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The Ubyssey Jan 13, 1984

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Array f
New students to be denied access
By GORDON CLARK
Fewer first year students will be
admitted to UBC next year if an administration proposal is accepted by
senate Wednesday.
The enrolment limitation subcommittee's proposal says the
number of students allowed to
enroll in first year courses in
1984-85 should not exceed 3,250 —
a sharp reduction from the 3,690
first years attending UBC this year.
The administration argues that
reductions in the university's size
are inevitable because UBC must
grapple with a large budget shortfall
next year. But critics say the proposal is simplistic and will not solve
the long term funding problem.
"We don't have sufficient funding to enroll these students," said
administration president George
Pedersen.
Vice-president academic Robert
Smith also defended the proposal,
saying size limitations for academic
programs are standard in many
disciplines such as medicine and
law, and the university must restrict
numbers in arts and science to overcome its $18 million budget shortfall next year.
He said this proposal is necessary
to ensure individual students receive
adequate attention. "I would prefer
to put it this way — quality of
education."
But graduate student senator
Penny Jones criticized the administration's proposal as simplistic
and damaging. "I think that it is
very unfortunate that at a time of
high unemployment the university
is turning away qualified people,"
she said.
The administration wants to
reduce first year enrolment to save
money, but Jones said educating
first year students does not absorb
much of the budget because section
sizes are large and equipment is not
as sophisticated as that required in
later years.
And overcrowding in Chemistry
103 and in English 100 this year did
not require massive reductions in
enrolment, she said.
"I don't think enough alternatives have been examined." But
Jones said the administration would
not have to propose limitations if
the provincial government made
education funding a priority.
"The university is over a barrel."
Currently only 12 per cent of
B.C.'s population is enrolled in
post-secondary institutions, compared with the national average of
13 per cent. Pedersen said Canada
is falling behind other industrialized
countries in this area, citing 20 per
Mourners to bury
symbolic coffin
By HOLLY NATHAN
Solemn students dressed in
mourning clothes will bury a coffin
symbolizing the quality of education next Thursday outside a board
of governors meeting.
As the board decides the fate of
tuition fees, campus chaplain
George Hermanson will perform a
liturgical ceremony in remembrance
of an accessible university.
A silent vigil at noon in SUB will
be held before the burial, followed
by six brief speeches from student
leaders and campus union members. The sombre procession will
then wind its way through the campus to the old administration building where the board meeting is expected to take place.
Leaflets and posters will be distributed by the organizers, students
against the budget, in an awareness
campaign before Thursday's
march.
External affairs coordinator Lisa
Hebert said she thinks the march
could positively influence the
board's decision regarding tuition
fees. A dramatic student protest at
Caribou College last year succeeded
in pressuring the college board to
increase tuition fees only six per
cent, she said.
"But Thursday is the day we find
out if we can come back next year,"
she added.
Student board member Margaret
Copping said if the funeral march
does not succeed in thwarting the
administration's proposal to double
fees over the next three years and to
introduce differential fees for foreign students, it will at least awaken
students to the gravity of the measures being recommended.
"Silence  is   still  consent,"
The procession will also make the
board aware of students' concerns,
she added.
Kevin Annett, member of students against the budget, said the
procession's purpose is to protest
against the administration's proposal as well as the government's
education policies.
The funeral march is modelled on
the events of Black Tuesday in January 1982, when 150 students similarly mourned the death of accessibility and the quality of education.
cent for the U.S. and 40 per cent for
Japan as examples.
Provincial deputy universities
minister Dean Gorde claimed B.C.
is not behind other countries in
educating its citizens.
"We are ahead of most other in
dustrialized societies."
Gorde said he realized the enrolment limitation proposal is a result
of the government's failure to pass
on an eight per cent increase in
federal funding for universities this
year,   but   maintained   that   the
government did not legally have to
transfer the increase.
Asked how the government plans
to deal with students denied access
to UBC as a result of enrolment
limitations, he said: "That is a
political matter."
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXVI, No. 27
Vancouver, B.C. Friday, January 13,1984
228-2301
NEW STUDENT SENATORS display true colours, while discussing plan of action for upcoming year when they
will lend a ewe to the students and try not to hide in sheep's clothing. "Holy Sheep," said one senator when questioned. Others reserved comment on their win, saying only they were sheepish about ramming their baa baad
political views down people's throats.
It
Armed with more than 3,400
signatures, organizers of the petition to halt military research on
campus plan to have a referendum
on the issue soon.
The petition campaign ended
Wednesday, and organizers say
they are now arranging for a
referendum to coincide with the
Jan. 25 to 27 Alma Mater Society
elections.
Campaign organizer Gary Marchant said some students
misunderstood the petition.
"A lot of people were thinking
this is stopping research in general
but it is just against developing
weapons of mass destruction," he
said.
Organizer Jennifer Kinloch said
banners and posters and billboards
plan for referendum
are planned for the campaign's second stage.
A referendum can only be held
when at least 500 signatures are
brought to the AMS vice-president.
The answer to the question must be
either yes or no, and student council
must set a date between 10 and 30
days after a council meeting,
Don Robert, student administrative commission returning
officer, said a jointly held referen
dum would not cost any more than
the $500 per day paid by the AMS
for its elections, and would not require much more work.
"It's less hassle if you do the
referendum with other elections,"
he said.
AMS director of^administration
Alan Pinkney said the referendum
could "possibly" be held during the
AMS elections.
Board may back down
Apathy reigns over elections
By NEIL LUCENTE
Although this year's voter turnout for student
board and senate elections did not dip down to last
year's all-time low of six per cent, it only faired one
percentage point better.
This year's seven per cent turnout was a disappointment, considering the importance of student
board and senate members' roles, said elections
commissioner Simon Sheshadri.
"When there's 28,000 students and only 2,080
voted, it's still a poor turnout despite the fact that
one-third more people voted," he said. Last year's
turnout was 1,593.
The winners of the board elections race are (the
envelope please): Dave Frank, with the highest
number of votes for any candidate, 1,220; and Don
Holubitsky with 979.
The new senators at large are: Donna Chow, 884
votes; Marvin Friesen, 758; Barry Mah, 628; Bill
Pegler, 693 and Phil Penner, 732. Eleven candidates ran for the five positions.
The newly elected faculty senate reps include
Joseph Rutherford for agricultural sciences with 29
votes; Steve King, forestry, 84; Eva Busza, arts,
172; Ronald Yavvorsky, graduate studies, 66; John
Kelsall, Science, 34.
Many of the newly elected senate and board
members, though pleased, are disappointed by the
low turnout.
"Many of the posters including mine failed to address any of the issues. Voter turnout was highly
disappointing as well. Therefore, I feel that the few
students who did vote did not exactly know about
all the issues. And I think it's going to be hard to
gauge what students want," said Donna Chow.
A short campaign and an early election kept
voters from the polls, said Marvin Friesen.
"The election was too soon after the Christmas
holidays. I feel the abruptness of the elections was
not good for voter turnout and the students'
familiarity with the issues," he said.
Students almost did not receive the election
results because of a computer failure, said elections
co-ordinator Mary Raphael.
"I'm going to leave town when the candidates
come to demand results," said Raphael before the
computer was fixed.
By ROBERT BEYNON
An administration proposal to
double tuition fees over three years
may be modified, board of governors members said Thursday.
"The majority of board members
believe an increase is warranted, but
how much of an increase hasn't
been determined," board faculty
representative William Morrison
said.
He said board members disagree
on the issue, adding he believes tuition fees should only rise to reflect
the cost of living this year.
"I think there's one or two board
members who think as I do" Morrison said. "In fact, I'm working
with the student board members
Dave Frank and Margaret Copping
in their fight against the proposed
increases in tuition."
Although Social Credit appointed board member Alan. Pierce
did not say he opposed Ihe administration's proposal, he also said
it might be altered at the meeting.
"We're going to be discussing
that at the next meeting, we expect
we'll have more information then."
Board member Hugh Greenwood
said he had an idea of what this new
information is, but he did not want
to speculate.
"In general I see no way to avoid
a fee increase," he said, adding he
did not want to comment on possible changes yet.
Board member G. H. D. Hobbs
said he would not know the board's
decision regarding fees until the
board voted on the matter.
"We'll be considering the submissions by students in addition to
the president's proposals," Hobbs
said.
But student board member
Margaret Copping said she thinks
large tuition fee increases are inevitable, even if the present proposal is altered. "I've accepted the
inevitability of the increase without
being reconciled to ."
Copping said students should
support the Alma Mater Society's
petition against the increases to remind the board continually of their
concerns in the hope it will affect
future board decisions.
UBC administration president George Pedersen said the petition would not sway the board and
he did not anticipate any change to
the current proposal.
"There aren't any options," he
said. "The board is going to be funding a $12 million deficit and the
fee increase will only cover a third
of its next year." Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, January 13, 1984
Strutt and Bankes find intimate guitar setting
By ELENA MILLER
The classical guitar is by nature
an instrument which requires a
small, intimate setting to be appreciated. The Vancouver East Cultural Centre provided such an atmosphere Sunday for the guitar duo
of Michael Strutt and Paul Bankes.
