UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Sep 17, 1985

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0126039.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0126039.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0126039-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0126039-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0126039-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0126039-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0126039-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0126039-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0126039-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0126039.ris

Full Text

Array £»0 /*.!>
V — i.*   tf  O
oeriai
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXVIII, No. 3
Vancouver, B.C. Tuesday, September 17,1985
228-2301
II
youth drop university plans
By KAREN GRAM
Canadian University Press
Four thousand jobless students
in B.C. decided not to return to a
college or university this fall.
Statistics Canada figures for
August compared with July show a
4000 drop in the number of students
planning to return this fall and a
5000 drop in the number of students
working or looking for work.
Terry Hunt, Canadian Federation of Students Pacific chair said
Poll shows
universities
supported
A new poll has revealed
widespread lower mainland popular
support for B.C. universities.
The survey, commissioned by the
B.C. Confederation of Faculty
Associations, showed more than
two thirds of lower mainland
residents feel government cutbacks
threaten the quality of B.C. university education.
Over 90 per cent agreed any
qualified student should be able to
attend university, regardless of
family income.
"The people put universities as a
high priority for funding
purposes," said Elmer Ogryzlo,
UBC faculty association past president. "They feel money should be
taken from other projects to fund
universities."
He said the associations were
pleased with the survey results
because they didn't know what to
expect.
"I look forward to a reaction
from the government," said
Ogryzlo.
The poll, which involved 500 people in the lower mainland, had a
number of findings:
• 66 per cent said universities shold
increase the number of programs
offered;
• 62 per cent said education is
"somewhat" or "a lot worse" than
now compared with three years ago;
• 73 per cent disagreed
"somewhat" or "strongly" with
the B.C. government decision to
allocate less money to universities.
Ogryzlo said the results should be
"wonderful for the morale of the
university." "1 think with the
results of this survey (UBC administration president designate
David Strangway) should feel he is
coming into a more attractive
climate." he added.
students aren't returning because
they didn't have summer jobs and
were unable to get the $990 needed
to pay their student loan committment.
The unemployment rate for
returning students dropped from
18.5 to 16 per cent in August but the
total labor force also dropped five
per cent.
Dan Cronin would like to study
Kinesiology or  Physiotherapy but
he has been unemployed for the
bulk of the summer.
"If 1 had the opportunity I'd be
back at school but it would be
literally imposible for me to go
unless I dropped everything and
stopped eating just to pay tuition."
He registered at Langara Community College last year for pre-
med studies but had to change his
plans because he didn't have
enough money.
"My   major   drawback   was   I
didn't have the tuition let alone the
other expenses involved in pre-med
education."
Cronin, who was unemployed all
last year, said he didn't even consider school this year because he
knew how much it would cost.
Cronin rejected a student loan as
an alternative to a summer job
because of the high debt involved
and the late arrival of the funding.
"Student loans usually don't ar
rive until late September or October. It is in no way intended to
pay for tuition or books," he said.
Hunt said the provincial government must restructure the loan program to make up for a deficiency in
job programs.
"Until we have an employment
program and a student aid program
that are adequate, we're going to
have students like that four thousand who can't afford to go to
school."
i
COME WITH ME cars and I will take good care of you said th
stanger. The price to your owners is nothing new.  I always
e grinning
take their
-   sieve engler photo
money for the privilage of allowing their cars to rust in my lot, and their
batteries to die. What's the matter, don't you trust me?
Students suffering limited study space
Library seats are already difficult
to find in the second week of
classes. "Due to last year library
cut-backs in funding there are less
library hours available this year,"
said Laura Drisdelle, a main library
desk assistant.
She said present library hours are
8 a.m. to 10 p.m. weekdays and
noon to 5 p.m. Saturday, at the
Main library, prior to the cut-backs
the Main library closed one hour
later weeknights and opened at 9
a.m. on Saturday.
UBC betters UVIC in enrolment
UBC enrolment has increased slightly in 1985.
Numbers are "marginally" up said assistant registrar Trish Angus.
Total registration this year is 25,061, a small increase from last
year's figure of 24,638. It includes an increase of 300
undergraduates, said Angus.
Complete registration figures will not be released until the end of
September.
At the university of Victoria enrolment has decreased 3.2 per cent,
said Cled Thomas, UVic director of record services. Thomas attributes the decline to a 13 per cent drop in first year enrolment.
Total UVic new student registration declined 9.2 per cent this year.
Last year enrolment dropped 18 per cent at UVic and UVic president Howard Petch warned if the enrolment drop continued the
following year staff and programs would be cut.
Petch  blamed  the provincial government  policies and high
unemployment for the drop in enrolment last year.
Fetch could not be reached in time for comment.
Starting in third year students can
apply for carrel reservations which
are available at the Main library for
a few more weeks, until the head
librarian feels there is no more
room, Drisdelle said.
At Sedgewick library there are no
carrel reservations and no changes
in times. Sedgewick library remains
open until 11 p.m., said Joan San-
dilands, Sedgewick head librarian.
"Sedgewick is the one library
which we are trying to keep open
the longest because it is the one with
the most study room,"she said.
"Sedgewick is the same as always
— crowded,;;    veteran   librarian
Judy Atkinson said.
At Sedgewick library most tables
contain the capacity six people
crowded elbow-to-elbow in their
circular encasement. Here
numerous complaints are heard:
Anne Shum arts 1 said, "Most of
the time at Sedgewick it takes 10-15
minutes of walking around and
around just to find a place to study
— lunch is impossible."
"You bet it's crowded — just
look around you. It's getting worse
every day," said Linda Chan, arts
1.
Compared to the complaining
first   year  students  the  more  ex
perienced students are unphased
and prepared for worse, Rose
Galic, arts 2 student said, "This is
nothing compared to exam time,
then we usually go to law because
there's more room there."
Catherine   Craig,   Main   library
student assistant said, "Places that
are usually less crowded and more
available for quiet studying are the
library reference areas."
Curt Wvong, arts 1 offers
another alternative, "I study at
home," he said.
Overloaded labs moved
Enrolment has increased 12 per
cent in an already overcrowded
chemistry department said
Chemistry head Lawrence Weiler.
Weiler said cuts in university funding have affected chemistry
students.
"Students are getting two or
three less experiments per year," he
said. "It used to be we'd take a day
to change equipment for labs, now
we have to cancel lab."
Weiler said students are now
forced to enrol in evening and
weekend labs when faced with overcrowded day labs.
Weekend and evening labs take
away from study time and part-time
jobs for the third and fourth year
students stuck in the lab," he said.
"Lab scheduling is so tight we
can't reschedule," he said, adding
enrolment in other science courses
with lab sections are similar to last
year, with the exception of Physics
115 which has added a lab.
Climbing UBC enrolment has
also increased English 100 class
sizes.
English 100 head Lee Whitehead
said an increase of about 100
students in English 100 coupled
with the loss of one section this year
has increased the average class size
to 27 per class when they already
consider 25 per class overcrowded.
"No extra staff has been hired
despite the increase of students due
to budget cuts," Whitehead said.
"Standards are being maintained
but we're being worn thin."
English department head Richard
Tees said third and fourth year
classes have also grown.
He said they are feeling
"frustrated" that despite increased
enrolment, 10 to 15 per cent in
some cases, the department cannot
afford to hire some teaching
assistants. "There's no money for
more teaching assistants," said
Tees. Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 17, 1985
Hard Halifax hides hordes of homeless
HALIFAX (CUP)—Students here
are living in closets, the Globe and
Mail reported recently.
Andrew Wright, a student at
King's College, lived in Dalhousie's
administration building last year.
He kept his clothes and sleeping bag
in the closet, and snuck in before
maintenance locked the building.
Then he rolled out his sleeping
bag in the lounge and went to sleep.
With a 0.7 per cent vacancy rate
and 18,000 students to house,
Halifax has the worst housing crisis
in Canada.
Catherine Blewett, Dalhousie
Student Union president, has 2
students living with her because
they have no other place to go. Tom
Rhymes, student union president of
King's   College,   knows   of   a   2
bedroom apartment that shelters 9
people, all of which are students,
living there since January.
Blewett wants the university to
step in. She doesn't criticize it for
accepting more students than it can
house itself, but she does think the
administration-run housing office
could do a better job.
"We approached the housing office with proposals to increase their
advertising campaign," said
Blewett, "but they didn't
respond."
Grant Wanzel, a member of the
steering committee of Housing for
People, a Halifax coalition of more
than 30 organizations, said the crisis
is one that can be solved, if parties
responsible start facing reality.
Wanzel placed much of the blame
OPEN EARLY
OPEN LATE
* passport pictures
• specialty papers
• volume discounts
kinko's copies
5706 University Blvd. 222-1688
M-Th8-9       Fri 8-6       Sat 9-6       Sun 11-6
?tf£C
< ftOH
l^L
99'
THE ACTION PACK
Scandinavian Design
Leather Knapsack
Last a lifetime
Limited quantities at
wholesale price*
Available through UBC
THE
THUNDERBIRD
SHOP
or MARSHALL TRADING LTD.
662-7013
* Valid Student Card Required
for the perpetuation of the housing
shortage squarely on the area's
universities.
"I think all the universities, and
Dalhousie is principal among them,
have been irresponsible," said
Wenzel. "Dalhousie has been absolutely derelict in offering any sort
of leadership in housing policy, in
assuming any form of responsibility
for the problem or in acting in any
way that says they're not the only
people in the city."
Wanzel adds that universities,
because their budgets depend on
enrolment figures, want to accept
all the students they can, but they
don't want to be responsible for finding those students a place to live.
"Dalhousie has demolished a lot
of adequate housing, and it hasn't
$1.00 OFF;
Any
Sandwich
LE BON APPETIT
. 1535 Yew Street
I (Next Door to Reds)
built any new residences, but it still
wants to bring all those students to
Halifax," he said.
"I think that attitude is extremely
arrogant," he said.
New building in Halifax almost
exclusively has been aimed at middle to high income people. Peggy
Sarty, a statistical clerk at Canada
Mortgage and Housing here, said
most of the construction has consisted of condominiums.
"There has been a lot of those
going up—so much so that they are
probably reaching their saturation
point now," said Sarty. "Maybe
some of those units will be placed
on the rental market, temporarily
anyway," she adds.
Halifax   student   unions,   the
Students' Union of Nova Scotia,
Housing for People, and other
housing advocate groups want
government intervention from all
levels, provincial, municipal and
federal.
Housing for People is directing
its energy towards this fall's
municipal election, demanding that
candidates publically challenge the
city's lack of housing policy.
The group first attacked the city's
June symposium, Housing Halifax.
They called it an election ploy.
"I made my pitch to the symposium, and I might as well spit in
the sea. (City Council) wants to
believe there is some magic solution
to the problem. They want everyone
to live on the beach with a blanket
to cover them," he said.
