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The Ubyssey Oct 23, 1981

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THE UBYSSEY
228-2301 /
HUIIUMI    I   «**?
mm.
By CHARLES CAMPBELL
The whole place is impregnated with the
smell of ancient manure and maggots. Every
other day it is swept with dichloride of lime,
or something, but you can't disguise horse
smell. . . The toilets are just a sheet metal
trough. . .An old, old lady was crying, saying she would rathr have died than come to
such a place . . . There are ten showers for
15,000 women.
— Muriel Kitagawa on
the Hastings Park holding
centre, 1942.
Hastings Park was a holding pen for
Japanese Canadians, most of them women
and children. For many it was home for
several months before they were sent off to
the internment camps. Their crime was being
of the Japanese race.
"That won't happen to the Japanese
again," says Anne Sunahara. "They're too
respectable, too many doctors and lawyers.
But could it happen to another minority?"
The answer is yes. The laws under which
the Japanese were interned still exist. Even
the federal government's proposed charter of
rights would probably not offer any protection from the kind of abuses suffered by the
Japanese.
Anne Gomer Sunahara has grave concerns
on the matter. Author of The Politics of
Racism, which explores the reasons for the
internment of the Japanese, she is now an
Edmonton law student working to see that
the same thing doesn't happen again. She
weighs her words like an experienced lawyer
and looks quite businesslike with her straight
blonde shoulder length hair and grey suit, but
she's no Alberta conservative.
"The proposed charter of rights could be a
deterrent," Sunahara says. "But there are
some major flaws in it. Clause one, for exam-
4. ANY JUSTICE OF THE PEACE OR OFFJCER OR CONSTABLE RECEIVING ANY ARTICLE MENTIONED
IN PARAGRAPH 2 OF THIS ORDER SHALL GIVE TO THE PERSON DELIVERING THE SAME A RECEIPT
THEREFOR AND SHALL REPORT THE FACT ""0 THE COMMISSIONER OF THE ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED
POLICE, AND SHALL RETAIN OR OTHERWISE DISPOSE OF ANY SUCH ARTICLE AS DIRECTED BY THE
SAID COMMISSIONER.
5. ANY PEACE OFFICER OR ANY OFFICER OR CONSTABLE OF THE ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED
POLICE HAVING POWER TO ACT AS SUCH PEACE OFFICER OR OFFICER OR CONSTABLE IN THE SAID
PROTECTED AREA, IS AUTHORIZED TO SEARCH WITHOUT WARRANT THE PREMISES OR ANY PLACE
OCCUPIED OR BELIEVED TO BE OCCUPIED BY ANY PERSON OF THE JAPANESE RACE REASONABLY
SUSPECTED OF HAVING IN HIS POSSESSION OR UPON HIS PREMISES ANY ARTICLE MENTIONED IN
PARAGRAPH 2 OF THIS ORDER, AND TO SEIZE ANY SUCH ARTICLE FOUND ON SUCH PREMISES;
G.  EVERY  PERSON
FORTHWITH;
OF  THE  JAPANESE RACE SHALL LEAVE THE PROTECTED  AREA  AFORESAID
7. NO PERSON OF THE JAPANESE RACE SHALL ENTER SUCH
PERMIT ISSUED BY THE ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE;
PROTECTED AREA EXCEPT UNDER
S. IN THIS ORDER, "PERSONS OF THE JAPANESE RACE" MEANS, AS WELL AS ANY PERSON WHOLLY
OF THE JAPANESE RACE, A PERSON NOT WHOLLY OF THE JAPANESE RACE IF HIS FATHER OR
MOTHER IS OF THE JAPANESE RACE AND IF THE COMMISSIONER OF THE ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED
POLICE BY NOTICE IN WRITING HAS REQUIRED OR REQUIRES HIM TO REGISTER PURSUANT TO
ORDER-IN-COUNCIL P.C. 9760 OF DECEMBER 16th, 1941.
"ATED AT OTTAWA THIS 26th DAY OF FEBRUARY, 1942.
Louis S. St. Laurent,
Minister of Justice
To be posted in a Conspicuous Place
STOLEN LEGACY . . . seized fishboats
Racism still legal
in new
pie, says the charter applies under normal circumstances, which leaves it up to the courts
to decide what normal circumstances are. If
the courts decide the charter doesn't apply
under an emergency then the charter is
useless" (to groups like the Japanese).
Also, if the War Measures Act were to be
invoked a simple Order in Council is all that
would be necessary to circumvent the
charter.
Sunahara points out that the powers given
cabinet under the War Measures Act were
abused. "They did things in defience of
.parliament," she says. "The Act should be
amended to give parliament the power to
anull Orders in Council made under that act.
Presently to anull such an order you have to
bring down the government. In times of war
that's just about impossible to do."
Suna hara says the charter would simply be
another hurdle for the government. "But it's
better than nothing. The American constitution freed their Japanese in 1945, and should
have done before if it wasn't for judicial
cowardice." Canada's own Japanese did not
see a complete return of their civil liberties
until 1949.
Another   possibility   Sunahra   fears   is
judicial procrastination. As her book amply
demonstrates, the judiciary is not so far
removed from the cabinet as it should be,
and judges are not above making legal decisions for political reasons. In 1942 the Hon.
J. T. Thorson was a cabinet minister participating in the decision to uproot the
Japanese-Canadians. In 1944 he was the
federal justice hearing the Japanese case
against their dispossession. Three years later,
after all the Japanese property had been sold,
he ruled that the case had been brought
before the wrong court.
"Legal authorities have unanimously called the procrastination by the courts on the
matter of dispossession an abuse of process
and a miscarriage of justice," Sunahara says.
Sunahara believes the majority of Canadians didn't support many actions taken by
Ihe government against Japanese-Canadians.
Hut she believes public apathy allowed racist
policies to be carried out.
"Any white South African will tell you
he's against apartheid, but they accept it.
And it's the acceptance that allows it to go
on.
"It's the same thing here. People accept
racism, so it's self-perpetuationg. MacKenzie
King believed that his policies were necessary
to appease racist sentiment. King was very
democratic. He always responded to what he
thought was public opinion. But if the myth
of public support for his Japanese-Canadian
policies had been exploded, much of it
wouldn't have happened."
Sunahara believes that the most important
way to prevent the tragedy of the Japanese-
Canadians from recurring is through education, "a lot of racism is based on ignorance
and fear," she says.
Educating children about other cultures
would go a long way toward eliminating that
fear. Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 23, 1981
"Wuflfti- <§i !Mk§- itr@y to/' th®y §@.yo
3® ©outfe y@m- ?h® s@@$®g- $@ b®G@m® y@^ th® wites?,, TTlhxi- tetnisSiSJks^ k skmpi®, einKSop
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@fo<$   fiffi)V®OV®g   (Al©
1,411 k- SP® ©ifii ©ffiy
^                                PREPARE FOB                              ^
MCAT-LSAT-GMAT m
SATDATGRE    m
UBC INSTRUCTIONAL COURSES          *.£A a
MIDTERM REGISTRATION                               \SB V
Monday, October 26 — Friday, October 30, 1981                             ^W r
Registration for all course will take place during regular office hours at the Intremural and                         La
Recreational Sports Office, Room 203, War Memorial Gym.                                               \^^_^9
ALL COURSES FULL EXCEPT FOR THE FOLLOWING:
NATL MEDICAL BDS
VQE • ECFMG • FLEX
NDB-NPBI- NLE
*Wgfanllm-\\ 1 mte.st
fr        educational    1 since 1938
(i^ajj      CENTER                 '
'^■""""""**   Call Days, Evenings t Weekends
University Village Bldg.
4900 25th Avenue NE
Seattle. Washington 98105
(206) 523-7617
Course
Section
Days
Time
Place
Cost
Dates
Max Closed
Circuit Training
Tennis (Beg.)
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Nov. 2-
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Nov. 10-
Dec. 11
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30
24
20
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Wild
Yup, it sure is something,
right? But hold on, buster,
there's none of that stuff here!
Just li blast-my-socks-off
burgers, fair prices, and tons of
other great stuff. So keep
your hands to vourself!
2966 West 4th Ave., open
from 11:30 a.m. seven days a week.
Opening soon corner of
Georgia and Hornby. (Yuk, yuk.)
SOUTHERN
COMFORT
Its special taste
made it famous.
THE BIRD'S GONE BONKERS
OR... BIG BIRD SOUNDS Friday, October 23,1981
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
C®ffinMHra®(fD®rr sMteifiif)^ E»®@f(§iiRi
'The Nixon, Ford, Carter or ... good lord...
the Reagan administration —
has not addressed how we
get away from reliance on
non-renewable resources7
He has been called a new kind of prophet,
a man whose work is the link between the
complex facts and moral issues.
He feels no qualms about letting American
congress representatives at public hearings
know that they are ignorant of the facts.
A recent candidate for the American
presidency, Barry Commoner is an interesting man. He is one of America's best
known environmentalists and most forceful
advocate of solar energy.
After his defeat for the White House as the
Citizen's Party candidate, Commoner
returned to his job as director of the Centre
for the biology of natural systems, an institution that investigates pollution and research
problems.
Commoner is also an author of numerous
books on energy usage, where he argues for
the urgent need to shift to solar energy before
the economy is "cannibalized by the exponential rise in finite energy source costs. "
Commoner's arguments differ from many
environmentalists in that his views are derived from researched scientific fact. This is evident from the stacks of books and dossiers
that cover his office — looks like a seminar
room. His manner is direct, methodical and
sometimes sardonic.
The Ubyssey's Paul Kaihla spoke to Commoner about oil company sabotage of the
economy, the no-win syndrome of nuclear
power, and his arguments for solar energy,
during a visit to New York last summer.
Is the energy crisis a myth?
There has been no real shortage of oil in
the United State. There has not been a period
in recent years where we didn't have the oil
we needed; even during the 1973 crisis when
there were gas lines on the east coast. When
the numbers were all accumulated it turned
out there was one-tenth of one per cent
deficit between demand and supply.
What is the energy crisis? It's the fact that
since oil and natural gas, coal, and uranium
are non-renewable, their price, the cost of
producing them, escalates each year as the
supplies become exhausted.
How far have the oil companies gone in colluding to cause artificial shortages or to raise
prices?
What the oil companies have done is to
pursue the highest profit they can make. In
the '30s, they discovered they could keep the
price up by limiting production in the United
States. They persuaded the Texas State
Legislative Assembly to set quotas on the
production of oil in Texas, and as a result, by
keeping production just matched to the
demnd, they were able to stabilize the price
well above production costs. However, as
their production costs rose, they noticed the
gap between what they were getting for oil
and what it cost them to produce it narrowed.
At that point, most of the oil companies
shifted a great deal of their effort from the
United States to countries abroad, because
there they could get cheaper oil and sell it at
the high price established by the quota
system.
This action by the U.S. oil companies, dictated solely by their interest in maximizing
profit, has made the United States heavily
dependent on foreign oil. They haven't been
interested in creating a sensible oil policy for
the United States, and as a result the rest of
the country suffers.
In terms of the current market structure and
rate of consumption, how long will it be
before we have a real crisis?
There is a real crisis now! The crisis is the
escalating cost of oil. That has contributed
enormously to inflation. It is driving the standard of living of poor people and people on
fixed incomes down. It is depriving business
of the opportunity to use capital for productive activities.
The oil companies dominate the financial
market. When Conoco was up for grabs, $20
billion of credit was involved by the various
bidders. That means that other companies
that want to do something productive can't
find the credit. There is a crisis and the only
ones benefitting from it all are the oil companies.
Can you explain why?
"If you have a non-renewable resource
and the amount under the ground is limited,
naturally you take the cheapest stuff out
first. That means automatically that as you
take a barrel of oil out of the ground, it
makes the next barrel that much more expensive. Its price rises exponentially as the
resource is exhausted.
Historically, how has the U.S. Government
contributed to the dilemma?
For years the government policy towards
business has been based on the notion that
whatever business decides to do is best for the
country. The free market can decide best how
we should use our resources. That turns out
to be wrong.
The other faults have been that no ad
ministration — the Nixon, Ford, Carter, or
. . . good Lord ... the Reagan administration — has really addressed the basic issue of
how do we get away from reliance on nonrenewable resources.
Carter came out with a somewhat disguised
energy conservation program. What direction has Reagan taken so far?
Carter tried to create an energy policy
three times and three times failed. Reagan
has no energy policy. Reagan's policy is that
whatever big business decides to do is best for
the country. That's his policy. It is a non-
policy, and it's already clear that his approach doesn't work.
See the theory is, for example, that if you
deregulate oil, which gives the oil companies
more profits, they'll invest it in producing
more oil. That's the so-called supply-side
theory. Well, when oil was deregulated, the
oil companies expecting larger profits did
what? They bought metal mining companies!
Why solar energy?
The reason why solar energy is so impor-
That's nonsense. The present nuclear power
system, if built to the scale the government
wanted, would use up the available uranium
in 25 to 30 years. Nuclear power is no solution to the energy crisis. The only way it
could be is if we massively shifted to breeder
reactors and we haven't built a single
operating breeder reactor of any significant
size in the United States yet.
Even the most avid proponents of nuclear
power would agree that if we tried to build
breeder reactors as the main supply of electricity, that wouldn't be accomplished for 50
years. Well in 50 years ... in 10 years the
economy would be wrecked by the rising
price of energy.
In contrast, we could put in solar sources
of energy right now. Right now, we could
economically shift to the use of solar collectors in most parts of the country for space
heat and hot water. Right now, we could
shift to the production of alcohol in place of
gasoline. And alcohol is solar energy; it
comes from crops.
tant is that it's renewable. Our reliance on 94
per cent of our energy on non-renewable
resources means that the price of energy will
continue to increase exponentially. The only
function of energy is to support the economic
system, to do the work that is involved in
producing goods and services which create
the wealth of the economy.
So if it takes more and more of the
economic output to produce the energy that's
needed to run the economy, you've got a no-
win system. You've got a negative feedback.
That means that the energy system is literally
cannibalizing the economic system it's supposed to support.
So we have to shift to a renewable source
of energy. The only feasible one is solar
energy because the amount of energy we
engage in capturing it will have no influence
on its availability. The sun will continue to
pour the same amount of energy on the Earth
whether we use it or not. And for that
reason, the cost of solar energy will not rise
exponentially, it will not cannibalize the
economy. Now we have got to shift to solar
energy for that reason.
This year our university had a representative
from Brookhaven come with a pile of charts
and graphs showing how nuclear energy is
cheapest and lowest risk.
. . . Mr. Coutts probably. Let me go back
to what I said before arid say it over again.
Solar energy, being renewable, will remain at
a constant cost. Constant. I'm not talking
about how high it is. Since non-renewable
sources of energy, including uranium, will
rise in cost at some point, the two lines will
cross. And in fact they have already crossed
with respect to using solar collectors for heat
from electricity.
I can tell you flatly, that if you're running
a nuclear power plant to produce electricity,
and if the electicity is used to heat a house, it
is cheaper to stop buying the electicity and install solar collectors.
The cost of electricity will go up forever
from now on, whereas the cost of solar heat
will remain constant.
Can you really say that uranium is a nonrenewable resource when we're told that the
amount consumed by reactors is so little
compared to the world supply?
Then how much of the current nuclear power
system does the United States need to fulfill
other immediate needs?
You could shut off three quarters of the
nuclear power plants in the United States
tomorrow and we would have all the energy
we need, because we have that much excess in
our conventional power plants.
What's happening with the excess capacity?
It's just not being used. For example, in
the Chicago area about half the energy being
used is supplied by nuclear power plants.
Carter and a number of people said, "well we
couldn't turn off those nuclear power plants;
we'd wreck the economy of Chicago.
That's nonsense. The Chicago district has
enough underused coal-burning plants that
they could simply turn them up faster and
turn off the nuclear power plants.
And they still want to build more?
Well the fact is the utilities are not building
more. One of the main nuclear power projects in the area has just been cancelled — the
Bailey Island Reactor. There have been no
new nuclear power plants ordered by
American utilities since 1978. The reason is,
they're unnecessary, expensive, and
dangerous, and the utilities are beginning to
catch on. What will happen to the nucler
power industry is that it will come to Reagan
for a bail-out, which if he grants it will completely violate his theories about free enterprise. And if it doesn't get the bail-out, the
industry will collapse.
If solar makes sense then why aren't the
utilities expediting the transition from conventional energy?
Solar makes sense but it doesn't make
sense to the utilities. The utilities get their
returns on the basis of central electric power
and they're paid for the capital investment.
What solar means is, the investment can be
made by the user. All we need are utilities,
for the solar transition is to serve as storage
points and balancing mechanisms, so that
when solar energy is insufficient in their particular time of the year, the utilities can back
up the decentralized solar installations.
Will you run in any elections in the future?
I am not in the business of running elections. I ran for president because the
Citizen's Party asked me to. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 23,1981
AMERICAN
ATROC/TfeS
rOOlLECT
rTWE WHOLE
rstTT, KIDS!
WOUNDED
KNEE
1890. THE: INDIAN WARS ARE COMING TO
THEIR END,  THREE CENTURIES OF GENOCIDE
HAVING DESTROYED A PEOPLE. THE TREATY
BETRAYALS  ARE ALREADY TAKING PLACE. ALL
THAT IS LEFT IS FOR THE WAR DEPARTMENT TO
HAVE THEIR LIST OF VfjMENTERS   OF
DISTURBANCES" ARRESTED AND IMPRISONED.