An appreciative audience of about
100 responded positively to the performance of mainly classical 18th
century and modern 20th century
repertoire.
The first half of the program focused on the classical period, including a sonata by Soler and a fandango by Boccherini. Fernando
Sor, a prolific composer for the
classical guitar, was also represented by a pleasant if innocuous suite,
Les Deux Amis. But the most interesting piece was a 20th century
work, Trois Climats by Francis
Kleynjans. These three whimsical
mood pieces composed in 1981 contained moments of dissonance and
variations in rhythm and tempo —
an interesting contrast to the less
varied classical pieces on the program.
The second half concentrated on
the 20th century, including works
by two Canadian composers, Michael Baker and Edward Arteaga.
Baker is perhaps best known for his
work as a film composer; he composed the music for The Grey Fox.
His work for two guitars, En
Rapport, is pleasing and musically
imaginative, making use of a range
of guitar sounds. By contrast, Arteaga's Seven Variations for Two
Guitars seems less varied, imaginative and somewhat repetitive.
The program's last work was a set
of three lively Spanish-sounding
pieces by Ernesto Halffter.
The concert overall was a good
balance of 18th century and 20th
century pieces. But the second set
was by far the most interesting.
Struttis and Bankes' ensemble
playing was stimulating, although
Strutt was clearly the more experienced and technically secure. Both
made effective use of the tonal possibilities of the guitar by playing
near the bridge to produce a sharp,
tinny sound, and also far up the
neck to produce a rich, mellow
sound. Throughout the performance the duo maintained control
over the dynamic range of their in
struments, playing softly yet
audibly as well as loudly and boldly.
Earlier in the week Strutt gave a
free noon hour concert on campus.
This solo performance demonstrated Strutt's solid technique and careful musicianship. Strutt's approach
to the guitar seems primarily intellectual rather than emotional. His
playing of the two colorful and dramatic etudes by Villa-Lobos featured on the program seemed lifeless
and uninspired. Strutt was unwilling to risk playing a flawed note for
the sake of some musical or emotional expressiveness.
But the rest of the program highlighted Strutt's strength as a sensitive and intelligent musician. A
piece by the modern Cuban guitarist and composer Leo Brower,
Parabola, was very well done, as
was a piece by Canadian composer
Robert Benedict, Two Dances and
Fugue.
But the concert's highlight was
undoubtedly the Nocturnal by Benjamin Britten. This classic of modern guitar repertoire is a theme and
variations loosely based on a song
by the Elizabeth lutenist and composer, John Dowland. The variations are miniature tone-poems,
with titles such as Musingly and
Gently Rocking.
The theme is not stated until the
very end of the piece, where it
comes through with a feeling of absolute beauty and serenity. Strutt
captured this feeling perfectly in
performance perfectly — and that
moment made the recital well worth
attending.
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CLOSING DA TE: FEBRUAR Y 10, 1984
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library ro
Vont fooch Friday, January 13,1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
David Thompson fights closure
Students, faculty and the community of Nelson are fighting the
Social Credit government's decision
to close the David Thompson
University Centre.
Tom Wayman, poet and former
writing instructor of the centre was
hired for two weeks as a media consultant Wednesday at a special student council meeting to organize the
protest.
Wayman will coordinate five ac
tion committees which will be
responsible for letter writing,
distributing a petition, releasing
human interest stories to the media,
organizing campus, community,
and trade union support.
COWARDLY SENATORIAL CANDIDATE disguised as Jersey Cow is caught by eager Ubyssey photog nibbl
ing on tree and generally ignoring early election predictions. "The whole thing reminded me of the story of Ferdinand the Bull," said the cow. "Now I can see that elections at UBC re far less important than sitting 'round smell
ing the daisies." As photog left, the cow emitted a gurgle and was seen to re-hash the same old issues.
Lunch with Andre will be no feast
You are cordially invited to have
lunch with Andre Tuesday.
But even at $10 a plate, don't expect to walk away full because
lunch consists of a glass of juice.
Tuesday's lunch is a benefit to
appease the hunger for human
rights in this province by raising
money for the B.C. Human Rights
Coalition.
The menu is the same UBC grad
student Andre Sobolewski has had
during his 27 day fast for human
rights.
Sobolewski sustains his commitment with deep spiritual reserves
despite a lack of response from
government officials.
"No one has even acknowledged
receiving any of my letters," he
said.
"Passive resistance, without
anger accusations and blame, is the
most appropriate form of protest,"
he said, "I want others to
acknowledge that there is a need for
change, a need to elevate human
rights above the realm of political,"
he added.
Sobolewski's fast is a strong personal stance against the government's decision to exterminate the
human    rights    commission    and
revise   the   B.C.   Human   Rights
Code.
He has lost more weight and is
"feeling his bones" he said. Dr.
Percival-Smith has altered
Sobolewski's vitamin diet to correct
deficiences detected by blood tests.
Lunch with Andre is sponsored
by the B.C. Human Rights Coalition and the UBC Campus Community Alliance. Also present will
be UBC law professor Bill Black, a
member of B.C. Civil Liberties
association; Alicia Lawrence, a
member of the B.C. human rights
coalition, and Andre Sobolewsk;,.
Students decided at the meeting
to seek a reversal of the government's decision "by whatever
means possible."
All of the centre's student council's second term funding is devoted
to the campaign, said council
member Ben Nichovolodoff.
"We've just come off the
Solidarity thing and we've got some
experience. We're really pumped up
for it."
But students are still concerned
about a relocation allowance which
is considered inadequate by some
halfway through their programs.
Dick Melville, information services
director for the education ministry,
said a ceiling of about $3,000 will be
allocated to students in addition to
financial aid.
A Jan. 4 press release issued by
NDP universities critic Lome
Nicholson said at least $4,000
would be necessary for each relocation allowance.
Wayman said many students are
reluctant to move from Nelson.
"There are students who sold their
houses because they were going to
study rural education here."
Some of the centre's programs,
including graphics, writing and
woodworking, could be relocated to
nearby Selkirk college in Castlegar,
said Nichovolodoff. The college
shared the responsibility for funding the centre with the University
of Victoria.
Melville added the programs are
available in eight other colleges in
the interior. But he admitted it will
be hard to relocate the rural education program that trained teachers
to work in a rural setting.
Thefts may raise
SUBway prices
SARAH MILLIN
SUB food prices may dramatically increase if theft in the Subway
cafeteria does not subside, according to Subway's business manager.
Subway loses about $8 per day
because of students stealing food,
said Helen Wilden. "This could be
reflected in the prices if it gets really, really bad."
The increase in theft has prompted the cafeteria to hire three people
who specifically monitor stealing
during lunch hour, she said. If one
counter person spots a student eating or stealing food, she or he will
immediately tell a supervisor, she
added.
Theft from Subway is at its highest in September or October when
students are waiting for their student loans to arrive, she said.
"As the students' budgets get
tighter, there is a real increase."
Although catching thieves is difficult, the cafeteria will prosecute
the individuals responsible, Wilden
said. Only one person so far has
been caught and executed for stealing a sandwich.
From September  1981  to mid-
Conditions horrify
February 1982, Subway lost $11,930
in stolen cutlery and china. Wilden
said the cafeteria may switch to
more plastic utensils and plates instead of stainless cutlery and china
to cut down the loss.
"We have three or four people a
week who come in here with the intent to steal," Wilden said.
When a student is caught eating
something or stealing, he or she is
asked by the cashier to pay for the
item, Wilden said.
"I'm not afraid to ask them,"
added Wilden.
Student reaction to the increase
in theft was mixed.
"I steal cutlery from the Subway
because they're stupid enough to allow it," said one student who wished to remain anonymous.
"I'm surprised at the amount,"
UBC graduate Sonia Mysko said.
"I personally have seen instances of
people stealing cutlery but I have
never seen people stealing food,"
she added.
"I don't steal food," said El-
speth Robinson, arts 3. "I live at
home so I don't steal cutlery," she
added.
Salvadoreans lack voice
By VICTOR WONG
Poverty stricken children, many
wearing rags, a few bloated and dying of malnutrition. A young
woman clutching a naked child at
the door of a little hut. Young boys,
some barely in their teens, learning
the art of guerilla warfare.
These were some of the images
conveyed in a slide show Thursday
of a refugee camp near San
Salvador by Jim Harney, a former
priest who spent four years working
with the El Salvadorean peasantry.
Harney, who showed the slides to
a small audience in Buch. B221,
described the El Salvadorean
peasantry as "people without a
voice." Most refugees are elderly
people, women and children and a
few have lived in the camps for
more ♦hart three years, he said.
"Most of these people are
abstractions for the Reagan administration. When you call
abstractions 'extremists, communists and subversives,' it
becomes easy to kill them," he said.
Many of the refugees are unable
to walk the streets at night because
they lack identity cards, he said. "If
you go out at night without a card,
you might end up becoming one of
the    missing    persons    of   El
Salvador."
Funded partially by the U.S.
government, the Salvadorean army
attacks the rebel soldiers as well as
the peasants because the guerilla
forces largely come from the
peasantry, Harney said.
