic control that
could not be excelled.
Cello and viola were particularly outstanding—although strictly part of the
ensemble—in the sustained lyric passages of the
Notturno. The andante
sections of the final movement featured tapered de-
crescendos which were
sheer perfection. The individual members of the
ensemble worked as a
single instrument—an ex-
:eptionally well-controlled
one.
The five uninterrupted
movements of the Shostakovich Eighth Quartet,
closing with two largos in
a tapered ritardando, displayed the ensemble's
interpretative powers.
Dtelicacy of contrast and
continual balance between
drama and lyricism extended applause before
intermission.
Everyone was expectantly seated minutes before the quartet returned
to play Beethoven's Op.
131 Quartet, a work in
which they expressed
feelings truly "not of this
world." The performance
more than lived up. to expectation from the first of
its seven movements to
the last; most notable
were the cantabile lines
of the fourth movement
shared and exchanged
among the instruments,
the driving delight of the
presto, and the searing
beauty of the adagio
bridge into the final movement.
In answer to repeated
summonses back on stage,
the ensemble obliged with
sensitive readings of
Tschaikovsky's Andante
Cantabile and a Weiberg
Intermezzo. After two and
one-quarter- hours of concentrated ^attention, the
audience wanted more.
UBC Symphony
has some rough
spots but it's
satistying
By MICHAEL  GIDEON
Hans Karl Piltz directed
the UBC Symphony Orches-
stra last Sunday in a very
difficult group of compositions whose style ranged
from the Classical period to
the  most   contemporary.
The opening work, the
Overture to Der Freischutz
by Carl Maria von Weber,
was performed in far too inflexible a manner for a romantic composition. The
French horns were quite disjointed; the brass, however,
was reasonably unified, and
the flautists were in remarkably good form. The orchestra only seemed completely
together in the loudest parts
of  the composition.
Barber's First Essay for
Orchestra, on the other
hand, was very well presented. The difficult rhythmic patterns of this work
were captured by each section of the orchestra. The
brass was somewhat colourless, but for the most part,
well organized and together.
The concerto for Clarinet
in A major, by Mozart, was
disappointing. Jerome Summers, the soloist, gave a
highly musical and mature
rendering of the concerto,
but the orchestra vaguely
meandered through the
work, giving very little support to the soloist. Summers'
low tones were full and
round — a difficult achievement for a clarinetist.
Robert Schumann's Symphony No. 4 was well treated. The strings had very
good texture and excellent
rhythmic control. The violinists maintained a continuous
spark to this extraordinarily energetic work. The
oboes also produced some excellent tone.
On the whole, the concert
was highly satisfying, as
played by an energetic
group of students. We hope
that we shall hear more
from them in the near future.
Symphony gives
violins real
chance to
string along
By DAVE   NORDSTROM
The Vancouver Symphony
again produced something of
real musical significance
after a somewhat less than
exciting first half program.
Mozart's Overture to the
Abduction from the Seraglio
and Symphony No. 39 gave
the remarkably improved
violin sections an unexcelled
opportunity to display their
(Continued on Page 10)
SEE: MORE MUSIC
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(Continued from Page 9)
finesse; in the exhausting
pace of the latter's final
allegro first violins quite refreshingly outshone their
partner sections.
Guest artist George London made rather unfortunate choices for his first two
arias: Lully's Bois Epais
from Amadis de Gaule,
and Chanson de Charon
from Alceste. The first
seemed obviously better
suited to an artist of greater
lyric power than Mr. London; the second revealed a
disturbing insufficiency in
range.
Richard Wagner proved
the salvation of both guest
artist and orchestra. Was
duftet doch der Flieder,
from The Mastersingers of
Nuremburg, brought Mr.
London back to reveal his
full sensitivity and dramatic
forcefulness.
Conductor Davies led vocalist and instrumentalists in
a gloriously integrated and
molded rendering of Wotan's
Farewell and Magic Fire
Music which climaxed the
evening. The reading caught
much of the grandeur of the
composer's conception; no
more need be said.
The concert could very
satisfactorily have ended
there. The succession of Siegfried's Rhine Journey (featuring exceptionally fine
horn work), then the ideal
combination of London and
orchestra in Wotan's Farewell, followed by, of all
things, the Overture to the
Master-singers of Nuremburg, proved a bit much.
Regardless of the quality
of presentation, such a fragmented assortment of Wagner could not do justice to
the music, the orchestra, or
the audience.
The final (!) Overture destroyed the total involvement of the audience in the
Die Walkuere selection, and
neutralized the organ-like
integration of sound, so essential to  total  effect.
Contemporary
improvisation
to liven up
music chambers
Friends, students and performers of chamber music
have come to the rescue of
the idiom in Vancouver's fall
music menu.-
The Music Department
concert series is already under way. These on-campus
recitals are free and open to
the public.
Today, a Collegium Musi-
cum, Improvisation  in  Contemporary    Music,    happens
noon and night in Music 104.
The Music Faculty Chamber Music recital in Bu. 106
■n Nov.   24  features works
y  Beethoven, Brahms  and
7eisgarber.
PF  Ten
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all for the ridiculously low price of 50 cents
FORD
MOTOR        COMPANY
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invites
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NOVEMBER
16 & 17
Graduating Seniors in
Commerce and Engineering
Learn what FORD can
offer YOU
Arrangements for interviews can be made
and further information obtained at the
Office of Student Services, U.B.C.
The Doorway to a  "College Man's" World
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Murray Goldman
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774
"U0 half a block from Birk'a Clock" HUDZ' JAZZ
Jazz 'serious'
and damn well
deserves to be
recognized
By TONY HUDZ
Somebody asked me a
question that started me
thinking. And wondering.
"Why bother with jazz?
There's an awful lot of more
serious music that should
be worth a lot more of your
time."
I disagree.
The implication is that
jazz is an insincere and unimportant form of music,
that it's a parody of "good"
or "serious" music. I don't
like this. I'll have to restrict
my remarks to America in
this respect, but there's a
unique musical heritage in
jazz that too many people
have too long rejected. Jazz
is the music of America, and
no other music better expresses the spirit of America.
The best classical music
written of America incorporates jazz and folk themes
from America. Dvorak said
usage of native themes was
a necessity if America was
to have its own music. This
was in the early 1900's, and
we still haven't learned. Traditionalist European purists
called him "that bohemian"
for saying so, and they're
still name-calling. The one
thing they refuse to realize
is that he was right.
Jazz is serious music and
damn well deserves a place.
This is, thankfully, being
realized more and more,
largely through the efforts
of the third stream composers such as Gunther Schul-
ler.
