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The Ubyssey Oct 1, 1965

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Array UN-ORTHO-DOX
SHE'S 18, SINGLE
THE   UNIVBRSITY   OF   BRITISH   COLUMBIA
HEALTH SERVICE
Our bachelor girl perforates  - ^- -
leaky Wesbrook pill policy   »
^4C
^-^C
^■o
By ANN  RATEL
I'm an 18-year-old single co-ed, and I've
got a prescription to buy a two-year supply
of birth-control pills.
How did I get it? Courtesy of UBC's
Wesbrook hospital.
UBC Health service's assistant director
Dr. C. A. Brumwell said Wednesday UBC
will give birth-control pills to married
co-eds, but not to single ones.
He said: "There have been cases where
single co-eds have tried to get prescriptions for birth-control pills, but they have
been refused."
Following this statement I wondered if
it was indeed impossible for a single girl
to receive birth-control pills.
And I found out it wasn't.
Wednesday afternoon I borrowed a ring
and assumed a married name.
Arriving at Wesbrook, I filled out the
regular health service's form with my assumed married name, but also wrote my
real name underneath.
The attendant on duty asked me which
name my UBC health service records were
under and I told her they were all in my
maiden name.
I asked to see a doctor, but she said
they were off-duty after 3:30 p.m. and 1
could only see a nurse.
I was shown to an examination room
and, shortly after, a nurse entered.
I asked her about contraceptives and she
said I would have to return Thursday and
get a prescription from a doctor.
Returning Thursday, I had a short but
very interesting and revealing, discussion
about birth control with a health service's
doctor.
Seeing my maiden name crossed out on
my records and my fictitious married
name written in, the doctor said birth-
control information could not be given to
single co-eds.
The doctor also asked me how long I
had been married.
"Since last Saturday," I replied.
He asked me a few questions about my
relations with my husband and offered
me several alternatives to purchasing
birth-control pills.
He said no physical examination was
necessary because all pertinent data required by the hospital was available under
my maiden name.
He then filled out the prescription which
allows me to buy Ortho-Novum birth-
control pills for the next two years.
'■^T-.
>v
XX
FORM NO. 39
PRESCRIPTION WORTH 480 PILLS - 20 a month for two
years — was handed our sneaky but single reporter by
Wesbrook doctor whose name has been obliterated. Prescription will  be returned.
Clip
and
swallow
THE U8YSSEY
Vol. XLVIII, No. 7
VANCOUVER, B.C.,  FRIDAY, OCTOBER  1,  1965
«@»       CA 4-3916
1 in 10 sign
fee protest
—don kydd photo
MAYBE MALTHUS WAS RIGHT
ANNUAL ARGUMENT for birth control was armory scene Thursday as students crammed themselves into building to check 68 c lub displays. Picture shows 2,387 of the many
thousands who showed  up.     (See also page 3 and 14).
petition
One tenth of UBC's students have indicated their willingness to  join  the  fee  fight,  Education  Action  Program
officials said Thursday. endum the petition requests.
"Close to 1,500 students have AMS councU Monday night
signed our petition calling for said & referendum will be heid
a referendum on the fee fight, Qct 2Q Qn tQe .^^ n wiu ask
organizer Randy Enomoto said. students  to  show support  for
"We got 120 more signatures student council fay withholding
during the two-hour clubs day their  second   term   fees   until
scramble. negotiations between the Board
And   while   students    were of Governors and the AMS are
signing the petition at a rate deemed fruitful.
of one a minute, another 100 „There is too much rule from
students signed up for commit- the top>„ Cruise said <.We wanl
tee work at the Education Ac- the Board of Governors to take
tion Program booth. a more reaiistic view on stu-
EAP co-chairman Bob Cruise dent fees.»
said   the   response  was   "very At   the   Canadian Union   of
enthusiastic." Students club's day booth, local
"Now we're going to get out cus vice.President Blair Tully
some  concrete   programs,"   he said   plans   for   the   Qct    27
sala- march by students on Vancou-
The 1,600-odd students who ver  courthouse  were  moving
have indicated strong interest ahead.
in  EAP  represent  about  one- Tully   said   B c    Commerce
tenth    of    UBC's    enrollment minister Ralph Loffmark's ar-
16,20°- gument Monday for retaining
Signers of the petition now fees were "rather weird."
do  so  more  to  indicate  their "Not   only   can   the   federal
concern for the problem than (Continued on Page 3)
to achieve the fee fight refer- SEE: RALPH Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October  1,   1965
JUST PLUG IT IN
»,__^•
Electric library
most automatic'
UBC's library system is now one of the most automatic
in Canada, library head Basil Stuart-Stubbs said Thursday.
He said the library now has
three Xerox photo-copiers, a
teletype system and a Telex
system connected to all Canadian cities and parts of the
USA.
An IBM system which replaces call-slips is now in full
operation and organization will
be completed within two weeks,
he said.
"Economy and better service
are the base of the new system," said Stuart-Stubbs.
He said that one million
books are being purchased each
year for the library.
A list of the new material
will be distributed to faculty
members.
But the most important project getting underway is the
mechanization of cataloging by
the IBM system.
"I am looking forward to
much progress within the coming year," said Stuart-Stubbs.
Universities aid
'relative — Liberal
Senator John Connolly
Liberal leader for the Canadian senate, came to clubs
day Thursday as a guest of
UBC Liberals.
But he refused to deal
with specifics when asked
about the fee situation at
UBC.
He said that the government is going to continue to
emphasize education in its
platform.
But it will not put as-much
money into B.C. education
as into other provinces.
"You must remember B.C.
ia the second richest province
in Canada," he said.
"Aid to education is a
relative matter."
Brass, pipers mark
our 50th birthday
UBC celebrates its 50th birthday today.
The event will be marked
by a combined faculty-student-
administration ceremony at
Brock Hall.
An academic procession led
by four pipers will walk from
the Lasserre building to Brock
at   12:30.
Chancellor Phyllis Ross and
President John B. Macdonald
will speak at the  ceremony.
Other speakers will include
Justice A. E. Lord, and Col.
Harry T. Logan, the only man
who has been a faculty member since 1915.
Letters of invitation to the
ceremony have been sent to all
students and faculty members
present during the period
1915-1925.
IThe university first opened
its doors to students in 1915 on
the site now occupied by the
i Vancouver  General Hospital.
The move to the Point Grey
campus did not come until
1926.
Vancouver writer Dave
Brock, whose father was Dean
of Applied Science from 1914
to 1935, will speak) at the conclusion  of the ceremony.
A reception in Mildred
Brock  Lounge   will  follow.
FROSH QUEEN CUTIES - 15 A-GO-GO
—bert   mackinnon    photo*
SHERRY BIE
DIANE BREHM
LINDA DORRICOTT
BARB DUGAS
BIRGIT FREYBE
LINDY JORDAN-KNOX
TRACY KENMUIR
LINDA KING
KIT McKINNON
DIANE NEUFELD
NIKI NORBERG
SUE RURYK
URSULA SCHAEFER
MARGARET TAYLOR
MELINDA WHITAKER Friday, October,  1,   1965
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
—don kydd photo
MUSSOC'S LI'L ABNER rides again at clubs day exhibit
Thursday, but Daisy Mae was the star attraction. Our
photog was too flustered by her smile and crushed by
the crowd to get her name.
100 FROSH RETREAT
It's retreat time for UBC's frosh.
This afternoon, 100 frosh leave UBC for frosh retreat at Camp Elphinstone.
The program starts tonight with history professor
Dr. John Norris talking about the changing character of
university life, followed by classics head Dr. Malcolm
McGregor on the individual's participation in campus
activities.
A singsong and a dance will provide the evening's
entertainment.
The frosh split up into small groups Saturday to discuss clubs and committees, publications and athletics with
senior   students.
Former frosh president Kim Campbell will talk on
student government and Alma Mater Society's first vice-
president Bob Cruise will discuss higher education.
Saturday night will see a student debate, followed by
skits and another dance.
Rev. Jack Shaver of the United Church will give a
religious service Sunday. The retreaters return to Vancouver Sunday night.
ON THE HUSTINGS
Tories opt upped
education money
By ROSEMARY HYMAN
The national Progressive Conservatives have opted for
increased federal grants to education.
An 11-point program released ———
MGAA, Spock
get campus
competition
by the conservatives advocates
a $5 per capita federal grant
to the provinces, compared to
the present $2 grant.
Ian Drost, chairman of the
Tories' B.C. campaign committee, said a conservative government would also discuss a more
satisfactory distribution for the
grants, on the basis of university enrolment rather than
population of the province.
Other points in the program:
Increased research grants to
the National Research Council;
Increased university research
grants to the Medical Research
Council;
Increased grants to the Canada Council for research in
the social sciences and humanities;
Implementation of the recommendations on education in the
Hall Commission report, including a capital fund for the
expansion of facilities in medicine, dentistry and nursing;
Extension of grants for vocational and training schools on
a 75-25 federal-provincial basis:
Contribution to the capital
costs of colleges and universities;
Income tax deductions for
gifts to universities;
And the establishment of a
department of youth affairs.
Part of UBC's 1965 extension
program will be competing
with Metro-Goldywn-Mayer
and Dr. Jones Spock.
CBC film director Stan Fox
will instruct a course on film
production starting Oct. 5 at
8 p.m., in Acadia Camp.
The course will include shooting and editing with emphasis
on continuity, planning and
editing of non-theatrical films.
A 16-session course aimed at
giving parents a better understanding of child behavior will
start at 8 p.m. Monday in Bu.
2280.
It is one of four UBC extension department courses in psychology.
Vancouver artist Sam Black
will give a course in italic
handwriting as part of the fall
program.
This 12 session series starts
8 p.m., Oct. 7 in Bu. 2202. Further information for all courses
is available from the extension
department.
RALPH IDEA WEIRD'
(Continued from Page 1)
government give more to education but it's their duty to give
more," he said.
Loffmark said Monday that
decreasing student fees would
mean decreasing the voice of
the student in university affairs.
He blamed the federal government for the shortage of
money at UBC.
In announcing the fee fight
totals, Cruse said he wanted to
emphasize the march planned
for National Students' Day is
only part of the Education Action Program.
"And it will not be just a
good-time parade, but an important step in making our
feelings about higher education known."
NO KANGAROO'
Scrubby EUS
cleans council
By KRIS EMMOTT
The engineers cleaned out the Alma Mater society
offices Thursday and scrubbed the officials in the library
pond.
From a rock overlooking the
pond engineering undergraduate society president Art
Stevenson said, "The EUS feels
it is its duty to clean out the
AMS office.
vice-president Bob Cruise. He
was accused of not liking Fort
Camp food.
"Everyone knows that Fort
Camp food is scrumptious,"
cried Judge Stevenson.
Cruise   was   also   convicted
"I am the judge and the en-        ... ... .
...        _ .   .       .   and thrown in the pond
gineers are the jury. This is not       Alv/ro ;J__4 „	
a  kangaroo  court  and  everything will be fair."
The engineers had previously stormed the AMS offices
and carried their caged victims
to the pond.
AMS treasurer Mike Sommers was the first to be tried
on a charge of being too stingy.
The jury found Sommers
guilty by acclamation and he
was thrown in bodily.
