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The Ubyssey Feb 6, 1987

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TUDENTSM,
87IIM,
THE UBYSSEY
•^ Vol. LXIX. No. 35
Vancouver, B.C. Friday, February 6,1987
tm*
228-2301
By CHRIS
They lined the walls enclosing the
meeting room of UBC's board of
governors; 30 students who penetrated
the hallowed turf of the university's ultimate
seat of authority. Undaunted by the stern expressions on the faces of the formally attired
board members, the ragtag assemblage of
protestors, half chiding and half pleading,
argued their case against yet another tuition
fee hike.
The board members, including eight appointed by the provincial government, listened as students decried UBC's soaring tuition
fee increases. And they kept listening as they
were berated for letting the provincial
government get away with inadequately funding the university.
But apparently they were unmoved, for the
15-member board decided in the closed portion of last week's meeting to approve the
four per cent fee hike.
Despite the board decision, student activists at UBC say the action was effective in
getting their point across and is a sign that
voices of protest are growing stronger -on
campus. However, Simon Seshadri, outgoing
Alma Mater Society president and newly
elected student board representative, called
the protest "offensive."
Seshadri says the protestors were not
representative of the overall student population and chose an inapropriate forum to express their concerns.
"If anything, it pissed the board of governors off," says Seshadri.
But activists interviewed this week by The
Ubyssey, point out that protestors have made
little gains in the past by being meek. At the
heart of significant student protests has been
the desire to challenge the status quo, not by
squeaking in hushed tones, but by making a
loud and clear expressions of discontent.
While those expressions have increasingly
been muted and muddled in the eighties by
obstacles, activists had no need to concern
themselves with two decades ago, optimism is
not in short supply. The activists say student
protest is far from a moribund phenomenon
and the student outcry about funding for
universities administration president David
Strangway has called for is forthcoming.
Stan Persky, an ever-present radical who
roamed the campus during the sixties and the
early seventies, says the notion of student
apathy is simply an ideological creation.
"You've got to remember in the 1960s,
students were arguing about student apathy.
For me it's such a false concept," says Persky, now a journalist, author and political
science instructor at Capilano College.
"There's a bit of a myth that students
aren't active," agrees Stephen Scott, executive officer of the Canadian Federation of
Students, Pacific Region. "The activism may
not be as dramatic as in the past, but it may
be more constructive."
As an example, he points to a new CFS
campaign to send postcards and letters to
politicians, communicating the urgent
message that the student aid program needs
revamping.
CFS has 14 member institutions in B.C.,
including Simon Fraser University and the
University of Victoria. UBC students voted
against joining the student organization in a
1984 referendum. But a new UBC group, the
Student Coalition For an Accessible Education, was formed after last week's board protest.
In the wake of the release last week of a
CFS task force report that slammed B.C.'s
student aid program as inadequate, Scott
Still active after
all these years
says the government should be given a chance
to institute improvements.
"They've agreed to have a second look at
the program — that's a significant step. Until
that's completed, I think it would be in kind
of bad faith to take to the streets."
That's exactly where students should head
en masse if the provincial government continues to place a low priority on education,
says Michael Moeti, an activist at UBC involved in a number of organizations including UBC Students For a Free Southern
Africa. But Moeti and other members of the
minority of UBC students who could be called activists, are painfully aware that such a
clarion call would, at present, likely go
unheeded.
Moeti, who failed in his bid to become the
AMS coordinator of external affairs, says a
major factor preventing more students from
getting involved in campus issues is the lack
of student leadership, particularly from the
AMS executive. But he says the potential exists at UBC for increased activism despite the
apparent conservative tone of students in the
eighties.
"You don't have to be radical to get involved. What you have to be is open-minded.
You can't restrict yourself politically or
ideologically to one extreme, you have to
galvanize everybody."
Seshadri admits the AMS executive could
do more to get students involved but he says
the problem lies within the students
themselves. Citing the low turnout of only
about 75 students to a forum last week on the
tuition hike featuring Strangway, Seshadri
says UBC students are not easily motivated to
get involved.
"I think it's pretty tough to inspire those
who don't want to be inspired. That's the
feeling we're getting on campus."
Christina Davidson, a student senator at-
See page 2: SPEAK Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, February 6, 1987
Speak up while you can
From page 1
large in third year law, says students
are impeded from becoming activists by the false perception that
they lack power to affect change on
campus.
For Davidson, that perception
was significantly altered when the
protest she helped launch against
UBC's decision to give Jim Pattison
an honorary degree led to concrete
results. Last month Pattison informed the university he would not
accept the award due to the controversy and student protests planned for the spring convocation.
"Pattison's decision (to turn
down the honor) was satisfying
because it helped reaffirm that I
personally have some control and
collectively we have control," says
Davidson. "We can actually stop a
very rich and powerful man from
doing something he wants to do.
That's a very important feeling."
Alicia Barsallo, a member of
Students For a Democratic University and the Committee For the
Defense of Human Rights in Peru,
says that many students in the
eighties have bought the philosophy
of individualism which entails a
strong desire to "make it alone."
Adds Persky: "You certainly
can't blame the youngest people in
society for not protesting when the
adults are quiescent in society," he
says, mainly referring to faculty.
"If the adults aren't speaking out,
why should the students shoulder
all the responsibility?"
Students of today are also
pressured to concentrate on their
studies and avoid acquiring radical
reputations because of the
economic realities which prevail,
says Dr. Gabor Mate, a student activist at UBC in the 1960s. "We
never had any doubt about our
futures. Frankly, you could just
screw around and get your BA and
that would lead to a job."
Mate made a name of himself
on campus by his opinion pieces in
The Ubyssey and his involvement in
campus politics (he was among the
first four student senators elected at
UBC in 1967). He was among
radicals at UBC in the sixties who
were fighting for issues which strike
a familiar chord today.
Among the most important concerns of the activists in the sixties
was fighting for improved accessibility to education, says Persky. They were also calling for better teaching, and complaining
about overcrowded lecture halls.
On another level, the activists
wanted more democracy within the
university and in the society surrounding it.
Says Persky: "We had the illusion we could actually change society. And so it was tremendously exciting. It looked like we were inventing the lives we were going to be
leading ... It's never a good idea
to operate under an illusion. But if
one side of the coin is the illusion,
certainly the other side which is not
such a horrible thing, is a dream."
While some significant gains were
made the dream, it turned out, was
just that. The university and society
^CAMPUS-WIDE'
VALENTINE'S DAY
CARNATION SALE
$2.00/CARNATION
Order in SUB Concourse
February 9th to 12th
12:30 p.m.-2:30 p.m.
Delivered February 12th and 13th
y      anywhere on campus
J
at large is no more democratic, and
the spectre of waste and destruction
is omnipresent, says Persky.
"It looks to me like the generation that's entering this particular
mess has got a lot of problems on its
hands."
All agree finding ways to get
more students motivated to partake
in student activism is not easy. But
most opt for a gradual process. Barsallo suggests students should be
shown different perspective than
the ones they have been spoon-fed.
To begin, she says students could
fight   for   small,   easily-attainable
issues.
Horacio de la cueva, an activist
on campus since the late 1970s, says
students have to be shown there's
more to life than attaining their
degrees. That is, their curiosity has
to be sparked to take a criticial look
at the environment they live in, says
de la Cueva, a member of the UBC
Anarchist club and Amnesty International.
Moeti expects more students will
participate as they begin to feel the
personal pain caused by cutbacks to
education funding, rising tuition
fees, diminishing student aid
monies and the declining quality of
education. "Those kinds of things
are already beginning to motivate
even some of the students who are
to some degree politically
apathetic," he says.
What will it take to change the
provincial government's views on
education? "Governments only
move if you put tremendous
pressure on them," says Moeti.
"That pressure must come from an
organized structure of students."
The question  remains,  will the
ranks of the student activists ever
expand beyond the limited confines
of the tiny minority they have constituted even since the height of protest on campus?
Says Seshadri: "It's got to come
from within. You can't say. 'dammit, be more active, they just won't
do it."
Persky concedes students have
good reason these days to think
twice about defying the powers that
be. "But it seems to me, it's a real
wasted opportunity not to get your
two cents in since you're going to
have to live in the world you were
silent in when you had a chance to
speak up."
UNIQUE... ANY WAY YOU SERVE IT
STANLEY Q. PERSKY, Esq.
FOR
CHANCELLOR
Stan Persky is the idealist individual who should serve as
Chancellor of Canada's second
largest University. His proven ability
and years of dedicated Socred disservice will add to the stature of the
University and help it achieve the
kind of recognition fundamental to
its future growth and development of
quality education.
In all aspects, Stan Persky has the
left credentials:
Career
Graduate in Political Science,
University of British Columbia.
Political Science instructor,
Capilano College.
Journalist, author.
Public Service
Smashed wine bottles to protest
sale in government liquor stores of
South African wine.
Keeps us in line with his caustic
social commentary found in This
Magazine, New Directions, West
Side Week and other publications.
Provides clear, cogent analysis of
current political issues in his political
science classes at Capilano College.
University Service
Former Arts Undergraduate Society president, Senate member and
Graduate Students Association president.
Dug up scandalous news stories to
embarass the university administration as a Ubyssey muckracker.
Roamed the campus as a bald-
headed, dope-smoking, free-loving,
student radical.
STANLEY Q. PERSKY, ESQ.
FOR CHANCELLOR
THE OBLIVIOUS CHOICE
This advertisement paid for by Stan's dope-smoking, free-ioving friends. Friday, February 6, 1987
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
5
TUDOnSM
87
I i
The market's tough out there
Unemployment hard
to cope with after
UBC graduation
By PATTI FLATHER
Steve is unemployed, and feels lousy about it.
Twenty-four years old, intelligent and articulate, he graduated from UBC in 1984 with a
B.Sc. in agriculture. He thought continuing applied studies in agriculture would be a safe route
to a job.
Since graduation he has worked
both as a research technician and in
manual labor jobs, and returned
to UBC one year as an unclassified
student.
For the past few months Steve
has been collecting Unemployment
Insurance. He also has been reexamining his career choices, and
grappling with feelings of depression, lack of motivation, and
loneliness associated with his
unemployment.