But the second legitimizing
element of jazz is its unique
emotional perspective. Traditionally, symphonic and
classical works are geared to
the attainment of a single
climax in the work. There
is an incorporate sense of a
single fulfilment of emotion.
The jazz performer is here
unique; by the improvisatory nature of jazz, he can
reach this climax many
times in a night, or even in
a   single   selection.  Because
his solos are his own, he can
create a peak at which he
constantly reaches this emotionally climactic point.
I suppose that what I'm
really saying is that the jazz
artist has the right to do
this, to play his own way.
And the opening question
tion of this column implies
that he doesn't. A jazz artist
is no less sincere in what
he is doing than Brahms
was.
Further information about
this "Inn group on campus",
"are you Inn?" and soon. It
has to do with what is presently "The End"; situation
is a change of management,
and a complete change of
policy. There'll be a theatre-
oriented policy, with enough
scope for the presentation of
jazz and folk galore, and
very regular jam sessions
(hurray!). Nov. 27 is quoted
as an opening date.
POETRY
Soviet cellist Daniel Shafran,
who first appeared with the
Leningrad Philharmonic at
11, performs Friday, Nov.
27 at 8:30 p.m. at Q.E.T.
BISTROS
One pub singer
goes; another
arrives to  *
take his place
By TAJA BHAVAN
Speaking to a woman just
a fortnight out of England,
I was surprised to learn that
(according to her) folk singing is becoming big over
there.
One who saw Charles O'-
Hegarty last week at the
Ark (or at the Bunkhouse
or the now defunct Third
Eye) might agree. Although
it is different—he is a London Pub singer, singing 17th
Century music — it is extremely pleasing.
•    •    •
Speaking of English folk
singers, one is playing in
town now. He is Londoner
Peter Elbing, affectionately
known as the Paddington
Nightingale. I met Peter last
summer when he played the
Third Eye. A fine fellow
with a marvellous voice that
seems to change from song
to song. His folk numbers
(he also sings and plays
rhythm and blues) are great,
right from his humorous
songs through serious songs
to the one in which, he
paints a picture in music.
He feels any good folk song
is ruined when it is recorded, especially in the popular vein. But, I sincerely
hope he has not dropped one
of his most beautiful songs
—"The House of the Risin'
Sun". Peter is singing this
weekend at the Ark with
Jana Bergh, a local housewife who likes to sing because it is fun.
•    *    •
Wednesday I took in Don
Crawford at the Bunkhouse,
where his engagement ends
Saturday night. As I was
about to go inside I noticed
Don walking around getting
some fresh air so I went over
and introduced myself. I
mentioned I had briefly met
him before and had heard
him a couple of times.
I asked him how he classified his music. He answered
that he did not really know
except there is a touch of
blues   and   he   sang   what
*0S
Lynne MacNeil, acutest accent of the Accents, vocal
quartet playing . in Brock
Nov. 16 noon.
On the same bill, the Don
Thompson trio. Sponsored
by Music Students Association,    admission    25   cents.
people liked and thought
was fun.
He is a sensitive man, not
only in his music, but also
in his own actions—everything had to be right, just
the way he desired it. On
stage, he started right into
a long tragic ballad giving it
his own soul backed by a
twelve string guitar.
This man is funny even
with the old standbys and
with the sprinkling of ad
lib. Besides pure folksongs
he throws in spirituals and a
few sing-a-long types. One
of his most unforgettable
numbers is the now well
known "Bald-Headed Woman."
All next week at the
Bunkhouse is a Blues singer,
Lynne Hughes, along with
George  Hewison.
If you are interested in
Jazz in a Coffeehouse take a
Sunday afternoon off to see
and hear Dave Hillary in a
Jazz Concert every week
at the Bunkhouse. I caught
him in one of his debut
weeks and he is well worth
the price  of admission.
Also on the jazz scene is
the Flat Five, a swinging
place open every Friday,
Saturday and Sunday nights.
Cavern poets
still spout
the worst ot
what's bad
By THOMAS WU
A cavernous hall behind
a Granville street bookstore
was the scene last Friday
night of a combined poetry
reading-rally in the worst
of the poetic tradition.
"Convert the New Democratic Party to Socialism"
suggested one red-lettered
sign, setting the mood for
three blasts of "message"
poetry from some of the
cruder schools of thought'
still permitted to speak at
large.
First to kick off was Red
Lane, with a series of poems
for children. Starting off
with a light tone of rhetorical questioning.
"The idea," Lane said, "is
to hold images out in front
of children: something to let
their minds  work on."
And he caught some of the
spirit of childhood with his
concept of a "surprise sandwich"—nothing between the
bread—evoking memories of
children's games everywhere.
But Lane jumped from the
nostalgic to the ridiculous
when he began a series on
"when - I - think - on - all -
those - children - without
sandwiches - all - over - the -
world - then -1 - don't - feel -
like - eating - my - sandwich."
At this, he slipped from
the child-like to the childish.
Second to read was Judith
Copithorne — the one poet
of the evening who declined
to fall into the pit of "mes-
sageism."
With a tremendous feminine vitality she ran through
a regrettably short set of her
■works: concentrating more
on sounds than sense perhaps — but delightfully so.
She could say the words
"Santa Claus" at the end of
a poem so the the entire
crowd of about 350 chuckled.
Miss Copithorne was followed to the lecturn by
sometime emcee Milton
Acorn, who preached a pro-
Non-Violence Co-ordinating
Committee sermon. Included
were such notable gems as
"the guys going south are
just like you and me—they
aren't heroes at all."
Next on deck was sometime Governor - General's
Medal winner Dorothy Live-
say — speaking her poems
of protest in her neatly tailored suit.
Closing   off   the   program
with a whimper was Milton
Acorn's   rendition   of   his   I
Shout Love.
"Love, damn you," was
his noisy command—ending
with a curse on all who oppose him.
Which is an interesting
comment for a socially-conscious poet.
PF   Eleven
DON
CRA WORD
NOV. 5 - 14
at the
BUNKHOUSE
Coffee House
612 Davie
Reserve now — 683-9790
.... and remember
Jazz Every Sunday
Afternoon 2-5 p.m.
peter
elbling
plus
jana
bergh
IhednV
3607 West Broadway
Reservations: RE 6-6011
BmnnnnnrB~inra~a~oTa"a b a s
' txVtl i»'Tj»s«P *7?iHje» itf\V
19.95
The proprietor wishes to stress
the supremacy of these slacks
in every detail from fabric to
finish. The lines are slim as a
sword, yet in the wearing they
give the gentleman comfort.
There is an ample variety for
the choosing.
Jack Elson Ltd.
