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The Ubyssey Feb 5, 1982

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Array Vol. LXJV. No.'
THE UBYSSEY
Vancouver, B.C. Friday, February 6,11
*4s    2JB-2301
WOUNDED KNEE...Joe Stuntz lies dead, killed by the FBI. No investigation of his
death has taken place, although Dino Butler, Leonard Peltier and Bob Robideau
stood trial for the deaths of two FBI agents in the same incident.
A struggle
of people
trying to be free
By PETER FRANCIS
"Basically our defense will be this: If you were an Indian in
Canada today, you'd run away too." John Trudell knows what he
is talking about, he has seen the inside of jails, been a prisoner of a
society which has systematically destroyed his people.
But today he speaks not for himself, but for Dino and Gary
Butler, two other members of the American Indian Movement
whose activities have again run them afoul of the law.
On Feb. 23, 1981 the cousins were involved
in an incident when a Vancouver police
cruiser attempted to pull over the car in
which the men were travelling. They fled,and
a high speed chase ensued in which police
claim shots were fired from the fleeing car.
Weapons and ammunition were seized after
the Butler's car overturned at Kingsway and
Imperial in Burnaby and the men were arrested soon after they abandoned the wreck.
Since then they have been held in Oakalla
prison, their cell doors locked, chained and
double locked. They have been held in chains
with manacle legs and handcuffed during
their pretrial court appearances. Behind these
bars they have prayed and fasted and struggled and won; for they won the right to their
own "religious ceremonies, a right long denied
all native prisoners. They had won the right
to smoke the Pipe.
"They are afraid of this Pipe!" John
Trudell tells the 60 prospective jurors in the
New Westminster Courthouse. Meanwhile in
the courtroom, Chief Justice Allan
McEachern is denying two motions by the
Butler's lawyer Stan Guenther.
Guenther argues that the jury panel, composed of 59 white people, and one east Indian
is not representative. The selection process of
taking names from the voter's list excludes
transient populations such as young people
and Indians. Motion denied.
Guenther requests that the Pipe, symbolizing truth and connection with God be allowed into the courtroom.
Dino writes in a leter from prison last
March: "In the western hemisphere there are
many different tribes/nations that have their
own language given to them by the Creator.
Just as there are different tribes and
languages, there are different ways of worshipping. Each nation has been given an ally
/medicine that allows them to communicate
with all life, such as the Sacred Pipe.
"I am a follower of the Sacred Pipe which
represents All Creation, past, present and
future. The Pipe is my medicine that helps
me to pray, to communicate with my God. It
is not known to the memory of our People
how old the First Pipe given to our People is.
"It is told, though, that a very long time
ago there was a Buffalo Calf appeared that
changed into the human form of a woman,
carrying a bundle upon her back. She appeared to the Lakota People and met with
them and gave them a Pipe with instructions
of the care and use of the Pipe. That Pipe is
still in the possession of the Lakota People
who call it 'White-Buffalo-Calf Pipe.' The
Pipe I carry for my People is representative
of that first Pipe.
The judge will not allow the Pipe.
Trudell tells the jurors as they file back into the courtroom.
"You swear on a bible, we use a Pipe, we
guarantee it. It's just a Pipe, we made it out
of wood, we use it to smoke tobacco; they
will not allow this Pipe in the court."
Denied the presence of the Pipe in the
courtroom, the Butlers decline to participate
further in the proceedings, and fire their
lawyers, Guenther and Judy Gedye. The
lawyers leave the room and the jury selection process continues without them.
Trudell: "We're tired of 400 years of being
denied this right to talk to white people
honestly. It's like as if you've been accused
of crimes and they wouldn't give you the Bible to tell the truth on. It's freedom of
religion."
Excluded from the courtroom, supporters
gather around the door, peering through narrow glass windows. One of them is Lew
Gurowitz, a Massachusett's attorney involved in native rights trials.
As Gurowitz peers into the room, one of
the deputy sherrifs, mistaking Big Lew for
an Indian asks "What tribe are the Butlers
from, Chief?" Big Lew gives him a withering
look, but he keeps talking about how much
racism there is in the U.S.
"There's not so much up here, you
know," he tells Gurowitz, "nothing at all
like down there in the south."
"You damn Canadians," Big Lew says,
"you're so damned smug. When I'm up here,
the whites tell me there's no racism. But I get
another story from the Indians."
Within the court the jury selection is completed, seven women, five men, all white.
Supporters, crowding the hallway, begin to
trickle into the courtroom after they are searched.
The searching procedure is as thorough as
it was in the preliminary hearings. Hand-held
metal detectors are run over the body, up and
down the legs, through the crotch. Shoes are
removed and checked. Women deputies
check the women's breasts and search the
babies' blankets.