JUST BEFORE DAYBREAK ON DECEMBER
15,1890,  INDIAN POLICE ARRIVE AT
SITTING BULL'S CABIN TO TAKE HIM
INTO CUSTODY. "WHILE SITTING BULL
ACCEPTS, ONE OF HIS PEOPLE FIRES
AT THE POLICE.   SITTING BULL IS
IMMEDIATELY SHOT IN THE HEAD AND
A WILD FIGHT ENSUES. THE INDIAN
POLICE ARE BARELY SAVED BY THE
ARRIVAL OF A CAVALRY DETACHMENT.
/
^
-%&*&-■
HUNDREDS OF MOW LEADERLESS
HUNKPAPAS FLEE, SEEKING REFUGE
WITH RED CLOUD, THE LAST OF
THE GREAT CHIEFS.
TWO CAYS AFTER SITTING BULL'S
MURDER, THE HUNKPAPAS REACH
BIG FOOT'S CAMP. AFTER
HEARING ABOUT THE KILLING,
BIG FOOT, ALSO WANTED FOR
ARREST, GATHERS HIS PEOPLE
AND HEADS TO THE SAFETY
Cf RED CLOUD'S PROTECTION.
IN THE BITTER COLD,  HE
CONTRACTS   PNEUMONIA,
HIS LUNG'S BLOOD DRIPPING
FROM HIS NOSE AND FREEZING
ON THE GROUND. HE CAN
NO LONGER RIDE AND IS
TRANSFERED TO A WAGON.
Ohi DECEMBER 28, THE INDIANS
SIGHT FOUR TROOPS OF CAVALRY.
BIG FOOT ORDERS A WHITE
FLAG RAISED, AND MAJOR
SAMUEL WHfTSIDE OF
THE SEVENTH U.S.
CAVALRY APPROACHES.
*VUA.:'
HE TELLS BIG FOOT THEY
ARE TO BE TAKEN 70 A
CAVALRY CAMP NEAR
WOUNDED KNEE CREEK.
BIG FOOT AGREES.
AT THE CAMP, THE TRIBE
IS COUNTED: 350 PEOPLE,
INCLUDING MANY CHILDREN.
MAJOR WHITESIDE DECIDES
TO DISARM HIS PRISONERS
IN THE MORNING.
TO MAKE SURE THAT
NO-Of^E ESCAPES,
TWO TROOPS OF
CAVALRY AND FOUR
ARTILLERY PIECES
SURROUND THE
CAMP.  .
-JSH
■BEE
AFTER BREAKFAST, THE INDIANS
ARE  TOLD TO STACK THEIR
WEAPONS IN THE CENTER OF
THE CAMP. AFTER THEY DO
SO, THE TENTS ARE SEARCHED.
THE CAVALRY RANSACKS THE
CAMP, SLASHING OPEN
PACKAGES WITH KNIVES,
LOOKING FOR INDIAN ARMS.
THE INDIANS ARE ENRAGED,
BUT DO NOTHING. TWO MORE
RIFLES ARE FOUND. THE OWNER
OF ONE, DEAF  BLACK COYOTE,
HOLDS HIS WINCHESTER ABOVE
HIS HEAD, SHOUTING IT HAD COST
MUCH MONEY.
THE PONY SOLDIERS TRY TO
WRESTLE THE GUN AWAY. THE
GUN GOES OFF, FIRING
HARMLESSLY    INTO THE AIR.
THEN, INCREDIBLY, A DEAFENING ROAR OF GUNS FOLLOWS
BIG FOOT SPRAWLS (N THE
FROZEN GROUND, DEAD. SOME
INDIANS GRAPPLE WITH SOLDIERS.
"I DID NOT KNOW THEN HOW MUCH WAS
ENDED. WHEN I LOOK BACK NOW FROM
THIS HIGH HILL OF OLD AGE, I CAN
5TILL SEE THE BUTCHERED WOMEN
AND CHILDREN LYING HEAPED AND
SCATTERED ALL ALONG THE CROOKED
GULCH AS PLAIN AS WHEN I SAW
THEM WITH EYES STILL YOUNG.  AND
I CAN SEE THAT SOMETHING ELSE
DIED THERE IN THE BLOODY MUD, AND
WAS BURIED IN THE BLIZZARD. A
PEOPLE'S DREAM DIED THERE.   IT
WAS A BEAUTIFUL DREAM... THE
NATION'S HOOP IS BROKEN AND
SCATTERED. THERE IS NO CENTER ANY
LONGER, AND THE SACRED TREE IS DEAD."
-BLACK ElK
FOR MORE INFO ON
HOW THE WEST WAS
REALLY WON, READ
THE VERY GOOD "BURY
MY HEART AT WOUNDED
KNEE," BY DEE BROWN.
an Friday, October 23,1981
THE    U BYSS EY
Page 5
By DAVID FRASER
Though there is much room for improvement, the status of native Indians in B.C. is
on the rise. A cultural renaissance is taking
place among our indigenous peoples, bringing them heightened self-respect and a more
vocal approach to the serious social problems
currently facing native Indians.
The opening of the new Vancouver Indian
Center (VIC) in May 1982 will increase
awareness among natives and whites of the
changes needed before unemployment, inadequate housing, and alcoholism — problems long associated with B.C.'s Indians —
can be dealt with.
"The VIC (located near Hastings & Commercial, site of the old Bacedas nightclub)
will serve as a drop-in and resource center for
both visitors to and residents of Vancouver,"
says VIC's educational director, Joan Carter.
"We are not trying to change the world,"
says Carter. "The center is just a tactical
move." Herself a native Indian, Carter says
that, economically, Indians are at the bottom
of our society.
"We not only have to convince the non-
Indian community to hire Native people, we
must also give our people enough self-
confidence and training to do a job right."
The VIC is well equipped to improve the
employment prospects of unskilled native Indians. There are workshops in carving,
silkscreening and Salish weaving, as well as a
daycare facility. Markets are held for European and Japanese customers, with high
quality Indian art made by apprentice artists
at the center.
The VIC also owns its own construction
company, which trains tradesmen and builds
native Indian co-op housing.
"Sixty per-cent of native women are
unemployed," says Carter. "Therefore, we
want to concentrate on this sector the most in
creating jobs. Much of our unemployment
problem is due to "lazy Indian" stereotypes
held by whites.
By collecting archival photos of working
natives in B.C., Carter tries to correct the
"faulty images natives have of themselves,
images promulgated by the media, schools,
and related institutions." Carter says she
wants to show natives were instrumental in
developing B.C.'s economy.
"Economics are behind most of the problems facing Indians today," says Ron
George, an organizer of the women's occupation of the Department of Indian Affairs
(DIA) offices.
"We took over the DIA offices to make
the public aware of funding cutbacks and
roaring inflation which are reducing our
quality of life," says George.
"Bureaucratic boondoggling by the federal
government was a major reason for the
sit-in," says George. "DIA spends 85 per
cent of its funds on administrative costs, that
means only 15 per cent reaches the people it
was intended for.
"We called for the resignation of Fred
Walchli (director general for B.C.'s DIA)
because of his political manoeuverings and
insensitivity to the appalling conditions on
our reserves," George says. The Mt. Currie
reserve has 90 per cent unemployment, according to George.
Indian centre
asserts native history
•S-T' '' >■*■'• A
Archives . . . show native participation
But Carter does not believe such
demonstrations are the best way to better the
lot of B.C.'s native Indians. "Though the occupation involved many grass-roots people
and attracted much publicity, the whole
event lacked organization and leadership;
says Carter.
She adds the government should pay more
attention to service organizations such as the
VIC. "Political issues have not been discussed on the community level," she says.
"Public forums, such as those organized by
the VIC, can help educate everyone to the importance of such issues as the new constitu
tion, Indian land claims, and child apprehensions."
But George says the sit-in had positive
results. "It prompted a CBC team to investigate the serious problems on the Mt.
Currie reserve, as well it-loosened up some
federal money to help combat the high incidence of suicide and alcoholism there."
Currently more than 50 native Indians,
mostly women, are awaiting trial this
December on charges of "public mischief."
George says the defendents could be used as
examples. The judge at their preliminary
hearing said: "strength in numbers is frankly
something I don't want you to have again."
Removing the occupiers cost $60,000, according to the official statement of the Concerned Aboriginal Women, who took part in
the takeover. "It became apparent that the
judge and the system were working against us
to break down our strength," the statement
says.
Statistics attest to the acute social problems currently facing the Indian community. In B.C., the infant mortality rate is twice
that of the general population, Indians have
more than double the rate of hospital admissions than the total population, and 40 per
cent of all native Indian deaths are violent.
Improving the lives of native Indians can
only come about through education, agree
both Indian activists and government officials. Lately, government and other agencies have taken initiatives such as the VIC to
encourage greater participation of native
people in the educational system.
Indians in B.C. have come a long way since
1946, when not one native graduated from
grade 13. "Educational opportunities are expanding for my people," says Verna
Kirkness, director of the Native Indian
Teacher Education Program (NITEP) who is
also native Indian.
Established in 1974, the program has
doubled the enrolment over last year with the
addition of two new "field centers" in Prince
George and North Vancouver. There are 28
native students currently enrolled in NITEP
at UBC.
Kirkness says about 140 native Indian
students are attending UBC this year, "a
marked improvement over previous years."
Eleven are registered in Law, a result of the
Native Indian Law Program (NILP) set up in
1975.
An affirmative action program, (the first
organized effort in a B.C. university to promote the welfare of a particular group,)
NILP does not operate by a quota system.
Rather, entrance requirements for native Indian applicants to Law school were made less
stringent than for other applicants.
"Considerable streamlining of native Indian students into non-academic programs
still persists in B.C.'s school system,"
Kirkness is quick to point out, however.
Carter says she thinks this may be caused
by underlying racism among teachers and
social workers. She says she tried to establish
a program to return native children to their
rightful parents when she noticed last
January that 80 per cent of all children in
B.C.'s adoption centers were native Indian.
Carter says she came up against some opposition by social workers "who might have
felt their jobs were on the line if more power
to control adoptions was given to Indian
organizations.
Social workers sometimes ignore the root
causes of the squalor and alcoholism in some
Indian families. Many Indian parents cannot
find suitable housing and have their children
removed for that reason."
The response to the VIC efforts has been
mixed, says Carter. "Many in the white community do not feel we are capable of undertaking such an endeavor. Perhaps educating
them is as important as removing our own
people from the welfare-UIC treadmill."
Sunahara's account of racism definitive
By CHARLES CAMPBELL
Definitive is a word that a reviewer doesn't get to use very often. But it is a
word that can be used without hesitation to describe a long overdue book on the
internment of Japanese-Canadians during the Second World War.
The Politics of Racism is primarily a historical account of the political
manipulation that led to the internment. But it avoids being labourious
documentation through its highly readable style free from academic jargon,
through the sensitivity of the author to the cause of problems rather than just the
symptoms and through the judicious use of personal anecdote. The book never
lets the reader forget that people's lives were shattered by easy political decisions.
The Politics of Racism
By Anne Gomer Sunahara
Published by James Lorimer,
222pp at $12.95
That balance obviously grows out of author Anne Gomer Sunahara's own
perspective. Married to a Japanese, she first became interested in the subject
when she heard her mother-in-law and some friends talking about what they called Slocan Days. "Here were a number of quite innocent people who had been
horribly victimized. I realized that what I'd read about in history books happened
to real people."
Throughout the book the humanity of her account relieves the harsh realities of
politically expedient racism and unadulterated hatred. Of particular interest are
the portraits of Etsuji Morii and Ian Alistar MacKenzie.
In many previous accounts of the internment Morii is portrayed as a gangster
who betrayed the Japanese. In Sunahara's account he is a nightclub owner who's
previous dealings with the police and experience as a social organizer and charity
fundraiser make him acceptable to the police and to naturalized Japanese —
Canadians as head of the Japanese Liason Committee. Despite a reputation
tainted by a murder charge he appears to act with the community's best interests at
heart and ultimately does the Japanese no good only because he has no real influence on decisions taken by the government.
MacKenzie, a minister in King's cabinet is portrayed more as a paranoid fool
than as an evil racist. Only his skill as a political strategist and position as the lone
minister from B.C. allowed him to manipulate government decisions.
The book also gives a particularly sensitive portrayal of the divisions within the
Japanese community. The picture is one of the vaguely defined two groups
unable to work in concert, the naturalized Japanese-Canadians preaching cooperation, a little fearful of what would happen if they made demands of governments that had always abused them in the past and the Canadian-born Japanese
who had faith in the 'British sense of fair play' and thought more protest was in
order.
The final impression is one of tragic realism; of people whose perspectives are
limited by their own narrow experience running in circles while the security that
had taken the Japanese 40 years to build was destroyed by a few.
At the same time the books' thorough references and dispassionate tone free
from editorializing make it suitable as a textbook. But Sunahara objects when her
work is compared favourably with other books on the subject. She says the end of
a 35 year ban on release of government documents has given her the first
opportunity to tell the story properly.
The book, which is obviously the product of considerable devotion, began in-
auspiciously as Sunahara attempted to discover the reasons for the internment. "I
never really intended that a book should come out of it. It was purely a personal
question. But once I had learned what I learned it had to be put on paper."
The Politics of Racism is a book that is infected with the passion of the author
to see the story told right. Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 23,1981
Altman 'hypocritical hype'
By HEATHER CONN
See the big-name film director.
See him laugh and tell jokes. He is
witty. See the audience laugh. He
makes fun of himself. Hear the applause.
Hear him talk. He is smug. He is
clever. He is successful. He is
smoothly performing a snow job. It
is working and he knows it.
But he is trying not to show it. He
is the "American innovator." He is
Robert Altman.
At a screening last Friday for
Health, his unreleased 1979 film,
Altman was a disappointing testament to his slam-the-sham shows.
Speaking to 300 admirers at Robson
Square theatre, he symbolized one
of the same contemptible sorts he
mocks in his own movies — a self-
flattering, opponents-be-damned,
publicity seeker.
For the expectant fan, the paunchy, bearded man in casual garb
bore little humility, or intensity. Instead, he aimed to please, using
jocular platitudes and pat replies to
gain approval from the after-hours
groupies. And for most of the star-
struck audience, his approach
worked. They got their $13 worth.
(As if to placate us, he jokingly
stated: "I'll do my best not to lie.")
It is sad, almost pathetic, that a
56-year-old director, whose films
are admirably irreverent, nonconformist and original by
Hollywood standards, should appear to seek public acceptance so
blatantly. He did all he could to
convince the crowd that he really
doesn't want fame and fortune. He
downplayed any personal enjoyment of success:
"You have to learn to be really
successful in your failure," he said.
"You must learn to be really happy
in it."
The next day, he told students at
the Freddy Wood theatre he could
be just as content in a room with a
bottle of wine as he is in a $4 million
New York apartment.
Sure, Bob.
Altman wanted us to believe in
him as a likeable failure, as a poor
little guy wronged by profit-hungry
Twentieth Century Fox moguls.
Because Fox shelved Health before
its release, the allegedly downtrodden director presented a good case
for empathy. But it sounded a trifle
too defensive. And hollow.
At no time did Altman even suggest that his film might not have
been good enough to release. Its
high drawing power was an
automatic assumption in his view;
therefore a distributor's fear of a
flop was wholly unrealistic when
dealing with his material.
So, like a sore loser, he lashed out
at an unseen enemy.
"It's hard for you to believe how
infantile and crazy these people
(film studio executives) are. They
are jerks and ultimately they will
lose," he said.
"They don't know what the fuck
they're doing. Idi Amin could be
president as long as they can sell
their pictures."
Altman was looking to gain
credit for plugging the film despite
its premature burial.
Like the captain of a dying ship,
he said: "I'll go anywhere this film
goes." Health is undeniably a
laugh-filled, entertaining picture
that parodies a two-party election at
a Florida health food convention.
But it is mere light comedy with
some subtle touches; it does not
deserve the hype that Altman seeks
to heap upon it.
When Altman asked for applause
to gauge audience response to
Health, it was split roughly half in
favour, half against. He said he
normally expects a 60-40 response
to his Alms and can't understand
ALTMAN . . . big name director pathetic
why Health is never to be released
in New York or Europe.
"They (Twentieth Century Fox)
are afraid it will be reviewed well in
New York," he said with conviction. "Its non-release doesn't make
any sense. With this cast and what's
on the market today ..."
The film stars Carol Burnett,
Glenda Jackson, Lauren Bacall,
Dick Cavett, Henry Gibson and
James Garner, who worked for half
their normal salary, according to
Altman.
It is indeed praiseworthy to condemn profit motives of major film
studios who seek mass box office
sales at the expense of quality.
Altman has fought consistently
with studios, distributors and and
reviewers for the right to make and
show his films. He has been daring
and off-beat with films such as the
anti-war M*A*S*H in 1970 and the
anti-American hero's Buffalo Bill
and the Indians with Paul Newman.
And yet, through his candid
quest for freedom of film self-
expression some glaring contradictions arise. Most notably, his latest
film Popeye reeks of an attempt at
commercial acclaim. It stars Robin
Williams, an actor with wide
popular appeal from television's
Mork and Mindy. His well-known
face and name were presumably
marketed for maximum gain; surely
his unique acting talents weren't
what sold his role.
Needless to say the movie flopped, despite Altman's attempts at
promotion in an interview with
Penthouse soon after its release.
Before anyone could point out the
incongruity between Altman's aims
and actions, he volunteered: "It
(Popeye) sold a lot of half-price
tickets." (End of issue.) Later at
UBC, he circumvented a direct
question concerning the hypocrisy
of his apparent need for film success while calling himself a contented failure.
"I'm trying to find one person
that will just be thrilled at what I've
shown them," Altman told the
evening screening crowd.
"Everyone has one thing in common. We all have a point of view.
We're all artists."