Clothes for
Men and Young Men
545 Granville   MU 1 9831
HJLB.0.flJliL8.g.B.g.a.tt.gJlflJLIUUH
^9S!sK5*^^^^?slSS3SsK^^^^g^^ CALENDAR
Nude in Art lecture tours,
Nov. 16 to 20. Vancouver
Art Gallery, 4 p.m.
Monday, "The Narrative
Nude" by Ann Rosenburg;
Tuesday, "The Active Nude"
by George Rosenburg; Wednesday, "The Theatrical
Nude" by Ian McNairn;
Thursday, "The Sensuous
Nude" by William S. Hart;
Friday, "The Spiritual
Nude" by Mary Morehart.
Admission free.
The Nude in Art, Vancouver Art Gallery. To Nov. 29.
Hogarth and His Age, UBC
Fine Arts Gallery. Daily to
Nov. 21. With Wedgewood
pottery from Hogarth period. Free admission.
Faculty Chamber Music
Recital. Music of Weisgarber, Brahms, Beethoven.
Nov. 24, 8 p.m. Bu. 106.
Carol Kneisbusch plays flute,
Hans-Karl Piltz, viola and
so on.
Ravi Shankar, successful
Indian sitarist, will execute
many ragas in the UBC auditorium, Nov. 28 at 8:30. Students 50 cents. One could
say Shankar went from rag-
as to riches. Tickets at AMS.
Double Door, until Saturday. Produced by Richmond
Community Theatre. Metro
Theatre, 1370 SW Marine.
Students 75 cents.
Taming of the Shrew, by
Bill Shakespeare. Nov. 18-25
at 8:30. Playhouse Theatre
Company. QE Playhouse.
Tickets $1.50 to $3.50.
Desire Under the Elms
by Eugene O'Neil. QET until Saturday.
Carlos Montoya, flamenco
guitarist, Nov. 17, UBC Auditorium, 8:30 p.m. Students
$.75 and $1.25. Special Events.
O Woe and Lamentations.
Pageant of the court of Elizabeth I. Anywhere, anytime.
Admission Free. A Hume-
Horsey production.
The Silence. Last film in
"Through a Glass Darkly",
"Winter Light" and "Silence" trilogy. Studio Theatre. (Review this issue).
Odd Obsession. Directed
by Kon Ichikawa. Varsity
Theatre.
Aparajito, directed by Sa-
tiyajit Ray, Saturday, 8 p.m.
UBC  Auditorium.
White Hell, film of Canada's north and Alaska. UBC
Auditorium, Nov. 18 at noon.
25 cents.
M, directed by Fritz Lang.
With Peter Lorre. UBC
Auditorium, Monday at 8.
Admission to series only.
$3.00.
Topaki from the novel toy
Eric Ambler. With Peter Ustinov and Melina Mercouri.
Ablett thinks it's a tremendous film. Odeon circuit.
The Finest Hours. Documentary feature of the life
of Winston Churchill. The
Odeon Theatre, Granville
and Howe.
The Ark. Broadway and
Dunbar. Peter Elbing with
Jana Bergh. Students $1.00.
Initial membership fee $1.00.
Call 736-6011 for reservations.
Bunkhouse, 612 Davie.
Don Crawford. Ends Saturday. Call 683-9790 for reservations.
PF Twelve
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and Repaired
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UNITED TAILORS
549 Granville St.
CONFIDENCE
You, too will hove confidence in
CONTACT LENSES
Cby LAWRENCE
ALVERT
"He specializes"
705 Birks  Bldg.    MU 3-1816
9:30-5:30 (Sat. Noon)
"FINEST CONTEMPORARY
JAPANESE FILM I HAVE
SEEN. An exploration of
moral breakdown that
makes 'Les Liaisons Dang-
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Herald Tribune
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1965   GRADUATES
seeking employment
register NOW with the
EXECUTIVE and PROFESSIONAL DIVISION
NATIONAL EMPLOYMENT SERVICE
Phone Mr. W. L. Roberts who will mail you
an application and arrange an interview to
discuss employment opportunities.
UNDERGRADS—will be registered later—
Watch for notice.
1145 ROBSON STREET
MU 1-8253
BELL NEEDS ENGINEERS
FOR TOMORROW'S WORLD OF COMMUNICATIONS
Plan now for an Engineering Career offering scope and
responsibility in a leading Canadian industry. Consider
the potential of a career in the Bell if you are graduating in
Electrical
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Ask at your Placement Office for
informative booklets, and
arrange to talk with one of our
representatives when they visit
your campus.
BELL
Built, managed and owned by Canadians
Make a date to discuss a career
in telecommunications on
Monday through  Friday
November 30 to December 3
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t -j , t-x-v-v , -„ u • t% m *;«..» «..*.* i *_ « % *.*, . Friday, November  13, 1964
THE      UBYSSEY
Page  19
—bert mackinnon photo
WHITELAW'S VOLKSWAGEN IN POND
. . . the swimmingest car going
'Amazing Volkswagen
Puddle-jumper
dunked in pond
Steve Whitelaw's car was illegally parked in the Library
pond Thursday noon.
Fellow Engineers placed
their president's . blue Volkswagen in the nearly empty
pond.
The Engineers then went after Frosh President Kim Campbell's car parked behind Brock
Hall.
Unfortunately    it    wasn't
there.
FOOT OF WATER
Then Whitelaw, strolling
around the campus with Miss
Campbell, came on his car
standing in a foot of water.
Engineers lifted the two of
them into the car.
15 pull out
of CUS debate
LENNOXVILLE (CUP)—
Fifteen English-speaking universities in Ontario and Quebec have withdrawn from
the Canadian Union of Students debating finals.
The Ontario-Quebec Debating League will not send
competitors to the CUS national finals at the Victoria
College in March.
The league said the competition wasn't worth the expense.
Whitelaw started his car and
drove around the pond to the
delight of a large crowd of students gathered to watch.
The Engineers lifted the car
out.
ROMANTIC EXIT
Steve and Kim then drove
off into the setting sun.
Art Stevenson, EUS secretary, would not comment on
why Whitelaw's car was tanked.
First year Engineers staged
another stunt.
Carrying signs announcing
Collision Corner and Danger,
Narrow Road, about 50 of
them trekked to the corner of
Wesbrook Crescent and University Boulevard.
PROTEST CORNER
"We're protesting the way
the corner juts out into the
road," said Ian Foster, first
year president.
"There have been too many
accidents at this corner because there isn't enough
space," he said.
"We want the corner rounded off and Wesbrook Crescent
made one way South past the
frat houses from 7:30 to 9:30
in the mornings."
A university patrol car and
truck passed the demonstration
without stopping to investigate.