Steve spends more time sleeping
and watching t.v. than he did
before. His self-esteem is low, he
thinks other people won't be sympathetic and see him as lazy and
most friends seem too busy working
or studying. "If I don't have
something to do," Steve says in an
interview at SUBway cafeteria, ". .
. my major motivation is to watch
my soap (opera) in the afternoon."
There is hurt, frustration, and
resentment in his voice when he
asks: "Why haven't I finally found
my niche?"
Steve asked that his name not be
used, saying he is embarassed about
his situation. But what he is going
through is normal for the
unemployed, and it is a devastating
experience that more and more
B.C. students face in a competitive
job market with double-digit
unemployment.
In the last job survey of UBC
graduates, done in 1984 by the
counselling services department,
unemployment rates ranged from
28.3 per cent in agricultural studies
and 25.8 per cent in nursing to 12.8
per cent for science grads and 8.8
per cent for arts graduates. There
was full employment in some
specialised fields, including
rehabilitation medicine and dental
hygiene.
Last summer 125,000 B.C.
students returning to school in the
fall, between 15 and 24 years old
(10.3 per cent), couldn't find work.
That was our Expo year, when
UBC's Canada Employment Centre
placed 1,000 students with Expo
jobs.
UBC professionals who deal with
student concerns daily say that worries about finding a job, combined
with increasingly high student
loans, are taking their toll on student well-being.
More than half the 10,000-odd
appointments in a year at counselling services relate to career concerns, says assistant director Dennis
Magrega.
Magrega laments that students
are so worried about landing a job
upon graduation that it's becoming
the main determinant in what they
study. What they are really interested in often is being tossed
aside, and employers want students
who do more than study, he says.
Magrega stresses that jobs are
available still for most graduates,
and that the university degree does
offer flexibility in the marketplace.
"I can't remember the last time someone wanted to study philosophy
for the sake of philosophy," he
says. "There has to be something in
it for them."
Magrega says students wanting to
enter professional disciplines are
particularly obsessed with grades,
to the point where some students
spend all their time studying.
On a recent visit to a high school,
one student told Magrega he
wanted to be a doctor in Vancouver
but was concerned about the
government restriction of billing
numbers. Magrega thinks it's
frightening that high school kids
already have job worries.
Counselling services can be obtained in Brock Hall, the old Student Union Building that the sandy-
haired assistant director used to
hang out in as a UBC
undergraduate in the 1960s.
iC
VI-
A*r
* > >*
PATAKY . . . planning for graduate school
rory a. photo
Students choose futures
Graduate school. Travel. Move to Ontario. 1 don't
know.
These are the kinds of options some graduating
students are pondering as they prepare to enter the
job market with a university degree in tow.
Mary Cowan, who specialized in special education
and psychology for her elementary education degree,
is set to take off to Japan to teach English. One of
about 400 education students graduating this year,
Cowan already has two friends from UBC teaching
in Japan and she said: "I really want to travel."
Diane Mar, the professional relations officer with
the Engineering Undergraduate Society, says "moving to Ontario would be a better career plan for me."
The fact that only four per cent of Ontario
engineers are unemployed, compared to 13 per cent
in B.C., appeals to Mar. She believes that to succeed
"you have to be mobile and pretty aggressive."
Dave Pataky, the Science Undergraduate Society
president, is graduating with a B.Sc. in physiology,
and will probably go on to graduate school. "There's
practically nothing you can do with a B.Sc. in
physiology," he says, except work as a laboratory
technician.
Forestry student Denise Magowan is more optimistic. She says more money is being spent on
silviculture, and more forest companies are interviewing on campus.
Magowan has spent two summers tree-planting,
and another working with a forest company in
Quesnel, and says she will find a job in her field.
"We'd sit around for hours
drinking coffee and discussing
issues, pretending we knew
everything about everything," he
reminesces. "It was a different era.
There was less pressure on us."
Down the hall at the Women
Students Office, director June
Lythgoe believes that beneath the
surface, students are profoundly
worried about their futures,
although many try to block fears
out and concentrate on school.
She says there are few bright
spots in B.C.'s economic prognosis.
Partly as a result, she says, students
seem to be more withdrawing and
shunning political activities, including those relating to student
economic concerns such as fees.
And at Student Health Services,
Dr. Dorothy Goresky says in the
last few years more students are seeing her with physical and anxiety-
type symptoms related to finding a
job and having a large student loan.
University offers advice on perfecting job-search techniques
By PATTI FLATHER
Your money is getting low, midterms and term papers are looming
in your mind, arid you haven't quite
shaken the post-holiday blahs.
Pius, it's raining a lot.
Unfortunately now is also the
time to think about summer jobs or
work after graduation. Some
employers have already interviewed
students on campus, others still are,
and some have to be sought out.
The following services can help
you, whether you need advice on
job-search techniques, career
counselling, or a morale-booster for
what may seem a hopeless task.
UBC Counselling Services, Brock
Hall, 228*4316
Individual career counselling, in
cluding aptitude testing, by "eight-
and-a-half" counsellors, and
periodic workshops.
Women Students Office, Brock
halt
Counselling and workshops for
women students; referral service.
Canada Employment Centre,
Brock hall
Our favorite job boards, plus
seminars on resume writing and interview techniques on request. CEC
placed 546 students last summer,
and there will be 6,000 B.C. jobs in
tree-planting this summer.
Student Health Services, 228-7011
Dr. Dorothy Goresky conducts
twice-weekly stress management
classes.
Despite your best efforts — a
hoity-toity resume, new clothes,
and lots of calls — you may find
yourself unemployed, and the effects can be devastating. UBC
counselling psychologist Norm
Amundson says students often lack
tbe necessary job-search skills, and
don't know how to keep "up" and
bouncy, something essential in a
job interview.
Amundson says unemployment
attacks four basic human needs:
financial security, community, a
sense of purpose, and routine, and
students must learn how to set up
coping mechanisms. Amundson
and Bill Borgen, the head of
counselling psychology, suggest the
following:
• Volunteer work;
• Support from family and
friends. Reach out to people; don't
withdraw from them;
• Job-search support groups.
These have excellent results.
Canada Employment Centres and
community centres can put you in
touch with one;
• Positive thinking. Do not
blame yourself for the situation,
but do not be afraid to look at ways
to improve your job chances;
• Take a survival job. This
allows you to put food on the table,
see co-workers, and boost self-
esteem.
• Careful budgetting;
• Improve job-search skills.
Seek out information, make the service agencies work for you;
• Job re-training.
Goresky, who specialises in stress
management, says students don't
come right out and say what is causing their stress. But when she
discusses their histories, "quite a
number of them say 'I'll be
graduating but I don't know what
I'll be doing'."
Professors and students in UBC's
counselling psychology department
have been prolific in studying the
effects of unemployment on people,
and a new study looks specifically
at university graduates.
Department head Bill Borgen,
who with his colleague Norm
Amundson coined the term "emotional roller coaster" to describe the
unemployment experience, says
graduates feel a sense of loss that
the university experience has ended,
as well as stress while searching for
work in a tough market.
University graduates are in a difficult position, because friends go
their own ways, friends that could
be offering support during
unemployment, says Borgen.
Graduate student Wendy Hatch
studied 12 unemployed UBC
graduates and found their
unemployment experience had two
segments: an initial holiday period
and a downward trend.
Hatch found that in the initial
holiday period, lasting for from
three weeks to three and a half
See Page 8: DOWNWARD Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, February 6, 1987
Snapped
There will be no more advertisements in The Ubyssey promoting the buying
of term papers. And there will be no more ads promoting the selling of term
papers after February.
The Ubyssey staff decided at its Wednesday meeting to boycott all ads
from Snappy Term Papers Ltd., a Vancouver based company run by two
students, on the grounds that the term papers licensed by the company will
most likely be retyped and submitted as original work.
We at The Ubyssey have no desire to help anyone help students commit
plagiarism, the most serious academic offence. We think the service provided
by Snappy lays itself open to abuse.
The staff has also given notice to Campus Plus, the national ad agency for
Canadian University Press, that The Ubyssey does not want to run ads for
Research Assistance, a company that sells custom research papers. Because
Campus Plus must be given 30-days notice before a national ad can be
boycotted, the classified ad will appear in The Ubyssey until March.
Both Snappy and Research Assistance say there is nothing wrong with selling information or providing students with reference materials. That is true.
But any student serious about research can find abundant material in any
library, for free.
The only service these firms offer that the library does not is a student paper
tailor-made for immediate submission.
K.A«*J»   IW4UJ&HA-/C   (rOT    AWA1    WITH     IT     If
^— ' IT   HAb f*JT   ME^   Fo^ Yovj
rAEbOUNO* KIW Ar*lt> y*>*-* boo/
S&W'WQ sm e»Ro?£
"Hajen confused about pro-choice movement
99
In his letter to the Editor, (Jan.
30) Walter Hajen seems somewhat
confused about the issues surrounding the pro-choice movement. In
order to 'increase his awareness' I
would like to draw his attention to
the facts upon which the pro-choice
movement is based.
Pro-choicers support preventative measures such as sex education in the high schools — (unlike
most    'Pro-Lifers'   like    Vander
Zalm who seem to feel that ignorance is bliss, and would like to
impose unwanted pregnancies (and
possibly death) upon men and
women who have not had the opportunity to educate themselves).
Over 60 per cent of the Canadian
population according to the last
Canada census recognizes that until
society provides adequate financial
support for the consequences of unwanted pregnancies, society has no
THE UBYSSEY
February 6, 1987
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Friday
throughout the academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and are not necessarily those
of the administration or the AMS. Member Canadian
University Press. The Ubyssey's editorial office is SUB
241k. Editorial department, 228-2301/2305. Advertising
228-3977
A towering green glob descended on the prone form of Patti Rather as Robert Beynon screamed in
delight, the glare of his teeth flashing in Steve Chan's spectacles. Malcolm Pearson grabbed Katherine
Monk's crucifix and swallowed Karen Gram's valium while Chris Wong and Debbie Lo played duck and
cover between Svetozar Kontic's sweaty things. Allison Felker and Corrine Bjorge were trampled
under foot by Neil Lucente's thrash boots as Rick Hiebert squealed like a pig bringing altruist David Fer-
man to the rescue. Michael Groberman led his faithful cult of Scott Beveridge, Anya Waite, Ross
McLaren, Michael Glenister and Dan Andrews into Muriel Draaisma's mud pit as Evelyn Jacob buried
the lot with a truck load of sand. Tony Roberts wept in memory of Jennifer Lyall, rumoured to be encased in concrete forever. Rory Allen was disappointed because he had forgotten his camera.