I
*wirii this coupon
WHERE    YOU    FIND    A
PERFECTLY  ACCEPTABLE
FAST-FOOD MEAL
TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THE
DAILY SPECIALS. SAVE LOTS
OF MONEY ON YOUR FOOD
BILLS
IN SUB LOWER LEVEL
Open daily 7:30 a.m.-6:00 p.m. )
NOMINATIONS NOW OPEN
FOR
THE FOLLOWING AMS PRESIDENTIAL
COMMITTEES AND POSITIONS:
* AMS OMBUDSPERSON (1 POSITION)
* SHERWOOD LETT COMMITTEE (1 POSITION)
* INTERNATIONAL HOUSE BOARD OF DIRECTORS (1 POSITION)
* HANDICAP ACCESS COMMITTEE (1 POSITION)
* FOOD SERVICES COMMITTEE (2 POSITIONS)
* TRAFFIC AND SECURITY COMMITTEE (1 POSITION)
* STUDENT UNION BUILDING COMMITTEE (1 POSITION)
* UNITED WAY COMMITTEE (1 POSITION)
* CAPITAL PROJECTS AQUISITIONS COMMITTEE (4 POSITIONS)
DEADLINE TOMORROW, SEPTEMBER 18
NOMINATION FORMS AVAILABLE FROM SUB ROOM 238
Any inquiries should be directed to AMS Vice-President Jonathan Mercer at 228-3092
INTRODUCING TCU'S
STUDENT BUDGETER ACCOUNT
Set this account up in
September to coincide
with your Student Loan
and your finances will be
totally organized until next
April.
We'll help you set aside the
amount you need for 2nd
semester tuition where you
will earn term deposit rates.
We'll also prepare a budget
program where you deposit
your living expenses for the
year and then receive equal
installments from October
until April.
In this special "Student
Budgeter" your money will
be earning a higher interest
rate than a conventional daily
interest savings account.
STUDENT LOANS are
processed at the TCU
Credit Union Branch
right on campus. If you
currently have a student loan
somewhere else we can
transfer it over to TCU so you
don't have to travel off
campus — or even out of the
S.U.B.
r>1llS yoli ccin clccess Your
Yj^TCUaccounts '
anytime the S.U.B. is open by
using our Automated Teller
Machines - more
convenience than you could
ever imagine.
mi
CREDIT UNION
Hia.PiN'c; good idkas grow Tuesday, September 17, 1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Work study provides 500 jobs
By DAVID McCULLUM
The work study program at UBC
has approximately 500 part-time
jobs available on campus and only
enough qualified applicants for half
of them.
The UBC Work Study Program
is an attempt to enable students
who qualify to earn approximately
$1,000 while they attend school.
People employed through the program can be doing "anything from
research assistance to sitting in the
library turnstiles," said Byron
Hender, the director of Awards and
financial aid for UBC.
Hender said he is not sure what
the total funding for this year's program will be, but the B.C. Ministry
of Education has allotted about
$110,000 and he expects that the
university will add about $400,000.
The total i allotment determines
the number 6f jobs available to
students. Hender estimates that 500
positions will be open.
A student employed through the
program will earn "the standard
university wage," said Hender.
That wage is determined under the
campus collective agreement and
averages out to about eight dollars
per hour, said Hender.
As of Sept. 9 (when the last total
was calculated) there were 281 people eligible to work under the pro
gram and Hender said the program
will be continued until all vacant
positions are full. Last year the
Work Study Program was in operation until the end of the first term.
Positions allotted through the program, however, continue until
March 31, 1986.
Interested students can apply for
Work Study through the Awards
Office. If the application is approved, they are then referred to the
Canada   Employment   Centre   for
job placement.
There are hundreds of unfilled
jobs posted on the boards there and
the qualified student can choose
their favorite.
Eligibility is determined by need,
and if you have been unemployed
for the last while, and are having
trouble making ends meet, then give
the Work Study Program a try.
AMS reviews job
hiring in summer
—   Steve engler photo
DINOSAUR SPLASHES TO extinction in pool of seething pitch. Some sayit was a meteiorite, others say it was
venereal disease that killed large reptiles. Truth they were water soluble has just geen discovered. Cap and raised
gauntlet are placed to disguise identity of doomed boggosaurus.
By DEBBIE LO
The Alma Mater society executives have all picked up their last
pay cheques from their $7,000 summer jobs even though now one of
the executives has still not completed his job mandate.
Duncan Stewart, AMS external
affairs coordinator, originally had
seven topics to write briefs on for
his summer job. In July the student
council hiring committee cut the
mandate to five because they
thought their original list was
"unrealistic" for him to accomplish.
Stewart manage to complete a
total of one project when his term
was finished.
"A lot of people haven't seen the
work I've done," said Stewart. He
said he wanted to concentrate on
one project, getting concession
fares for post secondary education
students on bus passes, instead of
completing his other written projects.
Stewart said his is getting close to
his goal of obtaining concession
fare cards for students by this
month, and added he has met with
all the mayors from the lower
mainland to rally support for the
project.
He said the hiring of the executives for the summer was a
"legal fiction" and added executives should not be expected to
be around UBC for the summer to
do AMS work.
Nicci Ricci, hiring committee
chair, said the AMS jobs only
stipulated the amount of work
which was to be done as a condition
of their hiring but did not mention
any recourse they could take if the
jobs were not completed.
Hiring committee recommended
to council in July to limit the hiring
next year to the president, finance
director, and one and one-half
other positions, all of whose projects would be chosen by council.
This year the summer projects were
drawn up by the executives
themselves.
"We feel we can learn by the
mistakes we made this year and
make good recommendations for
hiring next year," said Ricci.
"The money was not used well.
There were too many people working for not enough jobs," said Martin Cocking, student administrative
commission secretary.
Cocking said Council should be
the body which decides on the projects and not the individuals hired.
A motion will be brought forward by the hiring committee to
change the hiring procedures for
next year at the end of September.
Hiring committee is currently
researching the basis for the current
summer salary amounts, said Ricci.
Quebec funds research for high technology
MONTREAL (CUP) — "We're the
envy of every province," said the
McGill Dean of Research about the
Quebec government's new grants
for university researchers in high
technology fields.
"These new grants are unique,"
continued Gordon MacLachlan,
"No other province, or federal
agency has anything like them."
The Quebec government has set
aside $70 million over the next five
years to subsidise research on the
"cutting edge" of high technology.
After the five years, promising
research will be funded permanently-
"As you might well imagine this
makes every professor sit up and
take notice," said MacLachlan,
"You don't have those guarantees
in other grants — one year you're
on and the next you're not."
Yves Berube, minister of higher
education science and technology
announced eight research grants
last week for teams at Montreal's
four universities: McGill, Concordia,   Universite  de  Montreal  and
Visa students court Social Credit gov't
By DEBBIE LO
B.C. students are uniting to protest the provincial government's
decision ot remove medical service
plan coverage for visa students and
workers.
A September 19, 9:30 court date
has been set by the Simon Fraser
University's Teaching and support
staff union to get a court injunction
agains the decision.
Representatives from all three of
the B.C. universities are expected to
attend the court hearing but a large
crowd is not expected to appear said
Terry Hunt, Canadian Federation
of Students pacific region chairperson.
"The union was advised by their
lawyer not to encourage a large
crowd attendance," said Hunt.
"But we want to make our presence
known." He said they did not want
to look as if they were trying to
force a decision from the courts.
The TSSU originally had a court
date set for August 29, but the provincial health ministry asked for a
postponment on the decision.
The provincial health ministry
decided to remove MSP coverage in
July and did not officially notify
visa holders their MSP coverage
would expire on August 1.
Provincial health minister Jim
Nielsen has said the B.C. government provides medicare only to
those who have "qualified" resident status. About 4,000 students
and workers are affected by the
decision.
Nielsen said they were "cleaning
up their system" to explain the
ministry's sudden policy change.
The ministry announced on
August 14 it was extending MSP
coverage 90 days to give ' 'affected
persons additional time to arrange
coverage through a private health
insurer."
The ministries sudden policy
change caused visa holders to panic
especially those who were either
pregnant or had wives who were
pregnant.
Carlos Schrezor, a UBC visa student whose wife is pregnant, was
concerned because insurance companies do not take people with "existing" conditions.
"Notice should have been given
at least nine months before," he
said.
Universite du Quebec a Montreal.
These subsidies, each for about a
million dollars a year for five years,
are for basic research, according to
Dr. Paul Albert, vice-principal of
research at Concordia University.
"Instead of throwing money at
industry, or at applied reseach, they
are giving out awards to those involved with fundamental research
in new and unexplored fields," he
said.
Dr. Tom Chang at McGill received a grant for his work in correcting
genetic mutations. Inherited genetic
mutations like a cleft palate, or
hemophilia are caused by missing
enzymes in the DNA. Chang identifies the missing factor, constructs
an artificial one, inserts it in tiny
cells and shoots those cells into the
bloodstream. Hopefully, these cells
reproduce and eventually outnumber the mutant ones.
Another McGill team that received a grant last week is studying the
production of gallium, a metal that
promises to replace the silicon chip
for super fast computer.
"You've heard of Silicon
Valley?" asked MacLachlan,
"Well, the Quebec government
thinks we're going to have a gallium
valley here."
Forty special research teams
should be at work by next summer
and from the teams Quebec expects
new scientific knowledge and a new
crop of trained young researchers.
"Even if we produce three times
the number of PHDs we are now in
these hot areas, it would still not
meet the demand in Quebec alone,"
MacLachlan said.
Blanket, candles and pencils aid peace in Nicaragua
By KEVIN LOO
Tools for Peace, an organization
devoted to Nicaraguan aid, has
launched a campaign to raise $1
million this year.
The group's annual national
fund-raising drive this year consists
largely of three projects they call
Blankets, Candles and Pencils for
Peace, as well as a campaign involving the sale of calendars.
Tools for Peace hopes to raise
50,000 pencils and notebooks for
education in Nicaragua.
"The wonderful thing about
Tools for Peace is it deals with
tangible goods," said B.C. Coordinator  Creba.   "The public can
make donations and have no doubt
they will be used by the people of
Nicaragua. You can't use a shovel
for anything else but shovelling
earth."
Creba said he hopes to get
"quality donations" this year, including "complete office
packages" which can be shipped
whole to the Central American
country.
British Columbia currently holds
the highest number of Tools for
Peace members in Canada.
Creba who is trying to encourage
UBC support is also trying to form
an inter-collegiate committee by
linking   committees   from   UBC,
SFU, and Vancouver's community
colleges.
"SFU is really doing a lot," said
Pam Walker a volunteer for the
organization. "We really need a
contact at UBC."
Tools for Peace began five years
ago when "a group of fishermen
went to Nicaragua," said Walker.