Next to be tried was AMS
AMS president Byron Hender was tried for refusing to
relieve a UBC co-ed of her
frustrations.
"The poor girl was forced to
go to the engineers," said the
prosecutor.
Before being ducked Hender
was told to perform his duties
henceforth according to the
Constitution.
Last to swim was Vic Erick-
son, recently elected EUS
sports representative.
—donla  gons photo
—Joe vareti photo
ACADEMICALLY     GOWNED,
B.C. I i e u t enant-governor
George Pearkes acknowl-
eges his introduction during
Thursday's fine arts centre
opening.
Teach-in
talkers
tabbed
The program for the B.C.
universities teach-in Oct. 8-10
has been set.
The teach-in will consist of
discussions, with a panel of experts.
Topic of the teach-in is the
Problem of Viet Nam Today
and Tomorrow, leading to a
more general discussion of
Revolution and Response.
Delegations of faculty and
students from Simon Fraser
and Victoria College will participate.
The program starts at 8
p.m. Friday with a panel led
by Professor W. L. Holland
and Charles Bourne, both of
UBC, and T. B. Bottomore of
SF.
At 10 p.m. there will be a
taped speech by Dr. Linus
Pauling, two-time Nobel Prize
winner.
Saturday's topic will be
Viet Nam, and the discussions
from the University of Toronto teach-in will be wired in.
Toronto speakers include
representatives from North
and South Viet Nam.
Professors Holsti and Will-
mot of UBC will lead the discussion locally.
Saturday evening's panel
will be Canada's Role in the
Revolutionary World. Political
leaders Howard Green, Tommy Douglas and Paul Martin
have been invited to lead this
panel.
The teach-in concludes Sunday with Moral Responsibility
of the Citizen.
Phorogs meeting
Meeting noon today for all
Ubyssey shutterbugs under
the auspices of Barrel Bert
MacKinnon. Published Tuesday, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university
year by the Alma Mater Society, University of B.C. Editorial opinions
expressed are those of the editor and not necessarily those of the AM8
or the University. Editorial office, CA 4-3916. Advertising office. CA 4-3242,
Loc. 26. Member Canadian University Press. Founding member, Pacific
Student Press. Authorized as second-class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa,  and for payment of postage  in  cash.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies for general
excellence and news photography.
FRIDAY, OCT. 1, 1965
"The tigers ot wrath are wiser than the horses
of instruction." —Wm. Blake.
LETTERS
Another 50 years
Looking over our Thursday editorial on the 50th
anniversary of UBC's beginning, we began to think about
campus accomplishments again.
And it made us feel good to remember the first
Ubyssey appeared Oct. 17, 1918, which makes us almost
as old as UBC itself.
So, leafing proudly through our files, we came on
the cartoon reproduced here — a look at the future from
1927.
The various quaint touches reminded us how fantastically inaccurate predictions of campus growth can
Home-Coming, 1978
JUST THINK.    WHEN     50   YEARS   HENCE    WC   ARRIVE    OFF   THE  BUS
PERHAPS   FROM   CHiNA , AND    OGSFRVE   TH£   RADICAL   CHANGES
ANO    LOOK   AT  THE   OLD     PARKING - SfVXCE.    FILLED     WITH
COLLEGE    PLANES   AND   REMEMBER OUR  OLD "COLLEGE   CRATE
AND   WATCH    THE    UNDER&RADS     GO   BACK   AND   FORTH    ON    A
MOVABLE     SIDEWALK    «V  FRONT    OF   THAT     OLD   RELIC.THE   U&RMft
A look at the future from The  Ubyssey, Sept.  9,   1927.
get. But today, when at noon in Brock the university's
anniversary will be celebrated with due ceremony, we
venture to make a prediction of sorts anyway.
We feel sure the universary will soon shake free of
their adherence to a number of outdated concepts, and
gear down to produce men and women to match our
era of the Children of the Atom.
Much of the unrest on the campus today, we feel, is
due to our arrival now at a kind of transition stage in
this process.
_ We don't feel the future holds the IBM-oriented
multiversity that the Berkeley rioters said they struck
against. And neither do we feel the university's future
will be a relapse into medieval patterns of learning.
Progress is certain, but whether the result will be a
compromise of these two main possibilities, or the evolution of another system entirely, is still vague.
But we are certain The Ubyssey will be around to
laud the 100th anniversary of UBC.
EDITOR: Tom Wayman
New*   Ron Rlter
Associate   George Reamsbottom
City       Richard   Blair
Photo     Bert   MacKinnon
Sports _     Ed  Clark
Ass't News    Dan  Mullen
   Janet   Matheson
Ass't City  Al  Donald
Page Friday   John  Kelsey
Managing   Norm   Betts
Features   Mike Bolton
CUP   :..._ „   Don  Hull
Hard-working types for this edition were Ian Cameron, Brent
Cromie, Anne Bishop, Anne Balf,
Stuart Gray, Bill Graf, Kris
Emmott, Terry Brooks, Susan
Gransby, Sheila Dobson, Joan
Godsell, Mike Kvenich, Peggy
Stein, Rosemary Hyman, Joan
Fogarty,  and Anne Ratel.
LIBRARY BLUBS
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
Count first to 10 they say—
but hell, I'm at 110 and I'm
still steaming.
One morning this week I
entered the College Library,
not mad at anyone.
Approaching the loan desk,
I asked if it would be possible
to renew a book.
"There's a hold on it," the
loan desk guard said bluntly.
I asked her for a card to
put a hold on it myself. Instead of handing the card to
me, she flung the thing to the
other end of the adjacent
counter.
Constraining myself, I
walked around the counter
and filled out the required
information. The guard had in
the meantime replaced the
book on a shelf behind her.
When she peered over my
completed card, she suddenly
leveled a menacing glare at
me. "You've left something
out."
Apprehensively, I told her
the call number was on the
book behind her on the shelf.
"That isn't my job," she
snarled. "Look it up in the
card catalogue!"
There being no S.P.C.A. for
humans, would it not be so
much easier — for everyone
concerned — to replace such
people with nice, friendly
machines?
V.Iannacone
Arts III
A HACK HAWK
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
It was most encouraging to
read Thursday's article on
the engineers' conscription
of a hawk to their ranks.
It's about time they had a
symbol for their virility.
As any nature-lover knows,
the sight of a hawk soaring
and diving through the skies
is majestic indeed, if not
stimulating.
And for a faculty that once
sent a written apology to a
co-ed because one of their
manly members could not
properly hold his six beers
(let alone 40), it is fitting
their hawk is only four inches
in length from beak to tail.
A nature lover.
MLOW
ALL
PRESCRIPTION
\N0ULD m LENP
WMrXNW
CRICKET Bf\T?
WOULP
WKNT THIS
MAN TO m
Your
CLOTHES
FOR XOU ?
Vital decisions
Those pre-Brock concert blues
By   IAN  CAMERON
Singers get up on stage and
put on a show. What happens
before they appear?
Fred Hill, the Abominable
Showman (publicity), introduces us.
"Brownie, Sonny, Ian
Cameron."
"Pleased to meet you."
(As it happens, I know very
little about folk - miusic. I
I couldn't think of any questions that hadn't been asked
a thousand times before.)
"Brownie, how do you feel
about this sudden craze for
protest songs?"
(Bloody awful question, but
it's a start.)
"We think it's fine. We like
any kind of music, from rock
and roll to hymns. We . . ."
(Oh no, now what? Brock
proctor. What the hell . . .)
"The place is full. When do
you start?"
"I don't know. I'll find out
for you."
(Good for you, Fred, now
maybe . . .)
"You fellows don't sing
protest songs, do you?"
"Not the ones you hear on
the radio. The songs we sing
are protesting for any race,
but they do it by telling Bow
it feels to be blue. I'm singing for everyone, telling
people my troubles so they
can understand how it feels
to have these troubles."
(Good answer to a bad question. Uh . . .)
"Where do you get your
songs?"
(O, for Christ's sake now
what. Fred.)
"Start in 10 minutes."
"Thanks, Fred."
"Well, we use songs we've
heard all our lives, and we
write a lot . . ."
(Not another one. Murray
Farr, special events chairman. It figures. Why don't
all these people just . . .)
"Crowd looks great. Place
is really full."
"That's great, Murray."
(Yeah, that great. No offence, Murray, you're a great
guy, but would you just . . .)
"Say, can we get some
water?"
"Sure, I'll . . ."
"Don't bother, Ian. I'll get
it."
"Thanks, Fred. Brownie,
what do you think of university audiences?"
'Here's the water."
"Okay, ready to go. You
introduce them, Fred, will
you?"
"Glad to. You introduce
me, and I'll introduce them.
Ian can take them to the
door, and I'll bring them on."
"Excuse me, please. Make
way. Open the door please,
excuse me, sorry.rt
". . . and here they are,
Brownie Magee and Sonny
Terry!"
And there they were. IN EFFICIENCY: Question — What does your
super-keen student council
talk about during the big,
big fee protest meeting?
Answer — Chicken fric-
kasee and Joan Baez'
image, that's what.
The ultra-secret strategy
pow-wow took a back seat
while vice Peter Braun
and freshy Kim Campbell
battled over a bird barbecue /before the BIG
MARCH. Then music nut
Cliff Noakes mooted a folk-
singer to lead the courthouse tilt.
Council postponed the
folk singer bit because
"folksingers have a beatnik
image." They didn't say
why Jthey postponed the
chicken feast.
• •     •
INDELIBLE: The head of
Simon Fraser Academy's
geography department has
named his nice little brown
cat Phyllis. Oooh, that's
nasty.
• • •
INEXCUSABLE: Self-
appointed' Dick Tracy of
the campus patrol, Smilin'
Cece Paul, has decreed that
no more than three persons shall enter his traffic
office at one time. His
little henchman who sticks
stickers and tells you to
shut up and pay your parking fines now tells you to
bloody well stand in the
rain until the three people
ahead of you are out of the
office. For this we pay $5.
• •     •
THE NAME GAME: President J. Barfoot Macdonald
tops the ink poll this week.
He got his name in the
paper 3'2 times, an all-time
record, because he is so nice
and friendly with the students. AMS wheel Bob
Cruise, who has started
his campaign for president
six months early, got only
16. Others: Peter Braund,
11; Byron Hender. 6; Knute
Buttedahl and Ralph
(M-I-C) Daly. 3 each. Roger
McAfee, Christ, and The
Hawk got 1 mention apiece.
INIMITABLE: Ralph
(May-I-Correct) Daly was
SO worried that the university's image would suffer from the leak that people with less-than-60 per
cent averages were registering that he wrote us a
threatening (gasp) letter.
Maybe he's the same person who phoned PEducator
Bob Osborne and pleaded
that the Frosh drunk in the
gym be hushed up. Daly
and Tom Alsbury ought to
get together someday.
• • •
INDIGESTION (continued): Ptomaine princess
Ruth Blair is cutting all
the corners she can — the
order has gone out that a
10-cant bag of chips in
campus cafs must contain
no more than five ounces of
spuds. Waitresses admit
they used to dish out twice
to three times that, because
five ounces doesn't even fill
the bottom of the little
paper bag.