Well, if one fan is all he truly
seeks, why not be an independent
filmmaker and appeal to small audiences with limited, but controlled
distribution? Instead, Altman has
dealt almost solely with major
studios in a mainstream market.
Currently, he has left Hollywood
film-making on a temporary basis
and is directing plays in New York.
He has discovered a new creative
outlet, one where he can still use
overlapping dialogue, but without
the Lion's Gate 8-track sound
system so well-known in his films.
"It's not good to get
complacent," he says. "I think it's
good to go and keep stretching all
the time, to risk your security."
In his movies, Altman has aimed
an on-screen shotgun at society's
accepted values and institutions,
condemning authority figures,
hypocrisy, dollar-crazy performers
and shallow politicians. In
Nashville, he satirized tinsel-town
America; in California Split with
George Segal and Elliott Gould he
satirically pounced on gamblers'
obsessions.
(Altman himself enjoys gambling
and couldn't get an American Express Card until December, 1970
because he was considered a security risk. His father was a gambler
and Altman has been known to
drop $400 on a backgammon game.
It's no wonder that he told his UBC
audience: "We have pretty contented lives." (After all, money's
not important, is it)?
Altman was visibly basking in the
praise and recognition he received
at Friday' screening. One woman
lauded him for his apparent
understanding of the female condition in the film Three Women, starring Sissy Spacek and Shelley
Duvall. A stirring film about two
female misfits who feed off each
other's psyche, Three Women is unquestionably a poignant and sensitive picture.
Yet its creator, who conceived the
film's plot in a dream, is hardly
worthy of taking credit for outstanding compassion to women. At
UBC Altman cracked a boys-will-
be-boys joke that, at the time, he
said he couldn't resist:
"He (a friend) asked me 'What
have you got against good-looking
women?' And I said: 'Me, if I get
the chance.' " Yuk. Yuk. Thrice
married, Altman once explained the
failure of his post-second World
War first marriage with the words:
"I was a real chippie chaser."
At no time did he appear to be
personally accountable for his actions or statements, as if his films
are the only reality he wants people
to see and judge. At the UBC
gathering, he proclaimed glibly:
"Anything I say, you can forget
because I can change it in the next
sentence. I'm dealing with what occurs to be correct at the time."
He evidently does not like things
to stand in the way of his
moviemaking. He spoke disparagingly of film unions, complaining
that they ask unreasonable salaries
and make shooting difficult by
demanding that actors be used from
See page 10: NO
MONTY PYTHON'S
*  GRAHAM *
CHAPMAN
J^ will be at ^f
the BOOKSTORE
Thursday, October 29
12:30 p.m.-1:30 p.m.
Autographing copies of hb book
"A Liar's Autobiography"
Published by Methuen Publications
In Hardcover at a
SPECIAL UBC BOOKSTORE
PRICE $6.95 (published at $13.95)
or Paperback $3.95
ubc bookstore
228-4741
Orders
being accepted
RESERVE
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Student Union Building, University of British Columbia
Vancouver BC V6T 1W5   604 224-2344 Friday, October 23,1981
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
Socred solution to poverty
Let them live on less
Grace McCarthy human resources minister
Reprinted from the Kootenay Reporter
"Now you either get pregnant or try to find a low paying job. I'm stockpiling macaroni."
This is one Castlegar woman's way of coping with the
new ministry of human resources assistance policy.
Sharon is a single mother with a five year old child. They
were both living on a $595 a month income, living in a
basement suite and shopping for her family's clothes at
the local thrift shop.
On Oct. 1 Sharon's assistance dropped $35, 8.3 per cent
of her previous monthly income, and in three months she
will be completely disentitled from her benefits. Sharon
says she cannot live on the reduced income.
Sharon's name and the names of the other Castlegar
women mentioned here have been change because, if
identified, they might lose their benefits.
But she is just one example of the single parents staggering under the impact of sweeping changes in the provincial policy.
Under a new classification system for determining recipients' "employability," single parents with one child
more than six months of age face benefits slashed $35,
compulsory monthly meetings with human resource officials and no guarantee of continuing benefits — ending
previously existing medical benefits as well.
The new policy also says any women with two children
over 12 is no longer eligible for assistance. If they receive
aid, now reduced, they must prove each month they could
not find employment, and are completely disentitled every
four months. Two children under 12 still qualify a parent
as unemployable.
"Lucky me," says Frances. "My situation doesn't
change because I've got two kids. For the first time having
two kids works to my advantage in the system."
Frances' benefits would continue until one of her
children reaches the age of 12 in five years, but "after two
years of conscientious searching," she's found a low-
paying night shift job. It only pays about $200 more monthly than the assistance she was receiving from human
resources, which covered only the cost of food.
The Breadwinner
'■WELL I'VE GOT TO GO TO WORK. EVEN IF YOU DONT "
What would you do if you
had a pre-schooler, no job
skills and there
weren't any jobs?
Td go out and get pregnant.
"And it's at the expense of my children's security," she
says.
Says Shannon: "I call it 'The Grace McCarthy
Pregnancy Incentive Program'. What would you do if
you had a pre-schooler, no job skills, and there weren't
any jobs anyway? I'd go out and get pregnant."
Waiting on the welfare cheque has never been easy, says
Frances. "Even before the new policy raising children was
extremely difficult, because financially you get food and
shelter, but anything else was completely unaffordable.
It's particularly hard if there's ever a common problem,
like your car or your child's bike breaking down."
Says Jean, the mother of a 14 month old: "I'm still trying to find a place to rent that I can afford on what 1 get
now. I don't know where I'll live when T get even less
money." On October 1 her assistance dropped $35 and
three months from now she too faces disentitlernent.
Karen, with two children aged two and 10 has begun a
training program. Her oldest child will turn 12 six months
before she finishes, and since human resources arranges
subsidies for education expenses one year at a time, she
expects to lose her assistance before her program is completed.
"If that's what you call progress then go for it," she
says. "I'll get pregnant and they can pay for 12 more
years. What kind of game is that?"
"If I have to be unemployable to get my schooling then
I'll be unemployable."
If they back out on me I'll be up shit creek, because I'll
be right back where I am now, except owing six to $8,000
in student loans. My courses aren't worth anything unless
I finish them."
Human resources' rationale for the new employability
standards rests with their daycare policy. They have
decided that since a woman on welfare is eligible for a 100
per cent daycare subsidy she is employable, regardless of
the social, personal and environmental circumstances faced by the woman. As the ministry subsidizes daycare costs
by allowing the first child full subsidy and subsequent
children decreasing daycare costs, a woman with more
than one child under 12 is considered unemployable.
"It doesn't make sense," says Gloria, a mother of two
children under 12. "It's too ambiguous to define
employability that way. You just can't apply it."
Daycare centres and 'in home centres,' or baby sitters,
cannot afford to operate on the ministry's plan. They cannot even afford to operate on the human resources full
subsidy and often charge $20 to $100 more each month
for their services. And already there exists a waiting list of
18 applicants for each daycare spot in the province. The
Castlegar centre's waiting list is as long as its enrolment.
Their changes make me feel angry," says Frances.
"Again the're making it clear that their main concerns
don't lie with the welfare of the people, especially mothers
whose full time job is to raise children. Their job is being
disregarded as legitimate work.
Human resources said its introduction of the new
criteria for benefits mean a shift in policy intended to
decrease the number of slackards on their increasing rolls.
The story the ministry never tells is that statistically they
support few single clients, that they have one of the lowest
fraud rates of any government department and come far
below corporate fraud in both percentage and real
economic terms.
And the definitions of welfare fraud are tenuous. One
Castlegar woman who allowed a friend to register his car
in her name, unable to insure it himself, was recently
disentitled for failing to declare it as an asset. "They're
saying I won't qualify for any more welfare because I
defrauded them. If there's one little deviation, they cut
you off, she says.
Another speculates: "There will probably be a lot more
lying with the new policy."
Karen criticised the policy's arbitrary shifts. "My God,
I can understand, 'Okay, look at alternatives," she says.
"But not just bang — your kids are 12 — you're disentitled. At least they should look at the situation and evaluate
instead of expecting the mom to be a chambermaid."
Adds Gloria: "There's already a lot of social stigma attached to people on welfare. I think this is going to create
more."
/fmfrf£ I A#... A&M ro CCUArs£ Page 8
THE   UBYSSEY
Friday, October 23,1981
Rolling again with the Stones
This is the voyage of the news
team Ubyssey and their search for
rock and roll enlightenment. Staffers Rob Guzyk, Arnold Hestrom,
and Erica Leiren braved the
Washington state highways (and
troopers) to report on the second
Rolling Stones concert in Seattle.
This is their story.
Would you pay $20 to watch the
Rolling Stones on T.V.?
Almost 142,000 people did just
that last week at the Kingdome, our
team included.
The 1981 tour was "to be the tour
to end all tours. So were the tours
of 1978, 1975, and 1972, each one
billed as their last. If the pattern
continues, the band's next swan-
song will be in 1984 — the year of
Big Brother and the Thought
Police, ..as conceived by George
Orwell. Is Jagger trying to tell us
something or are we just under his
thumb?
The drive down was enlived by
the '60s sound of John Tanner and
CFMI's The Munchies Hour taped
one early August morning last summer. The immortalized news cast
that day led with a story about
Yoko Ono establishing a garden in
Central Park in memory of John. A
grim reminder of what can happen.
We were glad that we hadn't taken
a chance on waiting for 1984.
Our faithful powder blue
Volkswagen bug got us safely past
state troopers victimizing fellow
Stones fans at the roadside just
miles inside the border. Seven cars
had been stopped at a speed trap,
all of them bearing B.C. license
plates. Add at least $70 on to the
trip costs for them.
We entered Seattle around 1 p.m.
and spent a pleasant hour looking
for parking. Finally, we ditched the
car downtown and proceeded to the
nearest bus stop. There we encountered some mainstream
Americans from Boise, Idaho.
When we told them we were from
Vancouver, they said, "Washington?" Despite the remark, we
knew they were for real when we
saw them later in the lineup.
The bus ride was a transcendental
experience. The driver spoke into
her microphone like a hardened
D.J., calling out stops and points of
little interest to Stones fans. Meanwhile, senior citizens and rock and
rollers vied for standing room in the
aisle. When the bus reached our
destination, the driver called out:
"All right you Stones fans, get out
and burn your brains out!"
Outside the Kingdome we encountered an eclectic bazaar of
street hawkers flogging amphetamines, t-shirts, and tickets —
tickets for every level of the
Kingdome. Five American dollars
for level two or three, a mere $10
for the coveted first level. Some
scalpers were asking $50 two weeks
before the show. Those who paid
that price were the ones that really
got scalped.
Before we entered the gates we
endured a 45 minute walk in a
queue ten feet deep through paper,
broken glass, abandoned sleeping
bags, mangled lawn chairs, and
assorted pieces of clothing.
The line stretched to the southern
most end of the parking lot several
football fields away. An eight foot
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chain-link fence separated the lines
of people streaming in opposite
directions. Those few brave enough
to jump the fence, trying to gain
quick admission, quickly jumped
back when threatened by Seattle
police with billy clubs.
No big deal. Security was light
for those who patiently followed
the line-up. Despite signs threatening a body search and for those who
objected to this, a cash refund, we
walked into the stadium unobtrusively. Encouraged by the light
security, we decided to try for the
main floor.
Erica made it. Rob almost made
it, but for Arnold it was no go.
However, all for one, and all that,
we trekked up the ramps to our second level seats. The level with
television monitors in every section,
the same level as the press box.
We flashed our official Ubyssey
press cards (the ones that say 'admit
free to all AMS events') and one
naive woman standing at the press
door almost let us in. But at the last
moment she sent us to the next door
down where the hardened press
bouncer showed marked disrespect
for our illustrious credentials.
University paper reporters are
evidently looked down upon.
Resigned to our own second level
seats, we entered the Dome twenty
minutes into the opening set by the
Greg Kihn Band. They were followed a little more than an hour later
by the J. Geils Band, who played a
good set, with front man Peter
Wolf doing his best to prove with
his mad leaps that he was the
American equivalent of Jagger.
And now a few words about the
crowd. It was composed mostly of
young people in their late 'teens and
early twenties, some straights and a
scattering of hippies. But mostly
these were squirrel boys and
groupies. The squirrel boy can be
recognized by his shagged, long
hair, wide-legged pants and his
fascination with Van Halen.
The name "squirrel boy" of
course, derives from the way they
squirrel about in squirrel cars,
squirrelling after girls.
What can you say about
groupies?
And then the moment we were all
waiting for. The house lights
lowered and party jazz infiltrated
the cavernous Dome. The MC asked the audience to welcome the
boys from Britain as the first strains
of Under My Thumb were drowned
out by the roar of the crowd.
Jagger came out wearing yellow
tights and blue knee-pads. The
other band members took their
respective places. Richards, in fine
fettle, took up the wolf-like crouch
he has perfected over many years of
live concerts.
The actual concert? Pretty good.
"Anybody down from Canada?"
Jagger asked. The entire audience
at the rear of the stage erupted into
cheers. The view wasn't the best,
but for eighty cents on the dollar
what do you expect?
As the concert came to an end
Jagger told the crowd: "I want to
thank you. You're a fucking great
audience." (This guy went to the
London School of Economics?).
For the last thirty minutes the
band put on a nonstop barrage of
their   biggest   and   best:    Brown
Sugar, Jumpin' Jack Flash, and for
See page 13: STONES
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THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
THE CECIL H. ANB IDA GREEN
VISITING PROFESSORSHIPS
1981 AUTUMN LECTURES
PETER SINGER
Dr. Peter Singer, a professor at Monash University in
Australia, is well-known for his work in the area of moral
philosophy. He has used his background as a philosopher to
explore issues of concern to society, such as the distribution
of wealth and resources, health care and population problems. He is best known for his ideas about ethical issues
relating to biology and medicine. He has a reputation as a
challenging and stimulating speaker who generates interest
and enthusiasm in his audiences.
THE BASIS OF ALTRUISM
Tuesday, October 27 — In Room 104, Angus
Building at 12:30 p.m.
ETHICS AND SOCIOBIOLOGY
Thursday, October 29 — In Room 104, Angus
Building at 12:30 p.m.
ALL LECTURES ARE FREE
The black sheep of Canadian liquors.
Yukon
Jack
Soft-spoken and smooth,
its northern flavour
simmers just below the
surface, waiting to be
discovered. Straight, on the
rocks, or mixed, \iikon Jack
is a breed apart; unlike any
liqueur you've ever tasted.
Concocted with fine Canadian Whisky. Friday, October 23,1981
THE   UBYSSEY
Page 9
Indian miniatures a cultural feast
By CORINA SUNDARARAJAN
The UBC Fine Arts gallery's
paintings of imperial arid princely
India is a cultural adventure worth
writing postcards home about.
Hidden deep within the gloomy
catacombs of Main library, the
gallery is currently showing three
centuries of miniature paintings on
loan from Canada's National
Gallery until Oct. 31.
The display presents two parallel
schools of miniature painting — the
Mughal style, brought directly from
Persia by the conquering Moslem
emperors, and the Rajput style, the
resultant adaptation of native Hindu art to the Persian influence.
Although   both   schools   were
"&'&? iJ"CI x*< '~i» *P'>
MAN UNDER CANOPY . . . from mughal period
patronized by the ruling emperors,
the Mughal artists drew directly
from Mughal court life, depicting
the opulent pageantry of state functions and historical events. This
school is noted for its realistic
detail.
By contrast, the Rajput artists
lived and worked in the remote
courts of provincial princes, drawing from their sacred Hindu texts
and native settings. They developed
a highly lyrical and romantic style.
This quality in miniature painting, expressed in the show's title,
proves to be its unifying theme.
But the most intriguing illustration is not, in fact, a finished work.
Instead the 16th century Dying
Ascetic With Attendants is a half-
sketched/half-painted revelation of
technique. Its dense network of
penciled lines underlying the
layered paint reveals the exacting
preparation basic to achieving the
final delicacy in line. This layering
technique creates a ghoulish effect
in a later illustration page from the
Hamir series (late 18th century).
This provincial piece from the Punjab Hills depicts a battle rush of
eerily transparent warriors set
against a fortress whose sterile
whiteness penetrates their peachy
paleness.
in contrast to this palior. rich
oranges, greens and yellows olaze
the Babur:namen (circa 1585) with
the wealth of its name-sake, Babur.
founder of the Mughal dynasty.
The intricate detailing of he
emperor's bright tapestry, nis
workers' tools, construction and expressions create a hub of pioneering
industry in the midst of a pastel expanse ol unconquered nature.
But the opuience of the Mughal
court reaches its zenith in the twin
Portrait Bust of Nobie and Portrait
of a Suitan (both circa 1650). The
rich textures of the decorative
borders, lavished with gleaming
goid, completely eclipse the actual
portraits.
An accompanying gailery text admonishes viewers that "the underlying over-ripeness marks the first
symptom of Mughal decline," but
the very splendor of its decadence
justifies the indulgence.
RAMA
and others outside citadel
Io sober this excess, the Mughal
and Rajput styles merge in the
somber Woman Visiting Holy Man
at Night (circa 1650). The heavy
earthy tones shroud the work in a
mood of suspended mystery. Oniy
the muted yellow of the woman's
dress, bouyed by the smoldering
campfire embers, .varm the dark
stillness.
['he most dramatic miniature
painting, Madhu Madhavi Ragini
(late 17th century) is a tense juxtaposition of a swirling storm
brought sharp against a stable,
static lines of the house. A woman,
fleeing   for   safety,   echoes   the
storm's cnaotic composition with
her flailing limbs and body curvea
in flight. The colors add impact —
the storm is a sinister whiri of deep
blues, greens and black assailing the
absurd cheer offered bv her brilliant
red and orange home.