It provided $25,000 of fishing
equipment to the Central American
country in 1981 and provided over
$1.5 million of aid in 1984.
The organization receives strong
support from the B.C. Teachers'
Federation, organized labor,
church groups, and medical committees, said Creba. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 17, 1985
GENERALISSIMO HEINRICH
Pollster support
Five hundred random anonymous people in the lower
mainland have provided further proof the Socred policy
on university funding is completely wrong.
A survey conducted by B.C.'s university faculty
associations showed a clear call for a halt to cutbacks at
B.C. universities and an increase in accessibility and
programs offered.
This should cheer those who call for a university effort to create support for higher education in the community.
The support is there — if the survey is correct we
simply have to mobilize people.
The current government in Victoria is noted for its
worship of the public opinion poll.
It can only be suggested they adopt higher education
as a new idol.
Or, on the other hand, they may be beyond help —
other parties are discovering polls too and might follow
these results.
The poll results as presented couldn't be better. On
almost every issue, the people surveyed supported
university education in principle and practice.
Which shows using universities as a scapegoat has
never been a wise strategy for any government.
THE UBYSSEY
September 17, 1985
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Friday throughout
the academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff
and are not necessarily those of the administrataion or the
AMS. Member Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey's
editorial office is SUB 241k. Editorial department,
228-2301/2305. Advertising 228-3977/3978.
Ubyssey staffers struggled and vied to gel into the office and in the masthead. All but Debbie Lo,
whose car refused to let her leave the campus. "Why did you leave your headlights on all day?" asked
Sarah Millin. And the Stephen Wisenthal asked why as well. "Why did you leave your headlights and
the radio on?" Karen Gram asked a few hours later Gordana Rasic and Svetozar Kontic reminded the
co-editor at the restaurant to check her headlights. "There hasn't been this much talk a about cars
since Robert Beynon flipped his van" said Chris Wont and Nancy Campbell. "Can I be of any use?"
moaned Mike Groberman, "Yes!", cried Tony Roberts and Camile Dionne. "Everyone is needed" said
David fvlcCallum and Kevin Adams. Eileen Lee and Allison Felker waltzed while Phillip Ross drew.
Rosanna Ditrnars stayed or. the fringe with Kevin Lot!
^^"ifWP^Pi
iiG w vvlw
Christ commands followers to destroy nuclear weapons
I am the incarnation of Jesus
Christ. I am also known as Grant
Castillou. I live in Richmond,
British Columbia, Canada.
The human race now has the
potential to create a super being
(computer artificial intelligence)
that would have the power through
science, to manipulate reality itself
(ie. matter, energy, emotions,
spirit, etc.) to the extent of being
able to give every human that ever
lived the long-dreamt-of Heaven,
forever young, forever happy.
The creation of such an artificial
intelligence is at least decades
(perhaps centuries) away, but I can
now reveal that this is God's goal
for humankind.
As a united planet striving to
create such an entity(s) we will need
all the luck we can get. As separate
"nations" constantly on the brink
of nuclear destruction we don't
stand a chance.
The nuclear-weapon-wielding
"armies" of the world must
dismantle, and then destroy the
component parts of, all nuclear
weapons immediately! These "armies" (and their contractors) must
cease to build weapons of mass
destruction of any kind, and
dismantle and destroy any now in
existence.
If dismantlement does not occur
the human race will surely be
destroyed, if not intentionally then
unintentionally through a technical
accident. With all these nuclear
missiles sitting around on a hair-
trigger, 30 minutes or less flying
time from their targets, controlled
by super-complex computer
systems, it is not hard to imagine
world destruction occurring ac-
cidently. If you, the reader, are involved   with   nuclear,   or   mass
destructive, weapons in any way
then I want you to quit your job, or
at the very least refuse to have
anything to do with these weapons.
There are no excuses for people
who design, build, deploy, maintain, operate, et cetera, these
abominations.
No one has the right to kill
another human being. Not a
"soldier" during "wartime," not a
policeperson "in the line of duty,"
(they can use stun guns or some
other non-fatal means of law enforcement) not an executioner "in
the service of the state."
This paragraph is mainly to inform the nuclear weapons operators
(the ones who would actually fire
the nuclear weapons) that in my
mind they would be committing
murder, plain and simple,
regardless of which "side" they
were on.
I have sent repeated messages (ie.
telegrams, telephone calls, letters,
et cetera) to the heads of the nuclear
armies ordering them to order the
forces under their command to
dismantle, and destroy the component parts of, all the nuclear
weapons in their possession and to
inform as many people as they can
(which I believe would be almost
everyone) that it is against my will
for a human being to hurt or kill
another human being (always has
been, always will be).
"War" is an abstract idea and in
a sense does not exist. "Wars" are
only the conceptual grouping of the
individual killing of one or more
people by one or more other people. In my mind "war" is evil
because it is evil for a human to kill
another human regardless of the
"reason."
I want all nuclear weapons
dismantled and destroyed immediately. I want whoever reads
this to take immediate, passive,
physical action against all the
nuclear (or mass destructive)
weapons they can reach.
If you live near a nuclear
weapons installation, or know
where there are nuclear weapons,
then go there and use whatever
means necessary (without physically
hurting anyone of course) to
dismantle and destroy those
weapons.
1 want you to make any nuclear
weapons you can reach as inoperative as possible. Destroy the
firing control apparatus; destroy
any supporting structures; drain the
fuel from the missile; remove the
warhead.
In other words, put the weapons
out of commission. It must be
done! If you need my order, as
Christ, to do this then I order you
to do it! If not, then I beg of you to
do it! True, you will very possibly
be jeopardizing your physical safety
but the alternative is surely eventual
complete human destruction, and
along with it any chance of artificial
intelligence created Heaven.
I want you to organize as many
people as you can to make a concerted, passive physical attack on
all nuclear (or mass destructive)
weapons. If no one will listen to you
then go yourself, but do it now,
within the next week.
I can't force you to follow me.
You must follow me of your own
free will. In order to follow me and
be a Christian you must obey one
law, "Thou Shalt Not Hurt
Anyone." I believe you all know
when you are physically hurting someone (or placing someone in
physical jeopardy, which amounts
to the same thing) and you must not
do this, especially murder.
Whether or not you are hurting
someone in some other way (ie.
psychologically, emotionally, finan
cially, et cetera) is more difficult to
decide.
As corny as it may sound, you
should let your conscience be your
guide in non-physical matters. As
long as you obey this law, then
everything will work out all right,
and we will be able to attain artifical
intelligence created Heaven. Believe
or disbelieve, as you wish.
I want anyone with over $30
million U.S. in assets to give the
amount that their personal wealth
exceeds this figure to charities that
feed the hungry people of the
world.
No matter how hard you have
worked for this money, $30 million
dollars is enough for anyone. You
can still make money, but at the end
of each year you should give to
charity the amount that your personal wealth exceeds $30 million.
Jesus Christ/Grant Castillou
55-10871 Mortfield Rd.,
Richmond
Grad centre bans South African products
At its council meeting on Sept.
12, 1985 the Graduate Student
Society decided to recommend a
ban on the sale of products with
South African connections to Food
Services, who provide food and
beverage service in the centre under
an agreement with the society.
This action was taken in light of
the strong support in favor of a
petition circulated to this effect.
Food services has agreed to support this ban and will now no longer
order South African products for
the centre. This mainly affects products sold by Carling O'Keefe and
Rothmans, both of which are con
trolled by the South African Rembrandt Tobacco Corporation. It
also includes Paarl Wines and Bran-
dy.
A list of the banned products includes:
Black Label, O'Keefe Ale, Old
Vienna, Heidelberg, Carlsberg, Extra Old Stock, Miller, BC Growers
Cider, Jordan Wines, St. Michelle
Wines, Paarl Wines, sherries and
brandy, Craven A cigarettes,
Number 7 cigarettes, and Rothmans
cigarettes.
The society is writing to the
above distributors, both to inform
these companies of our ban on the
sale of their products and to ensure
that    our    information    regarding
South Africa ownership is accurate
and up to date.
Phil Bennett
Graduate Student Society president
., *"v     .«^    ,   ,
Letters. We love 'em. We get a
kick out of funny letters, insightful
letters, stupid ones too. Please type
them triple space on a 70-space line
and address them to "Dearest
editorial collective." We edit for
brevity and style only No sexist or
racist letters, please. Bring them to
SUB 241K today. Tuesday, September 17, 1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Protect our parkland from a dying industry
By ANDREW STEVENSON
The recent issue raised by Jack
Munro of redefining our parks'
boundaries seems to involve one
basic disagreement: money versus
recognition of the value of these
areas as unspoiled climax-growth
forests. It takes these woods hundreds of years to reach their pinnacle of strength and beauty unique
to our coast.
British Columbians have traditionally sacrificed all other interests, fishing for example, blindly
asserting that "logging is our
number one industry" as if it
somehow follows that it should
therefore be our only concern.
However, it seems pretty obvious
that this short-sighted determinism
is being carried much too far when
it carries over into our parks.
If the forest industry is telling us
that it must log park lands to survive, then obviously we should be
ready to redefine the economic role
of logging in our province, and look
to (God forbid!) a little diversification as a means of well-being.
It is frankly disgusting the
selfishness shown by the forest
ministry, the fat-cat heads of the
logging companies, and the unions,
in their insatible hunger for "prime
industrial timber". To reasonably
suggest that we should cut even the
less than five per cent of land set
aside for wilderness parks marks an
element of desperation in an industry which is supposedly our
chief saviour from economic collapse.
When, one might reasonably ask,
do we begin the inevitable slowing
of the pace of logging? When
Munro demands that we log Stanley
Park? Industry heads and even loggers themselves must realize that we
cannot continue cutting at the rate
of the last fifty years forever, and
that jobs, and, yes even dollars, will
have to be given up sooner or later.
The question now is: do we lose the
few remaining examples of what
was once a fabulous heritage before
we face the reality that forests
are a limited resource? South
Moresby, the Stein, Meares Island,
and the lower Stikine River hold
less than one per cent of B.C.'s
timber while the jobs dependent on
those areas won't last 25 years. Are
the jobs worth the price?
Even if we apply the single factor
apparent to the supporters of logging parks: money, there are still
very good reasons to question its
"necessity". First, it is an industry
doing so badly it now receives great
subsidization by the taxpayers. This
has caused many U.S. states to lobby for tariffs against our lumber exports, further weakening the industry.
The Stein watershed area will be
logged at a deficit costing us many
millions of dollars with questionable benefit to anyone but a
small community of loggers. The
industry already suffers a slump
and double digit unemployment. Is
this the vital industrial basket into
which we should be sacrificing all
our eggs, including our park land?