"The Reagan administration
would have people believe that outside agitators are causing trouble
among the people, but the spirit is
coming right from the heart of the
people.
"If the U.S. withdrew its support
from the regime, the Salvadorean
government would collapse," he
added.
Harney said the rebels want El
Salvador to be a non-aligned country. "They want to be a friend of
the U.S., and they recognize that
the U.S. is the dominant power in
the region. But they also want to
continue relations with Cuba, the
Soviet Union and Nicaragua."
At the slide presentation's end,
Harney quoted from a song he
heard from a refugee child he met in
the countryside:
"Don't ask me who I am or what
I am/ Things will happen even
when I'm not there/ I am of all
ages/ Even when I die I'll be as old
as any liberated child ..." Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, January 13, 1984
Loose canvas evokes ecstacy
By HOLLY NATHAN
The sole occupant of an otherwise empty gallery is a loose piece of
canvas, suspended from the ceiling
like a curtain. One side is entitled
The Pure Gold Baby that Melts to a
Shriek. The other is entitled Stars in
the Eyes — a Landscape. If you
stare at the work long enough, you
may find yourself experiencing a
religious ecstacy, or quietly contemplating the mysteries of the
universe.
The art of
Catherine MacTavish
UBC Fine Arts Gallery
On display until
Jan. 27
If it is unusual for one work by
one person to take up residence in
an entire gallery, it is also unusual,
in this age of mass-production and
flashy art, to find a work with two
years of life dedicated to it.
But Catherine MacTavish has
done that and more. She incorporated the theories of Einstein,
Liebnitz and Scientific American
with archetypal Egyptian, Mayan
and Persian patterns, to produce a
unique vision — one that is a result
of studies in the nature of optics,
light physics, and trips to museums
around the world. Philosophically
speaking, it seems MacTavish has
incorporated the whole of human
existence into one work.
On a literal plane the canvas Stars
in the Eyes captures the shimmering
night lights of Vancouver's north
shore on the water, and the
radiating glow of night stars. But
on another level the work is an exercise in perception. The glittering
glass, beads, and paint merely
allude to mountains and stars. It
appears MacTavish has captured
the very air between perception and
reality and left the viewer hovering
somewhere in between.
There is no end to the intellec-
tualization of a single piece of art,
as MacTavish herself indicates
through extracts displayed from a
journal which she wrote as she
worked. In her written work, the
poetry, analysis and self-
consciousness of an artist is obvious.
There is a disturbing quality to
Stars in the Eyes. MacTavish's
almost scientific interest in the
nature of perception gives her work
an awareness of the frailty of
human sense and the illusory quality of life. But she presented an old
philosophical dilemma: if the
universe is only a reflection of what
we are, then there can be no objective reality.
And there is the other side to the
artwork — The Pure Gold Baby
that Melts into a Shriek. It is the antithesis of everything in the Stars —
a   formless,   chaotic   and   almost
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spontaneous rendering of brown,
splatters of red, and brutal needles
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The problem of reconciling opposing forces, the problem of
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WARNING — Some nudity & sex.
B.C. DIRECTOR
Crfer** Friday, January 13, 1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Photographs see more
sharply than eye
By NEIL LUCENTE
"Photography has tremendous
social value. Upon the
photographer rests the responsibility and duty of recording a true image of the world as it is today ..."
— From the Photo League
Statement of Principles
This social commitment is based
on a tenet held by all Photo League
photographers — that by its nature
the camera actually sees more
sharply than the eye.
Jerome Liebling Photographs
Photos by Jerome Liebling
108 pp.
University of Massachusetts Press
$25
During its 23 year existence, the
Photo League dedicated itself
to documenting events of social
significance overlooked or avoided
by the commercial press.
Joining the League in 1974 (the
year the League was accused of be-
Boy and  car.  New York  City, 1948
ing "subversive" by the U.S. Attorney General), Jerome Liebling
showed an inbred sensitivity to
many social injustices in America.
Raised on New York's East Side
during the Depression, Liebling's
natural instinct was "to invite the
viewer's sympathetic interest,"
through photographs which evoke
the truth, not distortions of it.
Jerome Liebling Photographs
spans thirty years of photographic
development from the purely
documentary to his more abstract,
but no less powerful images of
later years.
Liebling makes
evident that which
we prefer to keep
hidden about
our condition
The pictures are not easy to
digest. They often incur feelings
ranging from mild queasiness to
deep disturbance. In two highly
visceral series, Liebling makes evident that which we prefer to keep
kept hidden about our condition.
He juxtaposes images from a New
York slaughterhouse with the butchered remains of human cadavers.
Following the viewer's initial
disgust comes a morbid fascination
soon overpowered by an unnerving
realization of the inevitable decomposition of all living forms.
Handball players, Miami Beach, 1978
In the series, "Politicians", he
captures the dreariness of political
life stripped of pomp and glory. In
an unusual John F. Kennedy portrait, Liebling shows him not as a
man larger than the presidency but
as someone struggling to restrain its
power to consume.
The gutted urban landscapes of
the "South Bronx" series reasserts
Liebling's reputation as a leading
visual commentator. The photos
are dated in the late '70s, years after
the areas' initial decay into the environmental disaster it is today. The
pictures are demoralizing because
the subject seems hopeless. But the
images were not intended to stir action, merely awareness.
Liebling's tendency to document
often gives way to love of the image
for its own sake. He's able to find
grace and high drama in the most
unlikely places. In the "Handball
Players' series, social comment is
edged to the brink of abstraction.
Isolation, fragmentation and
technical magnificence render exquisite images from figures which
we would not normally regard as
graceful.
Known as a documentary
photographer, the label is unfair
and limiting when applied to Liebling. His work embraces extreme
stylistic variations which surpass his
early journalistic work with the
Photo League. Liebling simply does
his work well by avoiding copies of
the world and by creating visions
never before seen.
Androids make mistake of trying to copy humans
By GORDON CLARK
Sex, rewiring and rock and roll —
that's all this Android needs.
Max is the almost perfect creation of a crazed scientist isolated in
a futuristic space station. The character played by Don Opper is the
focus of Android, Aaron Lipstadt's
first feature film.
His creator, Dr. Daniel (Klaus
Kinski), is an outlaw industrialist
who produces mechanical humans
illegally. Shut off in his own world,
Daniel is working on his final project — Cassandra (Kendra Kirch-
ner), the perfect android. But this
perfect android is presented as a vapid stereotype and she is ultimately
an embarrassment to the movie.
All Cassandra needs for activation is some sexual energy from another woman.
Android
Directed by Aaron Lipstadt
Playing at the Ridge
With all these elements the plot
meanders through a number of predictable scenes of sex and violence.
Although Opper provides an illuminating performance, large parts of
the film leave much to be desired.
Even though the film is quite juvenile, in parts it is a triumph when
one remembers it was made on a
small budget. Throughout we see
signs of inexpensive production
techniques, but these aspects can be
endearing.
It is refreshing to find a film that
offers a comparatively realistic pan
orama of the future. The film says
human frailty and technological
blunders still exist, but Android
compromises itself by offering simplistic character relationships.
In spite of some general weaknesses, the script is in many places
superb, and the characters of Max
and Dr. Daniel are offered many
opportunities to develop intelligently. Max's antics save the film. Consistently Opper's portrayal of the
sexually frustrated, and generally
far too human robot is humorous.
And it is only through Max's pan-
faced reactions to situations that we
are able to draw any meaning from
the film.
A main theme in the film is the
problems that arise when the androids program themselves through
learning to become too human. The
Munich Syndrome, as it is referred
to in the film, is not really a problem except when viewed with a human perspective.
Throughout the film we see the
attempt to create the perfect android — a mechanical re-creation of
humanity — but as this goal is
achieved and a mechanical person is
created  our  weaknesses  and  de
structive flaws are brilliantly illuminated.
The Munich Syndrome is not machinery gone berserk, it is the creation of a perfect human copy.
IQ(MM) screams of oooh,
oooh as tans wiggte=
By JACK TIELEMAN
The leading art rock bank Genesis finally played in Vancouver Monday
after a six year absence. Led by a somewhat schizophrenic Phil Collins, the
band demonstrated why they have been at the top for so long.
In a stunning visual and audio assault upon the concert-goer, Genesis
played both old and new material in a strong two and a half hour show.
Collins led the visual assault using the band's impressive lighting set-up.
Creative use of lighting was evident during Mama, when Collins had his
face lit by bright yellow beams that left his eyes and mouth darkened with
white light shooting up both sides of his head.
State-of-the-art Vari lights were also used throughout the show. These
high intensity lights formed an image resembling a prison around the stage.
Alongside the original lighting was equally innovative music supplied by
Collins on vocals and drums, Mike Rutherford on bass, Tony Banks on
keyboards, Daryl Stuermer on guitar and Chester Thompson on drums. A
highlight of the concert was dual playing by Thompson and Collins on their
drum kits.
But overall the group gave a consistent performance. Outstanding
numbers included Man on the Corner, Misunderstanding and Home By
The Sea.
Genesis also performed a medley of sixties hits including Satisfaction,
Pinball Wizard and All Day and All Night.