The children stand with exaggerated stiffness for the search. Their arms are outstretched and their fists are clenched in defiance.
In the courtroom, Chief Justice
McEachern sits in a red and black robe
behind an immense hardwood bench. Behind
him red curtains are drawn up as in a theatre.
Before him are the courtworkers, crown at-
-torneys, and space reserved for the defense.
Beyond that, Dino and Gary sit in a wooden
box with three raised sides of plexiglass.
McEachern requests a plea, but the Butlers
sit silently, not even acknowledging the request. McEachern orders a not guilty plea
entered on their behalf. The trial begins.
The charges include: attempted murder,
possession of a weapon with dangerous intent,possession of an unregistered gun, pointing a firearm without lawful excuse, and
criminal negligence in the operation of a
motor vehicle.
DINO BUTLER...no defense
The crown sets out its case carefully. The
first witness, a Burnaby RCMP officer, provides the court with sketches of the chase
route and the location where the men were
arrested. Then Sergeant Robert Graham,
also from the Burnaby RCMP Identification
sectiontion testifies.
Graham says he was called to BCIT last
Feb. 23 to examine a car. He says he was
"mainly looking for lead fragments." He
found two; one wedged in the wheel well, one
lying loose on top of a shock absorber. He
also noted a small dent on the
bumper.Testimony from the officer who arrested Dino shows that he actually gave
himself up. Grant Meadwell, now a student
at the University of Western Ontario tells the
court that he was called to the area of
Kingsway and Imperial to patrol when he saw
Dino walking down the street with a parka
See page 5: CULTURES Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, February 5, 1982
Oops
There are (ahem) three errors in
Thursday's Ubyssey.
First, the Law students' association women's committee did not
lodge a complaint to the RCMP
against the Lady Godiva ride.
When Kate Andrew contacted the
RCMP Tuesday, she was phoning
as a student and not as a member of
the committee.
Second, Phil Kueber is the name
of the person running against Eva
Busza for arts undergraduate soci
ety president. His name is not, as
we reported, Phil Coober. Also,
Renee Comiesotti is running for
vice president, not Rene Comasetti.
We apologize for these errors,
and the persons responsible have
been taken out and had their toenails clipped too short.
GA YS AND LESBIANS OF UBC PRESENT
GAY/LESBIAN WEEK 1982
MONDAY
FEB. 8
Retrenchment
Pot Luck
Luncheon
12:30 Buchanan Penthouse
THURSDAY,
FEB. 11
TUESDAY
FEB. 9
MINERAL WATER
CHALLENGE CUP
AND BOAT
RACES
12:30 SUB Concourse
KEYNOTE SPEAKER —
HARRY BRITT
Gay member of San Francisco's Board
of Supervisors
12:30 Buchanan 100
RELIGIOUS SERVICE
Vancouver School of Theology
4 p.m.
RECITAL
THE MUSIC OF GAYS
Performed by Lesbian and Gay students
of UBC's Music Dept
8 p.m. Music 116
WEDNESDAY
FEB. 10
Alternative
Family ing:
Panel and discussion
sponsored by the
Lesbian/Gay Health
Sciences Assn.
12:30 Woodward 6
FRIDAY,
FEB. 12
GAY AND LESBIAN
FILMS
Witches and Faggots - Dykes and Poofters
After the Game
12:30 SUB Auditorium
VALENTINE'S
DANCE
Faculty Club
STUDENTS — $4 50
OTHERS — $5 00
FEBRUARY 8-12
Arts Undergrad Society
ALL CANDIDATES
MEETING
Buch. 102 - Mon., Feb. 8, 12:30
Come and grill budding student politicians.
Watch your friends make the news! Observe
hopeful politicos put their feet in their mouths!
FREE BEARS &PIZZAS
See Pres. Paul Yaskowitch do the Ottawa strip!
Hear V-P Maureen Boyd sing! Watch Council Rep
Mike Mckinley dance! See Paul McCoullough juggle pucks with his toes! Listen to Treasurer
William Clark perform Mass! Fun and games for
all!
More entertainment for your time!
Bigger extravaganza than
"LET POLAND BE POLAND"!
P. S. Candidates are expected to attend!
Panther Production presents
INFORMATION: 687-2801
FOR THEATRE INFORMATION CALL 687-1515      |
Showtimes: 2:00, 3:56. 5:50.
7:50. 9:46
918  GRANVILLE
685  5434
Warning: Frequent gory violence. B.C. Dir.
/"TfflJffiJT^fc
Warning: Frequent!
nudity; some suggestive scenes &j
violence. B.C. Director.
CORONET
• 51   GRANVILLE
685-6828
Showtimes: 2:00. 3:50. 5:40. 7:40. 9:40
yMMJVswJ Warning: Frequent
suggestive dialogue; some swearing. B.C. Dir.