• •     •
IN    DARK    CORNERS:
Nobody has yet discovered
what the AMS auditors
discovered about the College Shop funds. Where'd
it all go, fellas? . . . Former
presidential assistant Geoff
Davies, who took a mysterious " leave of absence"
last year, has taken a permanent post with with a
new eastern university.
He's the last of the old buddies of ex-presidenit Norman MacKenzie to be
eased out.
INEVITABLE: Profs at
Simon Fraser thought it
would be down-to-brass-
tacks, no-frills Gordon
Shrum who would veto all
their requests for landscaping, fancy office furniture, a u dit o r i u m s and
lounges. They figured good
old McTaggart-Cow. or Mc-
Phogg as the prexy's called, would pull for all these
frills. Now guess Who's
pulling for frills, and guess
who's ordering cutbacks?.
e e e
INCONCLUSIVE: Last
people to nail up their sloppy little booth at clubs day
were — yup — the Education ACTION boys.
Friday, October,  1,  1965
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5 pf
OCT. 1, 1965
ON THE COVER: Students demonstrate at mass rally on
Berkeley campus last October,
protesting restrictions on their
freedom   of  speech.
Editor:  John Kelsey
Current affairs Steve Brown
Science, the  arts Al Francis
Executive Rochelle  Morinis
Drawings-
Arnold Saba,  Brett Smaill
Frederic Wood Theatre's Cocktail Party is a
professional party, and
student theatre takes another run down the
featherbedded slope.
For two years now,
UBC's theatre department has been eliminating student productions.
This time, two students
have roles — one secondary, one minor, none lead.
Of the other seven actors, six are professional
members of actor's equity, one is a UBC professor.
We'd like to know how
an actor is supposed to
learn to act if he never
faces an audience from
an on-stage lead role.
We'd like to know how
a director is supposed to
be one if he spends his
student theatre'time moving sets around backstage.
The department says
students learn by watching professionals; "You
can't teach anyone to
swim by throwing him
into deep water."
You can't swim in a
wading pool either.
At the same time, we'd
like to know why the
Freddy doesn't produce
any new- plays, or any
student written. plays.
New theatre at all
levels will never be explored anywhere but at
UBC, and UBC's theatre
department is not fulfilling its function.
That's to provide a
creative outlet for student actors, directors and,
writers. Everything doesn't have to be a professional calibre, $2.50 a seat
production.
And while we're asking questions, we'd like
to know what unemployed actors in this town
would do without the
Freddy Wood.   '
argument
You're just clay, man
Students not workers,
they're raw material
in multiversity factory
2wo
By DAVID YORKE
He stood on a car roof,
surrounded by students,
haranguing support for
CORE's Mississippi Project.
Police arrived, bulled
through the crowd, threw
the student into the paddy
wagon, and Berkeley, California, erupted into the
battle for free speech.
That was one year ago,
Oct.  1,  1964.
Last week, President Macdonald gave his analysis of
the events at Berkeley.
They were, he said, part of
"a growing tendency toward
irresponsibility and a growing incidence of lawlessness among students.
'I cite, for example, the
Berkeley students taking
the law into their own
hands. Many of them initially rebelled without a
cause. For many It was revolution in search, of a cause."
Macdonald's contentions
that the Berkeley movements were poinllesw, lawless and irresponsible, are
completely unfounded
The questions nT Herke-
ley echoed uncumfurtably
on every campus in North
America, UBC im-luried. It
was to avoid then- questions
that the president sought to
debunk Berkeley.
The central issue between
the Free Speech Movement
and the Cal board of regents
was that of advocacy. Board
regulations prohibited advocacy of off-campus actions
by persons or groups on
campus.
They   further   prohibited
soliciting funds and recruit-
Dave   York    is   a   third-
year forestry student.
He contributes to Scan, a
socialist monthly review,
and is secretary of UBC's
parliamentary council,
A visit to Berkeley
campus early September
prompted this article.
ing members. This greatly
hampered SNCC, CORE, and
other civil rights' groups, as
well as effectively preventing student participating in
the US presidential election.
FSM held that only the
courts, not the administration, could regulate content
of speech.
Bettina Aptheker, executive member of FSM, put it
succinctly: "At no time have
we asked for more than our
constitutional rights under
the first and fourteenth
amendments. We will never
accept less."
As students fought for
full advocacy, the whole
question of University
structure and control
emerged. FSM challenged
Berkeley    president    Clark
Kerr's multiversity concept
of a "knowledge factory".
Mario Savio, philosophy
major and leading FSM
spokesman, said, "He [Kerr]
looks at a University this
way: It's a factory and it
has a manager-—that's Kerr
—and a board of directors
—that's the Board of Regents—and employees—the
faculty and Teaching Assistants^—and raw materials—
that's us."
David Wellman, a T.A.,
says, "We aren't even the
laborer in the factory—
that's the faculty. We are
the product, and as such
we have no voice in our
destiny."
Countering the concept
of the multiversity, FSM
said, "The only defensible
idea of a University is an
intellectual community, a
place where people think together about important matters. ^Jg^^Jgotre of inde-
be jdiscussr-d   A non-contro-
7 versial university Is a con-
tradition in t*rni"«."
Presenting their case to
the administration. FSM
saw "the dean and all the
little deans:, the chancellor
and alt the little chancellors," and an endless series
of Faculty Student Conduct
Committees, Committees of
Cam|pus Political Activities
and more.
But when the administration in all its forms absolutely refused to discuss issues, FSM adopted civil
rights' tactics. They felt the
issues were too important to
get killed by administration.
FSM rallies and sit-ins
were characterized by their
order and discipline.
Joan Baez, who sang at all
major FSM action, said they
were the "nicest, best looking, and most decent rallies
I've ever attended."
On Dec. 2, over a thousand
students sat in at Sproul
Hall, the Cal Administration
building, demanding charges
against student leaders be
dropped, and speech rights
be restored. Inside, they held
up lectures given by T.A.S,,
study and sleeping areas,
etc.
That night, 600 police with
clubs, guns ancj tear gas infested the building. The, students, who did not resist,
were kicked, dropped and
dragged down stairs — 800
were arrested.
The entire campus rushed
to the support of the 800-
Profs raised ball, organized defence committees and
tacked notices on their doors
saying, "I will not teach with
600 police on my campus."
The faculty overwhelmingly
passed a resolution completely supporting FSM demands.
The students struck to
protest the arrests and the
University ground to a halt.
Moral and material support
flooded in from all sections
of the outside community.
This support could not
have been produced by student riots. Clearly, all violence was a result of police
brutality, not the non-vio-
ent student tactics. FSM tactics were always as valid as
their demands.
Was anything constructive accomplished?
Aptheker writes: "With
the appointment of a new
chancellor, we have won the
political fight. There will be
new regulations which will
maximize political freedom.
'The alliance between
faculty and the students represent new possibilities for
moving in the direction of a
transformation of the University into a truly free
community of scholars and
students."
FSM; won the immediate
iight   for    free    speech.
The gains made by the Berkeley students have started
campus  reform  movements.
There are obvious parallels between structure and
control at Cal and UBC.
Strong elements of the multiversity factory are present.
Like Cal, UBC is governed
by outside business inter-
eats; students and faculty
play insignificant roles setting policy and goals. Like
Cal, we have an administration that refuses to discuss
student demands—in our
ease on fees.
Cal demanded full rights to
speech; we demand universal accessibility to higher
education.
The lesson of Berkeley is
that mass student action, responsible but determined,
can win concessions, and
students can gain some say
in running the  university.
Dr. Macdonald's definition of responsible student
action is that it should not
accomplish anything.
In the next months we
will show Dr. Macdonald
exactlyi how well we have
learned the lesson of Berkeley.
argument   ___    pf 2
books    :__-_; :_   pf 7
cinema —._,. . _,... pf 2
dissent J. '__.__.1_ pf 6
drama  _. ----- ,---   pf 6
jazz __ ..__-_____  pf 3
music __ _ :_.__  pf 4
opinion ;-.-_____ pf 3
opinion pf 7
overseas _ pf 5
whimsy pf 3
—gosh, Mac G
cinema
Knack
Lacks
I Snap
By WARD FLETCHER
The Knack — "How long
do we have?"
Richard Hester's The
Knack proved to be disappointing, in fact, very disappointing.
I was prepared for something quite forceful after
the sounds of ceremony died
away. Instead I was exposed
to a mixture of Charlie
Chaplfin, clever tricks,
theatre of the absurd, racy
dialogue — these things provided Mr. Hester means to
try and convince audiences
he can do something serious
after A Hard Day's Night.
The Knack has a traditional plot. Tolin, a British
Mod, has the knack of winning (making it) with girls.
Colin, a teacher, wants the
knack. Enter Rita Tushing-
ham — a girl who comes to
London for the first time and
is looking for a room. With a
young man who wishes to
paint everything white, Miss
Tushingham and Colin push
a bed across London then
proceed through other adventures.
The film ends with Colin
winning over the star of A
Taste of Honey. They walk
into the distance and so ends
The Knack.
Mr. Hester's cleverness in
handling the film is what I
object to. For when this is
taken away, little remains.
Voices commenting on the
actions of the young British
generation bring out the gulf
between past and present-
day England. However, using
dialogue which points out
the lack of communications
within the young "in" crowd
does not work. All the director manages to create smacks
of the statements artists
make when someone from a
magazine interviews them in
New York or London.
Charlie Chaplin comedy
did nothing for the film.
> Tushingham's acting had a
certain sincerity but certainly was not enough to compensate for the script. I was
excited by the scenes in the
park where the film has a
lyricism. Here photography
did not try to be clever but
merely showed the innocence
of all the actors.
I felt sad that Richard
Hester did not offer more.
Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 1,  1965 Dig Jazz?
Wild Africans Blow
In Monterey Show
By ANGUS RICKER
The Monterey Jazz Festival was to be a plentiful
weekend of wine, weirds,
wit — and mostly wailing
jazz.
The eighth installment of
the MJF, Sept. 17-20, centered on a salute to the jazz
trumpet.
As an artistic production
the MJF, with monster
crowds in the 7,000 seat
County Fairgrounds Amphitheatre, was an overwhelming success.
The audience was a representative slice of the jazz
public: musician, critic, hipster, beat, intellectual,
phoney and student. And
despite the fact that beer
and other goodies were readily available, the crowd remained attentive.
• •     •
A carnival atmosphere
permeated the fairgrounds
where an art show ran concurrently. Booths on the outside of the amphitheatre
shell were manned by SNCC
agitators, record and poster
hucksters and (this is California) a palm reader.
The MJF is a unique
medium for any number of
jazz hapepnings. New talent
is uncovered; old is rediscovered; festival-produced
hybrid groups flourish and
wither — all within a pano-
poly of uncertainty caused
by musicians reacting to each
other and to 6,000 bodies
across the lights.
This unpredictablity of result produced an expectant
tension, created the essential
set for a festival and confronted performer with audience.
Foremost of the new
groups at Monterey was the
John Handy Quintet. Two
Vancouver musicians, bassist Don Thompson and drummer Terry Clarke form alto-
saxist Bandy's rhythm section. Michael White's violin
and guitarist Gerry Hahn
complete the front line.