Anchoring the show was Collins who demonstrated strong stage presence
by joking with the audience, including some cracks about how Vancouver
is the centre of the universe. "Don't worry, I'll be saying the same shit in
Seattle tomorrow night," he said wryly.
Collins also toyed with the audience. At one point he told the crowd to
raise their arms above their heads, wiggle their hands and yell ooh ooh ooh.
The crowd of more than 10,000 promptly filled the Coliseum with sounds
of ooh ooh ooh, demonstrating the power of Genesis. Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
We need you!
The Ubyssey is chronically under-staffed.
The diehards straggling into the newsroom every press day need a few
blithe spirits to inject energy and enthusiasm into the office environment.
In other words, we're tired of being bleary-eyed and cranky and waking
up after everyone has finished lunch.
We've mentioned the effects of late production nights on our sex lives. If
you've read our staff ads and grey boxes closely, you'll know we never can
muster up the energy to throw wild mazola parties anymore.
Our passion, like our lubricants, has dried up.
But we are still obsessed with The Ubyssey and although we labor day
after night after day to produce the vilest rag west of Blanca, we need help.
At news conferences lately, we've had to scramble for copy to fill the
white space in around the ads. The fish wrap that lands on your doorstep
in the morning (the Province) and the bird cage liner that wafts by in the
afternoon (the Sun) still scoop us regularly.
Our campaigns to slam the Socreds, crap on the administration and expose the weak-kneed and slimy student politicians conspiring in SUB only
limp along because we don't have enough reporters aiming for the jugular.
Although we realize many students consider us to be out of touch with
the campus, or as one former Ubyssey staffer wrote in The Sun a while
back, "dogmatic and rhetorical," we still believe we provide a valuable service to students at UBC, whatever their political stripe.
But this service will be inconsistent and lacking in thought and scope if
we cannot encourage more students to write for the paper.
And there is no limit to what can be covered in The Ubyssey. You may
have noticed that we're writing about the same, old, tired issues — cutbacks, student aid, accessibility, tuition, budget shortfalls, hiring freezes,
protests, blah; blah, blah .  . .
While these issues are very important, affect almost all students on campus and must be written about, we need to expand our coverage.
This is where you come in. All you have to do is trudge up the steps to the
second floor in SUB, walk down the hall (but don't breathe because you
might get asbestos lodged in your lungs), and open the door to 241k — a
whole new world full of self-proclaimed anarchists (Dog Shit), revolutionaries in sheep's clothing (Sicker and Kiss Wrong), lovely and talented
Amazon sisters (Moral Dogma and Scare-ya Socks), and other students like
yourselves.
The Ubyssey needs newswriters, reviewers, photographers, graphic artists and designers. We want people interested in all aspects of culture, be
it bacterial or subversive, to write articles.
We want students to write features — one area of the paper that used to
distinguish The Ubyssey from other student newspapers across Canada.
And we need science students to cover many issues and events of which we
have only a feeble knowledge and understanding.
Remember, freedom of the press belongs to those who own it.
Friday, January 13, 1984
Letters
Geer shows cowardice
On Tuesday, Jan. 10, a red-
jacketed, male engineer came to the
front door of the Lutheran Campus
Centre, opened it, and threw a
chocolate bar at the feet of about
five students who were just about to
leave for afternoon classes.
He quite nervously said, "This is
a present for Andre," closed the
door and slowly walked away.
This letter is for you, whoever
you are.
I am not sure what you were trying to prove, especially since you
failed to give your present to Andre, himself. Perhaps you wanted
to mock him, perhaps you drew the
short straw after you and your buddies decided you were tired of left-
wing radicals making social
statements.
Well, your message failed. You
did not stay around long enough to
engage us (or Andre) in any sort of
dialogue. It was important enough
to spend 45 cents, but not important enough to spend any time.
You failed. Someone else ate
your chocolate bar. You thought
you understood the symbolism of
your act, but you are just another
sermon illustration on blindness.
You have put yourself in the same
league as the smart-ass at the foot
of the cross who thought a crown of
thorns would make a great joke; in
the same league as those who called
Martin Luther King, Jr., just
another nigger.
You have failed to look past the
fast at the Lutheran Centre to what
is happening in the world around
you. Instead, you join a long list of
those who seek to martyr people to
mock ideas. If you have a VTR, I
will pay for your viewing of Gandhi. If not, at least go back to the
Lutheran Centre willing to discuss
and defend your views.
If you cannot even do that, I fear
for your soul because you are on the
same path as those who made their
statements by sending Jews, communists, and homosexuals to the
gas-chambers. No wonder you were
so nervous.
Stuart Lyster
class of '77
THE UBYSSEY
January 13, 1984
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Fridays throughout the
academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of British
Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and are not
necessarily those of the university administration or the AMS.
Member Canadian UniversiU Press. The Ubyssey's editorial office is
SUB 241k. Editorial department, 228-2301/2305. Advertising
228-3977/3978.
"Free the Four," screamed professional demonstrators Robert Beynon and Rob Handfield in front of
president-for-life Neil Lucerne's palace. Tiger Beat reporter Chns Wong, covering the trial of Stephen
Wisenthal, Arnold Hedstrom, Sarah Millen and Jack Tieleman, was beaten by hoodlums led by chief
pig Tim Langmead as he attempted to question known leftist/liberals Holly Nathan and Muriel Draaisma. Anarchists Victor Wong and Gordon Clark giggled insanely as Charlie Fidelman and Patti
Flather drank the last few drops of their Molotov cocktails. Judge Peter Berlin passed judgment over
the friends of Mark Nielsen in the name of Queen Elena Miller. Doug Schmidt promised a follow-up on
the saga
"Sometimes
I don't believe
how far I will
go to make up
a shortfall."
Letters
UBC education to be buried
The once prominent actions of
the Solidarity Coalition have
recently slipped from the forefront
of the media's attention. But if the
fight against the Social Credit
government's policies has entered a
new and less dramatic phase, it still
continues with equal significance
and urgency.
In making its political choices the
current provincial government will
reduce its funding of our universities by six per cent. While even
more cuts are planned for the future
the immediate problem facing UBC
is an $18 million shortfall in the
university's operating budget. The
proposed doubling of tuition fees
over the next three years by the
UBC board of governors is its way
of making up the deficit (fees for
foreign students are slated to go up
even more).
Like all of the now familiar
Socred policies coming out of last
year's budget, and peddled under
the euphemism of "restraint," the
underfunding of post-secondary
education will be felt most by those
least capable of bearing its imposed
burdens: women, ethnic minorities,
the disabled, teaching assistants,
lower income students and those
faculty and staff members facing
layoffs.
A dramatic increase in tuition
fees is perhaps the most obvious
negative effect of government cutbacks, especially in terms of its attack on accessibility and cost of living standards. But campus layoffs
and wage freezes, diminished services, reduced student aid (accompanied by tougher qualifications),
and course or program cuts are also
aspects of a policy by which the
Socreds, and their allies on the
board of governors, are redefining
education.
Members of Students Against the
Budget oppose the dramatic rise in
tuition fees. But we see this as part
of a much more generalized assault
on this province's social structure.
As part of our campaign to prevent
fee increases and the demise of
education, .and to increase the
awareness of these issues on campus, SAB, with support from the
Campus Community Alliance, is
sponsoring a Funeral March on
Jan. 19, 1984.
Beginning at 12:30 p.m. at the
south side of SUB, speakers and
musicians will introduce the procession, which will march through
campus from 1 to 2 p.m. We invite
all students, faculty and staff to
join in. The march will end at the
old administration building, where
a symbolic burial will take place.
We urge all campus members to
consider their responsibilities in
preserving education in B.C. and
request your support. We, of
Students Against the Budget, are
determined to defend education,
not as a privilege, but as a right!
Ros Morris
students against the budget
Happy parents tell it all
Our story concerning UBC
Daycare is a happy one.
For over two years our daughter
has attended daycare on the UBC
campus and we have been members
of two of the cooperative daycare
societies organized by students,
staff, and faculty approximately 10
years ago. While the facilities for
the daycares are provided by the
university, organization, finances,
hiring and policy decisions are all
handled by the parents. Parent involvement is a requirement of the
cooperative system and allows for
considerable input in the molding
of the daycare environment.
To a large degree the staff, both
male and female (many of whom
have children of their own) are well
trained, competent and dedicated
people who give guidance, training
and affection to the children in their
care. To benefit the most from the
qualified staff, the parents do many
of the housekeeping chores in the
daycares. This frees the staff for
greater interactions with the
children.
We have been very pleased with
the opportunities and attention
which our daughter has received at
the daycare.
For this reason, we are disappointed to read the recent article
(UBC Daycare needs student society backing, Jan. 10) written by a
parent with an obvious chip on his
shoulder. Daycare isn't for all
children and cooperative societies
are certainly not for all parents, and
Mr. Lueck obviously falls into this
category. It seems contradictory
therefore that he recommends that
the Alma Mater Society should implement "a policy of student and
spouse organized daycare."