After death
Druggist
out* of
practice
TORONTO (CUP)—A pharmacist who supplied pep pills
which killed a student at the
University of Toronto last
spring has had his licence suspended for a year.
The Ontario College of Pharmacy announced the action as
a result of a conviction against
Roger S. Bodkin, 72, for selling the drug without a prescription.
Bodkin was fined $100 on
one charge while two similar
charges were suspended.
• •    *
At a coroner's inquest into
the death of fourth-year Victoria College student Wayne
Bruce Mackenzie, Bodkin was
named as the person who supplied wyamine sulphate pep
pills to Mackenzie and other
university students.
A friend of Mackenzie's,
John Penman, testified he purchased the pills and used some
himself, giving the rest to
Mackenzie and other students
at cost.
U of T has ruled any students
found using restricted drugs
as pep pills will be suspended
or expelled.
Pep pills give the user a
heightened feeling of well being and seem to banish fatigue.
• •    •
However doctors warn that
prolonged use will drain the
body of its reserves and eventually lead to collapse, and, in
some cases, to death.
The user becomes increasingly irritable, his appetite becomes jaded and his efficiency
actually decreases.
The pills, commonly termed
bennies for benzedrine, one of
the most popular types, are
legally available only by prescription.
They are sometimes used to
help people diet.
Arts and Science
to be balkanized
MONTREAL (CUP)—McGill
University is re-organizing its
faculty of Arts and Sciences
for the first time since 1939.
There will be five separate
divisions: Humanities, Social
Sciences, Biological Sciences,
Physical Sciences and the
school of Commerce.
'57 M.G.A.
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861 Granville     ML 3-8921
^ Monvy-Bacfc Gwaront** ^^H
Spanish gypsy Montoya
pulls strings at UBC
A Spanish gypsy will exhibit his genius on the flamenco
guitar for UBC students Tuesday.
Carlos Montoya will perform at 8:30 p.m. Tuesday in
the Auditorium.
Tickets are 75 cents and $1.25 for students, and $1.25
and $2 for adults at the AMS office, Vancouver Ticket
Centre and at the door.
Deluxe Bowling Centre Ltd.
Hastings and Homer Street
"In the Heart of the City"
BOWLING PARTIES CATERED TO
5-Pins and 10-Pins
FREE    PARKING
MU 5-9940 (Saturdays 682-0956)
ENQUIRE ABOUT OUR FREE BOWLING CARDS
UBC Thunderbird Winter Sports Centre
For   SKATING,   CURLING,   HOCKEY
Pleasure Skating Hours:
12.45 p.m. to 2.45 p.m. Tues., Thurs. and Sunday
3.00 p.m. to 5.00 p.m., Friday and Saturday
7.30 p.m. to 9.30 p.m., Tues., Fri., Sat. and Sunday
THURSDAY STUDENT SPECIAL 15c
Skating Parties each Wednesday, 7:30 p.m. - 9:30 p.m.
SKATE RENTAL AVAILABLE, ALL SIZES
Book Now for Your Club
Skating Tickets ai Reduced Rates Available
For Information Phone Local 365 or 224-3205 Page 20
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, November  13,   1964
A Towny Day
in
LONDON FOG
Maincoat in Choice
of 4 colours
Consider the handsome benefits of the
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classic styling in meticulously tailored
65% Terylene and Cotton treated with
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This single breasted half-raglan model
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j   \ Regulars 36-46. Tails 38-48 and Shorts
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EATON Price,
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00
Also available in Beige only, with zip
in-out laminated lining, each 42.50
EATON'S
Men's Clothing—All Four Stores
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Resists soil
EATON'S has the Man-Sized Choice
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*p-
,iui"vi/ji.ii«jjp; Friday, November   13,  1964
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 21
SNEAKY SPORTS CAR's found a new place to duck campus parking gestapo's wrath
—a cosy corner inside Varsity Stadium be hind education gym. Sorry, fella. Next time
try the lane behind the chemistrv building. ^___^^^_^^^____^_
Totem facelift
Yearbook format
changing again
For the third consecutive year Totem is getting a new
format.
Totem editor Scott Mclntyre
outlined his plans for this
year's yearbook to student
council.
"Totem again will be in two
parts, a $4 hard-cover grad
book and a campus life book,
but there will be some important changes," he said.
"The campus life book will
be a 120-page soft-cover edition
which will sell for $1.75, the
lowest price ever. Our breakeven point for this is 2,000
copies.
"There will be eight to 15
pages allotted to each month
for events—there will be no
sections of sports, clubs or
Greeks as such, as in the past."
Mclntyre said pre-sales so
far this year have been low—
with only 300 Grad books and
250 campus life having been
ordered so far. He said this is
mainly because there was no
concerted sales campaign during registration week.
AMS treasurer Kyle Mitchell
suggested undergraduate societies be given an incentive to
sell copies to their members
by offering them a commission.
Most undergrad presidents
said later they support the proposal
However Engineering president Steve Whitelaw said societies which publish their own
yearbooks would be cutting
their own throats.
(The Engineers publish the
annual Slipstick.)
Mclntyre said Totem will be
on campus three weeks before
classes finish in April, so students will have a chance to
look it over before buying.
ORAL POLIO VACCINE
(SABIN)
Wednesday November 18th
9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.
Wesbrook Building, Room 237
Oral Polio Vaccine (Sabin) will be available
to Students, Faculty and Staff, and Adults in
the University Area.
Three doses of Sabin are required to give
immunity.
It is not recommended for those who have not
received two doses of Salk Vaccine.
Med schools
get plasma
TORONTO (CUP)—Medical and dental teaching
facilities in Ontario will be
expanded to the tune of $118
million.
Medical schools at the
University of Toronto and
Queen's University will be
enlarged. A new medical
school and teaching hospital
will be built at McMaster
University.
The University of Western
Ontario will have a new
school of dentistry and teaching hospital. Three regional
nursing schools will be built.
Fund talk set
Alfred Adams, executive secretary of the University Resources Committee, will speak
to student council Nov. 30 on
the three Universities fund
drive.
Carry
religion
to polities'
The German clergymen who
refused to oppose Hitler have
their counterparts in Canada
today, an Anglican history professor said here.
Both Protestant and Catholic
Christians in Germany were
ineffective against the Nazis
because none took their beliefs
into politics. Dr. John Conway
told a meeting sponsored by
the Newman Catholic students
centre.
"And the only time a Christian church is heard in Canadian politics is when denominational interests are at
stake," he said.
"Christians must be willing
to support frank stands by
their church on many great
moral issues of the modern
world.
"That Christians are often
split on issues like the atomic
bomb indicates a moral scizo-
phrenia between their religious
and political beliefs," Conway
said.