Jolt out of stupidity
right to impose such difficulties (the
physical pain and psychological
devestation of poverty) upon
anyone.
I would assume that when
Hajen mentions ultra-sound that he
is referring to the anti-choice movement's film The Silent Scream. The
silent scream contains gross examples of misinformation carefully
chosen to evoke a hysterical
response, according to Planned
Parenthood in their report on The
Silent Scream, "The Facts Speak
Lounder," available through Planned Parenthood, 810 Seventh Ave.
N.Y. N.Y. 10019.
Many of the so called 'facts' included in the film are completely incorrect, and are intended to horrify,
rather than inform the viewer.
For example, Brain waves do not
occur until the third trimester — the
film suggests 10 weeks. In the first
trimester the brain and spinal cord
are not developed to the extent that
pain can be perceived, since there is
nothing to perceive it, something
pro-lifers should understand.
The most absurd piece of misinformation is the intermittent
display of a fetal model, identifiable
as a five month fetus implying that
a fully formed fetus is being
aborted — wrong again: abortions
are rarely performed after the tenth
week of pregnancy.
When Hajen suggest that the
fetus to be aborted is already fully
formed, he is obviously misinformed.
His lurid description of mangled
bodies in garbage bags is typical of
the vulgar ignorance of the anti-
choice movement. Furthermore, the
name pro-choice is not a 'shield',
but an accurate description of a
movement which recognizes a
woman's right and ability to make
her own choice on a very complex
decision.
The pro-choice movement does
not suggest that all women should
be forced to undergo unwanted
pregnancies, and it definately does
not demand that all women should
be forced against their will to have
an abortion. Clearly it is a matter of
individual choice — something the
Pro-Choice movement recognizes a
basic human right.
Freyja Bergthorson
UBC Students for Choice
arts 3
Killing live humans is wrong
I was having coffee with friends
when a woman friend suddenly said
to me: "You know, you've really
developed the feminine side in
you." Here I was, a former nerd
who used to hide his fears behind
macho antics — getting one of the
nicest compliments a man can get!
What helped jolt me out of
masculine stupidity is a Women's
Studies course I initially took for
Monday evening recreation. It's
very different from the usual
academic fare: a class in which
women analyze sexist language,
power games in relationships, sex-
role conditioning, men's pathetic
ignorance of women's sexuality, the
motherhood-career dilemma, injustices in the job market and lots
of other issues.
These aren't just women's issues,
but issues that women and men in
our- society must face together. I
have found few courses so provoking, prejudice-uprooting and enjoyable. But why, I wonder, are
there only two men among thirty
students? Men stand to benefit at
least as much as women from a
Women's Studies course because
many issues that seem obvious to
most women and familiar from bitter experience are likely to expand a
man's mind.
After class a group of us always
meet at the Gallery Lounge. The
spirit of openness which this course
catalyzes has led to uninhibited conversations filled with the magic of
real communication between the
sexes. 1 still remember my rush of
delight when a charming woman
defined, with brilliant spontaneity,
the distinction between "having
sex" and "making love".
Men who like women and seek to
understand them better could do
worse than enrol in a Women's
Studies course. Only from mutual
understanding can come better relationships, and only from better
relationships with the opposite sex
can we extract life's sweetness.
Kurt Preinsperg
graduate studies
This letter is in response to Tammy Anne Soper's letter of Feb. 3
which was in response to my letter
of Jan. 30. I want to clear my name
of her slanderous statements. In
Soper's letter I came across as such
a cruel, uncaring creature I had to
check in the mirror to see if I had
grown another head!
Let's get a few things straight
here. In the first place I should not
have to be writing this letter to defend my character. When I submitted my first letter I expected some
opposition to my opinion but I
never expected nor deserved a personal attack.
Clearly Soper did not understand
the main point of my letter that
human fetuses are alive and human
and it is wrong to kill them since she
did not even approach this issue.
Secondly, she implied I have not
yet learned "what friendship and
love is all about" and implicitly
called my statements "hate-filled
accusations."
These are very dangerous accusations, Soper, and I suggest you
find out a little more about me
before you make them. For crying
out loud, you could at least reread
my letter and tell me just where I express any hate towards anyone.
True, I hate abortion but that does
not mean I must hate women who
have abortions. Since when does a
person have to agree with
everything a friend does in order to
be her friend? Surely I can have opinions that oppose those of my
friends and express them, especially
when human lives are at stake.
Finally, I really meant it when I
said it would almost be easier to go
along with the crowd who say it is a
woman's right to choose whether or
not to have a baby aborted after it is
already conceived.
It is not easy to be opposed and
my opinion is not a popular one so
please don't think I voice it lightly.
I have given it considerable thought
and I still believe that abortion is
wrong unless someone can convince
me that a human fetus is not alive
and human. This conviction, the
main and only point of my letter,
Tammy Anne Soper did not even
touch.
So please understand, I am not
out to throw stones at pro-choicers;
I am just out to defend the lives of
those who cannot speak for
themselves.
Muriel Hiebert
science 2
Obscenities offend
Upon examination of your first
page photo (Ubyssey, Jan. 30), we
were disappointed to note that of
those individuals photographed
while conducting a "stand in protest" at the Board of Governors
meeting, few attended the earlier
forum at which President
Strangway discussed the proposed
fee increase with students. It should
be noted that President Strangway
was sympthetic to the concerns expressed, and was receptive to the
question posed.
Rather than engage in a constructive dialogue, many of these "stand
in protesters" couldn't be bothered
and  would  presumably  prefer  to
carry signs and "hurl obscenities".
This is not the way to avert fee increases, and it doesn't make the
BoG any more sympathetic to student concerns.
As four percent of those who attended president Strangway's
forum, our concerns are directed
not so much towards the increases,
but what the additional revenue will
be funding. These concerns, we
feel, are best expressed in a civilized
manner, and not through the use of
confrontational methods and offensive language.
Russ Brown
arts 4
Byron Berry
arts 3 Friday, February 6,1987
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Outrageous
LONG . . . shows off
By SCOTT BEVERIDGE
It's disappointing to be insulted
by a film, especially when the film is
pretty good. Often good actors are
asked to carry a particularly awful
script into box-office success. Often
it fails.
In Arthur Hiller's Outrageous
Fortune, two very funny actors try
to cover up one of the worst plot
lines of the year. Sandy Brozinsky
(Bette Midler) and Lauren Ames
(Shelley Long) play women from
opposite sides of the tracks (guess
who plays the tacky, brash nymphomaniac?) who, unknowingly,
have fallen in love with the same
man — Michael (Peter Coyote),
and, coincidentally meet in the
same acting class.
The love affairs, however, turn
out to be no accident. Michael, the
handsome, caring school teacher,
turns out to be a double agent for
the KGB, using the women to pass
messages to a Russian contact
about a missing prototype chemical
agent stolen from the CIA that has
the capability of destroying the
natural environment for thousands
of miles around.
Michael attempts to disappear by
faking his death, but in the morgue
the two rookie sleuths discover not
only that they have been both seeing
the same man, but that the dead
man lying beside them is definitely
not Michael. They conclude this
from his penis size.
film
Play it again Nelson
Outrageous Fortune
Directed by Arthur Hiller
Capitol 6, Willowbrook 6,
Richmond Square, Eagle Ridge 6.
Pursued by the CIA as suspected
accomplices, the two soon decide
that Michael is not the man they
thought. They begin a wild search
that leads them deep into the desert
of New Mexico, federal agents hot
on their trail.
This is where the plot gets
especially ludicrous, even for a
comedy, and not even the talents of
Long and Midler can save the film.
Bette Midler is in her finest form.
Her kitsch is great, and she has
never been funnier. It is unfortunate that if you have seen the
previews, you have heard most of
the good lines.
Shelley Long is equally funny.
She has a great chance to show off
her many accents, and one of the
best parts in the film is Midler and
Long doing a Cagney and Lacey impersonation.
The only thing that breaks the
continuity of the two main
characters is the action scenes. The
stunt doubles are too easily
distinguished.
Hiller (Silver Streak, The In
Laws) has made an admirable attempt at making a terrific comedy.
The only thing that hinders the attempt is the sea of overused cliches
and stereotypes in the script.
The movie is worth seeing, and is
a lot funnier than most of the supposed 'comedies' that mainstream
Hollywood companies are churning
out (Soul Man, for instance). Just
don't expect to be on the edge of
your seat from the thrills and chills.
By ANYA WAITE
Over the last two weeks, The
Vancouver Recital Society arranged
two unusual musical encounters:
the highly acclaimed Brazilian
pianist Nelson Freire, and the
nineteen-year-old violinist prodigy
from Indiana, Joshua Bell. Both
were exciting virtuoso performances and had a flair and
originality that had the audience
hooting in enthusiasm.
music
The Vancouver Recital Society
Nelson Freire
Joshua Bell
The Vancouver Playhouse
Freire tackled an assortment of
romantic works with effortless
precision. His performance was occasionally marred by some jumpy,
matter-of-fact passages in Chopin's
Scherzo No. 4 in E major (Op. 54)
but he warmed into bold lyrical
tone in some of the long melodic
lines.
He had moments of real
brilliance: a fine regal entry in
Chopin's Sonata in B minor (Op.
58), for example, and a light touch
in the delicate melodies of the
Largo. His technical acrobatics
came out best in the works by the
remarkable modern Argentine composer, Heitor Villa-Lobos. Villa-
Lobos combines the traditional
elements of simple song melodies
with very baroque and classical
elements, drawing them into jazz
rhythms and dissonance. The
primitive combine with the
rhythmically complex into a great
modern kaleidoscope.