This is exactly what is now
available with the necessary continuity and expertise in childcare being provided by qualified staff. In
many ways the existing facilities are
great but they are old and for this
reason the efforts of the AMS in
planning and providing funding for
new daycare facilities is admirable.
Cooperative daycare is expensive
but many of us view this as far
preferable to cheaper babysitting
done by untrained, possibly preoccupied and transient parents as
recommended by Lueck.
While it is tempting to point out
the many comments in Lueck's article which are blatantly wrong, we
will simply agree with the headline
of his article, UBC Daycare needs
student society backing, and say
that many happy parents of daycare
children appreciate the support offered by the AMS.
Judith Myers
Jamie Smith
institute of animal
resource ecology
Zoology professor Friday, January 13, 1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
Centres clean, qualified, economical, safe
In Tuesday's edition of The
Ubyssey an angry parent suggested
that UBC daycares are unsafe, of
poor quality and profit-oriented.
He argues that what UBC needs is
co-operative parent-run daycare.
As parents who have chosen to
send our children to daycare cooperative Unit II, we would like to
respond to these allegations and express our enthusiasm for the quality
of care our children receive.
UBC has co-operative parent-run
daycare! The two independent
group centres on campus are all
parent-run, non-profit societies.
The parents, 70 per cent of whom
are students, set the fees, hire the
qualified staff, clean and maintain
the centres and in all but two centres spend between two to four
hours weekly working with the staff
to care for the children. All centres
are licensed and inspected by the
provincial childcare licensing
board.
What do we get for the money we
spend on daycare?
We get continuous and consistent
care. The centre is open from 8 a.m.
to 5 p.m., Monday to Friday, 12
months a year.
Although the daycare union
chose to support Solidarity last
November, they requested to be
classified as an essential service to
ensure that daycare service would
continue for as long as possible. In
fact, an agreement was made, at the
request of the daycare staff, that
picketing unions on campus not
restrict access to daycare centres.
We feel our children get the best
quality of care at Unit II. We would
like to assure readers that our centre
has an excellent staff, our children
have a warm and loving home away
from home and they do not consume cups-full of carpenter's glue!
Our staff are fully qualified and
trained to work in under-3 daycare.
They spend a lot of time developing
programs and creative activities for
the children. Our children are encouraged to develop self-discipline
through positive social interactions
and the experience of realistic consequences of behaviour.
The comfort of being in a cooperative setting is that there are
always parents around who, as well
as staff, observe the children's day.
This is a safeguard against abuse
and misinformation. Each and
every parent has a voice in change
and ample opportunity to grieve
any circumstance that is found inappropriate for childcare. Parents
and staff discuss the policies that
determine the quality of care at the
compulsory monthly meetings.
Parents who need to use daycare
must take the responsibility of
choosing and supporting the type of
care that suits their own childcare
philosophy. It is imperative that
parents feel good about the centre
their child attends. The reason for
choosing one centre over another is
to be sure that both you and your
child are happy.
The other issue raised in the article is the alleged high wages paid to
daycare workers.
At Unit II, the figure of $60,000
quoted for our three staff salaries is
inflated. Our workers are paid probably   less   than   most   clerical
GET A FREE TACO
WITH THE PURCHASE
OF A TACO
TACOV)
3396 West Broadway (at Waterloo)
Open 11 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. 7 days a week
393 East 12th Avenue (at Kingsway)
Open 11 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. 7 days a week
2028 W. 41st Street, Kerrisdale
Open 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. 7 days a week
Robson Square Food Fair (Hornby & Robson)
Open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. 6 days a week
(CLOSED SUNDAYS)
This coupon is good for a
FREE TACO
with the purchase of a Taco
COUPON MUST BE PRESENTED.
One offer per person.
EXPIRES JAN. 29th
"T
I I
workers. We feel we are getting
quality care and good value for our
money.
We have rent free huts with
thanks to the university but we must
pay for utilities (some of the UBC
centres pay almost $200 per month
for heat every month of the year
because the outdated equipment
cannot be regulated). We must also
pay for food, art and cleaning supplies as well as insurance and other
numerous annual expenditures. Our
revenue meets our expenses only
when we are fully enrolled.
Each family that chooses to join
the co-operative signs an agreement
which outlines the responsibilities
of the membership. One of these
responsibilities is to forward a
deposit of one half the monthly fee.
The agreement clearly states that
this deposit is refundable upon
withdrawal if a minimum notice, in
writing, of one calendar month,
"end of one month to end of next"
is given. This notice allows the centre to fill the space without loss of
revenue. A similar agreement is
signed at most group daycares as it
helps to ensure the economic
viability of the centre. Each
member of the parent group is
made fully aware of their responsibilities in this matter.
Unit II has 12 children, three
dedicated staff and parents coming
and going. It is a very busy place.
We have confidence in our centre.
The children greet parents at the
end of their day with an unmistakable feeling of well-being.
This ultimately makes the cost in
time and money well worthwhile.
At UBC we are fortunate to have
a choice in types of childcare. The
daycare buildings are rundown and
need to be replaced. The costs of
toddler care, in particular, are difficult   for   student   families   to
finance. We would suggest that the
AMS channel funds to student
families to subsidise the high costs
of under-3 daycare.
J. Deneer
P. McCullough N
Berger-Kline
I. Gummeson
T. Buican
K. Nelson
N. Calar
J. Sheehan
J. Gaskell
G. V aides
R. Hougham
Y. Mehrabedi
R. Loewen
U.B.C. DEPARTMENT
OF STUDENT HOUSING
Invites Applications for
Residence Advisors for 1984-85
These positions are open only to full-time
registered U.B.C. students. Successful applicants
will be required to live in the residences. Application forms and detailed job descriptions are
available at the Ponderosa Housing Office and at
the Front Desk of each single student residence
area: Totem Park, Place Vanier and W.H. Gage.
Applications will be accepted from January 3 to
January 13, 1984 at the Front Desks of the Single
Student Residences, or at the Ponderosa Housing
Office. Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, January 13, 1984
«>
Vancouver
after Classes ...
THE KEG
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Wednesday's
Student Night
Enjoy Caesar's for Dinner
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GREEK CUISINE & A
TOUCH OF THE MEDITERRANEAN, IN THE
HEART OF KITSILANO.
S   2272 W. 4th Ave.     736-2118
IPIaYZaVZZ!*:'
show room      :
B.B.  KING     | Wynton Marsalis
Jan. 16 to Jan. 28 Feb. 1 to Feb. 11
Tickets S^fedQ Tickets £&£Q
Mon. to Thurs.
2nd Performance
Mon. to Thurs.
2nd Performance
Only $10.00  \    Only $7.50
Tickets   in   advance   at
V.T.C. Outlet
FOR  INFO.  AND  RES.  CALL
280-4444
International Plaza
Corner Marine Dr. Et Capilano Road
984-0611
any
HOTEL UNDER
THE DOME Friday, January 13, 1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 9
Daycare deserves support, not criticism
As professors in the Faculty of
education at UBC and parents who
have enrolled two children at Unit 2
daycare, we were appalled by the
distortions in your recent Perspectives piece, UBC daycare needs student society backing (Jan. 10).
By printing such an obviously inaccurate account at a time when so
many social services are under attack, The Ubyssey has done a
disservice to the students, staff and
faculty who have struggled over the
years to build and maintain the
quality of this essential service.
The daycare centres on campus
already are what the article calls for
small, parent run, non-profit
organizations   providing   healthy,
stimulating and caring environments for children. The centres are controlled by parents. At
the monthly meetings everything is
open for discussion and, over the
years we have been involved with
daycare, almost everything has been
discussed. This includes questions
of hiring staff and setting budgets
as well as the details of what kind of
Law Students
Legal Advice Program
For Clinic Locations Call
228-5791 or 872-0271
LOVE
i/QuicheS "A
SCXJP / SALAD
QUICHE
A\
X*.
V       $ 4 95
A * Evsryday ,"
^ir horn '"*!•/,
A    , 5:30-7:30
'      . Ci ( a\ the back ot the Village )       Jf:
■ */ ■■■+/■"'
NO RETURNS
OF TEXTBOOKS
AFTER JAN 31
The Bookstore regrets that,
due to the need to negotiate
and arrange for the return of
overstock to publishers in
specific quantities and bv a
deadline, NO RETURNS OF
WINTER SESSION
TEXTBOOKS will be accepted
after
JANUARY 31st 1984
The last day for changes ot
classes is Jan 13th, 1984 so the
needs of students changing
classes will he accommodated.
Because of the 10-day rule
TEXTBOOKS BOUGHT
AFTER JAN 21st 1984 WILL
BE NON-RETURNABLE.
MSBOOKSTQ
juice to buy and what to do with
parents who fail to live up to their
agreement. The centres are nonprofit societies that exist on a financial shoestring. The staff receive
low wages compared to other professionals with similar qualifications and responsibilities.
The centres offer high  quality
education to the children who are
there. Well-trained, experienced
and hard working staff provide all
sorts of opportunities for children
to explore the physical and social
world in a safe and responsible
manner. The staff deserve our
thanks and support, not ill informed criticism.
We could have found cheaper
babysitting   for   our   children.