• SI   GRANVILLE
685-682»
Neighbors
JOHN BELUSHI ^"^  DAN AYKROYD
Showtimes: 2:00. 4:00, 6:00, 8:00, 10:00
, Warning: Frequent
nudity; some suggestive scenes & dialogue. B.C. Dir
OQEON
881  GRANVILLE
682-7468
I {MANURE)  Warning: Some coarse language & swear
' > '   ing. B.C. Director.
Showtimes: 7:00. 9:15 plus 2 p.m. Sat.-Sun.
DARK
Winner of 3 Golden Globes
cambie at lath      inc(- "Best Picture".
876-2747
JANE FONDA
olden
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HENRY FONDA
<K£n«D SxK J^M THE GREAT .EANJHVSNOm
Showtimes: 7:30, 9:30
VARSITY
224-3730
4375   W. 10th
i     i.   ii     a j-      ■ "o     .. « ■ A Film By IAMES IVORY
Isabella Adjani   Best Ac-
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Festival
IQHUTUHO Warning: Some-
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young children. Occasional nudity, suggestive
scenes & coarse language. B.C. Dir.
DROAdwAV
[70 7   W. BROADWAY
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GHOST
STORY
MELVYN DOUGLAS JOHN HOUSMAN
Showtimes: 7:00, 9:00
(MATURE) Warning: Many scenes may
Vnniwwy     frighten young children. B.C. Dir.
PROAdwAy
70 7 W. BROADWAY
8741957
Showtimes:
7:15. 9:30
TIME
BANDITS
RALPH RICHARDSON
JOHN CLEESE
(MATURE)      Warning: Occasional swearing
B.C. Director.
Showtimes:
7:30, 9:40
ABSENCE
DUNBAR at  30th
224-7252
PAUL NEWMAN • SALLY FIELD
(OCNOUU.)
SUNDAY AT 2 P.M. ONLY
VARSITY
224-3730
4-*75  W. 10th
THE TAMING OF
THE SHREW
Starring Richard Burton,
Elizabeth Taylor, Michael York Friday, February 5,1982
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
rudell
'We were being hunted. It was
a new type of massacre. Kill
'em in ones and
twos, rather
than just ride
down the
entire camp.'
By PETER FRANCIS
and TOM HA WTHORN
"This is Siege," he said, holding the
baby in his arms a little higher by way of introduction. "Well, actually, her name is
Sage, like the herb, but Siege is probably a
lot more appropriate to what's going on."
John Trudell smiles at his own joke, but a
siege is what he's here for.
He looks young, early thirties, and retains the look of the sixties activist: the
baby, a whispy beard, and shoulder-length
black hair he pushes back past his ears once
in a while to emphasize a point in conversation. Unlike many of those activists,
though, Trudell hasn't abandoned his
struggle. But then again, his fight did not
rise from a war in a foreign land. His war is
wherever he and his people happen to be
and that's been the case for almost 500
years now. Today, the front line is in Vancouver.
Trudell, a veteran of the Alcatraz Island
occupation in 1969, has come here to do
support work for cousins Gary Butler and
Dino Butler. Trudell has been to Vancouver
before; in 1979, he and Dino Butler sought
political asylum here just a few months after a deliberately set fire claimed the life of
his wife,Tina Manning, and their children.
In this interview, Trudell tells of "a new
type of massacre" being waged against Indian activists and says the group he's involved with, The Society of the People
Struggling to be Free, will stay in Vancouver as long as the Butlers are being held
here. With their sentencing scheduled for
today, they may be here for some time.
Why did you decide to seek political asylum in Canada?
Well, when you get caught between a
rock and a hard place, you do what you can
to survive, understanding the realities. Canada America, the United States America,
Mexico America, Brazil America, it's all
America, welcome to America! There is no
true safety turning to these governing systems. We understand that. But in 1979,
when Dino and I made that political asylum, it was our feeling at the time that we
were being hunted pretty intensely in the
U.S.
(In 1975, a firefight at Wounded Knee,
S.D., resulted in the shooting deaths of two
FBI agents and Indian activist Joe Stuntz.
No one was ever charged in Stuntz' death,
but Dino Butler, Bob Robideau and Leonard Peltier were charged with the FBI
deaths. Peltier fled to seek asylum in Canada. Butler and Robideau were acquitted by
an all-white jury on the grounds of "self defence. " Considering it was self defence
against federal agents, the decision was
hailed as significant. But Peltier, illegally
extradited from Canada, was found guilty
of the same crime and is currently in
prison.)
Dino, you know, was with Peltier on the
FBI thing, he was co-defendant with Peltier. Dino was acquitted. At the time of his
acquittal Dino had been told that they were
going to kill him. 'We know you're guilty,'
they said. Then he was told on the day of
his acquittal, 'You can lie to them (the
jury), but we know you're guilty. And
we're going to kill you.'