Though prone to lapses in emotional intensity, Fieire managed a
By TONY ROBERTS
Bizzare, eclectic, and downright
delightful, NRBQ is a bouncing,
bumbling, unpredictable band loaded with wit, energy, and dazzling
musicianship.
NRBQ
The Commodore Ballroom
January 29
The New Rhythym and Blues
Quartet can't be categorized. They
can turn tunes on a dime, switching
syles from blues, to jazz, to swing
to pop, gospel, country, and yes,
even rock . . .
NRBQ blew the doors off the
Commodore last Thursday with a
dramatic and challenging performance.
Joshua Bell's energetic performance provided a refreshing glimpse of a wide selection of the shorter
violin repetoire. He had a beautiful
tone, and excellent finger technique, though stiff and slightly affected on stage, especially at first.
The Mozart Sonata in B flat was
a charmer — and appealingly
lighthearted and energetic interpretation conveyed the true youth,
the essence of Mozart. He really
warmed up in the second piece, the
Sonata in A major by Franck; finally losing some self-consciousness
and focusing more on the music
itself.
His interpretive maturity was
outstanding. Bell really knows how
to pace the building of long
phrases, especially crucial in show
pieces of this kind. He had some
great moments during this concert,
hitting exactly the right tone and
temperament for each movement,
displaying a fiery romantic flair, a
lyrical ear, and bright emotional intensity.
Joshua Bell is someone to watch.
He has the technical brilliance and
musical sensitivity to be one of the
greats.
The Vancouver Recital Society
presents cellist Matt Horowitz on
February 22 at the Vancouver
Playhouse.
ADAMS . . . flops and bends
New blues turns tunes on a dime
dizzying two hour romp that drew
everyone under their musical yoke,
including the club's pre-neanderthal
legion of tatooed ex-con bouncers,
and the Sun's John Mackie: the incorrigible, hairless pint-sized party
creature extraordinaire.
The amazing novelty opener, Put
Another Nickel in the Nickelodeon,
hinted at the evening's groove
potential, and NRBQ delivered the
goods skillfully, with a looseness
and hilarity that radiated from each
individual member.
A looser drummer you'll never
find than in Tom Ardonlino. His
sticks flail away chaotically, but he
somehow manages to pump put a
beat  that  is  startlingly  accurate.
Joey Spampantino, the band's principal singer and songwriter, plays
bass lines that resonate with a
smooth Tightness.
A little dude with a genuine smile
and a gold lame jacket, Spampantino is the glue that binds the band's
dual focal points, keyboardist Terry
Adams and guitarist Al Anderson.
Adams is the joker. His limbs
flop and bend like twisting vermicelli strings as he stabs and slams
his clavinet. A long blond kupie
doll, he sneaks to the stage front
between runs to ham it up before
the crowd. While Adams flaunts it
up on one side, Al Anderson lurks
on the other.
Alan  J. Anderson is cool per
sonified. A towering six foot five
behemouth with a pork-barrel belly
and tree stump legs, Anderson
could pass as your typical beer-
swilling, red-neck hog farmer if it
weren't for his remarkable guitar
technique and expression. Moving
his mammoth proportions in an
amazingly subtle display of
nimble-footed elegance, with his
beady eyes shifting cunningly under
ample cheeks, this man is stone-
cold deadpan. Witness the tiny
breast patch on Anderson's shirt:
Diner's Club International.
NRBQ can squeeze a smile from
even the most solemn film school
Goth. AI's rendition of Michael
Row the Boat Ashore was nothing
MIDDLER . . . brash
DEAD
By MICHAEL GLENISTER
Take an aspiring young film actor (played by Mary Steenburgen)
who happens to closely resemble
two hostile sisters (both played by
Steenburgen), a brilliant but mad
psychiatrist and his patient/servant,
throw in an old deserted mansion,
mix well with a few suspenseful
scenes, and you come up with Dead
of Winter.
film
The Dead of Winter
Directed by Arthur Penn
Capitol 6, Willowbrook 6
Not that Dead of Winter is not
worth seeing. It is for the most part
quite entertaining and suspenseful.
However, while both the atmosphere and plot are exceptional
for the first two-thirds of the film,
when the story becomes predictable, towards the end, the atmosphere disappears. Some of the
audience laughed during the serious
climactic scene.
The problem is the script and
direction, not the cast.
Mary Steenburgen (Time After
Time) does excellent work playing
three separate characters. Her
primary role as Katie McGovern,
the young actor caught up in the
schemes of the devious psychiatrist
is both believeable and sympathetic.
Roddy McDowall (Fright Night)
plays the obedient servant of Dr.
Lewis. Although this role is now a
stereotype of suspense films, McDowall carries it off extremely well.
Jan Rubes (Witness) portrays Dr.
Joseph Lewis. The nature of his
performance, unfortunately, runs
in parallel to the plot's decline to
predictability. His final scene would
be at home in a Peter Sellers film. If
you're looking for a really good
suspense thriller, don't bother with
this one.
less than absolute joy.
Other highlights included the
stubby Ardonlino's wobbly descent
from his drum kit to blast out a
couple of Motown numbers,
Adams' marvelous crooning on
When Things Was Cheap, and of
course, the irrepressible Anderson
inserting dissonant burps into the
chorus of the gonzo classic: "Ooh!
(insert burp here) White
Lightnin!".
NRBQ is sheer musical elasticity
fleshed out over a solid emotional
backbone. Funny, sincere, and
downright entertaining, these guys
breathe fresh air into the balloon of
life.' '   ' \" '   '   '      '        '   " ' " Page 6
THE   UBYSSEY
Friday, February 6, 1987
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
Snappy students offer instant term papers
r'
By MURIEL DRAAISMA
Learning the ABCs of university is learning how to play the game.
The object of the game is not necessarily to get an education,
but to get high marks. Here's the letter P:
P is for plagiarism. P is also for profits.
And P is for paper, as in term paper, as in
Snappy Term Papers Ltd., Research
Assistance and A-l Essay Writing Services.
The three Ps go together, and the last two
have come to UBC in the form of two university students who plan to sell already marked
term papers this month in the hopes of turning a profit.
The students, directors of Snappy Term
Papers Ltd., say they are not promoting
plagiarism in any way. (Both go full-time to
UBC; one is in fourth year economics, the
other is in fourth year commerce. Neither
wanted their names used for fear of their professors reacting negatively to the business.
Call them Students X and Y.)
"We are going to offer the honest student
a further avenue of research," says X, 22, sitting in the Gallery Lounge across from Y, 23.
"Our company is not going to make an
honest student dishonest. It's encouraging
learning. It's giving people ideas on how to
start a paper. We are not interested in helping
students cheat."
But UBC administrators, professors and
some students disagree. They argue that the
newly formed company will enable students
in yet another way to misrepresent others'
work as their own.
UBC officials are alarmed at the prospect
of more academic fraud as a result of the service and say increasingly some students will
ask themselves — Why write my own when I
can buy one now?
And they plan to do everything in their
power to stop an increase in cases of
plagiarism.
But the directors of Snappy have answers
for alt questions from the administration.
X and Y say the term papers will serve as
good examples of undergraduate work,
showing how students successfully tackled
certain topics mainly in political science,
English and history. They say the papers will
be useful guides or models for students who
either have trouble starting an essay or feel
uncomfortable asking professors for help.
As for abuse of the service, the directors
say they are in the same position as
distributors of guns, knives and alcohol.
"We consider ourselves an ethical company," says X. "We realize there are illegitimate uses for term papers, but there are
also legitimate uses for them. And we are trying as much as we can to police our
business."
To protect themselves from liability in
cases of plagiarism, the directors insist they
will not actually sell term papers to students.
Instead they will license the written material
by asking customers to sign a contract that
says they will not submit the papers as their
own work.
Vancouver lawyer Peter Oreck, acting on
behalf of Snappy, is drawing up a licensing
agreement that will ensure customers are at
least 19 years old and will use the essays for a
maximum of two years and for reference only*
"My clients fundamentally oppose
cheating," Oreck says. "But there's nothing
wrong with looking at a paper for reference
purposes."
And there will be about 1,000 papers from
which to choose. X and Y, through a now
aborted advertising campaign in The Ubyssey
and hundreds of posters on campus, have
bought that number on topics ranging from
the Cuban missile crisis to Shakespeare's
Othello to the King versus Parliament in
British history.
The Ubyssey staff decided Wednesday to
boycott the Snappy ads because it is morally
opposed to the intellectual implications of
the business of distributing term papers on
campus.
The essays are waiting in storage
somewhere off campus — X and Y refused to
disclose the location. The essays, not yet filed
or catalogued, are the work of UBC
graduates, current graduate and
undergraduate students who wanted to make
some money. Snappy pays $12 for an eight
page paper, not including title page, footnotes and bibliography, and $1 for every
page after that.
The directors say they prefer term papers
that have received a grade of A + , A, A- and
B +, but they will accept those with Bs. Absolutely no C+ or lower, says Y.
"And we won't take outdated papers, such
as one on the role of Imelda Marcos in ruling
the Philippines," says X.
The pair have accepted about 75 per cent
of the lot from arts students, with the rest
coming from students in a variety of
faculties. Of the 75 per cent, nearly 40 per
cent were produced by political science
students, 20 per cent by English students and
15 per cent by history students.
Snappy is competing with Research
Assistance, a Los Angeles-based custom
research company that advertises in 11 Canadian student newspapers, including The
Ubyssey. Snappy is also similar to A-l Essay
Writing Services, a Toronto-based organization that sold essays in the mid-1980s but has
since folded.
The Ubyssey will boycott the ad of
Research Assistance after February, when it
has given 30 days notice to its national ad
agency, Campus Plus. Research Assistance
sells research papers on subjects from "A to
Z", employs 50 writers who also work for
Time and Newsweek magazine and charges
$6.50 U.S. a page, says its owner Barton
Lowe.
Although X and Y say they have sunk
about $14,000 of their own funds into the
business — more than $12,000 for the papers
and $1,200 for legal fees — they are thinking
of expanding to other Western Canadian
cities with universities. A national referral
service directing calls to Vancouver may be
on the way.