However, as parents and educators,
we felt Unit 2 provided the best environment for our children's happiness, social development and intellectual growth. We have not been
disappointed.
Jim Gaskell
assistant education professor
Jane Gaskell
associate education professor
THE LONG DISTANCE
CONTEST
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life   9:
Hi    JP
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;s4>;    X*%'
lajp. !:3$ji# sip'
* 3%. Ilk «#:. .
YOU COULD
WIN A1984
FORD BRONCO II   ^r-~~-
Dana Montgomery of
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Doug Watson Jr. of Malaspina College, Cobble
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on the world's liveliest bronco. A brand new 4-wheel drive Ford Bronco II. It's a
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PLEASE ENTER ME IN THE LONG DISTANCE PHONE SWEET HOME CONTEST.
Name.
(Please print)
Address.
City/Town.
Province _
. Postal Code.
Tel. No. (where you can be reached)
(-
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College or University attended .
Mail to: The Long Distance
PHONE SWEET HOME Contest,
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The Long Distance "Phone Sweet Home" Contest, Contest Rules and Regulations
1. To enter and qualify, til in the official entry form and mail to The Long Distance  Phone Sweet Home  Contest Box 1487. Station A
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Contest will commence September 1.1983. Mail each entry in a separate envelope bearing sufficient postage
2 There will be a total of 3 prizes, awarded (see rule #3 for prize distribution) Each prize will consist of a 1984 Ford Standard Bronco II
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the ford dealer nearest the winner's residence in Canada All prizes will bE awarded Only one prize per person Prizes must be accepted as
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3 A draw will be made from ail entries received by the contest organization on October 14 December 1 1983 and the contest closing date
February 15, 984 Prizes will be awarded as follows one Bronco H will be awarded from afl entries received by NOON October 14 December 1
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Station -D; Ottawa. Ontario, K1P BH5
4 This contest is open only -q students of the age of ma|onty in the province in which they reside who are registered full-time at any accredited
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5 'Quebec Flesidents * /TiTTTTft
All taxes eligible under tne loi sur les ictenes 'es courses, les concours publicitaires et    *^_/ III if If III
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Telecom    Canada Page 10
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, January 13, 1984
Matte
NITECLUBBING
Mark Hasselbach: horns player from Powder
Blues with his own quartet, Jan. 15. Classical
Joint. 231 Carrall, 689-0667.
Harold Krauss: a mainstream jazz musician
with his quintet, Jan. 18, Classical Joint.
Doctor Jazz: a group incorporating a unique
blend of musical styles including New Orleans
jazz, blues and R and B, Jan. 14, Hot Jazz
Club, 36 E. Broadway, 873-4131.
Larry Monroe's Swing Quartet: dixieland at
its best, Jan. 17, Hot Jazz Club.
David Raven Band: local rock band with cool
leather threads, Jan. 16-21. Town Pump.
B.B. King: the old blues rocker is back with his
guitar Lucille, Jan. 16-28, Plazazz, International  Plaza  Hotel,  North Van.,   reduced
prices.
CONCERT CONNECTION
Rural Delivery: a folk version of the Rolling
Stones,   Jan.   13,   Oddfellows  Hall.   1720
Gravely.
Masterpiece Music: quartet performing the
music   of   Bach,    Handel,   Telemann   and
Quantz,  Jan.   15,  Vancouver East Cultural
Centre, 254-9578. •
Jerry Jeff Walker: down to earth sounds
with a down to earth kind of guy, Jan. 17-18,
Soft Rock Cafe.
Gun  Club:  an interesting mix of voodoo
rockabilly and Southern spunk, Jan. 19, The
Commodore.
Magnetic Band: featuring Arlie Thompson,
Patrick Webb and seven other top Vancouver
classical musicians, Jan. 20, 8 p.m., 291-3514.
CAMPUS SOUNDS
Noon-hour concert: music of Shubert performed by Silverman, Stanick and others, Jan.
18, noon, recital hall.
«
CAMPUS FILM
Cinema 16 (SUB Auditorium, 228-3697) Jan.
16: The Man With A Movie Camera, 6:30
and 8:30 p.m.
REPERTORY CINEMA
Vancouver East Cinema (7th and Commercial, 254-5455) Jan. 20-22: Merry
Christmas, Mr. Lawrence, 7:30 p.m.; Double Suicide, 9:45 p.m. Jan. 23-24; Death of
A Salesman, 7:30 p.m.; Contempt, 9:30
p.m. Jan. 25-26; Taming of the Shrew, 7
p.m.; The Lion In Winter, 9:15 p.m.
Ridge Theatre 116th and Arbutus, 738-63111
Android, 7:30 and 9:30 p.m., a science-fiction
film starring Klaus Kinski.
Savoy Cinema (Main and Kingsway,
872-21241 Jan. 13-15; Baby, It's You. 7:30
p.m.; Cutters Way, 9:30 p.m. Jan. 16-17; All
That Jazz, 7:30 p.m.; Fame, 9:45 p.m. Jan.
18-19; The Gold Rush, 7:30 p.m.; A Night at
the Opera, 9:15 p.m.
Hollywood Theatre (3123 W. Broadway,
738-321II Jan. 13-15; Breathless, 7:30
p.m.; The King of Comedy, 9:30 p.m. Jan.
16-22; Without a Trace, 7:30 p.m., The Verdict, 9:35 p.m.
ALTERNATIVE CELLULOID
Society Promoting Environmental Conservation (2150 Maple, 736-SPEC) Jan. 14: Death
of a Legend, Garbage Ouroborus, A Crowded
Wilderness, 2-4 p.m., environmental films.
Pacific Cinemetheque (1156 W. Georgia,
732-6119) Jan. 13: 1984 and Animal Farm,
an Orwell Feast, 7:30 and 9:30 p.m. Jan.
14-15: Anton the Magician, 7:30 and 9:30
p.m. Jan. 18: Teorema, 7:30 p.m. Jan. 19:
Beauty and The Beast, 7:30 p.m.; Orpheus,
9:30 p.m.
CAMPUS THEATRE
The Importance of Being Earnest: A Serious
Comedy for Trivial People. Jan. 11-21, 8
p.m., Frederic Wood Theatre, 228-2678.
ON THE TOWN
K2: by Patrick Meyers, Men climb a mountain
on stage, Jan. 14 to Feb. 11, Q.E. Playhouse,
687-4444.
Key Exchange: by Kevin Wade, Comedy
about modern relationships, Jan. 13 to Feb.
18. Mon. Fri. 8:30 p.m., Sat. 6:30 & 9:30
p.m.. Arts Club Theatre on Seymour,
687-1644.
Albert Einstein: The Practical Bohemian: by
Ed Metzger, One-man play about the famous
scientist. One performance only, Jan. 19, 8
p.m., SFU Theatre, 291-3514.
North Shore Live: spoof about live TV shows,
Mon.-Fri. 8 p.m.. Sat. 6 and 9 p.m. until Feb.
4, Vancouver East Cultural Centre, 254-9578.
Piaf. Her Songs. Her Loves: musical about the
life of singer Edith Piaf, Held over until Jan. 28.
Tues.-Sat. 8:30 p.m. at City Stage, 688-1436.
Reflections on Crooked Walking: musical
fantasy. Held over until Jan. 21, Tues.-Fri. 8
p.m.. Sat. 6:30 & 9:30, Arts Club Theatre
Granville Island, 687-4444.
I Dol I Dol: musical comedy about marriage,
held over to Jan. 28 Mon.-Fri. 8:30 p.m., Sat.
6:30 & 9:30 p.m., Arts Club Revue Theatre on
Granville Island, 687-4444.
The Mother: by Bertolt Brecht, return engagement for three nights only, Jan. 20-22 8:30
p.m., Theatre Space on Water Street,
681-0618.
JzxUi>ik
Three Figurative Painters: Leonard Brett,
Colette French, Wendy Hamlin, Jan. 12-Feb.
15, Surrey Art Gallery, 13750 88th Ave., Surrey. 596-1515.
ME ME ME: See artists as they see themselves,
a self-portrait show with Oraf, Cummins, Vicky
Marshall and more, Jan. 16-28 Unit/Pitt
Gallery, 163 Pender Street, 681-6740.
Both Sides: An exhibition of one work by
Catharine MacTavish, ends January 27, UBC
Fine Art Gallery, 228-2759.
Manet and Balthus: Books and Posters, Jan.
17-Feb. 1, MX. Duthie Gallery, 776 Thurlow
Street, 6894766.
Photography in Louisiana — 1900-1980: A
collection of works drawn from the New
Orleans Museum of Art, Presentation House,
upper gallery, Jan. 5-Feb. 26, 333 Chesterfield
Ave., North Vancouver, 986-1351.
William G. Black
MEMORIAL PRIZE
A prize in the amount of $1,250 has been
made available by the late Dr. William G.
Black for an essay on some aspect of
Canadian contemporary society. The
topic will be designed to attract students
Trom all disciplines. The competition is
open to all students who are enrolled in
undergraduate programs and who do not
already possess a graduate degree. A
single essay topic of general nature related
to Canadian contemporary society will be
presented to students at the time of the
competition. Duration of the competition
will be two hours.