Companies like Mac-Bio and
B.C. Forest Products bewail the
loss of those poor loggers' jobs, but
still tuck away huge profits. In reality the welfare of the loggers and
their families is furthest from their
minds as they shut down unprofitable mills all over the province. Of course, the companies will
be the last to hurt. Western Forest
Products, which needs so desperately to log the South Moresby Islands,
will harvest nearly two million cubic
metres of wood this year, without
the area. Some opponents to preservation would suggest that these
companies need be compensated for
their loss of timber.
Secondly we should consider
tourism, our, if it is so important,
"number-two" industry. 1 think we
have to ask ourselves what the
prime interest B.C. holds for
tourists is,what B.C. has that, say,
DISCUSSIONS FOR
WOMEN
Covering topics of interest
to women students
Wednesdays, September 25
November 27
12:30-1:30 p.m.
Women Students Lounge, Brock Hall, Rm. 223
ALL WOMEN STUDENTS WELCOME!!
Office for Women Students
Enquiries: 228-2415
FRIENDS OF CHAMBER MUSIC
SIX CONCERTS (Series one) $80.00
Academy of St. Martin in the Fields Octet
(England)
Salomon Quartet (England)
Bartok Quartet (Hungary)
Cascade Soloists (U.S.A.)
October 1,1985
November 12, 1985
January 28, 1986
February 25, 1986
Alexander Quartet with Michael Newman,
Guitar
Tokyo Quartet (U.S.A.)
March 11, 1986
April 29, 1986
THREE CONCERTS (Series two) $40.00
Beaux Arts Trio (U.S.A.) October 22, 1985
Prazak Quartet (Czechoslovakia) February 11, 1986
Fitzwilliam Quartet (England) April 15, 1986
COMBINED SERIES $100.00
AVAILABLE A.M.S. BOX OFFICE
STUDENTS HALF PRICE
New Jersey doesn't. To millions of
visitors who each year pump
millions of dollars into our local
economies, B.C. means unspoiled
wilderness and spectacular scenery.
On a visit to Europe recently I
wasn't surprised to find a general
picture of vast, overwhelming, untouched wilderness among those
who have long ago lost their own. I
despair at what these people would
think upon visiting most or our
coastal areas and witnessing the ugly results of massive clear-cut logging practices. I cannot imagine what
they would think of Canadians if,
perspectives
even in a Provincial park such as
Pacific Rim, their experience of
grand virgin forest was destroyed by
the buzzing of chainsaws. .And what
do we think of ourselves?
A third economic consideration
should be fishing, an industry in
almost as much trouble as forestry, |
but one which holds promise of j
long-term and quickly renewable I
abundance. Through much of the W
same lack of management as logg- ¥
ing, the once endless stocks of one rf\\
of B.C.'s richest blessings have ^ ^
been taxed to the extreme, where
now we have seasons of one or two
days in some fisheries, and usually a
couple of weeks in others. But, a lot
of it is due to the practice of the logging and/or mining of watersheds
and river systems, clogging the
spawning grounds with eroded soil,
tailings and pollution from men and
machines, decimating entire
populations.
The logging of an area such as the
South Moresby, while bringing profit and no apparent disadvantage to
a city-dweller, does more harm than
GAYS & LESBIANS
of UBC
1st General Meeting
Thurs., Sept. 19
12:30 p.m. SUB 215
COMING OUT
DANCE
Sat., Sept. 21,
8:00 p.m.
SUB Party Room
Get to Know Us!
VACANCIES
FOR
WOMEN
in
TOTEM PARK
RESIDENCE
(Room & Board)
Commencing: September I,
to: April 30, 1986
1985
Rates: Single room - $2,986.96
Double room - $2,732.86
Please Contact:
PONDEROSA
HOUSING OFFICE
2071 West Mall
Tel: 228-2811
good to the local economy, which
after all should be the most important concern. While loggers ship in
for intensive periods during the logging season, bring the whole camp,
machinery and supplies, and then
ship out to spend their money
elsewhere, leaving behind nothing
but a land stripped raw, fishermen,
who live in the area, permanently
create and support local communities, and leave no such destruction.
Where then, should our support
lie? Logging, in negatively affecting
the entire ecosystem, of which the
fisherman is a part, amounts to
sacrificing all other benefits to its
short-term and limited interest.
Why though, must economic
consideration be our only factor in
making the decisions of a
democratic, civilized society? Surely a natural setting, vibrant with life
r
i
and growth and abundance such as
existed all along our coast at one
time, has value even if man never
sets foot in it. Are we not beyond
our narrow view of man's place in
the world that holds that nature is
nothing more than something to be
wrung of all possible benefit to
him?
Our primary concern, if it is with
us, should be equally with the earth
that nurtured us. For this reason I
hope we set aside a few remaining
vestiges of virgin wilderness from
our ravages, as a small example of
the wondrous truth and beauty of
nature undisturbed, even if it means
a couple hundred loggers must find
other work.
Andrew Stevenson is an Arts student who prefers his parks untouched by loggers.
 UBC DANCE CLUB	
FREE
INTRODUCTORY
JIVE LESSONS
Fri.
Fri.
Sept. 20
Sept. 27
Contact.
SUB Party Room
12:30-1:30
UBC Dance Club, SUB 220 (228-3248) or
see us during Clubs Days!
-§«£-
Rhodes Scholarships
for 1986
Applications are available from the Awards Office for the Rhodes
Scholarship, for 1985-86.
Candidates must:
— have been born between October 2, 1961 and October 1, 1967;
— be Canadian citizens or persons domiciled in Canada;
— be unmarried;
— have   been   ordinarily   resident   in   Canada   for   at   least   five
years immediately proceeding October 1st, 1985;
— have completed at least three years of University training by
October 1st, 1986.
Successful candidates will have demonstrated literary and scholastic
attainments, fondness of and success in outdoor sports, qualities of
truth, courage, devotion to duty, sympathy for and protection of the
weak, kindliness, unselfishness and fellowship, moral forse of
character and insticts to lead and take an interest in their contemporaries.
COMPLETED APPLICATIONS MUST BE SUBMITTED
BY OCTOBER 25, 1985
CURLERS!
HOUSE
SUNDAY OCT. B TH.
U.B.C. WINTER
SPORTS CENTER
< new > curlers welcome
10AM. TO 4PM.
YOUR CHANCE TO
TRY CURLING-FREE! Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday,!
Viet
refo
Moviemi
winning
the gem
No Congress, no law,no Sandinfeta can stop him.
By KE
Reprinted from
Canadian
The Vietnam War is dead, long
live the Vietnam War. Ten years
after the fall of Saigon the
American Right is still fighting to
win the war - the war of historv over
how the American involvement in
Vietnam is perceived. They know
what actually happened often matters less than what people think
really happened. If history is rewritten to their satisfaction, the new,
ideologically improved version of
the "good war" in Indochina will
make similar military excursions in
Nicaragua, El Salvador and
elsewhere much easier to justify.
Leading the way in this battle for
Yankee hearts and minds are
blockbuster films like Rambo, Uncommon Valor, and Missing in Action, in which the USA kicks ass in
a rematch with the "Vee-Cees". In
terms of their impact, they may yet
be among the most important films
of the decade, or a curious cultural
footnote to a frightening time gone
by. It all depends on who wins the
war.
Together with predecessors like
First Blood and fanatical fellow-
travellers like Red Dawn (where the
Russians, Cubans, and Sandinistas
invade the U.S.), these movies are
so similar in content and huge in
popularity that they belong together
in one group. Whether their aim is
to turn a profit or to make a genuine political statement is un-
consequential; by manipulating the
current political insecurity in the
States, they focus on and whip up
an audience's fears into a frenzy.
They're agitprop filmmaking - propaganda that works through
agitating its audience — and it's
most effective. And ugly.
Consider the plots of Uncommon
Valor (1983), Missing in Action
(1984), and this year's Rambo. The
story in each is simple: either one
man or a small group of men attempts to rescue American soldiers
officially listed as "Missing in Action" during the Vietnam war but
actually held captive in prison
camps. Our heroes do this despite
the active interference of status quo
American politicians, who seem to
be more on the side of the Vietnamese government. Finally, after
the personal loss of a friend/friends
and the killing of scores of enemy
soldiers the MIA's are rescued and
flown back to heroes' welcome.
Roll credits.
Aside from the obscenity of
feeding the hopes of American MIA
families, there are other reasons
why these films are worth taking
another look at. One is their style —
an old-fashioned patriotic appeal
dressed up in slick new effects and
rock-video editing. While the flash
is from the 80's, their minds are still
back in WWII.
As in all old-school war films, the
supposed object of the fighting (rescuing the MIA's, holding the fort,
blowing up the dam, etc.) isn't really the point at all. The real purpose
is to WIN; to BEAT the ENEMY
and thus prove the SUPERIORITY
of your side and your race. Up to
now, traditional war filmmakers
were stymied about Vietnam; with
the exception of John Wayne's
gung-ho The Green Berets (1968),
Vietnam's saga was translated onto
film in more questioning terms.
Riding the peace/love movement
of the era, filmmakers not only
questioned America's "dirty little"
war, but the politics of war itself
-complicated social issues surrounding the players became the subject,
not just the context. But by shifting
the emphasis from the Vietnam war
where America lost, the filmmakers
of the 80s finally get their war
movie. And the truth gets shafted.
Besides using the convention of
old war movies, these souped-up
models also play off one pretty obvious model - the American hostage
crisis in Iran. Just as that nasty
episode made America collectively
feel "powerless" (so we're told), it
also focused the country's hatred
on the captors without questioning
why the Iranian's loathed American
involvement in their country's affairs. By rescuing MIA's from Vietnamese torture camps, these films
do double duty they eradicate that
run-down, "powerless" feeling
AND avoid that tricky little question of what America was doing
there in the first place. As Gene
Hackman's characater in Uncommon Valour said during his big pep
talk, "This time, nobody can
dispute the Tightness of what you're
doing." No-fault Vietnam. Except
their fault of course.
The tremendous public appeal of
these films in the States can be
chalked up to an urge to purge bad
times from the country's collective
memory. But their smash business
elsewhere in the world shows they
touch some universal chords, at
least among violence hungry men.
Rambo's huge popularity among
Shiite militiamen in Beirut proves at
least that. The reason: these films
create ready-made myths for our
time.
It's superfluous to bring up the
obvious glorification of war and
violence in these films, yet the content of each shoots so far past mere
militarism that it lapses into a
delirium where mythology is the only available comparison that works.
These modern-day heroes are the
ultimate product of all that's good
in America, placed against all that's
bad. They are, to put it bluntly, a
master race.
The roots of what makes an
American master race are laid bare
in the growing trend towards the
celebration of survivalism in media.