Scheduled next to last in
a late-starting program, the
Handy group lost no time
rousing the Saturday afternoon audience with a strongly rhythmic If We Only
Knew. Thompson's solo bass
work proved' most able.
• •     •
The second and concluding selection is probably
Handy's most effective composition. The Spanish Lady
is a long, stirring piece
where Handy piles up climax in a virtuoso display of
blowing.
The audience and critics
were unanimous. Syndicated
jazz columnist Ralph Glea-
son flatly declared "the Handy quintet produced one of
the^most musically satisfying performances of the festival's recent years."
Audience applause drowned out even Diz in a five
minute standing ovation.
Interest  in  recording the
Handy group has been shown
by Columbia Records and it
appears the quintet, now appearing at the Both/And
Club in San Francisco, is well
on its way.
If any group was to outdo
the Handy five, it could only
have been that magnificent
orchestral contraption, the
Duke (Ellington band.
Arriving fresh from his
triumphant Grace Cathedral
concert, the Duke had his
fifteen cylinder machine revving high on a program of
new Ellington compositions.
But it remained for one of
the band veterans to break
things up. Alto-saxist Johnny Hodges, some 34 years an
Ellingtonian, elucidated just
one florid, glissando-laden
phrase and the sell-out Saturday night crowd blew its
collective cool.
•      •      •
And with Johnny Hodges,
it couldn't happen to a more
blase guy. Watching 7,000
people going nuts at Monterey or a knifing in front
of the bandstand in an obscure dance hall, Hodges remains the detached, impassive observer.
After the Hodges performance the rest of the band
slipped quietly into overdrive. Drummer Louis Bell-
son laid down a beat that
could have driven a train;
Ellington's piano fed the
soloists solid accompanying
chords and his new vocal discovery, Esther Merrill came
on to display a powerful gospel voice.
Even if prize committees
have trouble understanding
Duke's music, jazz fans seldom do and his Monterey
performance proved to be
an outstanding demonstration why.
The third highlight of the
festival occurred Sunday
evening when Cal Tjader's
Afro-Cuban quintet was further augmented by the Dizzy
Gillespie horn and the conga
drumming of Big Black.
The audience immediately
called for and got Tjader's
recent hit Soul Sauce. The
group hit a Latin groove that
developed into a conga duel
between Big Black and
Tjader's man, Armando Per-
aza. Peraza's finesse just
wiped out Big Black.
• • •
Proceedings then turned
into a real happening when
a stranger walked on stage
unannounced, apparently un
invited, and began dancing.
He performed until Peraza
put down his conga and with
some wild spins and pirouettes wiped him out too.
If nothing else, this encounter proved that the African drumfrner is still one of
the most powerful elements
in jazz.
•     •     •
There were other highlights too numerous to mention .Just a few: the marvellously precise chops of the
fashion plate of New York
city, trumpeter Clark Terry;
his outlandish wordless
vocal duet with singer Jon
Hendricks on Terry's composition Mumlbles; the perfect ear and burning beat
of Buddy Rich backing the
Harry James band; and finally, the three young Negro
cats who sat in front of me
and were so hip that they
even put the musicians on.
You just never see that —
they had to be out of sight.
But there were disappointments as well: longer works
by festival musical director
Gil Fuller failed to sustain
interest; Louis Armstrong
was content with a sub-standard night club routine; a
jazz liturgy by Mary Lou
Williams proved stilted and
uneven.
But the quizzical Charles
Mingus proved to be the biggest disappointment of all.
Bassist Mingus, the smash
hit of last year's festival,
again premiered original
music at Monterey.
•     •     •
Long on social protest,
Mingus played two short
numbers titled They Trespassed the Sacred Lands of
the Sioux and Once Upon a
Time There Was a Holding
Company Called America.
Although tired by the long
afternoon session the audience received them enthusiastically.
Then crytically the band
got up and serpentined off
the stage blowing a tragicomic version of The Saints.
What happened? Who
knows? There was more
music scheduled but one
never knows about Mingus.
For that matter, one never
knows about Monterey
either.
whimsy
Ralph Daly is UBC Director of Information Services.
He's been writing may-I-
correci letters to The Ubyssey
for two years now.
Knowing Ralph, Ralph
Daly Corrects will be a regular Page Friday feature.
Editor. The Ubyssey, Sir:
Your report on Page 9 of
Page Friday of September
24 that "the word went out
during registration week:
accept anybody with cash
and a 55 percent average" is
entirely untrue, and potentially very damaging to the
University of British Columbia.
The Ubyssey staff ought to
be aware that admission
standards are established by
the University Senate, and
cannot be altered in any way
by the Registrar or his staff.
The standards used this
year were precisely those
used in 1964-65: for admission, a student must have an
average of 60% in Grade 12.
Each year a few students
with otherwise good high
school records, but with just
below 60% average, have
been admitted on the basis
of individual merit. But no
one is allowed to register
under any circumstances
with an average as low as
55%.
I trust that in the interest
of the university's reputation
you will make a clear and
early correction of your
unjustified slur on the integrity of admission policy.
Ralph Daly.
opinion
McGeorge
is a liar
(politically
speaking)
says Gabor
By GABOR MATE
There are two opposing
groups of people who, judging from their views on the
Vietnamese question, must be
classified either as liars or as
fools.
The first group are those
who say the Americans
should stay in Vietnam to
preserve Vietnamese freedom. The second, those who
condemn American policy
because it is immoral.
In the first group come
such persons as presidential
advisor McGeorge Bundy,
who was on television this
week, patting his nation on
the back for her valiant defense of South Vietnamese
liberty.
Since it is difficult to imagine a man of his position
and intellect actually believing nonsense such as he
used to justify American
actions, one must conclude
that Bundy, in the realm of
politics, is a liar. Nonexistent things cannot be
preserved, and South Vietnamese liberty is as nonexistent as academic freedom
in a grade one spelling class.
Between French colonial
rule, Japanese occupation,
French re-occupation, and
the constant pressure of warfare when did the Vietnamese have, opportunity to
develop the institutions of
democracy?
After the French left in
1954 two rival dictatorships
ruled the country: Ho Chi
Minn's Communist regime in
the North, and Diem's reactionary government in the
South. The major difference
was that while the Communists carried out land-reform
for the benefit of the masses,
Diem was content with the
maintenance of the small
but enormously wealthy
landowning class.
In no sense, however,
could either government be
To PF 8
See: MORE McGEORGE
:mm&
Friday, October,   1,   1965
THE      UBYSSEY
Pagt 7 —dave  henderson photo
Sonny Terry and Brownie McGhee in Brock
music
Dylan, McGhee and Ringo -
all folk rock or folk folk
and college folk dig it all
By TAJA BHAVAN
Well, folk music and the
college crowd . . .
The obvious question is
whether one can say the so-
called university type (each
of UBC's 17,000-odd students
cannot be classified in groups
but are individuals in taste)
likes folk music, and in what
form.
•      •     •
Vancouver's noted actor
and publicist, Fred Hill, made
me aware, by the over-use
of Aristotle's ethics of stage
presentation, that every person in the audience — be he
university student, adult
viewer, male, female, misfit
or graduate — is in a coffeehouse to be entertained and
to be a good entertainer one
must cater to all the individual tastes and direct his material to fit.
Let's generalize a little-an_i
say folk music is "in" and
will always be in some form
or other.
"Folk music," says Brownie
McGhee, "will always be
with us and in that sense will
will never go out."
|)f 4ou[r
In theory, he suggested
that everything written is
folk music but that the meaning of a piece makes it what
is now classed as true folk.
He feels that folk has suffered recently from the research types who are trying
to get new material and succeed in finding nothing but
the same old songs.
Brownie and his partner
Sonny Terry write most of
their own material and have
done so for a number of
years.
Brownie thinks folk will
continue because of the new
writers and fresh material.
I asked if this meant such
people as Bob Dylan. He,
with his broad smile, said a
definite yes.
•     •     •
It's a new age in folk and
rock-and-roll. A few years
ago folk made a short spree
on the hit charts, then nothing—only the beat generation dug folk (and jazz).
The trend started again
with such perennial folk
groups as the Limeliters,
Chad Mitchell Trio, Kingston
Trio and the Brothers Four.
Also around were Gale Gar-
nett and Glen Yarbourgh
singing folk lyrics.
The British reformation of
rock-and-roll brought the
electric 12-string guitar and
such semi-folk artists as
Chad and Jeremy, Peter and
Gordon and a large number
of female singers — the best
known is Marianne Faithful.
On the blues-folk side of
the reformation were the
Animals (House of the Rising
Sun, a five minute version
with organ progressions), the
(gasp) Rolling Stones with
great flip sides such as Play
with Fire and Good Times
Bad Times, and (gasp again)
the Beatles with their own
compositions of I'll Follow
the Sun, and, from their last
movie, Hey, You've Got to
Hide Your Love Away.
The faithful chart-watchers
have seen the rise of the
Turtles, Byrds, Sonny and
Cher, Glen Campbell, F. F.
Sloan, Randy Sparks, and
Barry McQuire. These people
are a new breed of pop singers doing folk material with
a basic blues or folk-blues
beat.
It really was started by
Bob Dylan and his Subterranean Homesick Blues
single.
Dylan has been writing
folk for years now and it is
only lately that Dylan and
his contemporaries have been
noticed. Songs now on the
charts, besides Dylan tunes,
are Buffy St. Marie's Universal Soldier and a number
of creations by P. F. Sloan
which include Eve of Destruction, Sins of the Family,
and Dawn of Correction. Dy-
To PF 5
See: MORE FOLK
HELP WANTED
SECRETARY   RECEPTIONIST
FOR  CHAPLAINS'  OFFICE
Simon Fraser University
S houra daily
Call  Rev.  Ian Holter
Phone 431-2474
YOUNG MEN
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Janet Leigh
Plus  BEDTIME   STORY
Marlon Brando, David Niven
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Edward G. Robinson
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Michael Callan   ::   Barbara Eden
(Adult)
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Freddie Redd, Piano
Philly Joe Jones, Drums
Walter Benton, Tenor Sax
Bob Maize, Bass
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Thurs. $2.00 — Fri.-Sat. $2.50
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This will entitle the holder to a reduced admission
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<_.
Page 8
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, October 1,  1965 More folk
From PF 4
Ian songs to watch for are
Baby Blue, Gates of Eden,
and Mr. Jones.
A song by Joan Baez called
There But For Fortune, is
currently tops in England.
It is a straight folk song
released on a single and is
a big success.
Brownie McGhee summed
up this new craze: "Bob Dylan is writing for 50 million
kids and he knows what they
want. The teenagers have
found in Dylan and his con-
tempories what they themselves think and feel." But
the writers are one step
ahead: "They know how to
say it aloud."
About the new music,
Brownie said, "I dig it!" The
folk crowd "digs it", likewise the university folk
likes it, the teens obviously
like it, the teens obviously
tolerate it but even like some
of it — but does Joe Student
like it?
Judging by the profusion
of dances on campus, the
number of frat rats that like;
rock-and-roll and folk music,
the people on campus who
like the commercial sound of
folk trios, the average university student likes it or
has nothing really against it.
Now, what do campus folk
fans like?
According to the Billboard
poll, there were no sharp
changes in undergraduate
folk music tastes last year.