Time and Place:
SATURDAY, JAM ARY 21, 1984
Bl'CHAINAN 104
10:00 a.m. - 12 noon
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RESTAURANT
3293 West 4th Avenue at Blenheim.
Sun - Warmth - Icy and Sudsy Refreshments
Plus Spicy Mexican Cuisinesl
d\
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"A unique amenity with genuine personality" — Courier
"One of the best restaurant discoveries in Vancouver — C.F.O.X.
Order a Tijuana Twin Burrito and get our
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Expires January 31,'1984
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Fiesta
FIRST YEAR STUDENTS' COMMITTEE
Dance, 8 p.m. to 12 a.m., Partyroom SUB.
ZZ PHURST YEAR ENGINEERS
Geer garden, 3 p.m., SUB 207/209.
NEWMAN PARTY
Skating party, 5:30 p.m., St. Mark's College.
SATURDAY
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Classes begin, the new Danceworks piece, 1st
practice.
THUNDERBIRD CREW CLUB
Dance with "Rage," tickets available for $5 from
crew members and the AMS concert box office,
7:30 to 1 a.m., SUB Ballroom.
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
One day ski trip, 9 a.m.. Cypress.
THUNDERBIRD HOCKEY
Canada West hockey match vs defending Canadian champions Saskatchewan Huskies, 8 p.m.,
Thunderbird Arena.
SUNDAY
ST. MARK'S COLLEGE
Coffeehouse, 8 p.m., St. Mark's College music
room.
UBC SPORTS CAR CLUB
Winter series slalom #6, registration, 9 a.m.,
Blot.
MONDAY
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Submissions for the Gay/ Lesbian student artists
show, for information on submissions call Michael at 228-4638 or Barb at 669-1753.
STUDENTS FOR PEACE
AND MUTUAL DISARMAMENT
Film: No First Use, and information on campaign
against military research on campus, noon, SUB
205.
TUESDAY
ANARCHIST CLUB
Noam Chomsky speaking on language and politics (videotape interview), noon, Buch. B222.
EAST INDIAN STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Executive meeting, noon to 1:30 p.m., SUB 212.
FIRST YEAR STUDENTS' COMMITTEE
Meeting, noon, SUB 215.
OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS
General meeting, 12 to 1 p.m., Lutheran Campus
Centre, conference room.
GAY AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Planning session, all welcome, 4:30 p.m., SUB
239.
HUNGER PROJECT CANADA
Briefing — a presentation giving the facts of
where, how much, and why hunger exists in the
world, 6 p.m., 1652 W. 8th.
LUNCH WITH ANDRE
A "lunch" with Andre Sobolewski, who is fasting for human rights, consisting of a glass of rice
and an empty plate, coordinated with the B.C.
human rights commission and the media, noon,
Lutheran Campus Centre, $10.00/plate donation
for participants, 224-3722.
Daniel Leveille: a dance troupe touching on
issues like homosexuality, nudity and
voyeurism, Jan. 18-21, 8:30 p.m., Firehall
Theatre, 280 E. Cordova, 689-0926.
TODAY
PSI UPSILON FRATERNITY
Superstition party, 8 p.m. to 1 a.m., Psi U
House, 2260 Wesbrook Mail.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration for classes and new Danceworks
piece, noon, SUB main floor.
PHILOSOPHY STUDENTS' UNION
Wine and cheese party, all philosophically-minded types welcome, 7:30 p.m.. International
House.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Film, Beyond the Next Mountain, a powerful film
on missions, 7:30 p.m., Angus 104.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
General meeting, noon. International House.
UBC DANCE CLUB
Special Friday class with street hustle lessons,
noon to 2:30 p.m., SUB ballroom.
THUNDERBIRD HOCKEY
Canada West hockey match vs defending Canadian champions, Saskatchewan Huskies, 8 p.m.,
Thunderbird Arena.
U.B.C. DEPARTMENT OF STUDENT HOUSING^
Invites Applications For The Position Of
SENIOR RESIDENCE
ADVISOR FOR 1984-85
Single Student Residences
The ideal applicants for these positions will be students who are in
their final undergraduate year, are unclassified, or are graduate
students and who have substantial experience living and working in
residence. These positions will be attractive to those who have skills
and interests in working in an extensively people oriented field. Major responsibilities include the following:
(a) Supervising the residence's Advisors.
(b) Being the contact person between the Department and the
Residence Association.
(c) Ensuring that proper standards of behaviour are maintained.
Those interested in applying to be a Senior Residence Advisor
should submit a resume and letter explaining their reasons for being
| interested in the position to Dima Utgoff, Assistant Director Student
Housing, at the Ponderosa Housing Office (mailing address: 2071
| West Mall, University Campus, Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1Y9 on or
before Friday, January 13, 1984. Please phone Dima at 228-5778 for
(further information about these positions.
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: AMS Card Holders — 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; additional lines, 60c. Commercial — 3 lines,
1 day $4.20; additional lines, 65c. Additional days, $3.80 and 60c.
Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 10:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications, Room 266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
Charge Phone Orders over $5.00. Call228-3977. '   VISA
COMING EVENTS
30 - JOBS
80 - TUTORING
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| ADANAC TOURS LTD.	
SKI   *&
Weekends
Y  I// pp/dbl
Tod Mt., Mt. Washington
and Mission Ridge, WA.
Return coach, 2 day ski passes, 2 nights
accommodation, and transportation to &
from slopes. 10% Discount - 3 Trip Pkg.
TRAVEL CUTS 224-2344
Students' Union Building
LEADING BOARDSAILING SHOP
in Vancouver requires full & P/T
staff. Job incl. sales & instruction.
Must have windsurfing exp. & professional attitude. SEAMSTRESSES
also wanted for sailmaking manufacturing. Exp. required. Send resumes
to: Mgr., 1768 W. Georgia. Van.
B.C. V6G 2C7
TUTOR WANTED for Chemistry 230.  Call
222-2172.
85 - TYPING
11 - FOR SALE - Private
ONE-WAY TICKET TO  LONDON   ENG.
from Vancouver. Lv. January 18/84 Connie
922-4352
PRAXIS 36 ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER
(Olivetti).   Little use,  $400 o.b.o.  Phone
733-9B59.	
20 - HOUSING	
IF GAY. under 25, honest, N/S, N/D, not
into clubs, then will share furn. apt. near
Broadway & Alma. 2 baths, 2 beds, etc.
$100/mo. Box 46364, Stn. "G" Vancouver.
VACANCIES IN STUDENT RESIDENCES
for Ladies. Room & Board. Come to the
Housing Office or call 228-2811.
25 - INSTRUCTION
LSAT, GMAT, CAT preparation. Call National Testing 738-4618. Please leave message
on tape. Manager is counselling.
ESSAYS, term papers, reports etc. Writer
with extensive academic exper. can assist
with research, writing editing. 682-1043.
MODELS. Female, photographer's
models required. $15/hr. No exp.
necessary. For audition send
photo & write — Femme Enterprises, Box 344, 717 Denman St.,
Vancouver V6G 2L6.
40 - MESSAGES
GEORGE ORWELL wasn't an A.D. so
let's make it a good year. Crooster
45 - PERSONALS
IN MEMORY OF CHIP YOUNG (1958-
19841 Your smell will remain with us always.
Hugs and kisses, the guys.
70 - SERVICES
FORMER UNIV. PROF. (10 yrs. exp.)
will critique ft edit term papers, theses,
manuscripts. Reasonable rates. Fast turnaround. 669-1284.
EXPERT research help for hire. 224-5802 or
224-6518.
80 - TUTORING
TYPEWRITING - Essays, resumes, MINIMUM NOTICE REQUIRED. Tapes
transcribed. UBC Village location. 224-6518
day or night.
EXPERT TYPING. Essays, term papers,
factums, letters, manuscripts, resumes,
theses, IBM Selectric II. Reasonable rates.
Rose, 7 3 1-9857.
DOTS WORD PROCESSING service
offers reasonable rates for students for term
papers, essays, & masters thesis. 273-6008
evenings.
U—TYPE Micom word processor available
for rent @ $5/hr. Jeeva @ 876-5333.
WORD   PROCESSING  SPECIALISTS:   U
write we type theses, resumes, letters,
essays, days, evenings, weekends.
736-1208.	
WORD PROCESSING(Micom) student
rates for theses typing $12/hr. Equation
typing available. Jeeva, 876-5333.
TYPING essays, letters, resumes, term
papers. IBM Selectric - professional work
guaranteed. 876-8638.
WORD PROCESSING. Essays, Theses,
Resumes, Etc. by professional typist. Ask
for our student rate. Ellen, 271-6924.
ACCURATE. FAST TYPING. Reasonable
rates. Near UBC. Call anytime before 8
P.M. Ask for Vera 266-0497.
ENGLISH TUTORING - Assistance in all
areas. Oral, written; grammar composition,
spelling, punctuation. 682-1043.
FRENCH LESSONS. Reasonable rates. Call
Wendy 734-4340.
90 - WANTED
WANTED TO BUY: A mid-seventies Dodge
Dart in good condition. Willing to pay up to
$1500. Phone Chris at 733-2598 or 228-2305.