In Germany this separation
of beliefs and politics meant
church leaders could rouse
people against removal of a
crucifix from a school but not
against the slaughter of the
Jews, he said.
PUBLICITY   COMMITTEES
Any event you want publicized over C-FUN Radio. Address particulars to Bill
Thompson, AMS Box 152.
THE CHRISTMAS CARD
ONLY
YOU
CAN SEND
AVOID THE R
Made from your favorite
black and white or color
photograph.
ORDER NOW  FROM
RUSHANT
CAMERAS LTD.
4538  West  10th Ave.
224-5858 224-9112
Free Parking at Rear
College moves
WINNIPEG (CUP) — The
Manitoba Teachers' College
will move to the Universty of
Manitoba campus next fall.
Classical Guitar
Tuition to Advanced Level
Segovia Technique
W. Parker 682-1096
RENT
A CAR
FROM
AUTO   RENTALS SYSTEM
$   per day
0  per mile
1307   W   GEORGIA
ACROSS FROM GEORGIAN TOWERS
CALL 682-7868
What do you want in a
company after graduation?
Graduates who've been out a few years say the important things
to look for in choosing a job are good training, an unrestricted
chance to grow in a solid, recognized company, income, early
responsibility and a stimulating environment where intelligence
and enthusiasm are recognized. The points are not always in that
order, but these are the main ones. What, then, can Procter &
Gamble offer you?
J# An outstanding record of individualized,
on-the-job training.
2, Responsibilities and promotion based on
a man's ability — not seniority.
J# A growth company which controls 30%-
65% of all the major product markets in
which it competes; at least one of our
brands is in 95% of all Canadian households.
4» Among other benefits, highly competitive
salaries and profit sharing.
Obviously, you need to know facts before making an intelligent
choice of your career. We'd like to tell you more about us. Descriptive brochures are available at your Placement Office and
company representatives will visit for interviews on
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 2
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 3
FRIDAY, DECEMBER 4
for positions in
ADVERTISING - BUYING - FINANCE • SALES MANAGEMENT and TRANSPORTATION
PROCTER  &  GAMBLE Page 22
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, November 13,  1964
r
i
THE
SKI
I BUM]
By TIM ROBERTS
Winter is rapidly becoming a reality, as the snow on
the local mountains and the
mass exodus away from
them readily witness.
For those who couldn't see
it, there was snow on all of
our hills, and three or four'
feet down at Baker.
The tow on Blueberry was
run just to see if it could be
operated, and may be going
this weekend.
The hill was covered except
for the odd rock to take off
the remnants of last year's
base.
• •    •
The Thunderbird ski team
will be holding its annual ski
week from Dec. 26-Jan 1. in
Rossland again this year.
For $74.00 transportation
return from Vancouver to
Rossland, accommodation and
meals, and unlimited use of all
lifts will be provided.
Other benefits will include
daily ski lessons with the ski
team itself, which will be
training- at Rossland during
the holidays, and a New
Year's party.
The ski week will provide
six full days of skiing, and
caters to beginners, intermediates and experts.
Further information can be
found on posters in most buildings, as sheets with full particulars are attached.
The deadline is Dec. 4th.
• •    •
Last weekend VOC held
four trail-clearing hikes, all of
which.were well attended.
An access trail was cut on
Mt. Sedgewick, and trail clearing parties were busy on Mt.
Tetrahedron in the Tantalus
range and on Mt. Edge behind
Haney.
Another party of 20 people
chopped wood at Kulshun cabin and skied on the glaciers
on the back side of Mt. Baker.
In regard to the trail-clearing parties, last spring the Alpine Club of Canada, the
British Columbia Mountaineering Club, the Youth Hostel
organization, North Shore hikers and VOC formed a pool for
opening up mountains by trail
clearing.
Each club was allotted a
certain number of mountains
to open up by next spring for
hiking purposes.
• •   •
VOC has completed half of
its number, and has fitted the
hikes in with its work parties,
using anywhere from two to
ten or twenty members on a
trail.
This weekend the club will
be clearing on Deeks Lake,
continuing its project.
The mountaineering school
under Peter Thompson will be
climbing in-the-SkyPilot area
east'^,'Brtt*Mrfa,'Beach.1"'''''' ■
Want own terms
Coaches have
plan for sports
UBC's athletic coaches want to rejoin the Western Canadian Intercollegiate Athletic Association.
But on their own terms.
&&2&&M&®
GET AWAYI Bian Rattray, goalie for the Varsity field
hockey team, is seen here in an exciting "on the spot"
picture being attacked  by a  ball.
T-Birds ship out
but miss the boat
The Birds took the boat to
Victoria but were sunk in the
capital city.
UBC soccer Thunderbirds
scored first and last but Victoria United scored four in between to down the Birds*4 to 2
Wednesday.
Phil Brown gave UBC the
short lived lead and Harvey
Thorn ended the Birds scoring
in the final half.
The T'Birds record now
stands at two wins and six
losses in eight games.
They will be looking for victory number three when they
face North Shore United at Callister Park tomorrow at 2 p.m.
• •   •
UBC Braves will be out to
break New Westminster Royal's
unbeaten streak when they play
host to the Royal City team at
the Thunderbird Winter Sports
Centre, Saturday at 5:30 p.m.
• •    •
The second annual UBC Invitational Wrestling Championships will take place Saturday,
Nov. 21st.
Over 50 entries are expected
in ten weight classes ranging
from 115 lb. to heavyweight.
The coaches almost unanimously expressed this attitude
when they met with the athletic
directorate Tuesday night to
discuss the future of UBC's
athletic program.
UBC pulled out of the
WCIAA for two main reasons:
excessive travelling costs and
the generally inferior competition offered by the prairie
schools.
• *   •
As football head coach Frank
Gnup pointed out it just didn't
make sense to pay $4,000 to
travel to Winnipeg to beat the
University of Manitoba team
by a lopsided score. Not when
for less than one-tenth this
amount UBC can travel to Bellingham for a much more competitive and interesting game
with Western Washington.
Western Canadian universi
ties, however, are rapidly developing their athletic facilities
and programs. It is felt they
will eventually offer UBC the
balanced competition the
coaches would like to see.
• •    •
And belonging to a strong
Canadian conference would be
preferable to joining a big time
American conference and having to do things as they do.
For the next few years the
coaches want to rejoin the
WCIAA on a limited basis playing half a schedule with Canadian schools and the other
half with North-western American colleges.
This will allow UBC to cut
down travelling costs, obtain
better and more balanced competition and provide a more interesting calibre of athletic
events for UBC sports fans.
UBC's coaches would also
like to remain affiliated with
the WCIAA so their teams will
be eligible for the Canadian
National collegiate finals.