With 40 works in ali, the display
traces the development of miniature
painting through three centuries of
Persian and Indian interaction. The
historic and artistic richness of this
zenith period makes Paintings of
Imperial and Princely India a
cultural adventure as commendable
for its scholastic appeal as its sheer
splendor.
Talking Dirty jabs and prods aging Kitsilano
• II
rr
les
By EVE WIGOD
Where have all the hippies
gone? They've gone to law
schools, every one . . . They've
also cut their hair, bought
designer wardrobes and become
university professors.
Talking Dirty
By Sherman Snukal
Directed by Mario Crudo
Arts Club on Seymour St.
Sherman Snukal's contemporary comedy, Talking Dirty,
explores the lifestyles of Vancouver's young sophisticates.
The play takes place in a typical
Kitsilano apartment, which
sports the ubiquitous healthy
fern, a Toni Onley print, and of
course, a stereo playing Doug
and the Slugs.
This milieu is a realistic setting
for the play's five characters to
act out their various neuroses
and romantic imbroglios. First
there is Michael, a young
philosophy professor, and his
girlfriend, Beth. He and Beth
have been together for more
than three years, and their relationship is beginning to limp.
They try to remedy this situation
by an "arrangement?' where
they agree to "play it by ear."
Then there is Dave, a chirpy
young Toronto lawyer who is in
town for a convention at the
Four Seasons. Relieved to be
away from his suburban family
life, he seeks a spicy affair.
There is also Karen, an attractive, neurotic English professor
who reels through life by carousing from one partner to the next.
Lastly, there is Jackie, an
escapee from a party down the
hall. Jackie, with her funky
hairstyle and Calvin Klein jeans,
is a delightful parody of the pro-
totypic Vancouver woman. She
talks of chiropractors, shrinks,
and "kinergetics" ("It's a movement," she explains. "People go
there to move."). She suffers
from Burnabyitis, while
everyone else suffers from her
relentless gabbling.
Playwright Snukal is Neil
Simon's Vancouver analogue in
many ways. Talking Dirty,
however, does not explore the
audience's emotional range.
While Simon's plays are often
touching and thought-
provoking, Snukal's play does
little more than entertain. True,
it deals with problems like
jealousy, disloyalty, and confusion in human relatonships. But
rather than initiating solutions,
it simply presents a slice of life.
Talking Dirty is not just a
ROSE AND STILL . . . slugging along.
laugh at Vancouverites, though.
The satire extends to confusion
in relationships — for example,
"arrangements," such as
Michael's and Beth's. At one
point, Michael complains:
"Some days I wake up with
Beth. Some days I wake up with
myself. Some days I wake up
with somebody else. That's confusing."
At another point, Michael and
Karen must collaborate on an
essay. Between bursts of
Milton's Paradise Lost, Karen
tries to discuss her desire for sex
ual adventure. Michael responds
with basic linguistic truths.
The acting is generally convin-
cing. Norman Browning
(Michael), Sheelah Megill
(Beth), Gabrielle Rose (Karen),
and Alana Shields (Jackie) have
all appeitai in Arts Club productions before. Dana Still
(Dave) has been appearing
regularly with City Stage. The
play is skillfully directed by
Mario Crudo, who also directed
the Arts Club production of
Tribute last season.
The play's problem is neither
its acting nor the directing. The
problem is its subject matter.
Although Talking Dirty is both
funny and entertaining, it begins
to lag in the second half. The entanglements become tedious,
and chatty Jackie's novelty
wears off. Devoid of meaningful
orientation, the play amounts to
a series of episodes. These
culminate in jealousy over who
is sleeping with whom.
Depth will not be found in this
play — unless we count
Michael's lesson in moral probity: "Getting laid is not a
detachable event. Acts have consequences." But then, depth is
not always the order of the day.
Sometimes a few hearty chortles
will do. Page 10
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 23, 1981
No answers — Altman
From page 6
the same country as a film location.
"We're too job-protective," he
griped.
But Altman never hesitated to
congratulate the efforts of other
members of the film industry. He
said he highly admires Australian
cinema, which has recently come into its own with successes such as My
Brilliant Career, Breaker Morant
and Galiipoli.
"They don't need the investment
of dentists and all the people who
are hiding money," he said
facetiously.
Altman has been hailed as a compassionate director, known for his
ability to work closely with screenwriters and actors. He is flexible
enough to allow improvisation during rehearsals and often encourages
actors to work their own material
into a film.
His movies have a spontaneous
quality, exploiting reality's own
sudden and unbelievable events. An
unexpected Shriners' convention
added much color and humor as
a backdrop to the shooting of
Nashville. During filming of
Welcome to L.A., Altman urged a
cameraman to zoom quickly on two
dogs madly fornicating — this
became one of the comical high
points in the movie.
Yet in contrast to his unfettered
nature in the world of film, Altman
exercises personal retreat in the face
of harsh reality. He told a UBC student he would not make a serious
anti-war film and added:
"With the Vietnam war, I just
closed it out. With the killing of
(Egyptian president) Anwar Sadat,
I don't like to deal with that. I don't
know what to do."
And so, in both his films and in
person, Altman ultimately has no
real answers to the screwed-up
world around us. In the past, he has
said:
"I really have nothing to say to
anybody. I have no philosophy. All
I'm trying to do is paint a picture
and show it to you. It's like a sand
castle. It's going to go away."
Therefore, don't expect Robert
Altman the director to be any different than the good and bad guys
shown in his movies.
He's another human being. In a
director's chair.
EXPERIENCE THE IMPOSSIBLE
Sun., Oct. 25 - 8:00 p.m. SUB Ballroom
Tickets: $4 advance, $5 at the door
SUB ticket office and various faculties
 Sponsored by Campus Crusade lor Christ.	
APPLICATIONS NOW BEING
ACCEPTED FOR POSITIONS ON
STUDENT ADMINISTRATIVE
COMMISSION (S.A.C.) AND
STUDENTS COURT
Applications   my   be   picked   up   and
returned to the Executive Secretary in
SUB 238.
Applications must be submitted before
4:30 p.m. Friday, October23
Atomic Energy
of Canada Limited
L'Energie Atomique
du Canada. Limitee
RESEARCH FELLOWSHIPS
TO BE AWARDED TO ENGINEERING GRADUATES FOR
POST GRADUATE RESEARCH LEADING TO AN M A Sc. IN
MECHANICAL OR CHEMICAL
ENGINEERING
UNIVERSITY OF OTTAWA
The Research Company of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, in association with the University of Ottawa,
is currently offering a limited number of Research Fellowships. The awarding of these fellowships will be
extended to engineering graduates for post graduate research leading to an M.A. Sc. degree in
Chemical or Mechanical Engineering.
Terms for the fellowship are:
• $21,000 per year (1981 minimum) for 2 years
• Location: Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories. Chalk River, Ontario
• MA Sc. program requires completion of 5 trimester courses, seminar and research thesis
• Weekly lectures will be conducted at Chalk River by professors from the University of Ottawa and
scientists and engineers from CRNL
• Applicants must be Canadian citizens or landed immigrants, be above average in academic
standing and meet entrance requirements of the School of Graduate Studies, University of
Ottawa.
To apply, send your curriculum vitae and university transcripts to the Graduate Student Officer,
Department of Mechanical or Chemical Engineering, University of Ottawa, with a copy marked
"Fellowship Program" to the Employment Office, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, L'Energie Atomique
du Canada Limitee, Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario K0J1 JO. Applications must be
post marked before November 30, 1981. (Late applicants may be considered under special
circumstances.) Friday, October 23, 1981
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 11
By PAUL KAIHLA
Says playwright John Knzanc about his
play Tamara, "I think it's an incredible act
of modesty to write a piece in which the audience can see perhaps a fourth of what is
written." Just what does he mean by that?
written by John Krizanc
directed by Richard Rose
Necessary Angel Theatre Company
Playing at Strachan House in Toronto until
Oct. 31st.
Well, Tamara doesn't take place in a conventional theatre where people are fixed in
their seats for a couple of hours and are forced to watch whatever happens on the stage or
fall asleep. Tamara takes place throughout a
20 room mansion in which two to six scenes
are happening at any one time, which, if run
in sequence, would be nine hours long. When
you go to Tamara you create your own play.
Upon entering Bishop Strachan's old mansion in the middle of Toronto's Trinity
Bellwoods Park, one is enthusiastically
welcomed by Dante the valet. In an Italian
accent he tells you where to put your coat and
ticket before you are given a visa stamped
"January 10, 1927" by a black-shirted,
pistol-carrying fascist guard named Finzi.
Finzi, the 'capitano,' instructs you to hold
on to your papers at all times and to wait in
the adjoining music room.
Once the audience is seated along the walls
of the music room, they listen to Francesco
playing flowing melodies on a grand piano,
and begin to get oriented.
Enter Dante, who explains that we are in
Fascist Italy in the household of the famous
romantic nationalist poet, politician, and
military man Gabriele D'Annunzio (it is said
Mussolini borrowed much of his rhetoric and
style from D'Annunzio). We are awaiting the
arrival of the aristocratic and stunning Polish
painter Tamara de Lempicka who is to paint
D'Annunzio's portrait.
Dante describes the household's
characters: Finzi, the fascist policeman;
Francesco, a dillettante and inebriated composer; Luisa, a former concert pianist and
D'Annunzio's ex-mistress; Aelis, the head
housekeeper and D'Annunzio's confidant;
Carlotta, the ballerina seeking D'Annunzio's
recommendation; Emilia, the light-fingered
maid; Mario, the mysterious new chaffeur;
Defelice, the local prostitute who makes occasional visits; and, of course, good old
Dante himself.
Ahh, but we must get ready, Tamara is
about to arrive. We may follow any character
we like throughout the mansion, but if we
want to change characters we may only do so
within a room, and we may not open closed
doors.
The action that follows is a complex tangle
of relationships centred on who's trying to
get whom to bed, who knows what by spying
on whom, or who's plotting with or against
whom.
A few examples: D'Annunzio's real motive
for inviting Tamara was to seduce her, not
to get his portrait done. She is disillusioned by
the decadence of this man she once respected
as a great artist.
Mario, the new chaffeur, is actually a
TAMARA
TAMARA
TAMARA
TAMARA AND D'ANNUNZIO
characters and audience meet off stage
What follows is a complex tangle of
relationships centred on
who's trying to get whom to bed,
who knows what
by spying on whom,
or who's plotting with
or against whom
Communist spy who is trying to toppie
Mussolini's regime by getting D'Annunzio to
travel to England and convince British
bankers to stop floating loans to the Fascist
government.
Mario was hired under the pretense of being Emilia's cousin, but he's actually her
lover; that, however, doesn't stop the
unknowing, naive Dante from begging her io
marry him, or the sly Emilia from blackmailing Finzi, and so on, and so on.
Some of the timing of entrances and
dialogue is a bit loose, and the beginning is
somewhat confusing, but the overall effect of
Tamara is profound. Occasionally being as
close as a foot from the actors, moving and
even speaking with them, I began to feel sympathy or embarrassment in some situations as
if they were real.
When, during a scene in D'Annunzio's
bedroom (which has a sand-covered floor),
he tried to make love to the prostitute
Defelice but is impotent, I felt I should leave
the room. As writer Krizanc said in an interview, "I worry that the experience itself overwhelms what the play is about."
What is the play about? Are the exploitative and parasitic relationships within
this locked-away bohemian estate an allegory
for the decay of human spirit under fascism?
Krizanc says he is "very against a dogmatic
type of theatre where you watch a play and
see an A,G,Z of reality. In Tamara I attempted to deal objectively with left and right. For
some, Finzi will remain the Fascist; for others
who have seen him in private moments, Finzi
is the Jew struggling, the romantic in love
with Louisa. The audience has a choice."
In comparison, after 'being in' Tamara I
experienced the same feeling I had after seeing Bernardo Bertolucci's 1900 two nights
earlier. Krizanc said, "both Richard Rose
(the director) and myself are Bertolucci
groupies . . . I've seen 1900 about six times
and the Conformist, five." In Tamara,
Krizanc says he wanted to establish the same
mood created by Bertolucci's obsessive tracking shots by moving the audience and making
the scenes very fluid.
Tamara has run for nearly four months in
Toronto, originating as a showcase in
Onstage '81, the international theatre
festival. Audiences have been held at a 50
person limit and it has still sold out 90 per
cent of the time with weekend tickets selling
for $30.
Tamara has been reviewed in papers ranging from The Wall Street Journal to The
London Times and the ambitious new production team is beset with proposals for productions from as far away as India. Actor
Donald Sutherland (who played a fascist in
Bertolucci's 1900) has seen the play and is
considering a New York production.
Tamara is a conclusive step, perhaps a
revolutionary one, for the movement of
modern theatre towards 'living' and 'environmental' forms. As technological innovations emerge in the social environment,
in communications, media, and entertainment, — such as Sony Walkmans and
Telidon, — personal experience becomes
more diverse, more isolated, and more
relative. Surely theatre will move to reflect
the increasing relativity of the 'blip culture." Page 12
THE   UBYSSEY
Friday, Oc
Double chemistry
fizzles in
Confessions
By GREGG MITTAG
The pairing of Robert DeNiro
and Robert Duvall in True Confessions promised to be the acting
event of the cinematic season.
It would be difficult to conjure a
more prodigious combination,
given the recent output of each actor: DeNiro's performance in Raging Bull and Duvall's stint as in The
Great Santini. But the personal
chemistry between the two is more
assumed than genuinely developed.
True Confessions
Directed by Ulu Grosbard
At the Downtown
Duvall seems comfortable
enough as police sergeant Tom
Spellacy, a role not far removed
from either Captain Kilgore in
Apocalypse Now or Santini. He
projects the kind of crude amiability in all three roles that serves as a
reassuring reference point to the
mundane, gritty earth.
But Duvall works best when he
can bounce his reserved intensity
off more dynamic characters, as in
The Godfather and M*A*S*H. His
gift for chillingly understated
characterizations loses some of its
impact in the glaring light of centre
stage. And that's where True Confessions places him, opposite
DeNiro as his brother Desmond.
DeNiro is a more difficult actor
to assess. The intensity of his performance in Taxi Driver and Raging
Bull is virtually unmatched. Even in
his most quietly measured and controlled incarnations, such as the
young Vito Corleone in The Godfather Part Two and The Deer
Hunter, he burns with a restless inner violence.
These virtuoso performances to
his credit, it seems nearly irrelevant
to point out that DeNiro can be utterly out of his element in the wrong
role. He was an awkward leading
man in the ill-fated musical New
York, New York and a notably
stilted movie mogul in The Last Tycoon. And, quite frankly, his portrayal of a Catholic priest in True
Confessions was not particularly
convincing.
Sure, there are plenty, of shots of
him ruminating broodingly and
solemnly acting out his priestly
functions, but a certain shallowness
emanates beyond the spiritual
dissolution DeNiro intends to
depict. The psychological basis of
the Monsignor's mounting anxiety
and his ultimate stoical self-
realization ("I thought I was
something and I wasn't") is never
adequately conveyed.
Had the rest of the movie been
shrewdly executed, perhaps the lack
of electricity in the characterizations would be less apparent. But
the direction and script are merely
competent. The plot itself is no
more substantial than one expects
from The FBI t.v. series or any of
the 1940's gangster flicks whose
grimy realism this movie imitates.
Director Ulu Grosbard adds no
new dimensions to the lot of the
has-been hooker with a heart of
gold, the senile old folks home's
resident who can't even get her
son's profession right, or even the
two brothers whose polarized
vocations inevitably generate ample opportunities for tension and
irony (for a more entertaining treatment of the same holy versus unholy
brothers theme, see Michael Curtiz'
1938 melodrama Angels With Dirty
Faces).
Grosbard spends too much time
amplifying and reamplifying the incongruities between the sacred and
profane, usually by having Duvall
blurt out something vulgar in the
wrong place, like his aside to a nun,
"May  all   your   sons  be  Jesuits,
sister", or in the juxtaposition of
brothel scenes with those of the
church.
This scepticism reaches its
calculated consummation when the
priest himself says to his accuser,
"We met her, you fucked her".
Unfortunately, the narrative's two
main threads, the murder mystery
and Monsignor Spellacy's never
mesh very smoothly. As soon as one
begins to get a grasp of the priest's
private anguish, the film moves to a
routine blot of blood or low-life
rot.
The film's visual texture is so
studiously bland as to be boring —
its entire surface drips brown, gray
and black, down to the last polished
wall panel and sober suit. Most of
the locations are stock borrowings
from '40's gangster movies and
such recent seminal influences as
Mean Streets and The Godfather.
True Confessions' opening and
closing scenes recount Tom
Spellacy's visit to his brother years
after the solving of the murder,
when the priest has been exiled to a
small church amidst a wind-swept
desert. The entire situation is a
curiously contrived reaffirmation of
the priest's spiritual aridity. The
verbal exchange culminating in Desmond's assertion, "I'm going to
die," is neither moving nor particularly credible.
The brothers' final stroll through
the church graveyard to look at
Desmond's chosen plot is so
ponderously melodramatic and barren of real emotional significance
that the film's concluding fade-out
lines, "I guess one place is as good
as another", "This is it?" leaves
one wondering how two actors of
DeNiro's and Duvall's stature ever
became involved in such a
nondescript, charmless enterprise.
Duvall and DeNiro . . . misi
Delicate tear-jer
By STEVE RIVE
The subject of I Wrote A Letter
to My Love forces director Moshe
Mizrahi to walk the fine line between bathos and pathos. While he
is successful in delicately maintaining this balance, the effort leaves
little energy for anything else.