The directors refuse to discuss sources of
funding. But they did say that most of the
money is savings from summer jobs over the
past few years. Right now they employ five
part-time sales people to answer phones and
put up posters. They claim to have other
financial resources available for expansion
purposes, but declined to give details.
In the third week of February, they plan to
begin licensing term papers off campus for
less than $6 a page. In September, they plan
to investigate ways of expanding Snappy.
But they might not get that far.
Arts dean Robert Will is furious about the
presence of what he calls a "term paper factory" on campus and says the administration
will try to stop anyone who may be responsible for an increase in cases of plagiarism this
year.
"We will not reveal how we are going to
deal with this problem," Will says. "All I can
say is it's a miserable business. The bottom
line is they want to make money and will try
to make that money by jeopardizing
students' education.
"We indeed take a dim view of it. In the
academic world, plagiarism is the most inexcusable offence."
There is no need for a service providing ex-
PltTO
|6v I'******
% Von
amples of undergraduate essays because there
are libraries on campus that have friendly
and helpful staff willing to direct students to
credible research and reference materials,
such as books, academic journals, MA and
PHD theses, Will says.
"The purpose of writing an essay is to do
the research for yourself. The whole purpose
is lost if you take other students' regurgitation of the subject."
Department heads agree, saying professors
will check term papers more carefully now
for signs of plagiarism.
"It's stupid for people to put money into
the hands of these guys. Professors are
always on the lookout for this kind of
thing," says history department head
Richard Unger.
Political science department head David
Elkins, who tears down the Snappy posters
where ever he sees them, says professors will
"The whole purpose is lost if you take
other students' regurgitation
of the subject."
become suspicious if they find an
undergraduate essay listed in the footnotes
and bibliography of another students' term
paper.
"Alarm bells would immediately go off. In
some cases, it might be acceptable to use the
work, but in others, it might signal a case of
partial plagiarism," Elkins says.
Elkins dismisses the argument that this service is needed by students who are too intimidated by professors or too confused by a
paper topic. He says the students can always
ask teaching assistants for help or a list of
supplementary reading.
Besides, Elkins says, the term paper crunch
comes in third and fourth year, when
students generally have smaller classes, closer
relationships with their professors and less
hesitation to use office hours.
The plagiarists, he concludes, will most
likely be found out. And if they are not
detected by professors, they will be by other
students, says Dean Will, who has full confidence students will let the administration
know.
"Students are hard working and very competitive these days. They will and do let us
know about students cheating," Will says.
Tim Pearson is an English honors student
who must write eight term papers, including
his 35-50 page honors graduating essay,
before the end of final exams. While he is not
interested in reporting on the academic offences of other students, he does not approve
of X and Y and their Snappy business.
"They should be lined up and shot. I
would never support the type of assholes who
are making money off this kind of activity,"
Pearson says.
"I would never buy a term paper. It's
academically dishonest. I'm here to learn
something, not to retype someone else's work
and put my name on it," he says.
Pearson says talking to other students
about academic work is one of the best ways
to spark ideas for term papers. Having a
drink in the Gallery Lounge after seminars is
just as intellectually stimulating as reading a
paper by someone whose ideas are on the
same level, he says.
"There is a community here and we should
take advantage of that. And we don't have to
pay for it."
Students who buy papers from Snappy
probably don't want to do serious research,
he says; they are the ones pressed for time,
the ones who will snatch and grab where they
can.
"The students running this business are ignoring what the real motivations are behind
the students paying for an essay," Pearson
says.
The advisory committee to UBC president
David Strangway on student discipline dealt
with less than 20 cases involving academic offences last school year, according to UBC
Reports, the official voice of the administration.
Committee chair Cyril Finnegan, who fail
ed to return phone messages from The
Ubyssey, told UBC Reports in May, 1986 that
he expects the committee to deal with 20 to 30
cases of plagiarism, exam cheating and other
offences this year.
Penalties for plagiarism range from the
student receiving an F for a paper or course
to suspension for up to a year or more.
The committee distinguishes between complete plagiarism, when an entire essay is
copied and submitted as original work, and
substantial plagiarism, when no recognition
is given to an author for phrases, sentences
and ideas used in an essay. (These definitions
were plagiarized from the university calendar, page 19).
A committee member who talked to The
Ubyssey but refused to be identified says the
term paper company in this case may be just
as liable as the plagiarist for punishment.
(Call the committee member S).
"It's like cheating on exams. The student
who helps another cheat is just as responsible. If these students (X and Y) are registered
in classes, they could be in trouble," says S.
"In all my years on the committee I've
never seen a student who plagiarized from a
bought paper. We have had people actually
selling diplomas on campus a few years, but
we chased them off. This new company
sounds disturbing."
But X and Y are not worried. Though they
can no longer advertise in The Ubyssey as a
result of the staff decision, they are going to
continue their business.
The directors, however, are surprised at
the hostile reaction from the student paper
and from the campus in general.
"We want to earn money. We don't want
to be a scummy business," says Y.
Adds X: "The university can give us a call.
We really feel we have nothing to hide.
"If we could sit down with every professor
we have, 90 per cent of them would agree
what we're doing is legitimate. New ideas are
often tough for people to accept — they are
not always roundly applauded at the beginning."
Pam Fajardo and Derek McClaughlan
part of a trend
rory a. photo
\
Relationships and sex
going strong at UBC
By ROBERT BEYNON
It's a Friday night in the dimly lit
Pit. A 22-year-old male commerce
;  student laughs and says he will sleep
/   with a woman that night without a
condom if the opportunity arises.
"I wouldn't refuse as long as she
wasn't too fast . . . there's not as
much worry about here as (there is)
downtown." Three friends drinking
beer with him laugh.
Across the bar two female
students, each 19, say they might
sleep with someone that night. "It
just depends whether you'll click or
not," says one.
The women say they would not
require a condom but they would
want to know "something about
him and his promiscuity." One says
she wants a semi-serious relationship, one with no strings attached.
In the darkened bar the crowd
becomes louder and more excited as
the dance music begins. Students
eye each other.
The "sexual chill" Maclean's
magazine discussed in its Jan. 12
issue has not hit UBC. There's still
promiscuity within relationships. A
campus doctor says heterosexual
students are aware of sexually-
transmitted disease but it has not
changed their sexual habits. Some
students are promiscuous, some are
monagamous and some are
celibate.
One student says: "For guys on
my hockey team the big "score" is
still a big event if it happens."
*      *      *
Among gay students, however,
promiscuity has definitely declined.
Anthropology student Scott
Beveridge says he knows friends
who have become celibate to avoid
AIDS. "I've never met a man who
hasn't used condoms in three
years."
The number of places where gay
men can meet each other has also
declined as bathhouses and other
meeting places have become unpopular, due to fear of AIDS,
Beveridge said.
Beveridge, also vice-president of
the Gays and Lesbians Club of
UBC, estimates there are a few hundred active gays and lesbians on
campus. He's single now after a
relationship broke up at Christmas.
The only place left to meet, he
says, are bars and dance halls which
aren't geared to making long-term
relationships. He adds: "Most gay
men, in their minds, are looking for
a monogamous relationship."
Beveridge says it is a misconception that gays want just sex and
don't care about relationships.
"Love between two people goes far
beyond boundaries of sexual
preference and sexual encounter."
The greatest tragedy of the AIDS
scare for gays, he says, is that some
people are now afraid of their sexual orientation.
"I really believe a lot of people
do not come out of the closet now
because of it."
But fear of AIDS appears to be
having little effect on heterosexuals
at UBC. Monogamous heterosexual
couples living together and sleeping
together are still common.
Margaret Copping and James
Hollis are two people in a contemporary student relationship.
They met as opponents in student
society politics and have been
together for three years. This spring
Copping completes her law degree;
Hollis has already left UBC to work
as a scuba-gear salesman. Sex is
taken for granted as part of the
relationship.
They share Copping's large basement suite much of the time,
although Hollis has his own apartment. The suite is larger than many
student basement suites, but the
usual books line the walls, and kitchen utensils and clothes are littered
on the floor. Hollis pays one-third
of Copping's rent andhelps support
her.
"I really feel like a poor cousin in
this relationship," says Copping,
although she expects to earn a
sizeable income when she's called to
the bar.
They expect to get married,
although Copping says she has apprehensions about legal marriage.
"You (a woman) really give up a lot
of legal rights when you get married," she says.
Her name after marriage is a
point of dispute. "It's a question of
identity," says Copping. "I don't
want to be Mrs. James Hollis." She
says she will probably take his last
name legally but retain her own
name professionally.
They want to have children but
aren't sure how they will arrange
childcare. They have considered a
nanny. Copping may end up taking
time off work. She says it may be
too difficult for Hollis, as a male, to
ask for time off to care for his child
or children.
Both   say  there   is  little  male-
female role-playing in their relationship but many important questions
have yet to be worked out.
*      *      *
According to a UBC social
psychologist, the only major change
in student relationships is an ever
increasing acceptance of premarital sex. Dan Perlman, the family sciences and nutrition department head, says despite some
popular conceptions, it is unclear
that male-female roles in relationships are changing.
Based on studies of housework
by males and females in a couple,
there has been no dramatic shift in
the roles men and women play in
relationships — women still perform most household chores.
Perlman says: "It's not so crucial
that they (a couple) have a.traditional role (pattern) or an equal role
(pattern) but that they agree on the
roles."
Student Health Services director
Dr. Robin Percival Smith adds that
surveys of UBC women students in
the late 1970s and recently show
very little variety in students' sexual
patterns.
Smith says 50 per cent of female
students will have had intercourse
by 18. Sixty per cent of women
students have sex with one or two
people, 30 per cent have had sex
with more than two people and 10
per cent have not had sex.
Ninety per cent of the sexually active women have sex within
monogamous relationships. Student Health Services has statistics
on women only because they come
in more regularly for examination
than men do.
"There is a lot of anxiety in relationships to sexually-transmitted
disease," Smith says, "not that
people are really able to control
themselves under certain conditions!"
A sexual revolution in the 1960s
is largely myth, Smith adds.