Survivalism takes such attributes
glorified by the American Right as
self-reliance, strength, and the willingness to "defend" territory
against enemies, and then places
them in extreme circumstances. The
ultimate goal for a survivalist is survival at all costs; killing the enemy
whenever possible, and keeping the
"American Way" intact. The
Green Berets of Vietnam are
presented as a pure breed of sur-
vivalist, possessed with a simple,
admirable rule — "When in doubt,
kill," according to Rambo mentor
Col. Trautman. The qualities of an
effective survivalist are not limited
to the highly trained machines in
the Vietnam war films. In Red
Dawn, ordinary high school kids
find it in their genes to fight back a
Communist onslaught, wiping out
entire Soviet convoys with football-
game enthusiasm.
With boys like that in every
American town today, the fighting
forces in the Vietnam films have a
lot to live up to - and they do.
Former kung-fu star Chuck Norris
is adept at taking out entire platoons with no survivors in Missing
in Action. The army buddies of Uncommon   Valour  may  not   do   it
single-handedly, but they have great
credentials, too - heredity. Gene
Hackman's Colonel Rhodes is the
progeny of hundreds of years of
American soldiers.
"We almost lost the whole family
at Gettysburg," he tells his men.
A certain legend named John
Rambo (minus the "John" -legends
need only one name) tops all others
like him. His debut in First Blood
(1982) made him a victim of police
brutality - a cute twist on anti-war
protesters. As a result, he turns into
the same unstoppable force he was
in Vietnam, turned against an
America where he has no place.
After retreating to the woods and
subsequently outsmarting hundreds
of police and national guard, he
returns to seek revenge upon the
sheriff that did him wrong.
The outsider wronged by society
is a fairly sturdy character in
legend, especially when he returns
for revenge. But First Blood looks
mild compared to its offspring.
In    Rambo,    which    Sylvester
Stallone co-wrote with James C
Cameron (of the Terminator), a
the cards are on the table. Early or
the film states that Rambo is c
"Indian-German descent - a helluv
combination." Especially if you'r
trying to brew up a mythic warric
-part survivalist, part Beowulf. H
ex-commanding officer Trautma
calls him a "pure fighting machin
with only a desire to win a wa
somebody else lost." When he take
on the MIA mission with orders nc
to "engage the enemy," it's a heai
ty joke for the audience. It's irr
possible to imagine him in a comba
situation - working in a factory or
restaurant aren't suitable occupa
tions for a demi-god. In fact, hi
philosophy is: you gotta becom
war."
Stallone and Cameron even cove
their barebones plot. When goin;
"home" to Vietnam via parachute
he gets hung up by a cord outsid
the helicopter, which he cut
through with his huge, gleamin;
knife - chopping his own unwantei
umbilical  cord to be born again
flrjk Casta
Reluctant 1 ptember 17, 1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
nam
light:
dicers try
the war
irals lost
J BURKE
te Dalhousie Gazette
Iniversity Press
He's even more otherworldly
because Vietnam, which equals the
world's worst place in this film, is
where this "fighting machine" was
truly "born". "What you choose
to call hell," says Trautman, "he
calls home."
The American killing machine in
the form of Rambo even transcends
his own form. When going through
his paces, he actually becomes the
elements. He leaps out of pools and
rivers. He becomes part of a bank
of clay, he drops silently from trees,
and is propelled from fireballs when
attacked. What the plot doesn't do,
the camera does - it worships his
knife, crossbow, and machine guns
with fetish-like close-ups while saving room for loving shots of his
most spectacular weapon of all —
the reknowned hyperbolic he-man
body. That just about covers all
necessary requirements for legend.
In these films, the only special effect to rival the stunts and explosions are the tricks they play with
reality. They turn the mess into an
American victory.  While claiming
to have "anti-establishment"
politics, the scripts read like a
Ronald Reagan wet dream. The
Vietnamese are made helpless in
their country and the Americans are
made into great guerrilla fighters.
And that's just the beginning of the
reality-disappearing act.
The MIA films handily erase the
presence of blacks among the
.American troops. While over 60 per
cent of the U.S. armed forces were
black men and boys - mostly boys
-the films all but overlook this fact.
One in ten of the soldiers in prison
camp scenes is black, while none of
the MIAs, or the valiant heroes
themselves, are black. Still, these
are not the first films to play down
the sacrifice and slaughter of those
men in order to pander to the juicy
demographics of the white
filmgoer.
Curiously, these hawkishly pro-
American intervention films are being made by people with little personal involvement in the Vietnam
War. Ted Kotcheff, the director of
First    Blood    and    Uncommon
Valour, is a Canadian. David Mor-
rell, the creator of the Rambo
character, was also born here, as
was the director of the film of the
same name.
Sylvester Stallone, the actor and
writer who climaxes Rambo with
the tear choked lines - "Hate my
country? I'd die for it! I want what
every guy who came over here and
spilled his guts wants — for our
country to love us as much as we
love it!" - is the very same Sylvester
Stallone that sat out the Vietnam
War, expressing his gung-ho
patriotism by avoiding the draft
during the real war by working as
an athletic coach at a Swiss private
school. He also spent time as an acting student, and a some-time porn
movie actor.
Some American Vietnam
veterans are finding Stallone's newfound patriotism too much to bear.
"He apparently feels he can represent all vets but we don't like that,"
says Eduardo Cohen of the
Veteran's Speakers Alliance, which
has organized pickets of California
theatres screening the film. "He
doesn't know what we went
through."
"We, too, were brainwashed
with similar propaganda before the
Vietnam war," says Cohen. "When
we got to Vietnam we found it
wasn't like a John Wayne movie."
So did the people already living
there. But they may as well have
been Indians in a John Wayne
cowboy movie for all the care these
movies exhibit for the Vietnamese
people. Once again, the country
becomes the backdrop for
American suffering, American
triumph, and American stories. In
each film there are two types of
Vietnamese: noble assistants (one
reason the U.S. was over there in
the first place) and yellow horde
(the other reason). Both types are
amply killed in battle.
Rambo takes this good-race/bad
race split to an almost pornographic
pitch. The only "good" Vietnamese
Rambo sees on his mission is a
woman guerilla fighter who gets
blasted in the back not a half-
minute after she and Rambo soul
kiss; her only saving grace seems to
be her ability to speak English. The
Yellow Horde aren't as culturally
privileged, so all other Vietnamese
are depicted throughout the film as
less than human.
We are shown scenes of young
girls "willingly" used for sex to
demonstrate the perversity of the
bad race. The soldiers exist as just
so much target practice for Rambo.
Because the troops frantically, nervously screech at each other in a
caricature of Vietnamese speech,
they're easier to keep depersonalized, easier to laugh at, and more fun
for Rambo to kill. The only Vietnamese man given any kind of personality is their shifty leader who
shoots the "good" woman in the
back, and Rambo blows him up
with an explosive-tipped arrow to
the gut.
The Russian troops in the film
are treated no better, but their white
(and therefore more preferable)
skin makes it more difficult for the
filmmakers to develop the same
pitch of racism.
The film also resurrects a political
belief very much in line with the
world of Ronbo Reagan, and that is
the Domino theory. The ideology of
battling communism at any cost has
full expression in these films
without really bothering to touch
on the issue; these men are just out
to rescue their buddies, and along
the way happen to show what weak-
kneed liberals wrought by not letting them "win" the war.
It's up to Red Dawn to put the
real cap on what this Domino
revivalism   means.   In   that   film,
communism is the insidious cancer
it was in the early '60's, spreading
from country to country like The
Great Flood, having no relation to
social causes such as a desire to
dump oppressive regimes. The
Nicaraguan revolution jumps its
banks and engulfs Mexico in a few
short years; the Green Party in
West Germany causes the annexation of Europe. It's not clear
whether or not the NDP causes
Canada's compartmentalization into 12 Soviet states, or whether the
commie liberals or PC's take care
of that with their "Socialized"
medicine and crown corporations.
Director-writer John Milius (E;
ecutive producer of Uncommon
Valor) leaves such Canadiai.
scenarios up to the viewer's imagination, but through his perspective, shared by the new gung-ho
Vietnam War films, only a complete roll-back of the. red tide will
make the world safe for survivalists.
It isn't too difficult to see what that
means if you're living in Managua
or the mountains of El Salvador.
The final equation goes
something like this: take a newfound belief that America never
really "lost" the Vietnam war, add
faith in these mythic military warriors, an America-first attitude, and
a willingness to separate a people
into pure good and evil, and the
sum equals a perfect climate for
Central American invasion. If
anything, the analogy works too
well. With the help of films like
Rambo and Red Dawn, the first
battles in the perception war are being fought right now, even here in
Canada. Reagan's men may be out
to rewrite history, but one recent
slogan of the political Left may be
applicable for the Right's causes as
well: "El Salvador is Spanish for
Vietnam." To which Rambo would
just as eagerly rejoin, "Do we get to
win this time?" Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 17, 1985
Frankenstein: great potential pointless excess
Frankenstein played at the
Heritage Hall on Main Street. The
building itself is a converted Post
Office/Police Station from the turn
of the century and provides a
suitably spooky atmosphere for this
adaption of the famous Mary
Shelley novel.
The characters in the play are
Victor Frankenstein, his
"creature," Robert Walton, captain of a ship, and his sister,
Margaret. In an incredible tour de
force performance, actor Dorothy
Wolf plays all four. For her frequent and instantaneous character
Emotional power-play
By ROSANNA DITMARS
The Comedians, a monologue by
playwright Trevor Griffiths, was
my first sampling of the many
delights offered at the first annual
Vancouve Fringe Theatre Festival.
I ventured out on a rainy Friday
the 13th evening hoping for a
theatrical experience extraordinaire
at the Grunt Gallery on East 6th
Ave.
What I got was not too far from
my expectations. The Comedians
was a short, barbed but humorous
satire of the London upper class,
with an underlying note of despair.
Lila Roberts and Dean Dogherty
play an upper class couple who
stand perfectly still for the entire 15
minute piece.
Both are frighteningly manequin-
like, particularly Roberts, who accomplishes the amazing feat of remaining immobile while tears
stream down her cheeks. While they
stand motionless, Tony Bardach,
playing a poor street musician,
delivers a funny, biting, and often
obscene monologue in a desperate
attempt to gain their attention.
However, the couple remains
oblivious to his efforts, so he begins
throwing sexist insults at Roberts,
whose subsequent tears indicate she
does have some emotional response
to him.
At this point the audience begins
to see one of the main themes of the
NEW
RETURN POLICY
On
Course Books
• Course books bought for Fall
Term mav be  returned for
full refund  any time up to
Oct. Ut   (the ten-day rule
has been eliminated).
Books must be unmarked and
in saleable-as-new condition.
Returns will NOT be accepted without the original
SALES RECEIPT.
After OCT.
all sales of
course books will be NON-
RETURNABLE.
REMEMBER
to keep your receipt.