The big vocal group on
American campuses are the
Lettermen, Kingston Trio,
Peter, Paul and Mary, Brothers Four, New Christy
Minstrels, and the Four
Preps. Canadians generally
follow.
In the favorite folk song
category, Peter, Paul and
Mary head the list and the
Chad Mitchell Trio, Smothers Brothers, Limeliters, and
Serendipity Singers following.
Joan Baez is the favorite
female vocalist, beating
Odetta, Miriam Makeba,
Judy Collins and Barbara
Streisand.
In the male folk vocalist
category, Harry Belafonte
takes first honors, seconded
by Bob Dylan, with Pete
Seeger next.
The Billboard poll clearly
shows that commercial and
true folk are equally popular on college campuses in
the United States.
Folk groups and trios will
always be popular on campus, since they cater to all
those seeking entertainment
— be it humor, song, folk
music or popular music.
overseas
MaorisWhite?
Verwoerdsays
they sure are
By SUSAN ADAMS
Apartheid enters the field
of sport, but for South Africa
it is no game.
South Africa's rugby team
has been touring New Zealand. A return visit by the
All-Blacks is being planned
for 1967. A hot question now
arises — will South Africa
allow both New Zealand
Whites and New Zealand
Maories to kick on her
fields?
Usually decisions on sport
are made by the South African national sporting bodies.
This time however, prime-
ministers and the press have
become involved.
Dr. Verwoerd, prime minister of South Africa, has mentioned that guests of South
Africa should respect South
African customs. Mr. Hol-
yoake, prime minister of
New Zealand, has said a
dominion of one people can-
n o t be represented by a
team chosen on racial lines.
A newspaper article
screams: "If the races mix in
sports, the way is open to
other forms of social mixing."
Another newspaper article
screams: "No matter how
many people would like to
welcome a New Zealand
team here, it cannot happen
at the expense of a great
principle.
It will foe interesting to see
how the problem will be
solved.
It has been whispered
that South Africa might consider conferring "honorary
white membership" on visiting Maori sportsmen.
This would indeed be membership cheaply bought.
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Friday, October,  1,  1965
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 9 Student Shakes Cocktails
By STEPHEN BROWN
Glad to see Vancouver's theatre goers
are at last developing minds of their
own.
Freddy Wood Theatre Company's fine
version of Eliot's The Cocktail Party is
packing in near-sellout audiences this
week, despite scathing reviews from most
quarters.
The sets and lighting by Aristedes
Gazetas are superb and carry symbolic
reinforcements—the dominant pale blue
of the drawing room set matching the
cool superficiality of the cocktail conversation; the white lighting on the white
suit of Celia, a modern saint whose
"honest mind brings her suffering".
The play opened badly, with everyone
extravagently lilting in part repartee.
Antique dealer Rosemary Malkin has
returned to the stage to play with assur-
■<sv^.
=5   , %<
dissent
RCs have got it wrong
contraception is no sin
the Bible tells me so
By M. S. JOHNSON
It was with varying interest that I perused an
article by Gabor Maite in
Page Friday.
He seems to be carrying
on in. the tradition of last
year's Wulfing • Von Schleinitz, also an atheist. Many
times I was tempted to write
to the latter and correct his
multitude of errors, which
to me stuck out like sore
thumbs.
First of all, I agree with
the article somewhat, not
necessarily on how it is said,
as long as it applies only to
the Catholic Church. There
are millions and millions of
peope who are Christians,
but not Catholics, who belong to the more liberal and
fundamentalist Churches.
To get on the point, the
case of Onan cited by Gabor
Mate is the Catholic
Church's interpretation of
the story, and not what the
Bible actually says. I would
like to quote from "The
New Morality" by H. W.
Armstrong.
"Is planned parenthood
wrong?
"The Roman Catholic
Church has always responded: 'Yes!'
"But if the Bible ... be
your true authority, it says
no such thing!
"Sometimes the case of
Onan is cited in an effort
to sustain the false dogma
against intelligent planned
parenthood. But that incident upholds no such teaching.
"Judah, father of the Jews,
had three sons. Er, Judah's
eldest son, died, leaving a
childless widow. By Israeli
law, it then became the
legal duty for Judah's second,
Onan, to marry the widowed
Tamar, for the very purpose
of begetting a son to bear
the deceased brother's name.
The legal statute involved
here is stated in Deuteronomy   25   (RSV   trans.):   "If
i Mx
brothers dwell together, and
one of them dies and has no
son, the wife of the dead
shall not be married outside
the family -to a stranger; her
husband's (unmarried) brother shall go in to her, and take
her as his wife, and perform
the duty of a husband's
brother to her. And the first
son whom she bears shall
succeed to the name of his
brother who is dead" (Deut.
25:5-6).
Nov/ continue the story of
Onan:
"But Onan knew that the
offspring would not be his;
so when he went in to his
brother's wife he spilled the
semen on the ground, lest
he should give offpring to
his brother." (Gen. 38:9-10,
RSV.)
So God destroyed Onan.
Why? Not for planned
parenthood—not for intelligent spacing of the arrival
of children. Onan's purpose
in preventing conception
was nothing of the kind. He
prevented conception because he knew that the son
born would not belong to
him—he did it "lest he
should give offspring to his
brother."
Onan's sin was not planned
parenthood. There is no
biblical law forbidding
planned parenthood. His sin
was his refusal to obey the
law which required him to
beget a son to beaT his
brother's name. His disobedience to that law was his sin.
. . . Planned parenthood
violates no law of God! It
is a definite contribution to
this supreme purpose of
character building . . .
Any teaching or legislating which violates this divine
purpose of God—which instills in wives the dread and
fear of pregnancy—is a religious heresy, and/or a violation of the higher laws of
almighty God.
So you see, Atheist No.
Two, there is a definite division between Catholics and
those who hold the Bible as
their authority. Their beliefs
do vary somewhat, as I'm
sure you are now aware.
I truthfully hope you are
enlightened.
ance the difficult role of an unlovable
wife.
Stanley Weese, one of just two student players in the presentation, gives
marvelous—and badly-needed—comic relief as an assinine gourmet.
Derek Ralston gets over the compelling
personality of the psychiatrist extremely
well. Marg Malough is a mighty jumpy
Celia, making fantastic leaps from the
sofa to the far side of the stage between
sentences—but John Brockington's direction was partly to blame here.
Eliot demands extreme listening concentration. The cardinal sin of most of
the cast is lapses) into inaudibility during
the contemplative passages.
Is it asking Equity actors too much to
be able to project past the sixth row of
an intimate playhouse?
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Page 10
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October  1,   1965 books
Agent 007 gunned
by English profs
By AL DONALD
Cluttered up with Joyce,
Eliot, and Woolf, the English
department ignores one of
the greatest of contemporary
writers — Ian Fleming.
Which is a pity since Fleming's novels have the qualifications for university
study.
Apparently, a book needs
a psychological problem,
preferably dealt with on the
existentialist level, to get on
an English reading list.
And the James Bond
books have it. Bond is comparable to Colin Wilson's
Outsider, Albert Camus'
Etranger, and some of Hemingway's heroes.
Dig beneath the exotic villains and women, the licence
to kill, the ingenious spy
equipment, and you find a
picture of a man lost in the
world, a man whose great
escape from responsibility
is living close to danger,
revelling in sophistication.
James Bond has little contact with the real world, the
world that puts moral re-
sponsibility above pleasure.
Instead, he exists in a
vacuum with no immediate
group of friends to help put
him into perspective in the
reader's mind.
His    acquaintances    have
.•V-v';'
.•>i.-v.
little to say about him, and
what they do say is inconclusive and superficial.
In Casino Royale, girl
sleuth and future bed-mate
of Bond, Vesper Lynd says,
"He is very good looking.
He reminds me of Hoagy
Carmichael, but there is
something cold and ruthless
in his . . ."
Hemingway painted the
man to which Bond generally conforms in his short
story "Soldier's Home". A
young man, Krebs, returns
home to the U.S. after World
War I.
He no longer is interested
in knowing people, but only
in escaping the monotony of
peaceful life. He has been
BOND
DONALD
close to death, and now he is
bored.
"He did not want to come
home. Still, he had to come
home. He sat on the front
porch."
Bond first fights out this
problem   in   Casino   Royale.
Of course, Bond does not
sit on the front porch. He
would rather lose himself in
adventure, but the existential sickness is the same: the
same tendency to reject life
with its complicated ethics
and designate some things
as good and others as bad.
After a period of mental tur
moil, he decides SMERSH,
the Russian Secret Service,
is bad and the British espionage operation is good.
Only after this decision
can he continue to exist as
he did before. To accept the
real world would mean facing what he does not have
the ability to face — complexity.
This then is Bond. The
true Outsider in the sense in
LYND
which Colin Wilson portrays
the Outsider. Cut off from
society by his own choice and
looking with disinterest at it,
he seeks escape from himself and moral responsibility
in the green beize of the card
table, the roar of the battleship grey Bentley, the smell
of cordite and the caress of
blonde or brunette.
Since English instructors
are notorious for their search
for hidden meanings, it is
surprising that none Of them
have noticed Flemings.
Or perhaps they have, and
the popularity of the Fleming books keeps them off
reading lists.
English professors have an
aversion to any writer who
has sold more than a few
thousand copies in the previous year.
Of course the books are
popular ostensibly because
they are thrillers. James
Bond is not the classic existentialist; unlike the protagonists of Sartre and Camus,
Bond is an extremely capable
and efficient individual.
Fleming's real meaning
comes through only to those
who look for it—we intellectuals — and once it does
Bond's motivations become
clear.
**-mm/s'€^.:®mus:? -Mm^rr&jvwarjw ■vmzmmmmmkxj, & m,% m
Buttons can't heal pain
By EVE COUPLAND
I have never worn a civil
rights (button.
And I don't think I ever
will.
There isn't room for the
problem on a button, and
there certainly isn't room for
the solution.
Last summer I spent some
time in Los Angeles and several months in San Francisco.
I learned there are two
very valid sides to the prejudice lapel button.
The pin side has some undeniable facets. The average
Negro in the U.S. is ignorant end out for a fast buck.
For years the Negro could
not get a job, many still
can't. Naturally he prefers
the security of employment
to ithe unprofitable process
of education.
The  aim  of most  young
Negroes is to leave school as
soon as possible and get a
steady job. Then they cam
buy a new car and clothes on
credit, and look every bit as
"good" as the white man.
This attitude, understandable though it may be, does
create second-class citizens
in our social structure.
It creates a division in the
Negro communities, those
who have work and those
who have not. The have-nots
formed the nucleus of the
L.A. riote.
Working on the front side
of the button are many
Negroes throughout the U_3.
who are trying to increase
the level of education.
Remedial training schools
are being set up in many
Negro communities, to help
the children after school
hours and to provide them
with the background their
parents don't have. Donations provide libraries and
equipment, the teachers are
voluntary.
These Negroes are preparing their children to hold
jobs other than janitors and
waitresses.. They are promoting an interest in education. They feel that when
the Negro .standard of education is lifted, he will be
able to combat prejudice
from a far stronger position.
Economic want causes ignorance, which causes unemployment.