Although it is more acceptable and
more common now, most students
would have had pre-marital sex during the 1950s and sexual attitudes
were changing even before that.
Living together, which originated
in the 1960s, is probably increasing
in popularity, Smith adds. Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, February 6,1987
Letters
Student suggests pregnancy is like homework
I am afraid I find those who take
the "pro-life" view in the letters
published last Friday were too emotional and naive in their view. I cannot agree that the "pro-choice"
view "hides behind the pro-choice"
slogan in order to take "life". If an
unwed mother chooses not to have
an abortion, she is perfectly free to
choose to do so. But if she chooses
to have an abortion, that is also her
choice. No one should force her to
have an abortion or not. I find these
so called "pro-lifers" are imposing
their view quite forcibly on others. I
am not saying that the woman's
choice is the only consideration, but
it should have bearing on the final
decision. I agree that the abortion
operation itself is not a pleasant experience, and the woman's view
mentioned in one of the letters saying that the baby would ruin her life
is not a valid reason for her to have
an abortion. However, this does not
mean that no abortions should be
performed at all. It's like saying
since my prof is boring, all profs are
boring.
Certainly, abortion is not the
solution and it should not be one, as
some "pro-choicers" think. The
root of the problem, of course, lies
with the persons directly involved in
the unplanned pregnancy. In the
case of consented intercourse, both
persons should have thought of the
possible consequences before their
action. I have no sympathy for
those who are so irresponsible.
However, in the unconsented case,
the woman certainly should not be
forced to have the baby. There are,
of course, many other unforeseeable cases, and each case
must be individually examined. The
bottom line is, the homework is due
tomorrow morning and it should
have been done on Monday, but
griping about what I should have
done on Monday will not finish the
homework by tomorrow. Whether I
choose to finish the work off
tonight or not do it at all is my
Downward trend
follows holiday
period for students
From Page 3
months, graduates felt hopeful,
positive and relaxed. During this
period they participated in social
activities and trips, and the
highlight was the graduation
ceremony.
The holiday period ended with
the graduate's first major negative
experience, "usually related to
some aspect of disillusionment with
the job search of a reminder that
one's student loan is soon due."
Feelings of discouragement or
depression associated with this experience began the downward trend
stage, with occasional upward shifts
such as when the graduate receives a
job offer.
While Steve says he's not sure if
he could distinguish between two
stages in his own case, many of his
feelings and experiences are similar.
Like many graduates in Hatch's
survey, Steve found his parents'
questions about his career upsetting. And he also does not regret attending university.
Steve has decided to pursue a
career in chartered accounting, and
is willing to return to school to find
that elusive well-paying job.
"It won't be what I really want,"
he admits. "It 11be something."
business and no one should make
me finish it off at any cost.
Of course, one may argue that
this is a very poor analogy, but I
think not. If you say that human
lives are involved, then I must ask
you whether you eat beef, turkey,
fish, or any animal in any form.
You may say, well, cattle (for example) are different, then I must ask
you how different. As far as I
know, and correct me if I'm wrong,
during the period during which an
abortion may be performed, the
fetus all by itself is virtually indistinguishable from that of many
other mammals, or at least very
similar. I am afraid I just don't
think that human beings, in
general, are any more special than
most other species on this earth.
Despite the fact that we think we
are more intelligent than other
animals, we are in fact terribly ignorant.
Another thing that bothers me is
I have found no mention of the
"pro-lifers" setting up supports of
any kind for, say, single mothers. I
would be much enlightened if
anyone can give me evidence showing me that these "pro-lifers" are
setting up funds to help the single
mother, setting up,adoption agencies to aid those who prefer to give
up their child, or any other sort of
support these "pro-lifers" gove.
Why don't they set up an "adopt a
child" program, where a
"pro-lifer" would provide
everything from food to clothes to
education for a child for a single
mother who has problem making
ends meet without taking the child
$100
.00
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£r 8:00 p.m. Friday, February 13th
** at International House, UBC
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Send your Valentine a message in our special
Feb. 13th issue. $2.75/3 lines. Forms
available. SUB 266.
away from the mother? debate  really  needs is  for more
I am sure there are many other    questions  to   be   asked   and   less
social and psychological impacts
that neither the "pro-life" side or
the "pro-choice" side have looked
at before a view is taken. What this
answers
thinking.
be  expressed  without
Raymond Li
applied science 1
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
VALENTINE'S DANCE
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War Mem. Gym 301
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UBC Friday, February 6, 1987
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 9
S
1UDENTSM
>,87lllii,
CITR excites Chow
By ROSS MCLAREN
For all you folks who think Surrey is stagnant, take a look at one
UBC transplant from that sprawling mall-land — CITR's Don
Chow.
Don is CITR's music director
when he's not studying creative
writing — and the job even keeps
him awake at night. Don stocks
those shelves with record levels,
makes up CITR's playlist, interviews musicians, and insures that
fi
taste of the radio station. He joined
the station in December, more for
social reasons, and in three months
became station manager.
"It wasn't like we were going to
change the world", says Don, but it
was a start.
Next year, Don returned hypnotized by the fast life at UBC. This
time it was geophysics, and it ended
much like Don's engineering year.
Don gave up radio for awhile to
hit   the   books,   but   he   found
Chow . . . plans CITR platters.
those deejays play CITR's
hallmark, alternative music.
Don is no superman; he's just
committed to something he enjoys.
Standing around five-foot five, he's
a casual guy who likes warm, snugg-
ly sweaters and wearing shorts to
the office.
Don says that he tried the "getrich-quick-through-school" path
and didn't enjoy it.
"I wanted to be an engineer, and
chase after the golden carrot and all
that crap, but found it wasn't interesting" says Don.
Instead, Don handed his
calculator back and headed for
Langara. There, Don had his first
RED LEAF
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228-9114
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Opposite Chevron Station
geophysics was "too much work
and not that interesting." On what
he remembers as "a pretty weird
night", he found himself staring at
the ceiling instead of studying for
an exam.
"I had to learn this core course
and I decided that night that I was
getting out of this now, doing this
academic u-turn."
That turnaround includes Don
cranking his electric bass at Vancouver Community College's music
school, and working CITR's afternoon show.
He says CITR can be intimidating at first, but he adds:
"People think of it as some kind of
a clique but people are just waiting
for you to do something; they are
not sitting around waiting to be
your friend."
Inside the station booth, Don admits he was scared to turn on the
mike when he started, but the feeling didn't last long. He became
more involved and "freaked out
over the record library, all that
music I had never heard before."
Don completed his u-turn with a
switch to creative writing, which he
says he was always interested in.
This year he's taking screen-play
and short fiction, and plans other
neat courses like non-fiction next
year.
Last year Don landed the CITR
job, because of his experience with
radio at Langara College, but he
says he still wasn't prepared for the
new position. "Music director is a
full-time job, but it has to be done
by a student," he says, so he shares
duties with another student, Kevin
Smith.
As if Don wasn't busy enough, he
deejays in the Pit on Thursday and,
with Kevin, co-broadcasts a Friday
show on CITR called Neo-File.
"We play records received that
week from record companies. It is
all new stuff, domestic products
and independents," he says. As for
college radio, Don says it's improving and that the industry is taking
college radio more seriously.
The reason for that, Don says, is
that commercial radio is not breaking any new artists. "They really
just run along such a narrow little
line; they don't stop on shoulders of
roads, they are not concerned with
music, they are there to sell advertising." It's another question
whether or not this attitude will get
Don the job he wants in the future.
He says he's leaving his options
open.
"I could go into the music industry or into radio or go write
screenplays," he says. "I don't
want to narrow myself down".
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PHONE 228-1214
6050 NO. 3 ROAD
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UNIVERSITE CANADIENNE
The Universite canadienne en France programme offers Canadians a
unique opportunity to live for a year in France and earn Canadian university
credits.
Offered in both English and French, the programme for 198788 includes
humanities courses focussing on 'The Twentieth Century World' as well as
language courses. The faculty are from universities across Canada.
Various types of student accommodation are available, including
residences on the campus which is superbly located on the Cote d'Azur
between Nice and Monaco.
Students will be selected on a quota basis from universities across
Canada.
For more information and applications for September 1987. please write
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Universite canadienne en France,
68 Scollard Street, Toronto, Ontario M5R 1G2
(416) 964-2569, Canada - (800) 387-1387, Ontario - (800) 387-5603
or Laurentian University, Sudbury, Ontario P3E 2C6.
Information Session
Wednesday, February 18 — 12:30 p.m.
Buchanan Building, Room B-212
Laurentian University
BlythSfCompany Page 10
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, February 6, 1987
tween dosses
TODAY
PRE-MEDICAL SOCIETY
Gym Night: European handball, badminton and
pizza, 5:30-7:30 p.m., Osborne Gym.
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Gym night, 4:30-6:30 p.m., Osborne Gym.
UBC SKI CLUB
Bzzr garden, 3:00-6:00 p.m., SUB 207, 209.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
General meeting, noon. International House.
THUNDERBIRD VOLLEYBALL
Big game of the season for UBC. Women face
return match with University of Calgary after
Calgary Dinosaurs football team heckled UBC in
Calgary in November. Men must beat Calgary to
make CIAU championship tournament. Women
6:30 p.m.. Men 8:00 p.m., War Memorial Gym.
THUNDERBIRD GYMNASTICS
UBC   men   will   play   host   to   University   of
Washington   and   U.   of   Alberta.   Spectators
welcome, 6:00 p.m., Osborne Gym.
THUNDERBIRD FIELD HOCKEY
UBC Women's indoor hockey tournament.
Featuring best women's players in B.C., spectators welcome, 6:00-10:00 p.m., UBC Armouries.
SUBFILMS
Stand By Me, 7:00 p.m. and 9:30 p.m., SUB
auditorium.
UBC WOMENS VOLLEYBALL TEAM
Sports-Volleyball match v. Calgary Dinos. There
will be a cheering contest for beer. Groups just
have four or more people, 6:30 p.m.. War
Memorial Gym.
CIRCLE K
General  meeting.   Public welcome.  We are  a
community outreach club, noon-1:30 p.m., SUB
215.