This is urgent. Friday, January 13, 1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 11
Letters
Child education goal of daycare centres
A recent Perspectives piece in
The Ubyssey questioned the quality
of daycare on campus (UBC daycare needs student society backing,
Jan. 10). It is hoped that the following will help clarify some of the misrepresentations made by the author.
We would like to provide an explanation of why quality daycare, which
is both government licensed and
supervised by qualified staff, can be
a very important protection in the
care of children.
It has been illustrated by educators such as Montessori and Piaget
that learning occurs through play
especially via the manipulation of
materials. In other words, a child
learns by touching, sensing (i.e.
mouthing) and influencing the tools
in his environment. This is important for the development of thought.
The  young  child  may  become
frustrated, angry or passive with the
continuous demands placed on him
by an adult's expectations. A daycare facility often provides a child
with optimal conditions for learning. Since parents are sometimes
justifiably concerned about mess in
their homes — how wonderful to
have a place where young children
can spoon flour from one container
to another without fear of making a
mess! Their fingers may not be as
adept to the movement as an
adult's, but they can be given the
opportunity to try.
It seems important at this point
to state that the above notions do
not mean "anything goes." Freedom is not the license to hurt oneself or others. A child may not consume or touch dangerous objects.
The health and safety of each child
must be protected at all times. Swal
lowing paint, devouring playdough
are not encouraged by the staff. But
touching, smelling, in other words,
exploring an environment, which is
specifically geared to the developmental level of the child, has never
been thwarted in our centre.
One can only question the standard of a care facility which does not
allow the exploration and manipulation of a variety of mediums.
Our centre is under the supervision of government agencies such as
the human resources ministry, the
public health department and the
education ministry. We are a teaching facility for the early childhood
education programs at Langara and
Capilano College. Therefore the
staff and program are continuously
being assessed by others within the
profession. It has been repeatedly
stated that our standards are high.
As already mentioned one must
question the credibility of those
caregivers who do not understand
the developmental stages of the
children they work with. It would
be wise for parents to inquire about
the quality
child's care
givers.
and license of their
facility and its care-
Rosalie Rougeau
Susan Gushall
Anne-Marie Holmes
Unit II daycare staff
MOVE WITH THE BEAT
Join the UBC Dance Club
NEW BEGINNERS' CLASS
Scheduled for Tuesday evenings from
8:30-10:30 in the S.U.B. Ballroom.
Register noon hours in S.U.B. 220.
It all starts January 17, 1984!
Sci-fi condemnation 'silly'
FOR THEATRE INFORMATION CALL 687-1515
Sexual Stereotyping steps into
Twilight Zone (Jan. 10) is without
doubt one of the silliest articles I've
ever read.
A mixture of condemnation by
example (John Norman writes trash
— which no sane person will deny,
as the Gor books are possibly the
greatest waste of paper in the free
world — and therefore all science
fiction is sexist), blatant misinformation (e.g. "Robert Heinlein . . .
writes of heroines whose sole purpose in life is ... to look pretty for
the men" — Robert Heinlein's
heroines include geneticists,
surgeons, engineers, computer
scientists, judges, presidents, and
other over-achievers, and he has
been writing of such women since
long before feminism became
popular), and outright insanity (accusing Marion Zimmer Bradley of
advocating a male-dominated society is possible only to one who has
never read any of her work, or
possibly to one whose skills are not
better than those of Koko the
gorilla).
In addition, by omitting any
mention of the very many novels
and stories on the subject of
feminism and sex roles (e.g. Norman Spinrad's thoughful The Pink
and Blue War, F. M. Busby's Rissa
Kerguelen, and of Anne McCaffrey's books, to name just a few),
Lachlan MacQuarrie effectively
denies having read enough science
fiction to be qualified to write on
the subject.
As a parting shot, let us note that
Star Trek, condemned by MacQuarrie for not having female captains, was made in a time when
there were no female officers at sea
in the operational environment
(that is, no female officers with any
responsibility   or   power)   in   the
HOT
ri-
t
CHILI
&
COOL
SUDS
AT
o/tjllims
All the chill
&
bread you can eat
$3.95
(at the back of Ihe village)
American Navy. For the pilot
episode to have a female second-in-
command was thus a provocative
enough idea at the time. So, apparently, MacQuarrie isn't even
qualified to watch television intelligently. Rob corless,
grad studies
VIS GRANVILLE
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151 GRANVILLE
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At 2 45, 4:45. 7:30, 9:46
Chrktine
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WARNING: Frequent nudity and suggestive scenes. B.C. DIRECTOR
At 2:30, 4:15, 6:10, 8:00, 10:00
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scenes
suggestive
B.C. DIRECTOR
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"D.C. CAB' is 'ANIMAL HOUSE' on wheels!"
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WILLIAM HURT
TUITION MAY DOUBLE WITHIN 3 YEARS
ACCESSIBILITY WILL BE UNDERMINED
POTENTIAL STUDENTS WILL BE LOST
Sign The AMS Petition
Look for booths in SUB and Sedgewick January 9-18 Page 12
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, January 13, 1984
Thanks for opposing UBC weapons research
To those of you who signed the
CAMROC petition, supporting the
Campaign Against Military
Research on Campus, thank you. It
was encouraging to find so many
students who are not apathetic, who
do care what happens at UBC now
and in the future.
Canada's current military budget
is $10 billion. By contrast Canada's
job creation budget is $2.4 billion.
In the past two years defence (offence?) spending has increased by
35 per cent. At the same time the
f
Make the rich pay!
I am very upset about the proposal of tuition hikes as I, a first year student, had to take out a student loan to get educated here at UBC. What
they are doing here is taking my education away from me because I may not
be able to afford to come back next year. I come from a farming community an can barely afford it now as it is.
1 can see UBC in a year or two with all of the high society (upper-class)
people here because they will be the only ones who can afford it. UBC must
really be interested in only "business" and not education. As far as I am
concerned they might as well have the rich pay more and let the poor pay
only a minimal amount of money. That way it would be at least fair for me.
I am so sick and tired of hearing about money that I think the rich should
spread their wealth around a little more. Then I, and others in my position
can continue getting a better education. Right now I can not even think of
my second year here and it scores me a heck of a lot.
C. I.. Watkinson
education 1
University of British Columbia
FREDERIC
WOOD presents	
THEATRE
THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING EARNEST
by Oscar Wilde
Directed by John Brockington
JANUARY 13 - 21
(Previews - Jan. 11 + 12)
Curtain: 8:00 p.m.
Thursday Matinee/January 19 - 12:30 p.m.
Student Tickets - $4.50
Previews - All Seats $4.00
BOX OFFICE    *    FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE    *    Room 207
Support Your Campus Theatre
THERE'S
NO MAGIC PILL
TO STOP THE SPREAD
OF VENEREAL
DISEASE
The only effective way to lower the risk of
infectious disease is to avoid skin-to-skin
contact.
Only the condom lets you do that.
That's one good reason for using it.
The other good reason is that it's a reliable
and highly effective contraceptive.
Take our advice. Check with your doctor
or local birth control clinic.
Then take
their advice.
federal government has cut back its
post secondary education and
health transfer payment to the provinces by hundreds of millions of
dollars.
I don't have to remind you about
local university budget cutbacks.
Just look around those overcrowded classes and labs, at the students
on the floors with no desks to accommodate them. How many of
you have curriculums reduced
because of the shortage of teaching
assistants? You paid high tuition
fees for a quality education, for the
opportunity to pursue knowledge,
truth and to defend justice.
Do you want a curriculum funded by the multinationals who oppress and control third world countries? What about those people's
freedoms? Militarism creates and
perpetuates violence and war. We
already have enough weaponry to
overkill all the people in both super
powers 20 times over. Do we need
to research how many times we will
die in the process?
The U.S. alone is planning to
spend $368 billion per year on armaments by 1986. How else will
they be able to control their foreign
'investments'?
Some Ontario universities have
tapped into this military funding:
• University of Toronto received
over $250,000 to build a structure
that can withstand an atomic blast.
• McMaster University has a
"medium filter" project designed
to help ships detect the type and
location of submarines, along with
a grant for equipment to detect
flaws in ceramic material used to
protect   guidance   equipment    on
missiles, aircraft and spacecraft.
Dog lovers you will not appreciate what the University of Ottawa is up to. They have a contract
to study "radiation-induced
vomiting using dogs." It seems the
dog's ability to vomit makes it an
ideal test animal to be used in the
proposed study which includes the
testing of possible antidotes. I
wonder who they plan to have administer this antidote when there
are no survivors.
The former Rector of the University of Montreal and current direc
tor of Alcan is quoted, "more
money for research, less for
undergraduate education."
Public opinion can have an effect
on goverment policy. Students, as
the future decision makers, have a
right and a responsibility to make
their views known.
Don't let UBC become a research
haven for annihilation specialists.
Please vote yes for the referendum
Jan. 24 to 27, 1984, and ban arms
research at UBC.
Judith A. McLean,
arts 2
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a,7»t> wfc(voi\pv**V

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