I Wrote A Letter to My Love
Directed by Moshe Mizrabi
At the Varsity
Set on the rugged west coast of
France, the film centres on the lives
of three people dealing with a
frustrated existence. Louise (Simon
Signoret), is in her fifties and pricked by the stigma of still being unmarried. She has devoted her life to
caring for her crippled brother
Gilles.
Gilles is passionately alive — conscious of the beauty of the seacoast
outside his window, and painfully
aware of his unfilfilled sexual yearnings. He and Louise are joined for
breakfast each morning by their
neighbour Yvette. She is a smaH
town woman who continues to
dress as she did when she was a
school girl; moreover she has retained the naivete as well as the
clothes and hairdo.
It is difficult to portray this kind
of story well. The directors and actors must not only avoid the danger
of slipping into trite sentimentality,
but overcome the discomfort the
audience feels when faced with such
vulnerable characters.
They are not romantic or
'beautiful' people. Gilles is not a
tough, feisty cripple like Cutter of
Cutter's Way, so we are never able
to place a comfortable distance between ourselves and the characters.
There is nothing wrong with appealing to our sense and compassion. It
is a refreshing change from many
current films but the film ultimately
fails because it never takes us
beyond this initial feeling of pity.
Except for one clever device,
which acts as a framework for the
story, the film lacks plot and
character development. I Wrote A
Letter to My Love is not so much a
Neurotic banshee pens incisive, thoughtful lines
By STEVE McCLURE
Peter Hammill is one of rock and
roll's gadflies — someone who's
been on the periphery of popular
music for so long that his admission
into the rock pantheon seems overdue.
Hammill has been recording since
1969 and is best known for his work
with the progressive rock band Van
Der Graaf Generator, whose name
alone must have been enough to
turn some people off the group's
music.
Sitting Targets
by Peter Hammill
Rio Records RIO-1020
That music was dense, complex
and featured unusual timings combined with a harsh, dissonant instrumental sound. Overall this was
Hammill's voice, alternating between sounding like a neurotic banshee, and crooning like a misplaced
High Anglican choir boy.
Since Van Der Graaf broke up
for good Hammill has recorded a
series of solo albums with a variety
of other English 'art-rockers.' In
these albums Hammill is introspective and moody, frequently to
the point where the listener loses interest in Hammill's trials and tribulations.
Hammill's latest solo album, Sitting Targets, is no different from
his others save the evidently improved musicianship. Morris Pert,
formerly of Brand X, is outstanding on percussion and David Jackson on sax manages to reproduce
Van Der GraaPs characteristic
honking sound.
But what's mainly interesting for
Hammill fans and other devotees of
obscure English art-rockers are the
lyrics. These are thoughtful and incisive for the most part, and often
deserve to stand on their own as
poetry pure and simple.
On one of his earlier albums
Hammill claimed, 'I'm not writing
poems any more,' but his latest offerings belie that statement:
/ want to update my memory,
I want to rewrite my past,
I don'! like what it's telling me,
it all floods back so fast;
I guess I was my own worst enemy,
now I've come to a pretty pass.
A pretty pass, a pretty pass,
There's nothing pretty in the past.
— What I Did
Where Hammill was previously
concerned   mainly   with   his   own
problems   this   album   finds   him
ruminating on human relations in
general. In one brief, almost fragmentary song, Glue, he reflects on
the fragility of love and friendship:
Oh, but what do you do,
and where do you start?
When people are the glue,
when it all falls apart?
In short, this album is recommended to those who enjoy rock
with some brains behind it. Sometimes Hammill is too pensive and
can be more than a little strident but
he remains a singular voice in the
wilderness of pop music. A good album to play early some sunny fall
morning. Page 14
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 23,1981
Free to dream
Hare you are free! Free to live and work in peace and comfort.
Free to dream, free to plan your future. Free from cruel decrees.
Free from confiscation, from suffering, from wanton imprisonment
without cause. Yes, you are free in Canada. Speed the victory, buy
Victory Bonds.
—advertisement, 1943
Of course it was all rhetoric. While the government celebrated Canadian
freedom in advertisements they denied Japanese-Canadians the right to
work in peace and comfort, and the right to plan their future. They confiscated all Japanese property and they imprisoned them without cause.
The tragic thing is that neither the rhetoric nor the policies have changed. While Pierre Trudeau talks glowingly of a charter of rights he is not
prepared to give it teeth enough to prevent the government from abusing
another minority in a time of crisis.
Under the provisions of the War Measures Act all a government has to
do is sign an order in council to circumvent the proposed charter.
The government has apologized to the Japanese for the unjust treatment they suffered during the Second World War. yet it has refused to
give the Japanese full and fair compensation for their confiscated property.
The truth is that words are cheap. And they're made cheaper by an
apathetic public that didn't care about the internment of the Japanese in
1942 and doesn't care about Trudeau's proposed charter in 1981. Public indifference is another thing that is still with us.
And racism is still with us.
All these things — laws that allow a person's civil rights to be revoked at
the stroke of a pen, a public that gives consent to those laws by ignoring
them, and racism — they are an explosive combination.
But if people let Trudeau know that he would pay a price for rhetoric
without action, if people would confront racism whenever they saw it in all
its subtle forms, only then would we be able to move out from under the
shadow of the Japanese internment. Only then would Canada be able to
live up to the dream embodied in that ad for Victory Bonds.
Speed the victory.
■>p-********>»*-***i**»»*fpi
1   Aff*5 -MJt->.*«_JI-ml?5' »''■•'
'Women—more at stake, more responsibility
Re: letters from Parker and
Farkes, Oct. 6, The Ubyssey.
Farkes: I would believe you if
you told me I couldn't imagine
what it was like playing sports that
involve violence. I don't expect you
to know what it's like to be pregnant. But then, I'm not trying to tell
you not to play football, so don't
try to say what I should and should
not be doing with my body.
You say that the sexes are equally
responsible for contraception. That
would be nice, but it isn't the case. I
really think the issue here is not
whether abortion is good or bad,
but are we going to allow them to be
performed in a sterile setting or not.
When I was going through my
ordeal last year, I was emotionally
supported by three women friends
in their late 40s. About 20 years
ago they were all pregnant and
wanted abortions. One was married
but separated from her husband
and raised two boys. Her
gynecologist told her to go back to
her husband, he couldn't do
anything. So she did and suffered
three more years of physical and
mental abuse before finally leaving
him. The other two went to back-
street abortionists, never seeing
anyone's face and one walked
around with soapsuds inside her for
days and finally went to the
hospital.
Hospitals still have to patch up
the failures. Or things can happen
where the young woman in the U.S.
shot herself in the stomach with her
boyfriend's help because she
couldn't get an abortion. When a
woman has decided she is going to
get an abortion, only the method remains. Wherever there is a need,
services will be offered. Cracking
down on prostitutes only makes it
less visible. Stiffer drug penalties
make drugs harder to get. These
things go on, regardless of the law.
Parker: I really don't believe
there are people like you that live in
the same world as I do and supposedly have the same kind of ears,
Blood donor drive the best
The statistics from the Red Cross
blood donor clinic of Oct. 5 to Oct.
9 have been verified and are now official.
The (all '81 UBC clinic was the
best clinic ever at UBC, and was the
best clinic in British Columbia in the
past seven years.
The EUS, co-sponsors of the
blood drive with the Canadian Red
Cross society, would like to thank
all the 2,328 people (about 10 per
cent of the current student population) who attended the clinic.
It was very important for the
clinic to be a success in order to alleviate the unusually short supply of
blood, and more specifically the severe shortage of O type blood at
that time.
Coupled with this was the fact
that the clinic was just before the
Thanksgiving Day weekend, a tra
ditionally troublesome time for the
Red Cross.
But to the joy of all those at the
Red Cross, UBC students came out
in record numbers to give blood.
There is no doubt that a major
factor in the clinic's success was the
interfaculty blood donor competition. At this time, we at the EUS
would like to thank the following
undergrad societies for their participation and generosity in accepting
our $160 challenge: nursing ($100),
science ($100), education ($100),
law ($100), commerce ($75), home
ec ($50), agriculture ($50), phys ed
($50), and forestry ($50).
Nursing (which won the competition by one donor) will donate the
$835 raised to the Muscular Dystrophy Association of Canada.
We would also like to thank
Meral Aydin, Filmsoc, commerce,
the Keg,  Dr.  John Brockington,
and Weldwood of Canada for their
donations.
The official results of the competition are as follows:
No. of
% of
FACULTY
Donors
Faculty
Nursing
66
19.39
Home Ec
44
19.05
Engineering
253
15.46
Forestry
42
11.97
Agriculture
49
11.89
Science
308
8.63
Phys Ed
27
6.43
Commerce
113
6.36
Law
34
5.00
Education
98
3.32
Nelson Santos
UBC blood drive coordinator
eyes and brain cells. I will compassionately ignore your first dribble.
Now, you said that Birthright
provides counselling for girls who
do not wish to abort the young life
they have conceived in love. Do you
really think babies are conceived in
love? Do you think make-up, tight
jeans and discos are meant for love?
Is that what guys get spiffed up for
on Friday night? And how can you
possibly suggest that a female feel
"happy" (or righteous or even normal) bearing a child caused by rape,
which is a Birthright issue.
Are women to be unwilling receptacles when it is not physically or
emotionally necessary? Are you
serious? And regardless whether or
not you think 13 and 14-year olds
are "really ready" for sex, they're
going to do it anyway.
You seem to live in a world of
"should's" and not of "is's." Only
biologically is the male as responsible as the female and unfortunately
that's where most men cop out. Do
you know fathers have an average
of 2.7 interactions lasting an
average of 37 seconds each per day
with their child?
Women have more at stake financially, emotionally, physically and
socially if and when a child is born,
and until such time that men are
taking half the responsibility for a
child in all facets, we will continue
to control our own reproductive
systems. Thank you.
name withheld
arts 4
We're mad as hell
We're pissed off!
Contrary to the many posters on
campus and the ads in the Vancouver Sun advertising the AMS
Halloween Dance with HEUS as a
co-sponsor, HEUS (the Home
Economics Undergraduate Society)
never agreed to co-sponsor this
dance.
Our name was used without consent by AMS for the purpose of
promoting their dance. The real
Home Ec. dance is the "Home
economics 3rd annual Masquerade
Ball" on Friday, Oct. 30, a grand
finale to Home Ec. week.
So don't be confused when you
buy your dance tickets — Home
Ec's Halloween Ball is on Friday,
Oct. 30. Support your fellow
undergrad!
HEUS
THE UBYSSEY
October 23,1961
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year by
the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are those of
the staff and not of the AMS or the university administration. Member, Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey's editorial office is in room 241k of the Student Union Building. Editorial departments, 228-2301; Advertising, 228-3977.
Steve 'you've got to be kidding' McClure. In the paper, just like old times. But there's all those new folks around. Eve Wigod, that squirrely Rolfteteyfc, Steve
Rive, Greg Mrttag, Paul Kaihla, Erica Leiren. It's enough that a person could get downright lost between galleys after less than dozen Canadian. You know?
And vou can't insult them in the masthead like you can the old hacks. There's Glen Sandbag stonewalling them all day with his " ." There's Heather
'Blast from the past' Conn with another dose of prose about the same temperature as her hair color (214 degrees). I'm a bit of a noser, eh, but I don'thoric 'em
back like I might have implied. I'm no scumbag deadbeat drunkard. I've got other vices. As do the gang of Wheelwrights. "What vices," says Julie. Oh, I don't
know. Then there's poor Arnold Hedstrom. Ate Gage food for a year and now he's going bald. But that's OK. Then of course there's Craig Brooks. Worth two
of any one of us. Yvette! Yvettel The emergency supplies! Ahhhhhh. And Mark — was vaguely aware of all that went on around him. And only those from The
Ubyssey will ever know he was here at all. Then there's Eric Regression who upon taking up the supreem responsibility immediately abandoned it. That leaves
Yvette who's going to feed me. Glen 'Yuk yuk' Schaefer who's coming for dinner and Greg Fjetland who's just plain coming later on and can only stay for
awhile. What happened to Charles Campbell? Did he drink himself under the table? Take off, eh, no way! f 23, 1981
THE    U BYS S EY
Page 13
hed pair in mediocre movie
er too reserved
story as a mood or atmosphere into
which the viewer descends. It is like
the song Eleanor Rigby come to
life. Our feelings are aroused, but
the characters are never drawn to an
understanding of their lives and
neither is the audience.
For example, when Gilles and
Yvette eventually marry we can see
no reason why they didn't do so a
long time ago. After all, nothing
has changed, and so we are left
wondering whether this marriage
represents a hopeful new beginning
or a defeated resignation.
Nor does it explain why caring
for Gilles should have cost Louise a
life of her own. Gilles is not disabled to the point of requiring constant
attention and leaves us with the
suspicion  Louise  has chosen  her
life, despite her complaints. When
she falls in love with her brother we
are left wondering whether or not
Louise wasn't always in love with
Gilles and this was her reason for
staying with him.
But if this is the case, it is never
made clear. Gilles and Louise never
confront each other and the film
plays it safe emotionally right to the
end.
The music which opens the film
(a passionate little waltz in a minor
key, played on a tinny piano) sets
the tone: small emotions of only
passing interest.
By avoiding a tear-jerker,
Mizrahi leaves us with a work which
is too reserved. Before it's over you
will be squirming impatiently in
your seat.
Stones please
From page 8
their encore, I can't get no Satisfaction. It was quite a finale, with
lights, firecrackrs, and Jagger
hovering above the audience in a
cherry picker. Anyone who had
been ingesting anything other than
milk and cookies was experiencing
extreme sensory overload about
then.
The crowd made more noise wending its way out of the Kingdome
than it had during the entire concert, whopping and shouting all the
way down the concrete switchbacks
that led to ground level.
The next stage of our epic voyage
was the "long march" to the
Edgewater Inn, where the objects of
our adulation had spent the
previous night.
Only a bunch of Ubyssey staffers
could check into the same hotel as
the Stones and not know it. We had
met some fellow Ubysseyers who
had done just that. After the concert we agreed to meet at the hotel
for a few drinks and just see if we
might run into Mick and the boys
(or even cross a piece of the carpet
they walked on).
As luck would have it, w-e walked
from the Kingdome to the
Edgewater. Neither our staffers nor
the Stones were there. But we did see
some groupies, and the bell boy
who helped with their luggage.
The luggage and the Stones, well
on the way to the next sold out
show in San Francisco, we headed
back to the parkade by the JC Penny store. The horror of the empty
parking stall where the blue VW
should have been was only eclipsed
by the excitement when discovered
that we were in the wrong parkade.
Those parking structures all look
the same.
But the time had come to roll up
Interstate Five and head for the city
where civic politicians say the
Stones will never play again.
Finally, the Peace Arch loomed
at the fog shrouded border. We
agreed, in unison, not to tell the
customs agent about the three
Stones t-shirts.
"Coming from the Stones concert," she said.
"Yes," timidly.
"How many shirts?" she asked
forcefully.
We instantly confessed.
"Okay, go through." Never
knew smuggling could be so easy.
Must be in Canada though, the
speed limit jumped from 55 to 60.
Ripley's believe it or not department: We went to the concert totally straight. No drugs, no
mushrooms, not even a mouthful of
that stuff Americans refer to as
"beer."
Truth is stranger than fiction.
Rohans' flower blooms again
By CHARLES CAMPBELL
Rohans, the Kitsilano nightclub
threatened with closure, has
negotiated a second life. While the
building occupied by the club will
still be demolished by the new
owners, CITI Management,
Rohans will be provided with space
in the apartment/retail complex
replacing it.
Rohans spokesperson Jack
Christie says CITI was willing to
negotiate once their eviction action
.against Rohans was dismissed.
Rohans' problems began when
Royal Trust sold the site they currently occupy to CITI allegedly in
violation of a verbal agreement to
extend Rohans' lease by three years.
Lawyer Barry Fraser and Rohans
are still pursuing a $35,000 suit
against Royal Trust on the basis of
that violated contract.
Rohans, which received a 30 day
eviction notice at the end of July,
will close its doors on Saturday and
expects to reopen in May, 1982. The
last two nights will see members of
Powder Blues jamming with Jerry
Doucette and other musicians whose
careers got a start at Rohans.
Christie is not despondent about
losing the old building. He says the
demolition is the end of a cycle. "A
lot of the people who got their start
here we can't book any more."
Christie says people will be able
to remember the old Rohans for its
success and that the new Rohans
will be able to face new challenges
on its own terms. "Rohans is like a
flower that's been picked in
bloom," Christie says. j
Canadian prairie tale
has rough-edged charm
By MARK LEIREN-YOUNG
Jennie's Story by Betty Lambert
is what is known as a Canadian
play. Set in the Canadian prairie in
the late '30s it delves into the morality of a particular Canadian legal
statute. And, like Canada, it has a
certain rough-edged charm.
Jennie's Story examines the violation of a young woman by religion and the law. The way the law is
used against her is especially frightening and provoking. Jenny Mc-
Grane, well played by Sherry Bie,
discovers that an 'appendix operation' she underwent at 15 was actually an hysterectomy. There was a
legal statute which allowed parents
to have female minors sterilized.
The minor had no say in the matter
whatsoever.
Jennie's Story
Written by Betty Lambert
Directed by Jace van der Veen
At the Waterfront Theatre
What makes this even more
frightening is that this law existed in
Alberta until 1971. But Alberta's a
conservative province you say. Surprise, B.C. had a similar law which
was only repealed in 1973.