But persuading WCIAA officials — who have stated that
UBC must come in all the way
or not at all — to come around
to UBC's way of thinking may
be a tough chore.
If the WCIAA refuses to relent there are two alternatives
open to UBC: we can remain
independent as we now are or
join an American conference.
•    •    •
Officials of The Evergreen
conference, which UBC belonged to from 1953 to 1958, have
stated the doors are wide open
if UBC wants to rejoin.
Noah Allen, president of the
Pacific North-western Intercollegiate Athletic Conference,
has also said the PNW is interested in having UBC as a
member and UBC can count on
his vote if they apply for admittance.
Jokers at UBC
In men's field hockey games
Saturday Varsity takes its five
game winning streak against
the Jokers at 1:15 p.m.
And the Golds play India 'B'
at 2:45 while the Blues meet
the Blackbirds at the same
time.
All games take place on
Spencer field.
JUPOlfD EMPLOYMENT INTERVIEWS
ADA
23rd, 24th, 25th & 26th NOVEMBER
for graduate, post-graduate and undergraduate students in the following
disciplines for the positions shown.
REGULAR EMPLOYMENT
CHEMICAL  ENGINEERING
Development Engineer,
Design Engineer,
Maintenance Engineer,
Process Engineer
Chemical Engineer
Eng'.     Dept.,     and     Research     and
Development Dept.)
Technical Service Representative,
Marketing,
Patent Specialist,
Production Engineer,
Planning Engineer
ELECTRICAL  ENGINEERING
Design Engineer,
Design Engineer (Instrumentation)
Electrical Engineer (Eng. Dept.),
Production Engineer
INDUSTRIAL  ENGINEERING
Process Engineer,
Industrial Engineer
CIVIL ENGINEERING
Civil Engineer (Eng. Dept.)
MECHANCIAL  ENGINEERING
Development Engineer,
Design Engineer,
Maintenance Engineer,
Process Engineer,
Technical Service Representative,
Marketing,
Mechanical Engineer
(Eng.  Dept.,  Research and  Development Dept.)
Production Engineer,
Planning Engineer
ENGINEERING PHYSICS
Development Physicist,
Design Engineer,
Process Engineer
MINING  ENGINEERING
Technical     Service
(Explosives Dept.)
Representative
ECONOMICS
Economic Analyst (Master's Degree),
Financial and Control Staff
METALLURGY  (PHYSICAL)
Development Engineer,
CHEMISTRY
Development Chemist,
Process Chemist,
Analytical Chemist
Patent Specialist,
Marketing
COMMERCE OR BUSINESS
Financial and Control Staff
ADMINISTRATION
(at the plants or at Head Office,
Advertising Assistant,
Personnel Assistant
Marketing,
ARTS
Advertising Assistant,
Personnel Assistant
Marketing,
SCIENCE
Marketing,
MATHEMATICS-STATISTICS
Statistician
SUMMER EMPLOYMENT
Class of
1966
X
X
X
X
1967
X
X
X
X
X
1968
X
Chemical Engineering
Mechanical Engineering
Electrical Engineering
Commerce or Business Administration
Civil Engineering
The summer openings are:
(A) As Assistants to Design, Process and Development Engineers and
(B) As Vacation Relief in Production, General Plant Offices and the Laboratories.
Locations:   SHAWINIGAN  and   MONTREAL,  P.Q.,
MAITLAND  (BROCKVILLE), KINGSTON,
WHITBY and  NORTH   BAY, ONT.
An appointment to see our representative can be made through your Placement Office where
information booklets,  application forms and 1965 position descriptions are also available.
DU PONT OF CANADA LIMITED
PERSONNEL DIVISION P.O. BOX 660
MONTREAL, P.Q.
*   *   i    1   *   * Friday,  November   13,   1964
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 23
I FROM THE PRESS BOX
By JACK McQUARRIE
Bob Sikorski is a man who takes the sweet with the
sour.
He takes the sweet five days a week in a chocolate factory
which he and his father manage under the name of Sikorski
and Son, Makers of Bavarian Mints.
During the fall he takes his sour on the weekends when
his frustrated person can be seen steaming up and down the
sidelines as mentor of the UBC Junior Varsity football team.
Sikorski, known to acquaintances as "Bobo" is the head
man of a rather unsuccessful organization ... if one chooses
to regard the scoreboard alone.
The JV record this year, on a par with other years, was
two wins and six losses, including a 87-6 loss to Olympia
Junior College—a team filthy with scholarships.
The Jayvees are composed mainly of young men who
either have never seen a football before, or if they have, only
in a sport store window.
If by any divine grace there does appear three or four reasonable specimens in the crop, Bobo within a week or so
usually loses these to the parent T'Birds.
Bobo's only consolation comes in the form of comedy relief which, when he has the opportunity and presence of mind
to appreciate, is considerable.
The last game of the season, which yours truly witnessed,
affords a typical example.
• •        •
(The JV's opposition was the Seattle Cavaliers, a half white
and half negro team that is unique in that it is one of the few
athletic teams that competes for the sheer joy of it with nary
a trace of the modern day "death is better than defeat" philosophy.
For instance, one of Sunday's biggest laughs came when a
Cavalier halfback ran back with a kickoff—without the ball.
The ball went bouncing into the end zone and everyone
but Bobo was amused when the entire psyched-out JV outfit
went after the Cavalier instead of the ball.
Things like that.
And the Seattle manager charging onto the field to send
one of his ends, who was picking himself up after dropping
a pass, sprawling again to the great glee of his team-mates.
Also two Cavaliers yelling at each other in mock anger
after colliding with each other attempting to field a punt.
Getting back to Bobo's Jayvees.
In all fairness they must be credited with supplying the
other half of the act that kept on-lookers in stitches.
For example, the call of an inexperienced JV line-backer
for a goal-line defence with the Cavaliers on their own 20
yard line.
With everybody up tight the Cavalier blocking cleared
the end and the Seattle back went 80 unmolested yards for
the score.
Suffice to say, Bobo was disturbed.
Then a Jayvee tackled one of his own ball carriers.
Another look in Bobo's direction raised a suspicion that
shock had set in.
When asked why he choose to inflict this torture upon
himself Bobo answers "Just habit I guess—I've been associated with football ever since I can remember."
That he has.
Along with such familiar names as Norm Fieldgate and
Byron Bailey the last BC Lion program listed the name of
Bob Sikorski as one of its originals.
Before joining the Lions as a 200-pound offensive guard
in 1954 he played junior ball with the Winnipeg Rods and
the Vancouver Blue Bombers.
• •        •
Bobo's farewell speech after Sunday's game was perhaps
appropriate.