The vicious circle can be
broken when the Negro is
convinced that not only is
he good enough to hold a
"white man's job," but he is
also bright enough.
And that belief has to
come from within the Negro
sub-culture's and no number of student demonstrations oan teach it.
Plimley Automobile Co. Announces
the Appointment of
BILL STONIER
as Campus Representative and a
SPECIAL PA YMENT PLAN
For 4th Year Students
Buy a new Mini-Minor  1100, M.G.B.
Jaguar, Valiant or late model used car
No Payments Until May 1966
For  information  call  Bill  at  733-1007  (evenings)
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
Gomes Room Supervisor
— One afternoon and evening per week, plus every
fifth Saturday afternoon.
— Honorarium: $225 per school year.
— Duties: general supervision and incidental maintenance in the Games Room.
Applicants reply to Secretary, Brock Management
Committee, Box 5, Brock Hall, stating name, phone
number and time available. Applications close (Friday.
October 1.
Help Wanted
4 members needed for the Accident Benefit Fund
Committee — medical students or nurses preferred,
but representative sample of UBC students needed.
Apply in writing to the Secretary, AMS, Mailbox 54,
Brock Hall.
Grad Class
Membership: all students in the winter session who
are registered in the final year of a course leading
to a Bachelor's or the M.D. degree shall be members
of the Grad Class.
— the constitution requires election of executive
within one month of the start of classes.
— positions open are: President, Vice-President, Treasurer, Secretary, Social Convenor, Public Relations
Officer.
— a meeting o fthe Grad class (all graduating students for the first time on WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER
6, at 12:30 in the AUDITORIUM.
 nominations may be sent to the Secretary, AMS,
postbox 54.
Winter Sports Centre Management
Committee
— one year term.
— meetings to discuss all policy with respect to the
Winter Sports Centre including operating, scheduling, and financing.
— applicant should be familiar with the "layout" of
the arena.
— applications in writing to the Secretary, Box 54,
Brock Hall, no later than October 1st.
World University Service Committee
The I.PJA. (Share) Committee will hold important
meeting Friday, October 1 in Brock Extension 257
at 12:30. Anyone interested in publicity or programme
work is welcome to attend.
Homecoming Decorations Chairman
Needed to supervise the set up of Homecoming Dance
decorations in the Armouries and Field House; male
or female. Submit applications to Brock Hall, mailbox 81.
College Shop Committee
Applications now being accepted for positions on the
College Shp Committee. No previous experience is
required but applicants should have an interest in
marketing and retail policy making. Apply in writing,
Student Court
Applications are open for: 1 judge of Student Court
1 clerk of Court
Applications should be sent to the Secretary, A.M.S.
Box 54, and should be sent before October 1st.
Friday, October,  1,  1965
THE      UBYSSEY
Page U McGeorge
From PF 3
termed free or democratic.
There have never been
free elections in either North
or South. Indeed, how could
r es p o n s i b 1 e government
evolve in a country where
most of the people are illiterate?
Clearly, by supporting an
anti-Communist military dictatorship in Saigon, the U.S.
is only trying to preserve
its own prestige and influence. Supporters of American policy pretend otherwise.
It is equally futile, however, to criticize the Americans on the grounds that
their intervention is immoral and is against the interest of the Vietnamese
people. Those who condemn
the "unjust war" in Vietnam
are merely clouding the issue with puerile emotionalism.
The last considerations in
anybody's mind, from Peking to Hanoi to Washington, are morality or the interests of the Vietnamese
masses. Each power is motivated purely by self-
interest—the only consideration in international power
politics.
Just as Russia could not
allow the Hungarian Revolution to succeed in 1956, so
now the U.S. cannot allow
the Viet Cong — and thus
Hanoi—to be victorious. A
withdrawal from Vietnam
would be .disastrous for
American prestige in Asia
and Africa, and, indeed, in
Europe and Latin America
as well.
It is pointless, therefore,
to say the Americans should
get out of Vietnam because
they have no right to be
there. Despite the American
government's justification of
its policy with falsities and
half-truths, and despite the
fact that for the Vietnamese
peasant life under a stable
communist regime would be
preferable to existing conditions, the only basis on
which the U.S. leaders can
act is the self-interest of
their own country.
The most effective critics
jKjiiglit
of the war, therefore, are
not the moralists, but those
observers who, like Walter
Lippmjan, argue that America's present activities are
against her own long-range
interests.
Until this is recognized by
those responsible for U.S.
policy, the Vietnamese war
will continue to be attacked
by fools and supported by
liars.
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THE      UBYSSEY
Page  13
Big bad Board speaks up
By IAN CAMERON
"The UBC Board of Governors are a bunch of men
doing a helluva hard job."
"The UBC Board of Governors are a bunch of rat-finks
who are drinking the students
blood."
The first of these statements
came from Justice Nathan
Nemetz, the chairman of the
Board of Governors.
The second is from an unidentified UBC student, and
was overheard at the recent
fee rally.
The two statements show
considerable discrepancy. Obviously, someone is wrong.
The question is, who.
To most on campus the UBC
Board of Governors is a mysterious, almost mythical body
of 10 men and one woman
who decide the policy of the
university.
Some of them are elected,
some appointed. Some are
businessmen,   some   profes-
ARTHUR FOUKS
. Board  interested
■"■'•' . . .""*"«**;*w
sional. Some of them are
easily reached, and eager to
talk. Others are never to be
found and say nothing when
you do get hold of them.
But they all have one thing
in common.
They are all successful, and
they all agree that the Board
does a great deal of work.
Their names are Dr. Phyllis
Ross, UBC chancellor. Dr.
John B. Macdonald, UBC president. Hon. Mr. Justice Nathan Nemetz, chairman.
Arthur Fouks, Q.C., Vancouver lawyer. E. A. Gunder-
son, chartered accountant. J.
Stuart Keate, Vancouver Sun
publisher.
W. C. Koerner, Rayonier of
Canada, Ltd. Leon J. Ladner,
Q.C. Dr. F. H. Soward, dean
emeritus of Grad Studies, acting secretary to the Board.
John Liersch, Canadian
Forest Products. D. F. Miller,
Canadian Fishing, Ltd.
Their backgrounds are
varied.
Hon. Mr. Justice Nemetz, was
born in Winnipeg, attended
school in Vancouver, received
his B.A. and LLB from UBC,
Fouks was born in Vancouver, graduated from UBC law
school in 1949, and has been
on the executive of many public service bodies.
Walter Koerner was born
in Moravia, attended the University of Prague, and has
been on many boards, both of
businesses and service groups.
John Edward Liersch was
born in Manitoba, received a
BA and BA Sc. from UBC and
and MF from the University
of Washington. He was at one
time head of the Faculty of
Forestry at UBC.
Stuart Keate received his
BA'from UBC, and has been
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SPORTING ACTIVITIES
An active program of sports has been arranged for
the 1965-66 winter session. A Curling and Bowling
Evening will be held jointly with International House
on Saturday, October 2, starting at 7:30 p.m. The
sports will be followed by a social evening at the
Graduate Students Center starting at 9:30 p.m. Tickets
are available at the Graduate Students Center office
or from executive members.
Students interested in Hockey are invited to attend
sessions at Winter Sports Center, Monday, October 4,
at 11:15 p.m. Curling will begin on Tuesday, October
5, at 9:30 p.m. in the Winter Sports Center. The first
meeting will be an organizational meeting. Bowling
will begin shortly, the time and place to be anounced
in this column.
SPECIAL NOTICE
Since the success of the GSA Executive in planning
and organizing, social and sports events depends upon
communications between the Executive and the students at large, it has been decided to organize a committee to deal with the problem. This committee will
require the services of one student volunteer for
each department^ enrolling graduate students. Interested students are asked to attend a meeting in the
Committee Room of the Graduate Students Center
at 12:30, Wednesday, October 6. With a small amount
to the success of Graduate Student Activities.
DEAN SOWARD
. . . hard-working
an active journalist in B.C.
for many years. He has also
served on many committees.
Einar Gunderson was born
in Cooperstown, N. Dakota.
He is a Fellow of the Institute
of Chartered Accountants, and
is a member of the Board for
many corporations. He has
served on many public groups.
Donovan Francis Miller was
born in Winnipeg, received
his B. Comm from UBC and
his masters from MIT. He has
been on the executive of
many organizations.
Dean Frederic Soward is
the acting secretary of the
Board. He was born in Ontario, took BA at Toronto, B.
Litt. at Oxford, and LLD at
Carleton. He has held numer
ous positions in the university
and community world.
The Board of Governors
was questioned by The
Ubyssey regarding the reaction of the students to their
part in the fee increase and
to the attitude of the students
towards the Board. Their
opinions varied from "I can
see their point of view, and
some of it may be our fault,"
to a curt "irresponsible and
childish."
First, Dean Soward:
"The time I have spent
working on the Board of Governors has convinced me that
.they are among the most
hard-working men I have ever
seen. Some of them work 20
to 30 hours a week, with little
praise or glory.
"These men are all community leaders, and good citizens. I have been impressed
with the careful attention
they pay to their duties on the
Board, and I am sure they
work as hard here as they do
in their own professions."
Other members of the board
stressed not the time they
spend, but the reaction of the
students to their actions.
"I feel that the fa.uM is partly ours," said Stuart Keate.
"There is a lack of communication between the administration and the students on
this matter.
As far as qualifications go,
there seems to be general
agreement among the members of the board that the
present system may not be
perfect,   but   is   better   than
others that have been suggested.
Arthur Fouks said he felt
the main criterion for selecting a particular individual to
the Board was his willingness
to serve.
"The members on theBoard
are, without exception, people
who take an active interest in
the community. They are on
the Board because they are
interested enough to want to
do something for the university."
The board members I talked
to, to a man, were reluctant
to discuss the fee increase.
They felt that they had done
the best they could for the
students, and that there is
little chance of elimination of
fees in the near future.
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$79.95
Murrag Goldman
"Granville
774
Up Half a Block from Birk's Clock
Clothing Mgr   Pat Dipalma never went to school but
knows his clothing.
Free Parking
Credit Naturally Page  14
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 1,  1965
—don kydd photo
MOST COMFORTABLE SEAT in clubs day melee was also
the most expensive. Nancy Donaldson arts II, gets checkup in $2,400 chair from pre-dental student John'Hopkins.
Clubs go all ways
for new members
By TERRY BROOKS
The only thing safe from
being squashed on clubs day
in the armory was the banner
for the UBC squash club.
It was fluttering from the
rafters.
BUt then so were most of the
members of the outdoors' clubs.
They came swinging down
from the rafters ■with ropes and
gags to capture new members.
Jack Khoury of the debating
club summed up the spirit of
the day.
"I saw a blonde over there
but she disappeared," he said.
"We need members like her
but they always run away."
Marsia Kalensky giving
papers out for the jazz society
was pushed into a cubbyhole
when the engineers exodus began. She fought back but was
lost from sight for several
minutes.
Later she was back, a dirty
tennis shoe printed on her
sweat-shirt, but still giving out
leaflets.
Faculty and Students
Are invited to
THE INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
ANNUAL FALL TEA
to welcome new foreign students
on OCTOBER 3rd
Sunday  between 3:30  and   5:30 p.m.
at International House
Community   Members and   Friends  50c Students  free
Shall  we
bottle now
or after the
strike is over?