NO RECEIPT
NO REFUND
NO EXCEPTIONS
BOOKSTORE
6200 University Blvd.
228-4741
play — the analogy between the
treatment of women by the men and
the treatment of the lower classes by
the upper classes. Yet this is not just
"another play about oppression",
but contains some genuine
moments of emotional poignancy.
For example, in the last two
minutes the street musician pins a
plastic pointsettia over the woman's
heart — a beautiful metaphor or
her shallow, loveless relationship.
In general The Comedians is fast-
paced, entertaining, well-
performed, and not without a few
insights into human relationships.
changes, Wolf makes full use of her
simple props — a chair, a pair of
scissors, and some paper — and effectively integrates dance/movement and vocal techniques into her
performance.
For example, when she
transforms from Dr. Frankenstein
into his "creature," her body
becomes deformed and twisted and
her voice is convincingly thin and
eerie. Indeed Wolf's performance
was unquestionably powerful, but
unfortunately if cannot overcome
the wordy, overcomplicated, and
often confusing script (adapted
from the original by Sam Rathie —
the director — along with Peter
Eliot Weiss and Dorothy Wolf).
Obviously a certain amount of
mental effort is required of the
play-goer in order to gain
understanding of the play, but in
this case, too much is demanded
— to the point of making it a chore
to watch. Characters and situations
jump back and forth so often
that by the end of the play the au
dience is completely befuddled
and are left with the burning question: "What happened?"
True, there were some effective,
interesting and genuinely moving
parts, such as the one in which "the
creature" expresses his feelings of
eternal aloneness and his desire for
love, but mostly things are so
complex and overdone that after
the first 20 minutes nothing seemed
to make an impression — a virtual
emotional desensitization.
The whole theme of the play —
the evil of absolute intellect — was
so bogged down by all the complicated subplots that it loses its
clarity and coherence. A potentially
entertaining and thought-provoking
piece of theatre, Frankenstein, with
the exception of Dorothy Wolf's
impressive performance, proves to
be nothing more than an exercise in
excess.
Theatre barely working
"The Working Theatre," an
hour-long play, attempts to deal
with death, suicide and
metaphysics, but comes across as a
kind of emotionally excessive "Hippie Theatre" meets Sylvia Plath.
Four women: the mother, sister,
friend and lover of Michael (Pat
Bermel) — the man who commits
suicide — run around in purple
spandex aerobic suits, wearing little   bells   and   pouches,   chanting
while doing interpretive dance.
They try to come to grips with their
grief by simultaneously quoting
William Carlos Williams poetry and
writhing around in primal scream
pain.
Their acting comes from the
school of bad melodrama — all intense, strained looks and meaningless, superfluous gestures. Actually, at times it verges on the
hilarious. This it theatre?
i AMS PROGRAMS S9
would like to thank the
following in helping the
AMS BBQ. be so successful
MILLER BEER-PEPSI
All of the Deans & Administration Staff of UBC
who cooked the hamburgers & served the beer.
Those who were dunked for the AMS Bursary
Fund — Patrick Chapman, AMS Food & Bev.
Mgr., Kim & Leslie of the PIT staff, Bill Raduak &
all The Engineers who volunteered, Terry
Desmond —Carling O'Keefe, Bryan Piazza —Grey
Beverage, Doug Ford & The Heritage Festival for
the tents, Debbie Gouler & Sea Festival, Glenna
Chestnutt — AMS President for all the extra help
and of course . . .
DOUG & THE SLUGS
for the music & to whoever cleared out the clouds
and gave us the sunshine.
SHOP ON CAMPUS
Goggles
Swim Suits
Panty Hose
Great Gifts
Exceptional Greeting Cards
Magazines
Candy
Cigarettes
UBC Sweatshirts
T-Shirts
Sweatpants
Lower Level Mon.-Fri.
Student Union 224-1911    8:00 am - 7:00 pm
Building. UBC Sat. 10 am - 5 pm Tuesday, September 17, 1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 9
Slugfest a slimey success
By TONY ROBERTS
In search of a good time, I
stumbled out of class late Friday
afternoon, my brain sauteeing in a
deep dish of Chinese Philosophy
and my feet plucking the sidewalk
like a funky Confucian chicken. I
was burned out from a week of erratic study habits, snivelling
bureaucracies, and bad food. But
harken! From beyond the student
union building it came. It was
unmistakeable. It was the sound of
a Slug. Despite a broken tail-bone I
inherited after one "PITful" evening two days earlier, my legs chugged to the opening beats of
Chinatown Calculation, and before
a minute had passed, I was witnessing a most slimey occasion.
There he was, head slug Doug
Bennett making a slippery desent
from the covered stage to an enormous throng of beer-slugging UBC
pilgrims who had settled on Macln-
nes Field. Dressed in his best
whites, Bennett waded into the
crowd like an intact snowflake in
the presence of the melted. Big
Doug exposed several students to
the heat of his satirical wit and soon
his rapping had the stage-front
packed with people, some dancing,
some crawling, some spilling full
beers on unlucky observers. From
that point on, it was obvious that
the Slugs had the crowd on their
side.
Their music is danceable, loopy
rhythm and blues. Get up and
Groove was good, but coupled with
Dougslug's mid-song procreation
jokes it took on some curious new
meaning.
You Don't Remember Me, with
its reggae backbeat, pulsed with
party power. By the time Day by
Day kicked in the Slugs were on a
roll that would last until the final
bell.
In true Slug tradition, a few oddball ditties were thrown in for good
measure: My Way and the theme
from Gilligan's Island. The latter title, complete with seagull squacks,
must warrant some special attention
because it drove one guy in front of
the stage to do the worm right there
on the lawn.  Afterwards he rose
from the turf like a new wave
phoenix, swamped in grass with a
severed hamburger bun glued to the
back of his head. I think this may
personify the ultimate Slug fan.
The show was filled with a
number of highlights, some on
stage, some on the field. T. Rex's
Bang a Gong, a chomping guitar
tune that has been covered by
millions of bands, sounded sufficiently slugified. Then the band
wrapped up the annual Alma Mater
Society bash with the UBC tribal
chant version of the Flintstones
theme and closed out with a hollering re-run of Day by Day.
The Slugs of 1985 are a solid unit.
The punchy rhythm section of Steve
Bosely (bass) and John Walley Watson   (drums)   is   rounded   off  by
6
Jackets, pants
hats 8- deck boots
SPECII1LTIE5
UEST
4564 W. 10th Ave.
university gates
228-1112
tBmfcg
To welcome you back we're offering you. .
Canon
What HEWLETT
mL'HM PACKARD
ALL
CALCULATORS
■-t.irr- Aii'j.. > - Sf
#.
Texas
Instruments
CANON
HEWLETT-PACKARD
SHARP.
TEXAS INSTRUMENTS
Come on over to:
UBC Bookstore Electronics Shop
We Have The Largest Selection of Electronic
Calculators in Western Canada
We're open Wed. evenings & all day Saturday
BOOKSTORE
6200 University Boulevard   228-4741
keyboardist Simon Kendall and
dual guitarists Richard Baker and
John Burton. Pudgy vocalist Doug
Bennett is a funny guy who insists
that his "perfect body" is pivotal to
his claim as a sex symbol of the
80's.
Without a doubt. Doug and the
Slugs are one of Vancouver's most
entertaining live acts and Bennett,
with his cuddly beer-weaned appearance, exudes an odd, if not
slighly ridiculous, charisma.
As I hobbled through the Macln-
nes field post-party site, I caught a
glimpse of the shell-shocked worm,
peeling a stale bun fragment from
the back of his head. A good time.
Case closed.
SOPHISTICUT
Special Offer
20% Off
Any Hair Service
With Student AMS
Card
1071 Denman St.
688-7808
2178 W. Broadway
731-4138
VANCOUVER SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
presents
MAESTRO RUDOLF BARSHAI
in the first
CP AIR MUSICALLY SPEAKING
CONCERT OF THE SEASON
Sat. Sept. 21, 8:30 p.m.
THE ORPHEUM
Mon. Sept. 23, 7:30 p.m.
Programme:
Symphony No  41 ("Jupiter")   -   Mozart
The Planets  - '-    Hoist
Tickets NOW! at all VTC and CBO Outlets, Eaton's
Woodward's (VTC and Orpheum service charges applicable!
$8    $12    $14    $19    $28
• Vi off for students and seniors -
TO CHARGE BY PHONE: 280-4444 u„„, M„ero„j v,M
Sponsored by
 CPAir L< ^
NEXT CONCERT BY THE VSO
Sun   Sept   .?'!
>■ to p m
lue
Mon. Sept.   to
8. !() p m "  10 p m
THE JUBILEE SERIES
Victor Ydmpolsky, Conductor;
Steven Dann, Violist
Musk by Prevost, VaugKin Willuum, VWilton. Britten
Tickets at all VTC Outlets
$8    $10    SH.50    $11.50    $18.75    $2^.50
CA
The career with a future
t»
f>
^^J-ffH^*
4
People with the expertise and skills to meet today's
business challenges are a step ahead in the competitive world
of the Eighties. A Chartered Accountant is one of those
people.
CAs are at the centre of the financial decisionmaking process and a Chartered Accountant's training and
judgment are always in demand. The Graduate Admission
Program could be your first step toward a career with a
future.
GAP prepares you for entry into the School of
Chartered Accountancy leading to membership in the profession. In the Graduate Admission Program you will obtain
a sound grounding in business finance, economics, taxation,
computers, commercial law, financial and management accounting and organizational behaviour — the skills
employers and clients need in today's complex economy.
The program is open to university graduates with a
minimum 65 per cent average in the last two years of university.
Chartered Accountants come from a wide variety
of backgrounds. They have degrees in arts, science, law,
education, commerce and other disciplines. They've made
their degrees work for them. The excellence of their professional training is recognized internationally.
Firms of Chartered Accountants in British Columbia are now hiring a limited number of applicants to begin
the program next spring. Make an investment in your future
— inquire about The Graduate Admission Program.
For further information, contact your Employment Centre on Carnpus or contact Gail Noden at the Institute of Chartered Accountants of British Columbia before
September 27.
#4
sra
Institute of Chartered Accountants
of British Columbia
1133 Melville Street
Vancouver, B.C. V6E 4E5. Tel: 681-3264
Canada's leading accounting professionals Page 10
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 17, 1985
TODAY
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Sale of membership cards at $45 for fall term ot
unlimited ballet, jazz,  stretch and dancercise
classes, noon, 1:20 p.m., SUB 208.
UBC DANCE CLUB
Noon   hour  practice  time,   noon,   SUB   party
room.
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Co-op supper, 6 p.m., Lutheran Campus centre.
AMS ART GALLERY
Showing of works by Gary Dennis, continues all
week, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., AMS art gallery.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION
Weekly   meeting,    bible   readings.    All   are
welcome. Noon, SUB 215.