Jenny is a simple woman who has
been betrayed. She's caught in a
spider web of laws, beliefs and circumstance. Early in the play the audience discovers that Jenny had
once known the town's priest
— in the biblical sense.
It is a relationship that Jenny has
vowed to keep silent. But the priest
is afraid Jenny may have informed
her husband. She lets the priest
know in no uncertain terms that if
her husband were ever to discover
the affair, her husband would kill
him.
Jenny's main concern is her inability to have children. She makes
an appointment with a doctor in a
nearby city to which her mother
violently objects. While Jenny is
away, a 15-year-old girl who is "in
the family way" moves in to take
care of the house. Jenny returns
home knowing that her mother had
signed a form allowing for her
sterilization.
It seems the priest had informed
Jenny's mother of the affair and
presented her with the consent
form. Jenny's mother signed it because "he's a priest."
The priest, Edward Fabrizeau
(David Ferry), is a wonderfully contemptible character. He had Jenny
sent away because he could not control his lust. He told the mother to
have the operation performed so he
would not sire a child. And he considered himself absolved from all
sins because he had confessed to his
wrongdoings.
But Jenny was still guilty in the
eyes of God because although Jenny had confessed she still 'harbored
black thoughts.' And Jenny could
only absolve herself by confessing
to him, because he was the town
priest. Ferry walks a fine line between being hated or pitied by the
audience and being shot by them.
There's one particular scene in
which Fabrizeau professes his lust
for Jenny and says something about
her scent or odor. Jenny becomes
furious and gives the priest a close
up scent of her 'odor.' It's a credit
to the play that this scene doesn't
elicit even the slightest nervous giggle from the audience.
The most obvious problem with
the play is an occasional overuse of
heavy melodrama. Too many teardrops in just one play can be annoying. In this play there are a lot
of tears shed, often unconvincingly.
One of the reasons for the tears being unconvincing is an apparent
lack of motivation for some of the
crying scenes.
When Jenny's mother (Lillian
Carlson) breaks down when discussing Jenny's plans to go to the
hospital, it doesn't look unmotivated, just plain silly. Another point at
which Jenny burned an expensive
felt hat also looked sillier than it did
symbolic. Whether it looked bad
because of the way it was blocked,
the lack of believable reaction to
this supposedly important event, or
the event itself, is hard to say.
The ending is also a point of contention. There is a brilliant climac
tic scene that had the potential to
leave the audience breathless and
wanting more. But rather than accepting that, Lambert had two anti-
climactic scenes which wrapped the
play up in a relatively neat little
package.
The most engaging character in
the play is Jenny's husband Harry
(Pierre Tetrault). He did a fine job
of catching the audience's sympathy and their attention.
The girl who comes to look after
the house, Molly Dorval (Laura
Bruneau) seemed to be written to
capture the audience's interest. The
pretty, wide eyed innocent girl who
only made one mistake is almost a
perfect recipe for a likeable character. Bruneau played it well and
was as fun to watch as the character
was obviously meant to be.
Jennie's Story was developed
through the New Play Centre workshop process and it's obviously
something they're proud of. It is a
good play and though it's not enthralling it is interesting. It has soap
opera tendencies but is generally
humanistic.
It offers an interesting view of
that little known animal, Canadian
culture. And Jenny, could almost
be seen as a type of everywoman
struggling with traditions, laws, and
her own limitations.
Bie and Tetrault
happy young lovers Friday, October 23,1981
THE   U BYS SEY
Page 15
Media distorts M-L attack on anti-racist group
The following submission is by
Sandra Garossino, Judy Mosoff
and Jim Russell, all in law 2, and
Brian Loomes, law 3. They attended last weekend's rally of the B.C.
Organization to Fight Racism
which was violently disrupted by
the People's Front Against Racist
and Fascist Violence.
perspectives
Last weekend, national coverage
was given to scenes of violent confrontation at an anti-racist rally in
Vancouver. We are four UBC law
students who, for separate reasons,
attended the Oct. 17 rally organized
by the B.C. Organization to Fight
Racism (BCOFR). In discussing the
events and the media coverage, we
discovered a common point of
view. We believe that the local and
national media reports seriously distort what has actually happened.
Misinformation has been set afoot.
It needs to be checked.
With few exceptions, the media
has portrayed the rallies of Oct. 4
and Oct. 17 as stick-swinging confrontations between two equally
misguided although well-motivated
nut groups. In a recent front page
Vancouver Sun article (Police allowed rally on 'peace promise,'
Oct. 19), Vancouver police chief
Bob Stewart states that the two
groups promised to be peaceful, but
because violence erupted, "it's obvious their word can no longer be
trusted.
Television coverage leaves the
same impression — two violent
groups bent on wiping each other
out.
In the presentation of the sensational, the media have all but
buried the original purpose behind
the BCOFR rallies. In our view, the
media have forsaken investigation
and fair reporting for the glib explanations of those like police chief
Stewart.
Photos of fighting and Stewart's
'explanations' get page one coverage. A reasonably fair attempt (by
Sun reporters Rick Ouston and
James Deacon) to portray Saturday's events is dropped to page 10.
In our view, it is essential to take
the time to ascertain the true sequence of events. To begin with,
the specific purpose of the BCOFR
rally in Vancouver's South Memorial Park bears repeating. It was
in this park last August that an East
Indian man was kicked to death.
A rally was organized for Oct. 4
to protest this incident in particular
and the rising number of racist attacks around Vancouver in general.
It never occurred because it was violently attacked and disrupted by
the People's Front Against Racist
and Fascist Violence (People's
Front — the other group in the media reports).
BCOFR supporters were unarmed. Several were injured, one with a
fractured skull. The rally of Oct. 17
was called to fulfill the original purpose stated above. It was widely
publicized. The police were informed, and their attendance requested
to prevent a repeat of the earlier
violence.
At the second rally we witnessed
the following sequence of events:
At about 1 p.m. BCOFR assembled
in one area of the park, waiting for
supporters to arrive. The People's
Front had assembled in another
area, and marched en masse to the
BCOFR gathering.
Only one police car was visible,
parked 50 yards away. Police supervision had been requested days earlier, and this was the response. They
had no other identifiable presence.
When more protection was requested an officer in the car responded in
a cavalier manner that he would
"pass it along."
The People's Front must have
some women members, but there
were few there on Saturday. They
were almost exclusively men. Men
with 2 x 2s. In contrast, the BCOFR
comprised men, women and children. Professional people, millwork-
ers, housewives and kids. All scared. The executive had been prepared for this type of confrontation,
however, and many people had
been assigned the task of protecting
us.
As we moved away from the site,
the People's Front advanced on us
in a group, very quickly. Contrary
to the impression police chief Stewart leaves, no police were involved,
and we were on our own. We were,
quite frankly, frightened.
The People's Front barged to the
front of our march with their own
banner. To avoid a clash, our organizers turned us around and we
marched the other way, leaving the
People's Front in the rear. Those
who were assigned as "marshals"
for the BCOFR protected our group
by walking backwards and facing
the People's Front. In this formation, the BCOFR march moved out
of the park, constantly retreating to
avoid an all-out brawl. The battle
shown on TV occurred as the People's Front attacked and the
BCOFR marshals attempted to hold
them off while the majority of the
BCOFR supporters went on ahead.
It was only after this skirmish
erupted that the police arrived and
separated the groups. Any impression that the police were on hand in
great numbers throughout the rally
is entirely false.
The BCOFR march ended in a
rally at the Moberly elementary
school. There it was addressed by
the president of the Vancouver local
of the Canadian Union of Postal
Workers, representatives of the Union of B.C. Indian Chiefs, the Telecommunications Workers' Union,
Canadian Association of Industrial,
Mechanical and Allied Workers and
the Committee for Racial Justice.
These and other groups arrived
with   banners   identifying   them-
erandi of this organization has always been the same: it comes armed
to a meeting called by a rival group,
and demands the right to speak.
When the other group refuses to
have its meeting disrupted, the
CPC-ML attacks physically, and
verbally defends the attack by
claiming the right to freedom of
speech.
This has been noted by a Vancouver Sun reader in his letter to the editor (Sun, Friday, Oct. 16). Tom
Conroy described a similar attack
by the CPC-ML in 1976. Carrying
2 x 2s, they waded into a group of
unarmed demonstrators.
2.) The pictures of the attack of
Oct. 4 show a virtually all-male
People's Front carrying 2 x 2s,
while the BCOFR contingent, corn-
selves. Messages of support were
sent by a variety of their trade unions, ethnic groups, and cultural organizations. It is worth noting that
the People's Front had no identifiable representatives from any other
groups. It represented only itself.
At the end of the afternoon, with
frazzled nerves, we arrived home
and saw the fighting for the first
time on the evening news. The
message was that there had been another melee in the park between the
"rival" groups. Most of the initial
reporting ignored some basic facts
which would have helped viewers to
understand why the violence occurred:
1.) The People's Front is in
fact a front group for the Communist Party of Canada (Marxist-Leninist) — CPC-ML. The modus op
posed of men and women, hold
their placards on thin sticks. Many,
like the man who received a fractured skull, carry nothing at all.
3.) Of the BCOFR marchers, only the marshals who had Ijeen assigned to protect marchers on Oct.
17 prepared for confrontation by
wearing protective clothing and carrying 2 x 2s.
Only those marshals actually engaged in the defensive action; most
marchers were unaware of what was
happening at the rear.
The media strains our credulity
by asking us to believe that 500 persons were willing to act like hooligans by participating in a massive
brawl.
That this incident took place at
all raised serious questions:
Why did the police fail to take ac
tion when they were specifically requested to attend and supervise the
rally days in advance? This is not a
question of choosing to stay clear of
the infighting of street gangs. The
police force failed to exercise its duty to protect individuals from
known and likely attackers.
This police irresponsibility poses
a significant question: Must people
demonstrating against racism don
head gear and carry sticks to protect
themselves, their friends and their
children from these mindless attacks?
Are Sun readers really expected
to believe that the police have no
knowledge of past People's Front
violence? Did they forget that on
Oct. 4 an unarmed man received a
fractured skull merely for being at
the BCOFR rally? We are left wondering how such an incident can be
prevented in the future, we are not
really sure of the answer.
Finally, the questions for the
BCOFR are especially serious. The
BCOFR is a credible, broadly-based
voice against racism in the B.C.
community. It was brought together around the mandate of addressing the issue of racism, seeking
legislative change and developing
community support. The goal is to
defeat active and growing racist organizations like the Ku Klux Klan in
B.C., and to change attitudes which
allow and promote random racist
violence.
We are concerned that the CPC-
ML tactics are designed to undermine the credibility of the BCOFR.
It is especially offensive that the
media and police seem to cooperate
in that effort.
The real tragedy is that the focus
of attention has been drawn away
from the problem that motivated
our involvement: the rising number
of racist incidents that threaten the
safety and freedom of minorities in
Canada.
We have mentioned some of the
groups supporting the rally. As
well, in an emergency resolution in
response to Saturday's rally, the
provincial convention of the NDP
offered its support to the BCOFR.
It is also encouraging that Vancouver's Mayor Harcourt has publicly
commented on these events and distinguished the destructive objectives
of the People's Front from the
many efforts of the BCOFR to
place the issue of racism in the public forum. Let's get back to the real
concern.	
Perspectives is a column of opinion, analysis and rabid thought
open to members of the university
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Grad president says council held in contempt
After an hour and one-half of
consideration at students council
two weeks ago, during which film
society members were given full
hearing due to my challenge to
council's chairperson, President
Marlea Haugen; council approved a
resolution that requested the direc
tor of finance, in appropriate consultation with the budget committee, to make effective the $1 admission price and the 75/25 split between the Alma Mater Society and
filmsoc.
At students council meeting last
night, the director of finance stood
Great Scott, great job
I have been extremely impressed
by the quality of reporting that
graces these pages several times a
week. The reporter who is foremost
in my mind is Scott McDonald.
He has, through his articles about
UBC's lacrosse team, demonstrated
the ability to find and relate to the
public stories of importance and genuine interest. I was amazed to
discover that UBC even had a field
lacrosse team let alone one of national championship calibre.
Several students that I have talked to were anxious to join this particular sport but were ignorant to
the fact that there was this kind of
outlet on campus. My heartiest congratulations to the team, and to
Scott, for a job well done.
Scott, I do hope you give the
baseball team as much coverage as
the lacrosse team. By the way, do
you have Doug Adlem's new Vancouver address?
Marc Keith
sceince 2
corrected for the fact that this duty
had not been executed.
Insofar as I am able to determine,
the reason for this inaction is that
the budget committee when it met
Monday, Oct. 19th decided to
respect the absence of two of its
members, Lance Balcolm and
Jocelyn Bennett, as of greater concern than the request from students
council.
Both Balcolm and Bennett are
members of council, and were present when this matter was fully considered by council. Did they require
a second opportunity to speak to
this matter? I think not.
I am told that the director of
finance is responsible for requesting
the vice-president, who chairs the
budget committee, to call the
meetings of the budget committee
and advise of any matters that require consideration. Presumably
then, the vice-president is then
responsible for ensuring a meeting
is called; that the members of the
committee are advised of the
meeting; and that there is quorum
present.
This matter also requires that
there be an amendment to the
AMS/filmsoc contract to approve
the 75/25 split. I am told this can be
accomplished upon the recommendation of the budget committee.
The director of administration
chairs the student administrative
commission which meets to approve
such matters.
So much for bureaucracy. Last
night at council I introduced a motion to accomplish all of this by
simple motion of council. This was
ruled out of order. I am told that I,
as an elected director of the society,
have irrevocably delegated my
statutory authority and responsibility to these various committees,
commissions, and executives. I do
not believe this to be true, or legally
correct according to the Societies
Act.
While the AMS prepares "goals
and objectives," such as "improving communications and participating in the AMS," it at the
same time holds the decisions of
student's council in contempt.
Reflecting upon this experience, 1
must all the more strongly support
filmsoc in their endeavour to provide a high quality and low cost service to the campus, and apologize
as a member of council for this further delay caused by people whose
belief that filmsoc exists to provide
a profit to subsidize other peoples'
activities blinds them to their duty
to honorably administer the affairs of the society with expediency.
We must have better performance in future, without excuse.
John Allan Davies
president,
graduate student association Page 16
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 23,1981
Historical board
meets SUBs standards
This month's board of governors
meeting was quite historical as the
board held its monthly meeting in
SUB for the first time. Unfortunately less than 20 students attended
the open session.
There were a number of major issues which came up for discussion
this month. Realizing that one of
the topics was tuition policy for
1982-83, the AMS president and coordinator of external affairs, the
president of the science undergraduate society, the president of the
grad students association, and your
two student board representatives
made presentations on this topic.
—Tuition fees 1982-82:
• Student aid is not to be considered separately;
• A belated increase in 1981-82
student aid of $248,000 was
made (from UBC's system
development fund grant to
UBC);
• The board is well aware of student concern for decreased
Quality coupled with increased
costs;
• The Canada student  loan ceil-
ngs are inadequate:
« An independent student's ability
o pay is presently at or near its
'.imits:
s Aid increases snould be coupled
:o tuition increases.
— Proposal from AMS which
vould ailow fee referenda to be
•seld in January passed.
— The auditors report for TWSC to
March 31, 1981 received.
— The quarterly statement from
TWSC and Aquatic Centre was
received.
— UBC registration at approximately 22,000 students.
— Bookstore construction may be
aelayed slightly due to possible
cost overruns of project.
— The board approved a five year
capital plan for 1982-87 which
acts as a guideline (to UCBC) of
UBC's projected construction requests.
—Implications on armories — the
armories must be demolished for
fine arts gallerv to be constructed.
—The final budget for operating
purposes for 1981-82 was passed
(note: this budget is subject to
change if more funds become
available).
—The board is seeking a consultants advice regarding upgrading
Acadia Camp.
—The board referred the engineering enrolment limits back to senate asking the senate if there are
methods other than increased fi-
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nancial support for easing the
present problem of overcrowded
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-Senate committee on reductions
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t The committee will receive any
suggestions if they are signed;
» The committee will report to the
board in December or January;
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determining quality.
Chris Niwinski
student representative
board of governors
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SELF-IMAGE: RELIGIOUS OR SECULAR?
This is the third in a series of Jewish-Christian dialogues sponsored by the UBC Chaplains. Do modern
Jews see themselves as religious or secular people? Does this compare to civil religion in North America?
COME AND SEE
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THE    UBYSSEY
Page 17
Profs hit 'Canada first
9
By NANCY CAMPBELL
A group of UBC professors are
fighting against a new "Canadians
first" hiring policy for academics,
claiming the quality of education
for students will be jeopardized if it
is enforced.
Already, a letter of opposition
signed by all but two members of
the economics department has been
sent to Lloyd Axworthy, federal
employment and immigration
minister, and the department is now
asking other faculties to follow
their lead.
"The new regulations are giving
nationality a higher priority and
general excellence a lower
priority," economics professor Anthony Scott said Thursday. "It's a
worthy thing for Axworthy to be
concerned about, but finding Canadians jobs is not the most important
thing about universities.
"Gradually it will mean that the
universities will get filled up with
people whose strongest recommendation is that they are Canadian."
The new regulations, announced
in July by Axworthy, make it more
difficult to justify the hiring of
foreign academics. Ads discouraging applications by foreigners are
intended by Employment and Immigration Canada to force universities to consider Canadian applicants before examining applications from others. Every Canadian
candidate must be rejected on the
basis of a lack of qualifications
before any foreign academics can
be considered.
And if no suitable Canadian is
found to fill a position, the university must provide Employment and
Immigration Canada with a
rigourous file of evidence of recruitment activity before it can obtain
permission to hire a foreign
academic.