Now!
is the time to visit the largest selection of
paperback books in western Canada at
DUTHIE BOOKS
Open  Til  9 Friday
4560 W.  10th Ave.
901 Robson St.
Paperback Cellar
CA 4-7012
684-4496
681-8713
Thunderbird rowers aim for
'66 world championships
By JEFF WALL
"Blood, sweat and tears, anyone?"
The UBC rowing crew
started their 1965-66 opera"
tions Tuesday with the annual
organizational meeting. Head
coach Wayne Pretty outlined
a policy of hard work and dedication which he hopes will
lead the ^Thunderbirds to the
World's Championship in September, 1966.
Pleased with the large turnout of new prospects, Pretty
stressed the ideas of top conditioning and of competition
within the crew for places in
the varsity eight. "Everyone
has a chance as of right now,"
he told a crowd of 130, which
included 25 returnees from
1964-65.
The Thunderbird's objectives
for this year will be the Western Sprints in San Francisco
in May, the Canadian Henley
at St. Catherine's in July, the
American National Championships in New York in August
and the World's Championships in Yugoslavia in September.
A freshman-oriented race is
scheduled for November 15
against  Oregon   State  Univer-
Age of synthesis
coming — Angus
The age of specialization
will be replaced by an age of
synthesis."
Professor Henry F. Angus,
UBC's Dean Emeritus of Graduate Studies and honored
speaker at the opening ceremonies of the Angus Building,
said the new age will be
brought about by the continuing advancement of knowledge
and its growing homogenaeity.
The former professor and
department head <1930-56) of
economics, political science
and sociology, first Dean of
Graduate Studies (1948-56) and
member and chairman of numerous government committees, recalled the limited facilities of his day.
He    compared    himself    to
Moses who, reaching the promised land, said, ''Look here!
I have lived to see it all."
"The Angus Building was
constructed at a cost of $3
million," said UBC president
John B. Macdonald. "It is the
highest building on campus,
houses a faculty of 135 and
contains impressive statistical
and psychological facilities."
Its 2,000 - student - per - day
capacity is equal to the entire
student body of Simon Fraser
University, he said, eying
Chancellor Gordon Shrum of
SFU, who was in the audience.
Also present were B.C. education minister Leslie Peterson and B.C. Lieutenant-
Governor George Pearkes.
FIELD HOUSE
CLOSES
TODAY 5 P.M.
On and After October 4
Textbooks Will Be Sold
Only at the Bookstore
NEXT WEEK
Shop for all Your Supplies
at Your
BOOKSTORE
sity, the University of Puget
Sound and Pacific Lutheran
University in Tacoma, Wash.
UBC crews defeated all
three universities in meets last
season.
Daily calisthenics, under
team captain Bruce Jacks, are
held in the gymnasium at 4:30
p.m. These are specially developed exercises which are intended to condition the oarsmen for racing.
The rowers love company
and anyone interested is invited to join the crew by simply turning out to the workouts.
rREKRirnoM
EYEGLASSES
All Doctor's Eyeglass Prescriptions filled. Only first
quality materials used. AU
work performed by qualified
Opticians.
GRANVILLE OPTICAL
SSI Granville MU 8-8H1
■jar Money Back 0.uarantees_a
Clinton's
MEN'S WEAR
742 GramrilW Strnt 411-5*25 Friday, October,  1,  1965
THE    UBYSSEY
Page  15
CLARK
same, or die while watching
SF grow.
We might have the largest
playing fields, but they will
eventually go to pasture. We
can have the largest number
of sports in Canada and we
will be buried with them.
UBC is bleeding badly in
athletics. The dagger is in
pretty deep and there was one
man who could have started
dressing the wound last week,
but ignorance prevented this.
AROUND THE CAMPUS
By ED CLARK
Brutus had his chance to save the state of Rome
before he cowardly plunged his dagger into Caesar. One
hundred score and nine years later, UBC president John
Macdonald committed the same crime when he sliced
UBC's athletics in his welcome speech.
He said, I quote: "We have
by far the largest acreage of
playing fields in Canada; we
have the largest number of
sports in Canada."
How true, but so what! If
the big wheels in the band
wagon would stop and think
for a second, because only a
second of their time is ath"-
letically available, they
would realize that what UBC
needs is not a surplus of playing' areas, but a surplus of
spectators, to partly pay for
these athletics.
• • •
The only way the Thunderbird campus will get spectators is through spectator
sports, namely football,
hockey, rugby and basketball. Furthermore, these spectator sports need scholarship
athletes. Our president never
mentioned scholarships.
Not that UBC hasn't good athletes without these scholarships. But it has been fightfng
a losing cause, athletically.
Every year the athletic department screams because of
its mediocre budget.
Scholarships add an incentive to spectators. Watch
Simon Fraser and you know
what I mean!
• •     *
Having the largest number
of sports in Canada isn't
doing the campus a bit of
good. It costs money to keep
up all these sports and money
is what we don't have, athletically speaking.
We are a big university,
but one wouldn't know that
by our spectator sports. We
need student support to make
our athletics go Big Time.
We're not getting it, so let's
try something  different.
The answer has to be
scholarships.
• •     •
Take   SF,   for  instance.   A
new university with a green
football club but a club based
on scholarships had 1,8(10'
turn out for a football game
—an exhibition match with
Kats of the Pacific Northwest
Amateur League, a team even
the Jayvees could beat. Most
of the spectators were students.
• •      •
Last  year   for  five  home
games UBC's football team
went undefeated against top-
notch American Colleges, but
a total of only 1,200 students
attended the five games.
Our hockey team played
before an average of 100
spectators a game. Rugby
drew a bit more and basketball was a little better.
UBC has a bad smell—and
the skunk rests in the athletic department.
SF began its athletics on
scholarships. The Thunderbird   campus   must   do   the
Soccer birds
tackle St. A.
The UBC Thunderbird soccer team nests atop the
Pacific Coast Soccer League and it plans to stay there this
weekend.
UBC plays host to St. Andrews at 2 p.m. Saturday at
Varsity Stadium in its first
home PCL game. The Birds
won their league opener in Victoria last weekend 2-0.
UBC, a freshman team in the
PCL last season, won its first
game after four consecutive
defeats last year in which the
Birds finished on the bottom
rung of the strong PCL ladder.
Coach Joe Johnson contributes Birds' success this season
to the teamwork, desire and
the squad's much improved
morale.
"We have 11 players on the
field all working as a team,
each with the ability, desire
and determination to win," he
said. "We haven't any really
good players, but to me teamwork is far more important."
Johnson said.
St. Andrews will have two
former Thunderbirds in the
lineup Saturday. They are
goalie Don Cary and Noel Cum-
ming, a wing half.
UBC has added Russ Hillman
to its roster.
U.B.C. THUNDERBIRD
WINTER SPORTS CENTRE
SKATING SCHEDULE - 1965-66
Effective September 24th 1965 to April 15th 1966
TUESDAYS
WEDNESDAYS
FRIDAYS
SATURDAYS
SUNDAYS
12:45—2:45 p.m.*
2:00—3:30 p.m.
7:30—9:30 p.m.
3:00—5:00 p.m.
7:30—9:30 pjn.**
3:00—5:00 p.m.
7:30—9:30 p.m.**
12:45—2:45 p.m.
7:30—9:30 p.m.
(Beginners & Preschool Children)
*   Special student admission:  15 cents.
** Except when hockey games scheduled — Nov. 19 & 20,
Jan. 28 & 29, Feb. 11 & 12 and two more dates not scheduled.
ADMISSION:        Afternoons   —   Students .350   Adults .60*
Evenings   —   Students .50*   Adults .75*
Skate Rental .35* per pair — Skate Sharpening .35* per pair
NOTE:  The Centre will be closed all day Christmas  Day
and Good Friday.
For further information: Call 224-3205 or 228-3197
DON CARY
. against 'Birds
Bird teams fly
this weekend
Both UBC football teams
play out of town this weekend.
The Thunderbirds fly east
to Hamilton and a Staturday
afternoon engagement with
the McMaster University
Marauders. The Birds smothered McMaster here 47-0 last
year.
The Junior Varsity is set
to meet the Snohomish Athletic Club in a Cascade Football League game in Snohomish, Wash.
Editor:  Ed Clark
r
Overseas Auto Parts
PARTS FOR THE IMPORTED CAR
SPORTS  CAR  ACCESSORIES
We carry a good  coverage of
Volkswagen Replacement Parts
2780 Alma Rd.
at 12th Ave.
10% Discount with AMS Card
I
736-9804
.1
REGISTRATION
PHOTOS
Photos for AMS cards will be taken in
Brock Stage Room Monday, Oct. 4 and
Thursday, Oct- 7. Times - 12:30 p.m. to
3:30 p.m. Students without AMS cards
must bring their ELIGIBILITY FORM.
Cards will be at the camera.
Pimm's No.1 has a Gin base
Slacks Narrowed
Suits Altered
and Repaired
Fast Service — Expert
Tailoring
UNITED TAILORS
549 Granville St.
Pimm's No. 5 has a Canadian Whisky base
(both are absolutely delicious!)
Two things about Pimm's: easy to
serve, and a taste you'll enjoy.
Just pour into a tall glass and add
ice and fill up with your favourite light
mix. You can add a slice of cucumber,
a piece of lemon, or a sprig of mint to
make the traditional Pimm's, famous
throughout the world. But don't bother
unless you're in the mood.
A new generation is rediscovering
Pimm's... and enjoying every moment
of it.
DRINK
PIMM'S
simply because you'll enjoy
the taste of it.
H. CORBY DISTILLERY LIMITED, CORliYVILLE,' CAN.
This advertisement is not published or displayed by the Liquor Control Board or by the Government of British Columbia. Page -I*
 -*ge-
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 1,  1965
'TWEEN CLASSES
Teach-in takes in a
Making final plans for B.C.
Universities     Teach - In.     All
faculty and students welcome.
Mon. 8:30 p.m., Bu. 100. "
AUS
First meeting of Arts Undergrad  Soc.   Monday   noon,  Bu.
3202.
CHEERLEADING
Meeting    for     Thunderbird
soccer    cheerleaders    Monday
noon, Bu. 155. Everybody welcome.
LUTHERAN  STUDENTS
Dr.   K.   Erdman   speaks   on
How The World Began, Monday noon, Bu. 104.
FINE ARTS CLUB
FAC present a film on Henry
Moore   noon   today,   Lasserre
104. Non-members welcome.
NOON LECTURE
Prof. V. R. Lorwin on Conflict and Compromise in a
Multi-lingual Country — the
Case of Belgium — noon Monday in Bu. 100.
VCF
Information meeting — Bu
106 noon today.
CONTROVERSIAL
SPEAKERS
Ed. U.S. presents Lome
Brown and Your Role in Controversy, noon today—Ed. 100.
EL CIRCULO
Meeting today noon in Bu.
204, and 8:00 opening evening
in Buchanan penthouse.
DANCE
Sherwood Lett and Phyllis
Ross Houses present dance at
Lower Mall with the ACCENTS tonite, 9 p.m. lo 1 a.m.