UBC JUDO
Children's judo, 7-8 p.m., Tuesday and Thursday, Daycare gym. Arcade ave.
UBC JUDO
Judo practice, 8:30 p.m., Osborne gym E.
UBC WINDSURFING
Come get blown away, join UBC Windsurfing,
noon, SUB 57.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Sharing meeting, bring own lunch, noon, SUB
215.
UBC LIBRARY
Tour of Main and Sedgewick libraries, everyone
welcome, 10:30 a.m. and noon. Meet at Main
library, entrance hall.
UNDERWATER HOCKEY
First practice,  everyone welcome.  (Bring your
swimming suit) 7 p.m. UBC Aquatic Center.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION
Weekly testimony meeting  — all are welcome.
Noon, SUB 215.
WEDNESDAY
UBYSSEY SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM
Layout   and   design   seminar   featuring   Chris
Wong, followed by staff meeting, noon,  SUB
241k.
WOMEN STUDENTS' OFFICE
Discussion group for women, noon. Brock 223.
PSYCHOLOGY STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
1st general meeting, noon, Buchanan B212.
UBC LIBRARY
Tour of Main and Sedgewick libraries -
everyone welcome, 10:30 a.m. and noon, meet
at Main library, entrance hall.
AMS ART GALLERY
Showing of works by Gary Dennis, continues all
week, 10 to 4 p.m., AMS art gallery.
UBC WINDSURFING
"Come Get Blown Away" — Join UBC Windsurfing, noon to 1:20 p.m., SUB 57.
PEOPLE'S FRONT
Public Meeting: "What is the source of the
danger of war?", noon, Buchanan B223.
ACADEMIC WOMEN'S ASSOCIATION
Lecture by Dr. Beverly Burnside — Social
therapeutic approach to depression in older
women, noon, rm. 50 Family and Nutritional
Sciences Bldg.
PEOPLE'S FRONT
Public Meeting — Speaker is Charles Boylan,
National Spokesman of People's Front. "The 2
VilA
f'ltf#ti
superpowers and their military alliances, NATO
and the Warsaw Pact, are the source of war
danger", noon, Buchanan B223.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Sale of membership cards at $45 for unlimitec
ballet,  jazz,   stretch,   and dancercise  classes,
noon to 1:20 p.m., SUB 208.
THUNDERBIRD RUGBY
Men vs Trojans in Van First Division game, 5:30
p.m., Gordon park.
UBC DANCE CLUB
Noon hour practice time, noon.
THURSDAY
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Small group meetings — teaching, sharing, caring, 7-9 p.m., 1868 Knox rd.U.E.L. Call 228-8554
for info.
CAMPUS CRUSADE FOR CHRIST
General prime time meeting, noon. Brock hall
302.
UBC CHINESE CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
There will be a short meeting concerning the
clubs day for those who are interesed in helping,
noon. Scarf 209.
STUDENT CHRISTIAN MOVEMENT
Newman club — Lutheran Student movement
—  Anglican United Student ministry presenta
tion — dialogue on Christianity in the Philippines, noon, Lutheran campus centre.
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Thursday nooners, noon, Lutheran Campus can
tre.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Sale of membership cards at $45 for unlimited
ballet, stretch, jazz and dancercise classes, noon
to 1:20 p.m., SUB 208.
UBC DANCE CLUB
Noon hour practice time, noon.
UBC LIBRARY
Tour of Main and Sedgwick libraries — everyone
welcome, 10:30 a.m. and noon, meet at Main
library, entrance hall.
ISMAILI STUDENTS ASSOCIATION FOR UBC
General meeting, noon, Buchanan B216.
SCIENCE FICTION SOCIETY
"Dr. Who" Introspective on CFRO Radio (co-op)
102.7 FM - The Ether Patrol, 9:30 p.m.. The
Radio 102.7 FM.
WOMEN'S SQUASH TEAM
Tryouts wilf be held Thursday, Sept. 19 at the
Winter Sports Centre squash courts from 12:30
to 2 p.m. Everyone welcome.
UBC JUDO CLUB
Judo practice Tues. & Thurs., 8:30 p.m., Saturday, 11:30 p.m. at Osborne Gym E. Contact
Room 203 War Memorial gym.
Children's Judo; Daycare gym, Arcade ave.
Contact Room 203 War Memorial gym, 7 to 8
p.m., Tuesday & Thursday.
CLUBS' DAYS
ALL DAY
AMS
MONDAY, SEPT. 23
TUESDAY, SEPT 24
BOTH FLOORS OF SOB
I WANT YOU
TO
JOIN A CLUB!
BacktoSchool With PENTEL
[Pentel Combo
k
Package includes:
Clic Eraser,
SuperBall, M25
Pencil, Free Tube
of C505 HB leads
Reg. $5.28
Sale
3
49
Pentel Opaquing
Fluid Correction
Pen I
Oil Based
Quick Dry
& Multipurpose
Reg. $2.98
Pentel Oil Pastels
Clear, brilliant colors. Use on paper
board or canvas.
Sale   -J 39
PHN 12 Reg. $1.95 JL
Sale   199
PHN 16 Reg. $2.60 A
Sale
1
99
Pentel Quicker Clicka
Assorted
colors
Reg. 53.98
Sale
2"
PentaH.-
ThiiU
BOOKSTORE
6200 University Blvd. 2284741
Safe expires Sept. 30.
Register NOW with the
UBC DANCE CLUB
and enjoy
Meeting People — Learning to,dance — Lessons
taught by professionals — monthly parties — and
much more.
at LOW, LOW Prices!!
Contact: UBC Dance Club-Upper SUB (228-3248)
JOIN THE FUN!!!
*Free Jive Lessons, Friday, September 20, 27 at 12:30 p.m.
SUB PARTY ROOM
INTERESTED IN CA EMPLOYMENT?
ARTHUR ANDERSEN & CO. is seeking 1986 graduates
for Vancouver and all other offices of the Firm. Submit
your resume to the Canada Employment Centre on Campus (forms are available from the Centre) by October 3,
1985.
All resumes will be acknowledged. You will be contacted
on or about October 11th regarding campus interviews
which take place during the week of October 21st. Additional information is available at the UBC Canada
Employment Centre and the Accounting Club.
rTHE CLASSIFIEDS^
kTES: AMS Card Holders - 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; Additional
lines, 60c. Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $4.50; Addi-
Classified ads are payable in advance.
Deadline is 10:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications Room 266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
Charge Phone Orders Over $10.00. Call228-3977.
COMING EVENTS
70 - SERVICES
The Friends of the
Richmond Public Library
are   holding   a   mammoth   BOOK
SALE on Sunday, September 22nd
1985 from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the
Minoru Sports Pavilion, 7191 Granville Ave., Richmond.
ADVENTUROUS?
HOT AIR BALLOONING, YACHT PARTIES
SCUBA PARTIES, TEXAS BBQ'S,
DISCOVER INTRIGUE, EXCITEMENT
& ROMANCE.
DISCOVER DOUBLE-DATE
for $20/year
736 4444
11 - FOR SALE- Private
LOVELY SIDE BY SIDE duplex with 2
bdrm. & den. Exc. revenue. Asking
$249,500. Pauline Jones, Royal LePage,
Kerrisdale Branch. 261-7211, 738-0583.
1979 SUZUKI GS 850 Vetter Windjammer
Fairing, Vetter Saddlebags. Excellent cond.
23,000 km. $1700 obo. 222-2284.
IBM   CORRECTING   SELECTRIC   II.   Ex.
cond. $600 obo. 738-7183.
20 - HOUSING
SHARED ACCOM. Want 1 N/S female,
large 2 BR. apt., Kerrisdale. Share with 2
other females. $225 & 1/3 util. 261-7601.
25 - INSTRUCTION
FAST, EFFICIENT, professional writing/
editing/typing services. Excellent results.
Reas. rates. 734-0154.
PIANO LESSONS by Judy Alexander,
Graduate of Juilliard School of Music.
321-4809.
30 - JOBS
BABYSITTER NEEDED. Two, three or
four mornings per week. $4/hour.
222-3348.
35 - LOST	
ANYONE finding grey pack sack or
clothes bag at Vanier Residence Aug. 10,
please phone 397-2186. Contents are important. Reward offered.
LOST — Light blue sweat shirt with
B.C. crest. Lost near Totem Park. Please
call 224-9901, ask for Dave, rm. 483.
WOULD        THE        PERSON        who
found my white purse outside the
Bookstore last Monday please call me.
526-9050. Reward.
PERSONAL INJURY
ACCIDENT CLAIMS
Gerrit TeHennepe
Barrister & Solicitor
683-6561
No Charge For
Initial Consultation
80 - TUTORING
FRENCH or Spanish tutoring & transac
tion. B.C. certified teacher. Daytime classes
perferably. Beg. to Adv. level. 261-4987.
85 - TYPING
EXPERT TYPING: Essays, t. papers, fac-
tums, letters, mscpts, resumes, theses.
IBM Sel II. Reas. rates. Rose 731-9857,
224-7351.
WORD WEAVERS Word Processing.
(Bilingual) Student rates. Fast turnaround.
5670 Yew St. at 41 St. Kerrisdale 266-6814.
THUNDERTECH PERFECT TYPING. Computerized word processing system. Essays,
resumes, etc. Stud, rates. 873-2062.
EXPERT essay, theses typing from legible
wk. Spelling/grammar corrected. 738-6829,
10 a.m.-9 p.m. King Ed. bus rte.
TYPING/WORD PROCESSING. Experienced typist. Reasonable rates. Call
Mari-lou, 421-0818 (near Lougheed Mall).
40 - MESSAGES
ANY UBC STUDENT, staff, faculty wishing
to write about peace/disarmament for The
Ubyssey please call James at 734-4128.
FOR FREE. Kittens, tabby, trained and wean
ed. Cute as buttons. Please call evenings,
266-6305.
EXPERT TYPING - IBM Sel. essays, term
papers, letters, resumes, theses. Reas.
rates. 298-1147.
90 - WANTED
WANTED: People interviewed for jobs at
Expo. Particulary but not exclusively for the
Expo Preview Center; for an article on Expo
hiring. Phone Patti Flather at 732-2445. Tuesday, September 17, 1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 11
Low wages dispel Challenge '85 success
OTTAWA (CUP) — Although
the unemployment rate among
returning students fell last summer,
the news may not be as good as it
looks. Most students are now earning much lower wages than before
the recession, according Kenneth
Bennett of Statistics Canada
Household Surveys Division.
The seasonally adjusted
unemployment rate fell to 11.1 per
cent in August from 14.4 per cent in
July, according to figures just
released by StatsCan. The new
August figure is just one per cent
lower than August 1984, and approaches 1981 levels.
"The largest growth (in student
employment) has been in the service
sector," Bennett said. Before the
recession, many students could find
jobs in forestry, mining or
manufacturing. But in 1985, "you
don't find students making their
way on to the factory floor
anymore."