AYN RAND CLUB
Videotape: "Socialism v. Capitalism: Which is
the Moral System. Noon-2:X p.m., SUB Plaza
North.
AMS ROCKERS
Ballroom bash dance, 8:00 p.m.-1:00 a.m., SUB
ballroom.
ASTRONOMY AND AEROSPACE CLUB
Public lecture. "The Galactic Radio Patrol," and
"Seti,"   by   UBC's   Dr.    P.   Gregory,    radio
astronomer. Non-members welcome, 5:30 p.m.,
Hennings 201.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Ballet 1 and 11, 8:30-10:00 a.m., SUB partyroom.
UBC
T(E-X-C
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THE GOOD DEAL IS YOUR LEAST EXPENSIVE BURGER IS FREE WHEN
TWO ARE ORDERED. THIS APPLIES TO BEEF & TOFU BURGERS ONLY,
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By The Sea
Surf n Ski
CONTEST
Your fantasy can come true...
GRAND PRIZE
Trip for two
to Hawaii
3 WEEKLY DRAWS
For APEX ALPINE
Ski Package
Winning can be easy... First Draw Jan. 29
Drop entry forms obtained at    v? ill L?  I Pj    Restaurant into
the barrel provided in the lobby. Contest closes March 12,1987.
V.T irVl "l "r? -? At the Corner of
L.ULLJ   I  i-JO       DENMAN and DAVIE
VVW/AV 682-1831
JEWISH STUDENTS' ASSOCIATON
Leave for Whistler ski trip, evening.
THUNDERBIRD VOLLEYBALL
V. Lethbridge Pronghorns, UBC women at 6:30
p.m.. Men at 8:00 p.m., War Memorial Gym.
THUNDERBIRD FIELD HOCKEY
UBC   women's    indoor   hockey   tournament,
featuring best womens' teams in B.C., all day,
UBC armouries.
SUBFILMS
"Stand By Me," 7:00 p.m. and 9:30 p.m., SUB
Auditorium.
NEWMAN CLUB
Clean-up party: bring tools and cleaning supplies, noon-mass, 1:30 clean up, St. Marie's College.
SUNDAY
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Communion service, 10:00 a.m., Lutheran Campus Centre.
MARANATHA CHRISTION CLUB
Worship service, 12:00 p.m., 2490 W. 2nd, basement auditorium Kits United Church.
THUNDERBIRD FIELD HOCKEY
UBC women's indoor invitational hockey tournament. Championship final at 1:00 p.m.
SUBFILMS
"Stand By Me," 7:00 p.m. and 9:00 p.m., SUB
auditorium.
MONDAY
SUBFILMS
"Gentlemen Prefer Blondes," starring Marilyn
Monroe, 7:00 p.m. and 9:30 p.m., SUB
auditorium.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
International film night: India: Home and the
World —- a provocative film of the nobel prize
novel of R. Tagor set in the winter. 7:30 p.m.,
Gate four. International House.
CAMPAIGN AGAINST SEXUAL HARASSMENT
ON CAMPUS
Meeting, noon. Women's Centre SUB.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Ballet I and II, 8:30-10:00 a.m.; Beginners Jazz,
noon; Jazz I, 5:30-7:00 p.m.; Ballet and Jazz I
(3:30-5:00 p.m.), SUB partyroom. Beginners
Jazz and Jazz I (5:30-7:00 p.m.), SUB Plaza
South.
TUESDAY
SUBFILMS
"The    Last    Picture    Show,"    starring    Cybit
Sheperd, SUB auditorium.
PRE-MEDICAL SOCIETY
Lecture   on   "Pediatrics."   Guest   speaker   Dr.
Smith, noon-1:20 p.m., Wood #1.
PSYCHOLOGY STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Content lecture — Dr. T. Williams on Television
and  Human  Behaviour,   noon,   Peter Suedfeld
Lounge — Kenny Building.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Jazz   I   and   II,   8:30-10:00   a.m.;   Stretch   and
Strength, noon; Jazz I, 1:30-3:00 p.m., both jazz
classes in Partyroom SUB, Stretch and Strength
in SUB Plaza South.
Master of Public
Administration
Queen's University
at Kingston
A three-term (ten-month) professional graduate
degree program, with an interdisciplinary approach to public policy and administration.
Admission Requirements B.A. (Honours), or its
equivalent, with upper second class standing,
all fields of study.
Information/Applications are available from:
School of Public Adminstration
Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario K7L 3N6
Telephone 613-545-2159
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: AMS Card Holders — 3 lines, 1 day $2.75; Additional lines, 60c. Commercial —
1 day $4.75; Additional lines, 70c. Additional days, $4.25 and 65c.
Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 10:30 a. m. the day before publication
^^^ Publications, Room 266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
•^^ Charge Phone Orders Over $10.00 - Call 228-3977
5 - COMING EVENTS
40 - MESSAGES
75 - WANTED
FENCING
STEPHEN LAZAR
MEMORIAL TOURNAMENT
SAT., FEB. 14-
SUN., FEB. 15
9 a.m.
OSBOURNE GYM A
D. What a jock! What a cook!
And those tennis shorts!
H&B? You know our nos.
Happy B-day! Luv ya, S&J
65 - SCANDALS
THE VANCOUVER INSTITUTE
Free Public Lecture
Saturday, Feb. 7
PATRONAGE IN
CANADA
(J.V. Clyne Lecture)
Geoffrey Simpson
The Globe and Mail
Lecture Hall 2, UBC Woodward
Building at 8:15 p.m.
WHO LOVES YA. BABY?! The Ubyssey is
accepting Valentine messages for its special
issue. Feb. 13th, $2.75/3 lines. Forms avaii.
SUB Rm. 266.
70 - SERVICES
AMS CUSTOMER OPERATED
WORD PROCESSING CENTRE
Lower Level SUB Rm 55 228-5496
NUTRITIOUS GOODIES at Agora Food
CoOp! Fresh fruit, vegetables, bulk goods,
plus a full variety of grocery items. Check
us out at 17th & Dunbar or call 228-9115.
CRISIS PREGNANCY! Birthright offers
alternatives to abortion. Call 687-7223 (free
pregnancy tests.)
OCCASIONAL OVERNIGHT WORK avail
able for person wanting to work with
animals. Call Dale, 925 2463, 681-2822.
WANTED —Referees for adult rec soccer
league. Sun. mornings, 10 a.m., S30 per
game   CaH Toiid ■>• Brent al 437 9290
80 - TUTORING
FRENCH TUTORING - Translation, experi
enced teacher Masters degree. Call Mike
874-0394 or 733-0441 after 11 a.m.
85 - TYPING
MINIMUM NOTICE REQUIRED Essays,
term papers, resumes, editing. UBC location. 224-2662 or 732-0529.
ARE YOU LOSING MARKS BECAUSE
OF YOUR WRITING STYLE? Call a pro
fessional writer with M.A. for quality word
processing, editing & writing services.
Resumes, theses, essays, letters, etc. Hand
in work you can be proud of! 324-9924.
11 - FOR SALE - Private
"66 DODGE CORONET, 318, 4-door, auto
matic, radio, reliable. Prices to sell, $399.
224-5209.
20 - HOUSING
ROOM ONLY AND ROOM/BOARD avail
able for immediate occupation in the Single
Student Residences: Fairview Crescent,
Walter Gage, Place Vanier & Totem Park.
Contact Student Housing Office at 2071
West Mall, 228-2811, 8:30-4:00 p.m.
weekdays.
ROOMS FOR RENT $200/month Ino utilities). 1 blk. from campus. Available Feb.
15th. 224-2662, 732-0529.
UNIVERSITY HILL UNITED
AND PRESBYTERIAN
CONGREGATIONS
invite you to join us in worship
Sunday mornings at 10:20 a.m.
in the Epiphany Chapel.
Vancouver School of Theology
Young Adult Groups Sunday
or Monday evenings.
PHONE 224-6377
6050 Chancellor Boulevard
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST. 30 yrs. exp.
Wordprocessor & IBM typewriter. Student
rates. Dorothy Martinson, 228-8346.
UNIVERSITY TYPING - word processing.
Papers, theses, resumes, letters, P-U &del.
9 am - 10 pm. 7 days/wk. 734-TYPE.
30 - JOBS
SOUNDS FISHY? BUT IT'S NOT. I need
promotion-oriented people for my entertainment company. You can work in your
spare 'ime it make extra income the funest
way possible. If you are a social organizer,
have lots of energy, and enjoy people, give
me a call. Eran 261-FISH.
HUNTING CAMP COOK, northern B.C.,
Aug. 15-Oct. 15/87. Must be fluent in German & English. Capable of meal prep, for
15 hunters. Prefer outdoor exp. Send
resume by May 1, 1987: Grizzly Outfitters,
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THE    UBYSSEY
Page 11
Death squads responsible for disappearances
For years, the Guatemalan
government has waged a war of terror against its own population.
Over 85,000 people have either been
killed or disappeared since 1979,
while another 200,000 Guatemalans
are refugees fleeing the terror. Even
with the election of a civilian as
president in 1985, the disappearances are continuing at a rate
of about five to 10 people each day.
According to the World Council
PANGO PANGO (UNS) Hairy
Puce Blorgs on this tiny island
kingdom babbles incoherently.
Pecker Nevermounted rubbed red
leather against Slobber Bunyons -
the crowd sighed. Back at the
ranch, things were getting really
hot. "Oh my God" said Barf
Fillher as he photocopied Careless
Meddler's external affairs. The
world stood still. Meddler beckoned
lustfully to Sterile Prigg, "I'll show
her the ropes", she purred. But
romance of a finer sort was in the
air. Maniacle Doberman waltzed to
Chopin, unable to express his feelings. Through it all, the old fucks
fought and the audience giggled.
Peace on earth to all.
of Churches, an extra-legal body of
policemen and soldiers, organized
into death-squads, are responsible
for these continuing disappearances
of opponents to the Cerezo regime.
These most recent victims need your
assistance:
On Jan. 25, 1987, Camilo Garcia
Luis was kidnapped by heavily armed men on the streets of Guatemala
City. Camilo was pushed into a car
and driven off in front of his fami-
iy.