"Our opposition stems from our
belief that achieving excellence in
university teaching and research,
and saving able students from being
induced to take their general, professional or graduate schooling
elsewhere, are frustrated if nationality becomes a significant
'qualification'," the economic
faculty's letter states.
The regulations' emphasis on the
availability of "qualified" Canadians makes too little room for
selection according to personal
quality, promise or excellence, the
letter adds,
"We don't want people who are
qualified — we want the best," said
Scott. "There's a difference between meeting qualifications and being excellent."
Scott said rejection of the new
regulations did not imply a lack of
confidence about the calibre of
Canadian academics. Instead, he
said he was against guranteeing jobs
for Canadians at the expense of a
quality education for students.
HOT NEWS THAT FITS
AMS Executive
'Conspired' Against
Council Says Filmsoc
CRAIG BROOKS
Student council executive
members are deliberately delaying a
reduction in SUBfilms' admission
price, a filmsoc executive told student council Wednesday.
Filmsoc acting chair Dusan
Milatovic charged that finance
director Jane Loftus deliberately
lost a copy of the revised club
budget last week, forcing at least a
one week delay in lowering the admission price.
He said Loftus deliberately did
not bring the matter up to a budget
committee meeting, as she was
directed by council.
Council two weeks ago passed a
motion requesting the budget committee to meet and amend filmsoc's
budget to lower the price of SUBfilms to $1.00.
Loftus said Milatovic was "blowing the whole thing out of proportion.
"Whether they sell tickets for
$1.00 or $1.50, it's up to them.
Because they are a club, budget
committee does not set the price. I
am surprised the price hasn't
already been lowered, she said.
The finance director said filmsoc
should have taken the request to the
student administrative commission,
which is charged under AMS
bylaws with looking after club affairs. "It has to go through SAC
(not budget committee)" she said.
Grad studies representative John
Davies said he can't see why nothing
has been done since the last council
meeting. "They (the executive) have
a duty to carry out council
motions," he said.
Milatovic promised to send
the issue to referendum if it is not
soon resolved. "Student council
meetings won't be so boring (if the
referendum passes)," he said.
Milatovic declined to comment on
the possible wording of such a
referendum.
Loftus said filmsoc members
know the procedure for amending
the price. "Someone should have
told JDusan (Milatovic) what the
procedure was," she said. "I
apologize for not making sure it
went through."
Under AMS bylaws and code of
procedure AMS president Marlea
Haugen is responsible for ensuring
council motions are carried out.
Milatovic said if all filmsoc needs
is formal SAC approval the price
should be reduced by next week.
SAC chair Bill Maslechko told
council SAC would feel "morally
obligated" to pass the motion.
Maslechko said SAC is not being
bullied by council into passing the
motion. "Council ultimately has
the final authority to make the decision."
Davies moved a motion that
council amend the SAC-filmsoc
agreement. It was ruled out of order
by Haugen as contravening the
AMS code of procedure.
UBC Might Get
King-Ed Bus Route
UBC bus passengers will have access to a new bus route next year if a
proposal by the Greater Vancouver
Regional District planning committee is approved.
The GVRD approved in principle
a new route which would travel
from UBC to Brentwood mall in
Burnaby. Buses would run along
King Edward Avenue and East
Twenty-second avenue.
GVRD planner John Mills could
not be contacted for details of the
proposed route.
The new route would meet what
the GVRD considers "a high priority need for an additional crosstown
route midway between those currently operating on Broadway and
Forty-first avenue."
The service is tentatively scheduled to begin by April 1982. But Vancouver and Burnaby municipalities,
the Urban Transit Authority and
the Metro Transit Operating Company must first approve its route
and service.
Double Fees 'OK'
Says SFU President
WINNIPEG (CUP) — Many
students can afford to pay double
the current cost of tuition, says
Simon Fraser University president
George Pedersen.
Pedersen, interviewed at a
meeting of top university and college administrators here earlier this
week, said he thought students
could affoW to pay 20 per cent of
university operating costs through
tuition fees. Fees now finance about
10 per cent of most universities'
operating costs.
"I think there are students who
can afford to pay them without subsidy, looking at the wages some
students are earning in the
summer," he said. "I had a
daughter who was making $7.25 an
hour for the telephone company,
which is a very good wage."
"I also noticed, walking through
the SFU parking lot, that there are a
lot of BMWs and Porsches, so it's
not fair to say that some students
would find it impossible to pay increased fees," Pedersen said.
"Don't take this as we're not
sympathetic to students. We are."
Pedersen added any increase in tuition must be compensated by increased student aid.
The meeting, a national conference of the Association of
Universities and Colleges of
Canada, did not adopt any position
on increased tuition fees.
But a paper presented by a committee of seven presidents said arts
and science programs, the "core"
of Canadian universities, must be
defended against the growing belief
that they are of little value to society.
Many presidents said they were
concerned by the federal and provincial governments' tendency to
play off the interests of professional
faculties against arts and sciences.
"It shows the shallow understanding of how breakthroughs are
made," said University of Calgary
president Norm Wagner. "We must
emphasize the core's effect on the
world and stop stressing the non-
employable aspect of the core."
Arnold Naimark, president of the
University of Manitoba, said
"those who count as practical men
in-politics are always emphasizing
going back to the basics on the
primary level of education. Yet,
they do not respond to what post-
secondary institutions feel are the
basics."
While the consensus of the conference was that arts and science
programs were important in giving
students a general education, the
discussion paper was not adopted as
official policy.
PIRG Regroups
For January Vote
The B.C. Public Interest
Research Group is stepping up its
campaign to become an official
society at UBC, PIRG spokesperson Elena Klein said Wednesday.
Klein said PIRG is aiming for a
January referendum to seek .funding from UBC students. She said
the first step in the campaign is to
attract more grass roots support for
the organization.
"We lost a lot of people last year
who were very disillusioned by losing the referendum," she said.
Klein said the group is optimistic
about gaining student support.
Scott said if the current crop of
Canadian graduate students cannot
meet the quality needed in an
academic they should forget about
becoming an academic and not expect to be hired for their nationality. "My own view is if you can't
stand the heat, get out of the kitchen," Scott said.
Arts dean Robert Will also supported the economic faculty's
stand. "A university can only
achieve so many things," he said.
"We are here to teach, not to take
on an objective of employment. My
concern is to get the best people
possible for students.
"I don't like constraints. We
know better than government
bureaucrats."
Scott said there are some
academic areas which should be
taught by Canadians, such as Canadian history, literature, and
economics. But the new regulations
apply to all areas of the university,
which he feels is unwarranted.
And UBC already has a high
ratio of Canadian to foreign
academics. "We hate a good record
of hiring Canadians, and nothing
pleases me more than when the best
people we hire are Canadian," said
Will.
The UBC administration has not
yet decided its position on the new
regulations, said university
spokesperson Jim Banham.
However, the policies have been
discussed and may be debated further, he said. "We can't rule out
the possibility that there will be a
statement."
The University of Toronto administration has decided to defy the
new regulations. In an Oct. 7
memorandum, David Strangway, U
of T vice president and provost,
permitted principals, deans and
directors to ignore the new advertising regulations. According to
Strangway, the new rules have been
established to improve a situation
that needs no improving.
— craig yuill photo
IN MELLOW mind maze, student explores intricacies of science not realizing it is only explicable form of magic and physics is only matter of knowing
things fall when dropped. But when attending The Big School logic and
reality are irrelevant if one knows art of getting money to pay for job
oriented course like underwater insurance sales.
Council Briefs
By CRAIG BROOKS
Maintenance of university
athletic facilities is "dreadful," the
director of UBC sports services said
Wednesday.
Robert Hindmarch made the
''comment during a presentation on
university athletics to student council.
Physical education director
Robert Morford also said the condition of squash and racquetball
courts at the Thunderbird winter
sports centre left a lot to be desired.
Morford said he could not do
anything about the court conditions, since the centre is under
council control.
Student board representative
Chris Niwinski told council! "we are
paying $8.50 (per student) to
athletics at this university, compared to the total AMS discretionary fee pf $10.50. Council
should ensure representation (on
university athletic committees) is
used responsibly."
The presentation was the first in a
series of talks from university administrators that AMS president
Marlea Hausen says she hopes will
improve communications between
council and university departments.
« • «
Council voted unanimously to
spend $500 on bringing a University
of El Salvador student leader to
UBC to speak on student problems
in El Salvador under the current
military resime.
"These people know what it
means to have a problem at university," student board of governors
representative Chris Niwinski told
council.
The University of El Salvador's
president was murdered, and the
university was closed down by the
regime, external affairs coordinator
James Hollis said.
The date of the appearance has
yet to be set.
* * «
External affairs coordinator
James Hollis said delays in the processing of Canada student loan
forms are being caused by a "hiccup" in the programming of B.C.
Systems Corporation computers.
President Marlea Hausen said
anyone holding a UBC awards office award recommendation would
be able to set an advance on their
loan from their bank. Page 18
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 23,1981
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THE    UBYSSEY
Page 19
vista
No attempt at humor this week,
folks. This week, you get your information straight.
The Vancouver Community College music department is presenting
the Tone-Art Quartet with Jerry
Dommer at the Mount Pleasant
Centre, 225 West 8th Avenue, on
Friday, Oct. 30 at 8 p.m. Admission
is free, so bring friends and family
along for a fun and cultural evening.
Malcolm Bilson will offer a solo
recital on Sunday, Oct. 25 at 8:30
p.m. The program features the music of Mozart and Haydn and is part
of Vancouver Society for Early Music's fall series. There is a special
discount for students. Phone
732-1610 for more details.
David Y.H. Lui, a Canadian institution, will present the Montreal
Symphony Orchestra at the Orpheum theatre Nov. 10, at 8:30 p.m.
Charles Dutoit will conduct and
celebrated violinist Ida Haendel will
make a special appearance.
Glen SoresUd and Colin Morton
will read poetry at the Literary
Storefront on Oct. 27 at 8 p.m. Admission is free.
Chaplin's buried treasure, A
Woman of Paris, will be presented
at the National Film Board theatre
on Georgia St. on Thursday, Oct.
29 at 7 and 9:15 p.m. $3 for
members and $4 for guests.
The Hollywood Theatre is celebrating its 46th anniversary this
week. Tonight's a special night
'cause you get to see the 1978 remake of Thirty-nine Steps and Soldier of Orange, both for only $1.
Arrive early. Show time's 7:30
p.m., but expect a big lineup.
Sherman Snukal's Talking Dirty
continues at the Arts Club Theatre.
Tickets at Vancouver Ticket Centres, Eaton's stores, and at the
door. Show times are at 8:30 p.m.
Monday to Friday and at 6:30 and
9:30 p.m. on Saturday.
Every Saturday night the NFB
presents a series of documentary
films. The films are shown at the
Vancouver Museum auditorium
and start at 8 p.m. Admission is
$2.50. This week's films are Bethune, producer Donald Brittain and
Los Canadlenses, director Albert
Kish.
Continuing until Oct. 31 at the
Cafe Madeleine, 3761 W. 10th, a
photo exhibition by Patsi McMur-
chy. The show is called Polaroid
Triplets.
Echo and the Bunymen lead a
fine series of events at the Commodore ballroom on Granville St. The
show is Oct. 26, doors open at 7:45
p.m., tickets $8.50.
-L>C
THE TOTAL EXERCISE EXPERIENCE"
Mon. thru Thurs. in SUB
upstairs from 3:45-6:00 p.m.
(1 Admission
Gorilla
wrestling
Yes, it's a very popular sport
in the small emerging
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happeninman? But you won't
find it at I? J. Burger & Sons.
Nope. Just 15 incredible
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and other great stuff.
Open 7 days a week from
11:30 a.m. till really late.
Furs optional.
CANADIANS FOR DEMOCRACY
IN CHILE
PRESENTS
QUILAPAYUN
The Latin American Group will be performing
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 25th, 8:00 p.m.
at the ORPHEUM
This group originated in Chile in 1965 and by 1966 the group was already nationally
famous. By 1973 they were famous throughout the world performing in more than 30
countries. Since Sept. 1973 they have been based in Paris. This is an evening you
won't want to miss.
TICKETS AVAILABLE AT ALL CONCERT BOX OFFICE OUTLETS.
\$8 PER PERSON.
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THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 23,1981
FOR THEATRE INFORMATION CALL 687-1515
1
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Warning: Some frightening and     SIGOURNEY WEAVER
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Showtimes: 2:35. 4:55. 7:15. 9:36
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CARBON
COPV
i GEMGE SEUISISAN MINT UMCS • IACK WARDEN
<^—-—-j-jjk      Warning: Some coarse lan-       *qtt T   * jTTTDD AV
MATUwEJ    guage,   nudity  &  suggestive    BlLiLi JVl U luCn.X a.
scenes. B.C. Dir.
CORONET
Showtimes: 2:00,
'""mm"    3m SM-7:40' 9:4°    P J SOLES • JOHN CANDY
AT 8 P.M. ONLY
CAMBIE at  18th
876-2747
A ROMAN POLANSKI FILM
'TESS
NASTASSIA KINSKI   PETER FIRTH
Warning: Frequent violence,
some nudity and suggestive
scenes. B.C. Director.
DROAdwAV
70 7   W   BROADWAY
874-1927	
Showtimes:
7:30. 9:30
Warning: some violent
scenes. B.C. Dir.
Showtimes: 7:00. 9.00
(mature)
DROAOWA
AWARD WINNER AT
70 7 W   BROADWAY CANNES
874-1927	
cBneaker
cTMorant
Warning: Some violence, occa
sional suggestive scenes
B.C. Dir.
VARSITY
realizing your
potential...
Your energy is wanted by a world energy leader.
Ontario Hydro needs engineers and scientists.
If you are about to graduate, this could be your
opportunity of a lifetime.
A career with Ontario Hydro will provide you with a
variety of opportunities, new challenges, a stimulating
working environment, and most important-professional
growth and job satisfaction.
Energy. A crucial issue for the eighties, and beyond.
As other forms of energy become depleted, electricity will
become even more important than it is today. At Ontario
Hydro, you will work for a world leader in electrical energy
technology.
Hydro needs you. For your talent. For your energy.
In return Hydro offers you extensive training, a salary that
recognizes your abilities and experience, substantial
long-term benefits and a variety of employment locations.
We'd like to talk to you about energy. Yours, and
ours. To start the conversation, ask your Placement
Office about meeting us on campus.
Or write to: Senior Staffing Officer-Doug Rodrigues,
Ontario Hydro, 700 University Avenue,
Toronto, Ontario M5G 1X6
Premium brew. Regular price.
Distinctive, satisfying taste.
MOLSON BRADOR
...when you demand more from a beer. Friday, October 23,1981
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 21
COMMUNITY
SPORTS
October Specials
Dl TRANI SKI JACKETS $129.50
BAUER 95 ICE SKATES $99.50
NUNATUK SLEEPING BAGS .... $79.50
CONVERSE LEATHER HI-TOPS.. $59.50
CARLTON 3.9 BADMINTON
RACQUETS (STRUNG) $39.50
CANTERBURY RUGBY PANTS .. $29.95
BAUER LIGHTFOOT JOGGERS .. $24.95
COOPER WATERPROOF SOCCER
BALLS     $19.95
WILSON RACQUETBALL RACQUETS
 $17.95
GREY SWEAT PANTS $11.95
POLYESTER HOCKEY JERSEYS .$11.95
ALL-PURPOSE SPORTS BAGS ... $7.95
These and other outstanding
buys are now available at
3615 W. BROADWAY
733-1612
Speaking nightly OCTOBER 16-30
7:30 p.m. at the
BUCHANAN BUILDING in Room 104
ALSO IN CONCERT NIGHTLY
CHECO
TOHOMASO
Checo has played and sung with the
best...
• The COMMODORES
• The BLACKBYRDS
• The BROTHERS JOHNSON
• NATALIE COLE
• MARVIN GAYE
• ANDRE CROUCH
Engineering, Computer Science
and Business Graduates
... looking to the Future
Northern Telecom is one of the world leaders in advanced
telecommunications, and to keep that leadership we have a
constant demand for talented individuals from Engineering,
Business and Computer Science disciplines. We offer
challenge, variety and, importantly, a future. And this offer
holds good for all our divisions across Canada.
Opportunities are available in technology, manufacturing,
finance/control, business systems, and marketing, just to
name a few. Whatever your choice, with continued effort, your
opportunities for advancement are excellent.
If you're looking to the future and to a long term career, submit
your application by October 22nd and our Campus
Representative will be pleased to discuss our opportunities
with you in the near future. See your Placement Officer for
more details.
We
hire
talent
northern
telecom
TODAY'S LEADERS IN TOMORROW'S TECHNOLOGIES. Page 22
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 23,1981
Tween Classes
L
n
TODAY
INTRAMURALS
Peripheral road run, three and 6.7 km, men and
women, noon.
THE UBYSSEY
Photojournalism with Eric Eggertson, Capilano
College lounge, 4:30 p.m.
FIELD HOCKEY
Canada West field hockey tournament, all day
today, Saturday and Sunday, Warren and
McGregor playing fields.
GAY UBC
Fall dance. International House, 8:30 p.m.
SAILING CLUB
Bzzr garden and Great Hobie film, SUB 211, 7
p.m.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
Lunchtime rendezvous, International House
lounge, noon.
CCCM
Meet for FIRCOM retreat, Lutheran campus centre, 4:X p.m.
UBC SPORTS CAR CLUB
Great pumpkin chase rally, SUB loop, 6:30 p.m.
FROSH CLUB
Frosh dance, SUB 207. 8 p.m.
LSM
Happy hour, refreshments, trite humor, congenial companionship, Lutheran campus centre,
4 p.m.