The late drop in unemployment
statistics means many students
found work only in the last few
weeks of summer. Others, like Gordon Miller of Simon Fraser University, worked for more than half the
summer but at very low paying
work. Miller, who commuted to
work at Whistler mountain, a two
hour drive from Vancouver, saw
gas costs consume almost all his
$1,700 earnings.
Low wages were also prominent
among Challenge '85 jobs.
Although the minister responsible
/
PERM • BODYWAVE SPECIAL
PERM, CUT & DRY   (| A    05
till
31 Oct. 85
733-3831
39
3621 W. 4th Ave.
STUDENT SPECIAL
20% OFF
THE REGULAR PRICES
OF ALL MERCHANDISE
IN THE STORE.
With a copy of this ad
or the presentation of
an AMS Card.
Big savings on hockey equipment, soccer   boots,   racquets,   running   wear,
sports bags, day packs, etc. etc. etc.
at
COMMUNITY SPORTS
3615 West Broadway
733-1612
OPEN SUN DA YS NOON TO 5:00 P.M.
THIS OFFER EXPIRES SEPT. 30/85
for the program, Flora MacDonald,
cited only success stories in a recently released press kit, New
Brunswick students have another
tale to tell. With 57 per cent of the
Challenge '85 grants paying
minimum   wage,   students   earned
save the $68 per week required for
the student loan program after paying for the food and lodging.
In Nova Scotia, the government
assumes students save $72 a week
from summer earnings when
calculating loans and bursaries.
money is long and nerve-racking,
says Anne Marie Turcotte, Canadian Federation of Students researcher.
"The best student aid is a summer job," she said. "If students
had a decent job with decent wages,
they would not need student aid."
minimum   wage,   students   earned    calculating loans and bursaries,
only $152 per week. They could not Appealing for more student loan
U of T debates S. Africa support
TORONTO (CUP) — The
University of Toronto's Governing
Council is headed for a second
round of heated debate over the
school's hefty investment in companies that do business with South
Africa.
The Council, the university's top
administrative body, is expected to
again take up the contentious issue
Sept. 10, shortly after a group of
students concludes an Orientation
Week petition campaign. The campaign will protest the $6 million U
of T has invested in banks and corporations that deal with South
Africa.
The U of T Divestment Committee is renewing its efforts after
presenting   university   president
George    Connell   with    a   pro-
divestment brief last November.
"Faculty and students are upset
about U of T's investment policies
and pressure is mounting," said
committee member Ava Szczurko.
"The situation in South Africa is
making it increasingly difficult for
governing Council to treat the issue
lightly."
*
*
*
University of British Columbia
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
presents
Tennessee Williams
THE GLASS MENAGERIE
with
Marjorie Nelson
SEPTEMBER 20-28
(Previews Sept. 18 & 19)
Curtain: 8 p.m.
STUDENT SEASON TICKETS
4 Plays for $13
September 18-28
THE GLASS MENAGERIE (Williams')
November 6-16
LOVE FOR LOVE (Congreve)
January 15-25
MAJOR BARBARA (Shaw)
March 5-15
AS YOU LIKE IT (Shakespeare)
* * BONUS PRODUCT/ON * *
(Not Included In Regular Season)
April 7-May 3
THE THIRTY NINE STEPS
A new Musical by John Gray (Subject to rights approval)
BOX OFFICE * FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE * ROOM 207
Support Your Campus Theatre
& ToucheRoss
Look sharp.
The headhunters
are coming.
They're coming to find you. The cream.
Those who have ambition, smarts and
motivation.
The bright minds who wish to join a bright,
energetic company.
An international firm of chartered
accountants, professionals with an industry
reputation for forward thinking and excellence.
If you think your head fits with ours, please
submit your application, accompanied by recent
transcripts, to the Campus Employment Center
by October 3rd.
October 21st, 22nd & 23rd, we'll be on
campus. Hunting for you.
JL Page 12
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 17, 1985
Slow start costs
T - birds game
AT A GLANCE
By SVETOZAR KONTIC
The UBC football club could not
come back from a 17 to nothing
deficit and lost 32-20 in Manitoba
on Saturday afternoon.
UBC had an impressive total of
388 yards offense in the game including 22 first downs. Yet the
'Birds could not narrow the
Manitoba lead any further than
28-20. The game was marred by
penalties as UBC was penalized 13
times for a total of 170 yards.
"Manitoba got an early lead, and
playing in their  building made it
week was absent as UBC gained a
mere 84 yards on the ground.
"Manitoba played well, it was a
tough game. They played a major
part in stopping our running
game," said Smith.
After falling behind 17 to nothing
in the first quarter UBC managed to
get on the scoreboard with two field
goals by Ross Gatensbury. The
score at half time was Manitoba 25
and UBC 6.
But at 5:01 of the third quarter
Pearce returned a punt 91 yards for
a touchdown. Then at 14:07 of the
SPORTS
tough to catch up," said UBC
coach Frank Smith.
The bright spot of the day was
UBC quarterback Jordan Gagner
who set a new record for completions in the game, breaking a record
held by former Thunderbird great
Dan Smith.
Gagner completed 26 of 36 passes
for 312 yards breaking Smith's
record of 23 completion set back in
1975 and again in 1977.
For his efforts Gagner was named Thunderbird Shop Thunderbird
male athlete of the week. More importantly it may signify UBC
generating a passing attack for the
first time since Dan Smith was
quarterback.
Other standouts included running
back Matt Pearce who had a 91
yard punt return for a touchdown.
Receiver Tom Vlasic caught eight
passes for a total of 99 yards. Yet
the formidable running game of last
'Bird
(droppings
The UBC women's soccer team
started the season off on the
weekend with a 3-1 victory over the
University of Puget Sound Loggers
at UBC's O.J. Todd field.
Christine Pinette led the
Thunderbirds with two goals while
Sheila Chondon added another.
Shelley Flack replied for the losers.
The UBC men's soccer team will
open their season this weekend at
home with a game against the
University of Victoria Vikings.
p"-——J
9 Come out and see S
4 what goes into the    4
8 making of the            8
f Ubyssey, your
4  come and join in the 9
festivities hosted by   4
j  out in the Ubyssey 8
4.  office, have fun, 4
8  learn something, 8
4, maybe even meet 5
B  some people. 4
same quarter running back Terry
Cochrane, a star of last week's
game, scored from the one yard
line. That left the score at 28-20
after three quarters but UBC never
got any closer.
A fading running game and a
host of penalties cost the 'Birds.
UBC also had two fumbles and two
interceptions in the game. Inconsistency and the inability to finalize
drives were the detrimental factors
in the game for UBC.
Smith said, "We couldn't finish
off our drives and had to kick field
goals instead. We have to tie up
some loose ends. People tend to
forget that we do have a young
team and we have to keep
working."
UBC now one-and-one on the
season travels to Calgary this Friday
to take on the first place Dinosaurs.
Calgary, now two-0 is coming off
an impressive 44-16 victory over
Alberta on the weekend. The contest will be important for UBC and
should prove entertaining and interesting.
The Dinosaurs had a huge turnout for the Alberta game and
crowds exceeding 7,000 people are
expected for the contest with UBC.
Catch all the action live on CITR
Radio (102 FM, 100 Cable) beginning at 6:15 p.m.
GRAND SLAM WINNER
To win this laurel, your team
must win the Logan Cycle 200, Arts
'20 Relay, Centipede Road Run and
Storm the Wall. The varsity
women's rowing crew captured the
crown last year, while no men's unit
emerged victorious. The Rowers are
convinced they will sweep these
events again, but they will have stiff
competition from Forestry, who are
strong contenders. Of the men's,
the Rowing men are the favourites
— other candidates are Engineers,
Foresty and fraternities.
So shoot for the Laurel, and sign
up now for the first event, the
Logan Cycle.
INAUGURAL ROAD RUN
The first of sixteen noon runs —
the Inaugural Road of 2.8 km and
4.8 km kicks off this year's Intramural program.
Last year we had a record
number of 304 participants. The
times to beat this year are: Men —
Paul Van Donkelaar, Rowing, of
9:21.4. Women — Brenda Taylor,
Rowing, with 11:27.4.
A giant send off of helium
balloons and a band from the UBC
music department will start off the
SHOTOKAN
KARATE
-SELF DEFENSE
-TOTAL FITNESS
Registration Room 203
WAR MEMORIAL GYM
(&.
^\
BOOKSTORE
announces a
NEW YEAR ROUND SERVICE,
beginning September 3rd
FOR YOUR
USED TEXTBOOKS
We will pay you up to 50% for
your current edition texts, scientific,
technical or reference books.
service
of
BOOKSTORE
6200 University Boulevard
228-4741
I
event. Messages filled out by runners are put in the balloons. These
messages were found as far away as
Everett, Washington and Hope,
B.C. last year. When returned, both
the runner and the receiver get
clothing prizes. There will be free
soft drinks and spot prizes for
everyone.
UPCOMING EVENTS
«-^.'
THREE ON THREE
BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT
If you want some intense three-
on-three basketball this event is for
you. Players play three-on-three
half court games in a round robin
format in each of Divisions I, II and
III. Sponsored by the UBC
Bookstore.
REGISTRATION DEADLINES
Oct. 1-Nov. 28
Fort Camp Hockey League
Sept.
16-20
Sept. 21, Sept. 26
Logan Cycle "200"
Sept.
16-20
Sat., Sept. 21
UBC Open Golf Tournament
Sept.
16-18
Sept. 28-29
Softball Tournament (Co-Rec)
Sept.
18
Fri., Sept. 20
Inaugural Road Run
Drop
in
Sept. 27-28
Bookstore 3-on-3
Sept.
16-20
Sept. 19-Dec. 1
Drop-in Volleyball (Co-Rec)
Drop
in
Sept. 19-Dec. 1
Drop-in  Badmirtnn 'Co Recj
Drop
in
=&
SIMPLEE   SHELVES
KXJfaoFP RESULT PRICES
d)& STUDENT D15C01MT
/AN E.XTRA \07o OFF
1    (S-    r—4
^fctS   w    if7* NtARftuuft   T58-OSBI
OFFER.   65T>P«».e^.    StPT   AS. /85"
COMMUTING?
Bike
to the
Co-op!
For
the best deals
on cycling accessories
in town!
Blackburn AR-1 Rack $35.00
Kryptonite K4 Lock $39.50
Espa Touring Shorts $22.50
Zefal HP Pump $12.50
Plus Bell helmets,
wool tights, safety vests, and
more at low Co-op prices.
MOUNTAIN
EQUIPMENT
CO-OP
On 8th Ave. between Cambie and Yukon. 872-7858
Bring this ad in for a FREE catalogue.

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0126039/manifest

Comment

Related Items