Two days later, after she had
publically denounced the disappearance of her husband, Marta
Odilia Caxal Sisimit, Camilo's wife,
was summoned to the Fifth office
of the National Police. She went
there early in the morning of Jan.
27, and never reappeared.
The following day, Maria
Esteben Sisimit, Marta's 53-year-
old mother, was also kidnapped
near her home in Guatemala City.
AMS SUMMER PROJECTS *»■*.
CALL FOR PROPOSALS
The Alma Mater Society is now receiving proposals
from students for projects that will be undertaken this
summer by AMS Project Coordinators.
The scope of possible projects is limited to those that
will benefit a majority of students overall. In the past,
projects have included the AMS Bookstore, the
Pathfinder Calendar, "Ask Me" information, and a
questionnaire concerning AMS activities.
Proposals are to include a description, budget and work
schedule. These proposals will be reviewed by the AMS
Hiring Committee and presented to Students' Council
for approval.
Proposals can be submitted to the AMS Administrative
Assistant in SUB Room 238.
Deadline for submissions
4:00p.m. February 25, 1987.
A call for applications for the position of Summer
Project Coordinator will follow in March.
I
FREE MONEY
FOR GRADUATING STUDENTS &
THEIR UNDERGRADUATE SOCIETY
OR DEPARTMENTAL CLUB.
—Applications are now being taken by your
Undergraduate Society for $4.00 refund per
graduating student. All undergraduate
societies must hand in the applications they
receive by
FEBRUARY 24, 1987
For more information or to submit applications please contact your undergraduate
society or
DON MUSTARD
President, Grad Class Council
228-6101, SUB Box 118
These disappearances leave the
seven children of Camilo and Marta
completely on their own and
helpless. Other members of the
family have been threatened with
torture and death by government
security forces.
On Feb. 3, the bodies of Marta
and Maria were found on the streets
of Guatemala City. Please protest
their   deaths   to   the   authorities
below,   and   insist   that   Canada
withhold     bilateral     aid     to
Guatemala.
Exmo. Vinicio Cerezo
Presidente de la Republica
de Guatemala
Palacio Nacional, Zona 1
Guatemala City, Guatemala
Rt. Hon. Joe Clark
Secretary of State for
External Affairs
House of Commons
THE
THUNDERBIRD
SHOP
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0A6
Mr. Stephen Lewis
Canadian Mission to the
United Nations
866 U.N. Plaza—Suite 250
New York, N.Y. 10017
USA
When   writing   to   Joe   Clark,
please request that all bilateral aid
from Canada to Guatemala continue to be withheld until human
rights are respected in that country
and the disappearances cease.
Kevin Annett
Vancouver School of Theology
Urgtnt Action Committee,
Christian Task Force on
Central America
Cheers to... linda
lee
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THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, February 6, 1987
Controversy "terrifies" council
By SVETOZAR KONTIC
A motion to establish an Alma
Mater Society ad hoc committee to
investigate sexist practices was easily defeated by student council
Wednesday.
The committee's mandate would
have been to investigate complaints
concerning behaviour, activities,
publications or practices, by individuals or groups on campus
which stereotype male and female
roles as listed in council minutes.
Jamie Andrews, one of five full
members of the proposed committee and a member of the Coalition
Against Sexism on Campus, said he
was disappointed and surprised that
so many people voted against the
motion.
"I can't understand why they
(council) would not even set up a
committee. Who will deal with this
now? Not the AMS, not the administration or the ombudsoffice,"
said Andrews. UBC president David
Strangway has appointed a committee to define sexual harassment and
set up grievance procedures. There
are no student representatives on
the presidential committee.
External affairs co-ordinator
Carol Pedlar, who moved the motion, said the AMS is "terrified" of
controversy and does not want to
deal with the issue.
Council member Phil Ross, a
representative of the Graduate
Students Society said he would support a committee but questioned
why it should be an AMS committee as it would be dissolved in a few
weeks.
Because of its ad hoc nature, the
day the new AMS executives take
power.
Andrews said if the committee is
not started now, the next opportunity would come in six weeks,
which would be the end of term.
"We wanted to get the committee
established and get some visibility.
After it is abolished on Feb. 18 we
could get some unofficial work
done on it," he said.
Ross said because the committee
would cease to exist after that date,
its sole purpose would be to oppose
WOMAN ON HORSE . . . muses about feminist revolution.
neil lucerne photo
Asbestos sickens SFU cafeteria users
BURNABY (CUP) — The cafeteria
at Simon Fraser University could
make you sick. But it is the lining of
the ceiling, not the food, which
could poison you with a deadly
fibre diet.
Critics argue that the asbestos lining, sprayed on the east concourse
cafeteria ceiling, could give students
and employees lung disease.
Normally, the "limpet" asbestos
remains safe as long as it is undisturbed, but maintenance work,
particularly for wiring, can disperse
its tiny fibres. Inhaled particles can
lead directly to lung disease such as
asbestosis,    lung    cancer    or
mesophelima.
Asbestos consultant Dr. Robert
Lockhart said he found indication
of minor damage at access points
while inspecting the cafeteria last
year.
The provincial Workers Compensation Board has asked SFU to do
an asbestos management program,
requiring the university to identify
and inspect all asbestos on campus
and submit a proposal on how to
remove or contain the material.
Bill DeVries, executive director
of administrative services said the
university's plan is to remove all
asbestos on campus over a period of
about five years, but little has been
done to prepare for this.
Norton Youngs, health and safety director for the B.C. Telecommunications Unions, said current
compensation   board   standards,
allowing for over one asbestos fibre
per cubic centimeter are inadequate. He called the danger of the
material a "very well kept secret."
"It only takes one fibre to make a
cancer," said Youngs.
the Lady Godiva ride.
"This is a one issue committee
that is very pointed and preordained. It doesn't even pretend to
do what it says. That's wrong
because there are real problems
with sexism on campus — things to
address," he said.
Andrews said most of the
members of the committee were
from CASC and their focus point
last year was the Godiva ride. He
said when the administration took
action against the engineers it was
perceived as an infringement on the
engineer's rights by the AMS.
Andrews said, as a result, council
wanted to avoid the controversy of
sexism related issues.
"The typical response of a
bureaucracy is to form a committee, and now they don't even want
that," he said.
Pedlar said council had no reason
to fear the committee.
"This is not a group that can
walk in and stomp all over council.
It cannot harm council," she said.
Godiva ride
covers up
Lady Godi\a kept her clothes on
this year, and the UBC community
is grateful.
After losing rights to book campus space last year when they hired
a stripper to perform in Hebb
theatre, the Engineering
Undergraduate Society chose a
clothed exotic dancer to ride a horse
through campus Tuesday.
"The ride was conducted in a
way less offensive than last year.
The change was something very
welcome," said applied sciences
dean Axel Meisen Thursday. He added he would prefer to see the ride
completely discontinued, but that
he had not heard any negative feedback about it this year.
June Lythgoe, director of the
Women Students Office, said she
applauded the change of attitude of
the engineers.
"People are expressing gratitude
concerning the event," she said.
"We've been beating this drum for
so many years, and finally some action has been taken."
Horacio de la cueva, a member
of the Coalition Against Sexism on
Campus, said CASC is happy about
the ride this year.
"We can only praise the
engineers for coming up with a
creative solution," he said.
"The event showed we had a lot
of spirit," said Peter Gawlick, applied science 3. "The engineers
don't need to have a strip show. We
still carried on the tradition."
Hamilton funds Nicaraguan rebels
HAMILTON (CUP) — The
Nicaraguan contra rebels may be
having a hard time raising money
from the U.S. government, but
have had a little luck with Young
Progressive Conservatives at
McMaster University.
Concordia student sets up food bank
MONTREAL (CUP) — A slight
delay in Quebec bursary cheques
has led a Concordia student to set
up a food bank for starving
students.
Felix Weekes, founder of the
Canadian Association for the Advancement of People, set up the service after three food drives and now
has provisions for 50 students.
"Nutrition is the most important
part of anything," said Weekes.
"You can want to do anything in
the world, but if you don't eat,
forget  it.   You  can't  concentrate
when your stomach is growling."
Some students have told Weekes
there are people who need food
more than students. But Weekes
disagrees. "Students are one of the
most important groups in society.
They are the ones coming from the
real world and going into the real
world," he said.
Boxes have been set up at both
McGill and Concordia campuses so
that students only have to drop off
a note with their name and number
so they can be contacted. Weekes
said he isn't worried about students
abusing the generosity of the service.
"I'm going on altruistic
motives," he said, "If people abuse
it, there's not much I can do about
that, but what I can do is give people that really need it the opportunity to use it."
So far a total of about 15 requests
for food have been made at the two
universities. "There is a lot of pride
involved. We have to look past
that," said Weekes.
The Young P.C. Club at
McMaster donated $20 in American
funds last year to the rebels, who
are trying to topple the Sandinista
government. Club president Brian
Clarke said the money was for
humanitarian aid, and was sent
through a college Republican
organization in the U.S.
The donation was not made
public until Paul Ianni, president of
the campus New Democratic club,
asked Ontario P.C. leader Larry
Grossman Jan. 19 whether he knew
of the donation.
Grossman, who did not know of
the donation, said the money
"could have been put to better
use."
Clarke defends the donation to
the contras, even though they are
not recognized by the national P.C.
party. "We are independent of the
federal party," he said.
He said the issue is old. "To
bring it up now is obviously an at
tempt to smear the party," Clarke
said.
Heidi Siwak, a member of the
Ontario Public Interest Research
Group, was fired from the
McMaster Student Union's Graphic
Productions Department for producing and distributing 100 posters
implicating the Young Conservatives with the contras.
The posters read "Help the contras rape children, blow up
hospitals, burn down schools. Send
your donations to the Young Progressive Conservatives", and
"What do the contras and the
Young Progressive Conservatives
have in common? $20 U.S."
Clarke is threatening legal action,
although Siwak is not sorry for her
actions. She said the Young Conservatives "hanged themselves, and
for only $20. If you're going to
hang yourself, at least send $1,000
and do it right."

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