—75c.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
IH's upper lounge  reserved
for    speaking   French,    every
Friday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m
All welcome.
NDP
General meeting. Everyone
welcome. Mon. noon, Bu. 204.
DISCOTHEQUE  MIXER
Records,    prizes,    entertainment,  Rolf Johannson.  Fri.  8
p.m. till 12,    Ed lounge. Men
60c, women 45c.
NEWMAN CLUB
Hayride   and    Barn    Dance
Sat.,  Oct.  2  from  7:30 to  12,
Richmond   Riding   Stables.  $1
each. BYOB.
P.E.
Orientation day Saturday.
Swimming, games, dinner, discussions, dancing. Faculty and
students welcome.
totem '66
totem IS '66
totem is a new
design
totem is a way of
life
totem is you and
your campus
totem is pictures
totem is stories and
reports
totem is your
YEAR BOOK
UBC SOCREDS
General meeting Mon. noon,
Bu. 313.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
Organizational meeting noon
today, Brock stage room.
RECORD HOP
International House, 8:30 tonight, 25c.
SCIENCE SYMPOSIUM
Register Oct. 1-3 at AMS office.    Topic    "Progress   Reexamined". Cost $6.50.
FRIENDS OF CHAMBER
MUSIC
Vancouver Ticket Centre has
50 tickets for students only.
Seven concerts $6.75.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day, $.75—3 days, $2.00. Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Publications  Office:  Brock   Hall.   Ext.   26.   224-3242
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost & Found
11
LOST — BRIEFCASE, in vicinity of
Library. Urgently required. Return
to Ubysaey Office or phone 224-
7198.
BRIEFCASE TAKEN IN BUS STOP
Cafe 2.00 p.m. Tuesday. Please
return to 4188 W. 10th or to Cafe.
FOUND — WALLET containing
sum of money. Call Doug Keith,
224-9055.
FOUND — FOUNTAIN PEN in East
Mall Annex. Apply Ubyssey, Publications  Office,   Brock   Hall.
FOUND BU 1221 (ladies) watch
Friday 24. Phone Hut 6, Room 4,
Fort   Camp.
LOST: Physics 101 Lab Report Book
and Text Book. Need urgently!
Phone  321-2883 ask  for Gary.
FOUND ADS inserted free. Publications office. Brock Hall. Local 26,
224-3242.
Special Notices
13
ONIiT SEVEN MONTH TO GRADU-
ation. Next Tear's TOTEM will
be nearly 300 pages and Advance
Orders will receive a special 8-
page graduation supplement. Order
now from AMS Business Office.
SPECIAL COLLEGE RATE SUB-
scription for Playboy Magazine,
1 yr. $6.50, 2 yrs. $12.00, 3 yrs.
$16.50. Call Fred RE 8-4504.
HEAR THE NEW SOUND OF THE
Dartelles at Totem Park, Saturday,
October 2, 9.00-1.00. Admission 50c
with A.M.S.  Card.
HOW DO YOU use your sense of
touch and smell for watching
television?  Find   out   Thursday.
INTERESTED in Figure Skating &
dancing on ice? UBC Thunderbird
Arena Tuesdays 7:30 - 8:30 p.m.
Special rates. For full information
call Pt. Grey Winter Club. 224-
7628.
YOU DIG THE SOUL SOUND? You
think the Mersey Beat is gear?
Or do you just appreciate good
big-beat music? Then you be at
the Armouries, Sat. Oct. 16, 8:30
p.m. - 12:30 a.m. for the greatest
dance ever to hit the campus. It'll
be something else! Watch for details  Monday.
Transportation
14
RIDE WANTED vicinity Renfrew
and' Charles, 8.30 classes, Monday
thru Friday. Phone Vicki, AL 5-
0428.
NORTH BURNABY — RIDE wanted
Mon. Wed. Thurs. Fri., 8.30's.
Phone Gina, CY 8-8519.	
RIDERS WANTED from Richmond
8.30 classes, Mon. thru Sat. Phone
277-9338.
CAR POOL URGENTLY NEEDED.
Area of Dunbar and 32nd, 8.30
lectures. Phone AM 6-7758, ask for
John.
RICHMOND — RIDE URGENTLY
needed, vicinity Westminster Hwy.
and No. 1. Phone BR 7-8576, ask
for Bev.
RIDE WASTED FROM CRESCENT
Bach.  Phone 531-2694  after 6 p.m.
DESPARATE RIDERS needed daily
except Tuesday. 4th and Alma
area. Phone RE 8-8007. Reliable
transportation! _^
RIDE WANTED from New Westminster for 8:30's. Phone Gloria
LA  l-555'6.
HELP! - 1 NEED A RIDE from
North Burnaby -vie. Willingdon
and Hastings phone Susan or
leave message CY 8-1688.
DRIVER WANTED: New Westminster area. 9:30 classes only.
Call Phil. Between 6:30-7:30. LA
1-3262. 	
RIDE WANTED Monday to Friday
for 9:30's. 4th Ave. and McDonald
phone  RE 1-2563  after 7:00,
WEST VAN CARPOOL wanted for
2 girls vicinity 20th and Mathers
phone  Linda  922-7750.	
Wanted
15
AUTOMOTIVE  8c MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
FOR SALE — 1953 CHEV, 2 Door,
Bel Air, in good condition. New
paint.  Best offer. Nick, CA 4-1449.
A TRULY AMAZING SUNBEAM
Conv., perfect for Student. Best
offer.  Phone RE 1-6284.
MUST SELL '59 M.G.A.  Best offer.
Phone  733-5380  after 6  p.m.	
•53   FORD.    EVERYTHING   NEW—
after 5 p.m. RE 6-5171. 3643 W. 1st.
'62 M.G. MIDGET, top cond. New
tires, seats, windows,- $1150. AM
6-7887.
1963 A.H. SPRITE — EXCELLENT
condition, only 18,000 miles. One
girl owner. Light blue. Phone CA
4-9585.
ATTENTION    RALLY    FANS!    160
Skoda   Sports   Convert.,   spotless,
new tires, brakes, clutch, etc. 1100
cc. Twin Carb. $500 or offer. BR
7-2012.
'61  SPRITE, -New Clutch  and Gen-
erator,  good condition.  HE  3-1890.
MUST SELL 1950 CHEV. Dependable transp. Phone 431-2494. $95
or best  offer.
$900 OR BEST OFFER: 1959 Simca
Conv. Sports, pullmanized seats,
Michelin "X" tires. All trans,
radio. Cheap on gas. Phone 265-
4283 Mon.-Fri. after 7 p.m. All day
Sat.  & Sun.
•54 STUDE. LOWBOY. Rebuilt
trans, and motor. $350 or offer.
Lyle,   AM   6-7887.
1959 M.G. REC. MOTOR JOB. Good
tires, trans., radio, heater, $875.
228-8296.
1962 VALIANT SIGNET — 2 door
hardtop-automatic. Fully equipped.
In excellent condition. $1700.00 or
best offer. Phone 738-2988. after
5:00 p.m.       	
1960   TR3    IN    GOOD    CONDITION
call WA 2-8440.
1957 SUNBEAM RAPIER. Sale or
trade for sports car. Stick, tach.,
good  cond.  AM  6-0162  Grant
Motorcycles
27
1965   SUZUKI  50  cc,   $215.   224-9986.
Kappa  Sigma  House.	
HONDA 90, NEAR NEW, 3900 M.
Need money to pay fees. Cheap.
922-6731.
1965 HONDA 90, 4% months old, 2
safety helmets. Contact Bruce,
Hut 6, Rm 12, Fort Camp. 224-9880
ONE ONLY! 1966 80 cc. SUZUKI
Motorcycle. Good condition, only
$235. Phone Earl, CA 4-1772, after
6.30.
YAHAMA 60 1965 MODEL brand
new-licensed. Reg. $330.00. Cash
$275.00 Call AM 6-9841 or RE 3-
3022.
BUSINESS  SERVICES
Typewriters 8c Repairs
42
GOOD CLEAN TYPEWRITERS. $-0
up. Also Typewriter repairs at
60 percent savings. Poison Typewriters, 2140 W. 4th. Phone RE
1-8322.
Typing
43
ESSAYS, BOOK REVIEWS AND
cases typed by qualified typist.
From 40c per page including paper, 1 carbon copy and binder.
Ardale Griffiths Ltd., 70th and
Granville.  Phone 263-4530.
TYPING     (HOME).    ALL    KINDS.
Mrs. Wood.  Phone 986-5086.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
SI
WANTED — 1st FLOOR HOUSE
"Mother" — Apply Sherwood Lett
House.   224-9014.
BABY SITTER WANTED — FRI-
days, noon to five — Kerrisdale—
two children, ages 2-6. Call 261-
4766.
FEMALE STUDENT for light house
work and babysitting four hours
per week. Pref. Thurs. afternoon.
Phone CA 8-8434.
VARSITY STUDENTS
PliAN NOW TO ATTEND:
Morning Worship        11:00 a.m.
"the Unknown Quantity"
7:15 p.m.
SPECIFIC TO STUDENTS
College Age Bible Class
9:45 a.m.
Informal College Age Meeting
9:00 p.m.
Broadway
West
Baptist
Church
3500 W. 7th AVE.
AT COLLINGWOOD
MALE OR FEMALE—PART TIME
work available in the Department
of Recreation or Physical Education with the BURNABY Y.M.C.A.
Call CY 9-6411.
Work Wanted
52
NURSE   will   look   after   children-
weekdays.   Phone  224-6738.
INSTRUCTION
Tutoring
64
TUTORS WANTED FOR ZOOLOGY
422 Ethology and Psychology 100.
Please phone 224-9776 in the evening and ask  for Judy,  Room  214.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE 71
BIRD CALLS—the most useful book
on the campus. Student telephone
directory available latter part of
October. Limited Number. Order
now, only 76 cents.	
BALLS & CHAIN! IDEAL FOR
Stags, etc. 15-45 lbs. From $7.50.
FA  1-1776  and AM 6-2869.
HIGH DENSITY & FLUORESCENT
Desk Lamps, $6.95 and $9.95. Cal-
vert-Craft Hardware & Gifts, 3209
West Broadway. Phone 738-2311.
(Opposite Liquor Store, Peter's
Ice Cream, and Super Valu).
FOR SALE — SET OF DRUMS.
Bass, Large and Small Tom-Toms,
Ludwlg Super Classic Snare $250,
Cash. Call Joe. HE 1-0889, after 6.
Know "Who's Who"
-where they live
-their phone number
- faculty, year, etc.
All the information you need about
UBC Students
in "BIRD CALLS
The Student Telephone Directory
rr
RESERVE YOUR COPY FROM
PHRATERES CLUB MEMBERS
Only 75c per Copy
Available  Mid-October
UPPERCLASSMEN -
HELP
WELCOME
the Frosh at the
Frosh Reception
DANCE
Saturday, Oct. 9 - Armouries
Dance to the Fantastic Sound of
THE SONICS (The Witch)
From Seattle
— semi-formal $3.50 per couple
— 8:00 - 12 midnight Tickets at A/AS
— AMS Cards to be presented at the door
See the Frosh Queen Crowned
2nd Year — 3rd Year — 4th Year — Grads
ALL WELCOME

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