On behalf of himself and assistant Barry Carkner he
thanked the players for their dedication through "at times
frustrating circumstances" and said he had enjoyed it . . .
and as I indicated previously, perhaps he did in his more reflective moments.
SKI SWEATERS
All the  latest ski  patterns for fall  . .  .  whether
bold or subdued in pattern; wool and mohair
or pure wool.
Priced $18 95 to $29 95
Kats on prowl
for UBC's Birds
Kats, perennial rugby champions in B.C., are hungry for
a win against UBC's improving Birds.
Currently the Kats are tied
SPORTS
BUZZ MOORE
. . . have spirit
UBC bowlers
beatVicagain
Last weekend the UBC bowling team won their tenth
ftraight victory over Victoria
University four games to zip.
Led by Bill Enefer, who averaged 280 for the eight game
series, UBC bowled an impressive 1356, 1292, 1302, 1269,
giving them a total of 5219 for
four games.
This was a new high.
Members of the team were:
Doug Symonds, Jon Strom,
Lyman Warner and Ray
Hughes.
for the league lead with Meralomas, have been beaten only
once in their last 57 games.
Saturday at 2:30 p.m. they
play the Birds in Varsity stadium.
The Katz have played together as a unit for over five years
and are the only club considered to be good enough to tour
overseas. Their lineup features
12 B.C. Reps.
However, UBC which features a fast, running and passing game, has its strongest
team in recent years.
Coached by former English
International rugger star,
Brian Wightman the 'Birds are
returning to the old form of
the unbeatable "Wonder-Birds"
of the mid-fifties.
Fred Sturrock, Bob May and
captain Dick Haye were all
B.C. Reps and Gary Rowles
played for the Canadian All-
Stars.
This will be the big game of
the season for both clubs.
If UBC, now in third place,
defeats Kats and Ex-Brits defeat the second place Meralomas UBC will be in first
place and have a good chance
to win the Miller cup, representative of the League's first
half winners.
After Xmas UBC drops out
of the Vancouver League to
play intercollegiate rugby and
in the World Cup series.
In exhibition action Wednesday, UBC defeated Georgians
22-3 and have now outscored
their opposition 140 points to
44.
Birds not alone
on rugby scene
In other rugby action Saturday the first division
Braves take on the Barbarians, the Totems battle the
Barbarians II and the Tomahawks play Kats II.
All games start at 1:30 are
played at Wolfson field.
The Education
Undergraduate  Society
is sponsoring a talk on
"The Teacher and
Controversial   Issues"
Friday, November 13th
in Education  100 at 12:30
Speaker—Mr.  Lome  Brown
Assoc. Prof,  of Education
No Admission Charge
"THE" PLACE
to meet
your friends
is at ihe
Do-Nut Diner
4556 W. 10th Ave.
Try Our Delicious T-Bone
Steak $1.35
It's really Good!
Full course Meals
within your income
Students Meal Tickets
Available
2174 West 41st in Kerrisdale
$
i'rwrrr»'j**Ti'i'«rrmu»rnumiti
AM 1-2750
SHELL
CANADA   LIMITED
Will Be On Campus
to Interview Students
For Regular and Summer Employment
For
EXPLORATION
PRODUCTION  (Oilfield  Engineering)
GAS
MANUFACTURING
ACCOUNTING and FINANCE
Dates: November 16th -19th 1964
For specific details  please check  our  posters
and also with your Placement Officer
I   &  i   i 1.1   1'4A   t  *   •   t  A   *  •   ,
*AA)i**A*AMA*   «Jt«>
k ■» A -It :jt A  M   A .«   A .» A   * .4 .»  * A A *  J
r « .t .*- .* .1 ,». * i .% * i Page 24
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, November  13,   1964
'tween classes
Hamlet wavers
Aud. today
in
English 200 special: Film Hamlet with Lawrence Olivier
will be shown three times today in Auditorium, 12:30, 3:30
and 8:00 p.m. Admission to the show, sponsored by the Film
Society, is 50 cents.
NUS
Fall dance at Gai Paree tonight 8:30 to 1 a.m. Hawaiian
costume; everyone welcome; $4
per couple.
• •    •
NEWMAN CENTRE
Friday the 13th dance in the
Newman lounge, St. Mark's, at
8 p.m. Members 25c, non-
members 50c. Casual dress.
• •    •
SAILING CLUB
Party at 2723 West 4th, Sat.,
9 p.m., $1.25 couple and $1
single. Everyone welcome.
Bring your own refreshments.
• •    •
DAWSON CLUB
L. R. Redford will speak on
The Development of Boss
Mountain noon today in F and
G 102.
• •    •
NDC
Peace Night at IH, Saturday,
8:30 p.m. Folk dancing and
singing, poetry reading and
dancing. Admission 75c.
Dr. Miller, Faculty of Medicine, speaks noon today in Bu.
114 on Effects of Nuclear and
Allied Radiation.
• •    •
VCF
Lecture on Encounters of
Christ by Miss Cathie Nicoll
in Bu. 320, Monday noon.
• •    •
CLUB  CREDITISTE
Action committee meeting
noon today in Bu. 217. Sanctions to he contemplated. General meeting for sweatshirts
and debates.
• •    •
VCF
Christianity Relevant to
World View by Mr. Ben Wait,
Indian Christian leader, in Bu.
106 noon today.
• •    •
SPECIAL  EVENTS
Hear Carlos Montoya's flamenco guitar 8:30 p.m. Tuesday
in the Auditourium. Reserve
at AMS office or Vancouver
Ticket Centre.
• •    •
Last minute tickets available
for Japan Symphony Orchestra
from Special Events Office.
• •    •
ARCHAEOLOGY CLUB
Those signed up for Saturday field trip to Musqueam
meet at 12:30 p.m. in front of
lab.
• •    •
LSM
Rev. D Emberg, controversial Haney minister, speaks
Monday noon in Bu. 102 on
Experimental Marriage.
LORNE  BROWN
.   .  .  teacher  controversy
EDUS
Education prof. Lome Brown
speaks on The Teacher and
Controversial Issues, noon today in Ed. 100.    Free.
• •    •
LOWER  MALL
Kootenay and Hamber
houses present Black Friday
dance with the G-FUN Classics
from 9 tonight to 1 a.m. in
Lower Mall Ballroom. 75c
with AMS card.
• •    •
IH
Tea today at 3 p.m., all welcome. Dance tonight at 8:30,
students 35c, members 25c.
• *    *
QUAKERS
Quaker meeting for worship
in Buchanan penthouse Sunday, 11 a.m.