PC CLUB
General meeting to elect vice-president and directors, SUB 212, noon.
UBC WARGAMING SOCIETY
Risk tournament and bzzr night, SUB 212, 6:30
p.m.
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Tai Chi, SUB 211. 3:30 p.m.
SATURDAY
AIESEC
Solicitations training seminar, Angus 104, 1 p.m.
INTRAMURALS
Men's Buchanan bedminton tournament, Osborne centre gyms A and B, 10 a.m.
CSA
Table tennis tournament, SUB party room, 1
p.m.
THUNDERETTE BASKETBALL
Vs. University of Victoria. War Memorial gym, 8
p.m.
RUGBY THUNDERBIRDS
Vs. Meralomas, Connaught Park, 2:30 p.m.
THUNDERBIRD BASKETBALL
Vs. alumni. War Memorial gym, 6:30 p.m.
Fencing class, Jericho Beach gym, 10 a.m.
SUNDAY
INTRAMURALS
Men's Buchanan badminton tournament, Osborne centre, 10 a.m.
AQUASOC
Co-ed underwater hockey, UBC Aquatic Centre,
10 p.m.
THUNDERBIRD VOLLEYBALL
Vs. University of Victoria, War Memorial gym, 2
p.m.
THUNDERETTES SOCCER
Vs. Edmonds, Mclnnes field, 10 a.m.
MONDAY
INTRAMURALS
Correctional badminton, Osborne centre, 7:30
p.m.
HOME EC
Charity breakfast. Main Mall, 7:30 a.m. to 10:30
a.m.
CAUSE
Creation-evolution discussion. Woodward IRC 2,
7:30 p.m.
CHESS CLUB
General meeting, SUB 215, noon.
TUESDAY
UBC-JAPAN CLUB
Ikebana demonstration, noon, SUB 212.
MATH CLUB
Format's little theorem, the periodicity of repeating decimals, with math professor, David
Boyd, noon, math 232.
COLLEGIATE ADVENTISTS
Group discussion on First Corinthians, noon,
SUB 213.
HOME ECONOMICS
Home economics week, obstacle races, everyone welcome, noon, Mclnnes field, east of SUB.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Film series continues with Russia, 7:X p.m., International House 400.
CCCM
Worship. Topic, caustic nature of the divine
eros, noon, Lutheran campus centre.
PRE-MED
Lecture on admission into UBC's faculty of
medicine, by associate admissions dean, Alexander Boggie, noon, IRC 2. Bring your membership card.
LAW STUDENTS LEGAL AID PROGRAM
Free legal assistance and referrals, noon to 2:00
p.m., SUB 211.
WEDNESDAY
INTRAMURALS
Final registration for men's racquetball and
snooker tournaments, 4:00 p.m., WMG 203.
HOME ECONOMICS
Home economics week cookies sale, freshly baked and yummy, all day, on SUB plaza.
HOME ECONOMICS
Pumpkin sale. 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m., outside
home economics building and SUB.
WUSC
Slide presentation on Ecuador, noon, Buch. 205.
CCCM
Community pig-out and group belch, 5:30 p.m.,
Lutheran campus centre.
CHESS CLUB
Analysis of current world championship games,
7:30 to 9:30 p.m., Scarfe 204.
THURSDAY
UBC STUDENT LIBERALS
General meeting, speaker Patrick Graham, former party president in B.C., noon, SUB 212.
New members welcome.
BCPIRG
Organizing meeting, noon, SUB 125. All welcome.
SCIENCE PSYCHOLOGY CLUB
General meeting, everyone welcome to come
and help organize, 11:30 a.m., Angus 426.
HOME ECONOMICS
Boat races with milk naturally, noon, SUB plaza.
LAW UNION AND NDP CLUB
Film on the Canadian Farm Workers Union, A
Time to Rise, noon, law building 101.
PHOTOSOC
General meeting, orders will also be taken for
photosoc T-shirts, 7:00 p.m., SUB 211.
FRIDAY
PRE-MED
Come to the gym and have some fun night, 7:30
p.m., Osborne centre, gym A.
B.C. ART THERAPY ASSOCIATION
Conference, opening lecture, Martin Tischer, Art
Therapy as a Diagnostic Tool, 7:00 p.m., Scarfe
building. Conference continues until Nov. 1.
FRIENDS OF THE ARMADILLO
Ditlo-ween, 7:X p.m party room SUB. Admission $1 plus a costume.
SUNDAY
PENDER GUY RADIO
General orientation, 2:00 p.m., at 337 Carrall St.
Information on cooperative radio.
[
Hot Flashes
Mow cffcf you
got fo UBC?
Monkey see, monkey do?
Creation will meet evolution yet
again in a debate between UBC
zoology professor Dennis Chitty
and Gary Parker, a biology professor at Christian Heritage College.
The discussion, set for 7:30 p.m.
Monday at IRC two, is being sponsored by Citizens Against the
Undermining of Science Education.
Tract ion act Ion
Bash that Bentley, pound that
Pontiac and flagellate that Fiat.
The UBC Sports Car Club will
sponsor their annual Great Pumpkin
Chase rally starting at 6:30 p.m.
tonight in front of SUB.
The admission price of $3 (club
members free) entitles participants
to lustily pound the bejesus out of
their vehicles in an evening of structured mechanical madness.
Prizes and trophies will be awarded to some finishers, and anyone
running into Dr. Livingstone during
the rally is asked to tell him to contact his wife.
tllly Ubytey
Boy, did we fuck up.
AISEC is not, as stated in Thursday's Hot Flashes, the UBC
marketing club. It isn't even AlSEC,
it's AIESEC.
Whoever they are, AIESEC will
meet Saturday in Angus 104 at 1
p.m. to provide training for personal interviews. Members of
AIESEC Edmonton will be there,
with representatives of the business
community and the local executive.
forty oofi
Getting into a flap. Jack?
Brekky is to be served on Main
Mall Monday morning by the Home
Ec Undergraduate Society. The
price of $3 includes pancakes,
eggs, bacon and a choice of
sausage or breakfast steak.
Proceeds from this epicurian
debauch are going to the C-FOX
Children's Hospital Fund, and the
jacks are flapping between 7:30
a.m. and 10:30.
Your Future—ICBC
We are a young and dynamic organization providing a range of insurance services to the people of
British Columbia. To possibly make you part of our future, we are recruiting graduates in the
following disciplines:
COMPUTER SCIENCE
Our computer systems are among the largest and most sophisticated in Western Canada. With
plan capacity expansion and systems development we expect to be one of the first "Offices of the
Future". We offer well established career development paths with rapid promotion from Programmer Analyst to System Analyst.
COMMERCE? SCIENCE AND ECONOMICS
We actively recruit graduates for Claims Adjuster positions, which investigates, adjust and
negotiate automobile claims. Candidates who enjoy analyzing, researching and making decisions
requiring technical and legal judgment will find this work challenging. Career path promotion to
more reasonable levels of adjusting, including supervision and management, is a logical expectation of this position.
To be investing in your future you will want to apply by submitting a UCPA application form
together with a recent transcript of marks to Brock Hall Manpower Office by November 4, 1981.
□ INSURANCE
CORPORATION
OF BRTT1SH COLUMBIA
MUSIC/UBC
presents
GUITAR RECITAL
Michael Lorimer, Classical Guitar Virtuoso
Student Tickets $5 at the door
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 25 at 8 p.m.
Recital Hail of Music Building
lift: i^LASStrMtliJSS
1U1^:Ca*mfH»-3lln^1d^«UB;a<kiti0fMl
fimflMf ill Of rtnf jfoonfinf ftv ttianhnnm onrf arm «*w^» **W ,
JUJL^|||U j^^a^MOfaUk-  m\m\       fid**'40  mm\    J*M m^mmlk    mlmmmmtrnf    J^^HAM^S    ^MAA^Mtt^^Ufc
Pubticttkm Offlea, Room211, S.U.8., VBG, Mm., B.C. VST2AS
5 — Coming Events
]
THE VANCOUVER
INSTITUTE
Free Public Lecture
CONOR CRUISE
O'BRIEN
Consulting Editor
The Observe*
Dr.   O'Brien   is   internationally
known as an author, politician,
historian and literary critic.
LECTURE HALL 2,
WOODWARD BUILDING,
SATURDAY, OCT. 24th
AT 8:15 p.m.
Improve Your Study
Habits Through
SELF HYPNOSIS
FEE: $40 for any 4 of 5
Ph.D GUIDED
Tuesdays, 6:15-7:30 p.m.
STARTING
Oct. 13. 20 or 27th
Blue Room, Arts 1 Bldg.
U.B.C. Campus
ALTERNATE    FUELS    FOR    AUTOS    -
Slides and discussions — presented by
Patrick Brown, Vice President CNG Fuel
Systems, Monday, October 26th at the
Hellenic Centre (upper hall) 4500 Arbutus at
7:30 p.m. Sponsored by Social Credit Con-
stituecies of Vancouver Point Grey, Vancouver Little Mountain, Vancouver South
and Vancouver Centre. All welcome. Call
733-1048 for more information.
10 — For Sale — Commercial
COMMUNITY SPORTS; A store packed
with ski wear, soccer boots, hockey equipment racquets of all kinds, jogging shoes
and dozens of other sports items at
reasonable prices, (including adult small
hockey jerseys for ladies hockey teams at
$10.96). 3615 W. Broadway	
11 — For Sale — Private	
OLYMPUS MICRO-CASSETTE recorder.
Excellent condition. 1 hour tape, includes
accessories. $200. Phone 228-8588 anytime.
10 SPEED Gitaine Tandem bike.
Quality components. Accessories. Extra
wheels and rims. Excellent condition, $650.
228-8688 anytime.
15 — Found
20 — Housing
25 — Instruction
30 — Jobs
TELEPHONE PERSON needed immed. part-
time 6 a.m. to 10 a.m., $6.00 per hour cash.
10-1423 Howe St., 689-3684 or 685-4979.
35 - Lost
JADE PENDANT on Oct. 15. 253-0404 after
7 p.m.
40 — Messages
70 — Services
FOOTLOOSE IN NEW ZEALAND I Use our
personal budget quide to plan your trip.
$5.96 Can. Kiwi Publications, P.O. Box
94-UB Concrete, Wa 98237.
MODE COLLEGE of barbering and hair-
styling. Student hairstyle — $8, haircut —
$3.50. 601 West Broadway, 874-0633.
86 — Typing
YEAR AROUND expert typing theses
and essays. 738-6829 from 10:00 a.m. to
9:00 p.m.
FAST, EFFICIENT TYPING. Close to
campus. 266-5053.
EXPERT TYPING: essays, term papers,
factums, letters, manuscripts, resumes,
theses. IBM Selectric II. Reasonable rates.
Rose 731-9857.
TYPING: $1 per page. Legible copy. Fast,
accurate, experienced typist with IBM
Selectric. Gordon, 873-8032 (after 10 a.m.).
TYPING SERVICE for theses, correspondence, etc. Any field. French also available.
IBM Selectric. Call 736-4042.
PROFESSIONAL court recorder guarantees
fast, accurate typing. Essays, theses,
manuscripts, letters, resumes. Phone
Carol, 987-6527.
TYPING Special student rates. Ftltness of
Cameron Public Stenographers, 5670 Yew
Street. Phone 266-6814.
WRITER'S CRAMP7 Yours truly secretarial
services ltd. types up a storm day by day so
you can sleep at night. Dependable service,
reasonable rates. Professional results. Call
Kathy (yours truly) today. 873-5578.
EXPERIENCED TYPIST
732-3647 after 6.
Ubyssey
classified ads
get fast
results —
advertise
your needs
today Friday, October 23, 1981
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 23
LUV-A-FAIR
Vancouver's #1
New Wave Club
175 Seymour St.
*. (*>**
v
(Wie GUiMijire (KIjeehe 3nn
A SrautttDnal English Seataurant
4686 Dunbar at 30th 224 2521
3 COURSE LUNCH SPECIAL
DINNER SPECIALS from
3.96
4.96
Plus complete Menu Selection
\ of Salad. Sandwich and
v House Specialties
♦ Open: 11:30 - Midnight
Monday thru Saturday
' ENJOY ENGLISH PUB-STYLE
FOOD IN AN AUTHENTIC SETTING
Fully Licensed Premises
Make "The Cheese" Your Local
■UrJdmcl^lr=idi=lrJdclr=lrfclr=lddnJr=li=lg
SO
W
WEtm
Traditional
Greco-Roman Cuisine
7 Days a Week: 5 p.m.-l a.m.
Fri. and Sat.: 5 p.m. to 2 a.m.
FREE fast delivery!
228-9513
« 4S10 West 10th Ave.
ssa
UBG Gampas
Pizza
Steak & Pizza — Lasagna
Spare Ribs — Ravioli
Chicken — Greek Salads
Souvlaki
Fast Free Local Delivery
224-4218 - 224-0529
Hours Mon Thurs. 11.30 d.n,. 2:00 p m.,
1 1 :10 d m 3 00 p m S.n 4 IK) p m 3 01) ,.
Sum   4 00 p m.-1 00 a n
2136 Western Parkway
CITR-UBC RADIO
AND THE PIT
continuing the drive to the %
finals. Two bands face-off in
a toe to toe battle
IN THE
"HOT
AIR
SHOW"
LIVE!!
JIM MEAD BAND
Entertainment
So Cheap It Hurts
BRING A JOKE, ANY JOKE!
Mon., Oct. 26, 9:00 p.m.
NO COVER
Sac
(m
addcjs
THURS.
Halloween
Costume
Party
, OCT. 29th
$$$PRIZES$$$
645 Hornby
681-9271
This Weelc
Great Sandwiches,
Fabulous Desserts,
Cappuccinos,
Espressos
Licensed Premises
RED LEAF
Luncheon Smorgasbord
Authentic Chinese Cuisine
228-9114
10% DISCOUNT ON
PICK-UP ORDERS
LICENSED PREMISE
Mon.-Fri. 11-30-fcOO p.m.
CLOSED SATURDAYS
Sunday* and Holidays
4:00 p.m.-tiOO p.m.
2M2 Weetem Parkway
U.E.L. Vancouver, B.C.
(Opposite Chevron 8t»tlonl
ROTIMAN DELI
CARIBBEAN FOODS
Roti— Curry Chicken — Beef—
Stew—Poulourri Rice 'N' Peas
Take Out— Catering — Delivery
Tel: 876-5066
Open Tuesday through
Sunday 11:30 a.m.-IO p.m.
922 Kingsway — Opp. ICBC
*
GEORGIA
HOTEL
Proudly Presents
GEORGIA EXECUTIVE
HAIRSTYLISTS
Under New Management
For Appointment Call
801 W.Georgia 681-5615
Lower Level
crtefc
eison-i
Cmcej
HOTEL
Now Appearing
FLYING
HIGH
1006 Granville
681-6341
NOW, A NEW
BURGER THAT'S
MORE RURGER
THAN
RUM
Introducing the new hamburger from the DAIRY QUEEN
BRAZIER store. In a new "six to a pound" size that really
gives you some meat for your money. Instead of a banquet of
bun.
You see, while other burger chains
get as many as ten hamburgers from a
pound of beef, we get only six. And
that gives you "more burger than
bun." A burger that's tender,
deliciously-cooked. Every time. The
new burger from DAIRY QUEEN
BRAZIER.
Dairii
Queen
brazier
2601 W. Broadway
HARLOT
FRASER ARMS
1450 S.W. Marine Dr.
11 a.m.-1 a.m.
Monday to Saturday
4-11 Sunday
MON. Wet "10" T-shirt
Contest
TUES. Whip Cream
Wrestling
WED. Wet Jock
Night
THURS. Ladies Night
TOP LIVE BANDS NIGHTLY
THIS WEEK:
Two Bands
David Raven
& Head Pins
NEXT WEEK
Two Bands
Hostages &
Hot ice
FREE PASS WITH THIS AD (Mon-Thurs)
315 E. Broadway 879-4651 Free Parking
It's A Pit Party
THE HOOVERS
Appearing at THE PIT — Straight from San Francisco
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22, 1981
Door Charge at 8:00 p.m. $2.00
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 23, 1981-It's A Pit Party
AND
AMS
TICKET
OFFICE
AMS PRESENTS
UPCOMING EVENTS
E.U.S.  Pre Hallowe'en Ball  -
Fri., Oct. 23
Frosh Dance—Fri, Oct. 23
Andre Koles—Sun., Oct. 25
Home   Ec.    Masquerade   Ball
-Fri., Oct. 30
1st Annual Hallowe'en Ball —
Sat.. Oct. 31
B-Sides - Sat., Nov. 7
Cinema 16
IN VANCOUVER - CBO
Quilapayun — Sun., Oct. 25
LG73 UNICEF Costume Ball-Sat., Oct. 31
11th Annual Hallowe'en Hoedown —Sat., Oct. 31
World of Great Classics—Nov. 4
Sonny Terry & Brownie McGee—Nov. 6
Xth Subhumans — Nov. 12
The Imperials — Nov. 17
A Night in Old Vienna - Nov. 27
All Tickets available at
YOUR AMS Box Office. Page 24
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 23,1981
KITSILANO       736-2468
2190 W. 4th Ave.
WEST END        689-3408
1114 Davie St.
DOWNTOWN     687-6455
536 Seymour St.
RICHMOND       270-8171
6900 No. 3 Rd.
N. WESTMINSTER 525-6351
702C 6th Ave.
N.VANCOUVER    985-0577
130°. Lonsdale Ave.
KAMLOOPS
230 Victoria St.
VICTORIA
858 Pandora Ave.
374-3155
386-4433

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