• •    •
PRE-SOCIAL WORK
• •    •
A member of Alcoholics
Anonymous speaks in Bu. 202
Monday noon; everyone welcome.
Oakalla volunteer work postponed until after Christmas.
• *    *
SOCREDS
Regular Monday meetings in
Bu. 313.
• •    •
LIBERALS
Jack Davis, MP for Coast
Capilano today noon in Bu.
100.
• •    •
EL CIRCULO
Films Bu. 204 noon today.
• •    •
NDP
Tom Berger, NDP lawyer
and legislator, speaks on
Labour Legislation and Human
Rights. Noon today in Brock
lounge.
Sherwood Lett joins 'Nest'
in name-the-SUB contest
Sherwood Lett-Hall is the latest name suggested for the
new student union building.
Student council's contest now includes Norman MacKenzie Hall, Walter Gage building, Thunderbird Union
building, J, F. Kennedy Hall and The Birds' Nest.
CLASSIFIED
Lost & Found
11
FOUND ADS inserted free. Publications office, Brock Hall., Local 26,
224-3242.
LOST—Brown wallet Monday morning.  Reward.  B.  Martin,  224-9062.
LOST—Black Shaeffer fountain pen
Friday in Biol. Science. Reward.
No questions asked. Please call
Don,   325-9318.	
LOST—College Physics Text last
Friday in Hebb, Arts or Chemistry
Bldgs.   Reward.   Call   HE   3-7668.
LOST—One copy of Turn of the
Screw & Daisy Miller by Henry
James, Friday, International
House Bookmark. Keepsake. Important.   AM   6-8510.	
LOST—Blue pencil case in Buch
washroom Friday. Reward offered.
WA 2.9720.
FOUND—Light blue   ski   jacket   in
Hab   20.   Will exchange   for  mine,
same    color. Phone     AM     1-1979
after   6.
LOST—Nov. 2, Parker 61 red pen,
gold cap, around Buchanan. Please
call Rene, CA 4-1063. Reward, $3.
FOU1NJD—Books, scarf & brown
leather wallet, gloves, Bu. extension, ladies' washroom. Monday
night. Inquire at bus stop coffee
shop   office.	
FOUND—Silver earring, bird design,
Publications  Office  AMS.
FOUND — Silver medallion brooch
found at Zeta-Psi fraternity house
night of homecoming. Phone
Carlos, AM 6-9298.
FOUND—Key & chain blue pendant,
initial C, Frederick Wood Theatre,
Monday. Phone 521-9463. Ask for
Ginny.
FOUND—Umbrella left in car by
Agric. student Tuesday noon.
CA   4.7648.
BIRD CALLS. Will those holding
pre sale tickets please apply for
their directory at the Publications
Office as soon as possible.
Special Notices—cont'd
13
HEAR the young lovers in action.
731-9108. .	
PURPLE PILGRIM is the usual
appelation for a pledge of the
fraternity   of   Phi   Gamma   Delta.
WANTED—A "Fieser" experiments
in organic chem. Call Gary at
CA   4.6892   or   WE   9-0184.
WANTED   —   Placards     to     picket
N.D.P. See Totem, BE 168.
Transportation
14
WANTED—Ride 9:30 lee. Mon. to
Sat., vicinity Granville, Marine
Dr., 64th Ave. Phone Iraj, Am
6-9706.
DESPERATELY wanted from central West Van car pool member to
drive once a week. Phone Christine,   WA   2-0205.
LAST PLEA: Two popular handsome Lochinvars need ride from
Kootenay loop area, 8:30 classes.
YU   7-2362.
Automobiles For Sale
21
1956 FORD, 4 door Sedan, radio, $300.
John,   228-8141.
1960   AT_,PINE,    excellent   condition,
radio.   Tonneau,   Regent   3-9807.
'54   AUSTIN   convertible,    $295.    CA
4-0513.
'63 Honda 50 cub,  $175.  224-6940.
FOR SALE—1955 Dodge 4-door sedan, standard transmission, 6-cyl.,
snow tires,  $250.  Phone CA 4-4010.
1963 AUSTIN Healy Sprite custom
radio, white walls, seat belts fender
mirrors.   Offers.   738-5954.
INSTRUCTION  —  SCHOOLS
Music
63
JOYCE MAGUIRE, G.R.S.M. (England), L.R.A.M., A.R.C.M., Piano,
Theory,   Accompaniment.   733-4584.
CLASSICAL GUITAR tuition to advanced level. Segovia technique.
W.   Parker,   682-1096.   ■
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
18-FT. CANVAS racing kayak & de
luxe luggage ski rack for M.G.A.
Offers  on  both.   WA  2-5050.
FOR SALE—Reg. $95 man's black
cashmere coat, size 40-42, as new,
for $30. Steel Queen stainless sink,
21"x20",   $12.     Phone   CA  4-3587.
SMART QUALJTY clothing for all
the family, like new, at terrific
savings. Ex Toggery Shop, 6246
E.  Blvd.  AM 6-6744.	
EXCELLENT English 200 notes
now on sale at the College Shop.
Check the high quality yourself!
TOTEM   PRE   SALES   now   at   the
AMS office.
Rooms
81
MATURE MALE student to exchange some house cleaning,
maintenance & gardening duties
for furnished private room with
kitchen privileges, close to gates.
224-3618.	
ROOM FOR TWO men $35, kitchen
privileges, private entrance, shower
TV & one to share. CA 8-8000
after  7.   3680  W.   13th.
2 BOYS wanted to share large upstairs double room 2 blocks from
gates. Room and board supplied if
desired.   224-6084.
Room  & Board
82
EXCELLENT room & board on
Campus. Kappa Sigma Fraternity
House. Phone after 5:30. Ask for
Derek.  CA 4-9986.
PRIVATE room & board for male
student available now. 4595 W. 6th.
CA 4-4866.
Furnished Houses & Apts.    83
SHARE large pleasant suite at
Kitsilano with one other gentleman graduate or quiet student.
Garage,   phone.   733-6534.
WINTER  PALE  KNITS
... to wear right now! . . . fashion's compelling statement that colour knows no season.
The plain, applauded by the Bay, is all
subtlety and charm . . . destined to add
brightness to the Winter scene while emphasizing fashion's gentle mood.
Soft-misted tints take over this wool and
angora sweater dress, a livelty fashion for
young moderns, with buttons to the nipped
in waistline. Fully-lined. Pink, blue, mint or
yellow . . . sizes 7-15. 29.95
The Bay Collegienne Shop, Third Floor
INCORPORATED   2?"    MAY   1670.
GEORGIA at GRANVILLE
SHOP  DAILY 9:00-5:30.  FRIDAY 9:00-9:00
MU  1-6211

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