When Dino got out of jail, connected to
all that — we're talking about 1976 now —
they did a couple of things that if he had
been there, they would have killed him. So
we know at that point that the pattern is being established.
When someone comes in and puts a gun
to your little brother's head and tells your
brother, 'Tell your brother we're going to
blow his fuckin' head off!' that's not just
harassment. They use some theoretical warrant that doesn't exist as a means to crash
into the family home in the middle of the
night — well, that happened to Dino's brother. And his mom and dad.
We went through the Peltier trials in '77.
When Dino and Bob Robideau were acquitted on the FBI thing, what we had was a
jury saying, 'Yeah, you can defend yourself
against people that try and shoot you, even
if they are federal agents. You got the right
to defend yourself.' Here's a truly major
court decision. A major one. 'Cause it's
never happened before, ever. All legal proceedings against Peltier should have ceased,
when you deal with the technicalities of the
law.
But that also meant Peltier could never
be freed in the courtroom, because they had
to convict someone to cover up all the political activities and everything that was going
on on that reservation that led up to the
firefight that got the FBI agents killed. So
Peltier took the fall. . .
In late '77,1 was sent to this prison down
in Missouri. While I was in this prison, see,
I had this talk with this other Indian and we
were discussing economics and certain
things that were happening in the U.S. Anyway, I told this other prisoner some things
about all that and he said, 'That is what's
happening. Most people don't even look at
it like that. It's dangerous.' And he said, 'If
you had any sense, and you know what's
good for you, you'll quit talking about
that, or you'll leave the country.* And I
said to him at that time something to the effect, 'Well, hey, you know, it's not my in
tention to wait to engage in any military trip
with the U.S.'
And he said, 'You don't know these bastards. They'll kill your wife, they'll kill your
kids, they'll do anything to make you
react!'
We were doing some stuff in D.C. for
Peltier and on Feb. 11, 1979, I burned the
American flag in front of the FBI headquarters. On Feb. 12, somebody burned
down the house where my wife and kids and
mother-in-law was in and they were all killed. This happened about 13 hours later. It
was obvious in the beginning that the way
the government investigated the fire that
they told certain blatant, direct lies to take
my attention away from what really happened there. It was arson. It was a deliberate act, a political assassination.
I was told that probably what I was supposed to do because of this is that I was
supposed to react violently, and that solves
the problem the government's got going in
this particular case. . . In the U.S., all the
federal agents were closing the doors on
that this was assassination. So we knew that
we were being hunted, selectively hunted. It
was a new massacre, a new type of massacre. Kill 'em in ones and twos, rather than
just ride down the entire camp.
We go back through the Peltier people,
the people that were engaged in supporting
the FBI defendants from the FBI firefight:
Joseph Stuntz was killed in '75 during the
firefight; then Anna Mae Aquash was killed
in '76. (Aquash, a Micmacfrom Nova Scotia, had been missing for three months
when her body was found in a ditch. The
FBI had her hands cut off, thus desecrating
the body in Indian eyes, to ship them to a
lab for identification. A coroner ruled she
had died from exposure and the government had her buried. After protests, the
body was exhumed and a different coroner
took X-rays that the original doctor had decided to forego. But the X-rays weren't
The burial of
Anna Mae Aquash,
assassinated in 1976
needed, for the bullet hole in the back of
her skull was clearly visible.) I don't think
I'm leaving anyone out, but the next killings were Tina and the kids. Since then, it's
escalated to Dallas Thundershield, Bobby
Garcia and Roque Duenas. So out of the
original number of people we started out
with, half that original group has been killed. . .
So in 1979, when we made the political
asylum request, personally for me, my
every intention was to survive. There are
things that have to be done in the West to
survive. . .
One of the things out of that was that
they had to give us an international hearing
that we were being persecuted. They had to
give us the fucking hearing. They had to put
it on the record at the international level. So
that means the American pigs are going to
try and make it look like we're excitable
and we're deranged and all this and that.
But for them to make us look like that,
they've got to back off.
How are Gary and Dino doing? Are they
feeling good?
They're strong. They're handling the
whole trip well. When I look at the way the
whole prison trip is being run against them
it helps me to understand power. These two
men are connected to their power. Through
their consciousness of the earth, they're
connected to their power.
And so the pigs got to weld chains on
their door, see, and they've got to put them
in shackles and they've got to fuck with
their right to religious freedom, to interfere
with their right to have access to their traditions. It's all because of the power these
two men generate.
When I go to visit them . . . yeah, they're
doing good, under all the conditions, I
think they're putting up a good defence for
themselves because it's all based upon their
being passive. Just resisting. When they let
me visit them, it's through the glass and the
little telephone and all that stuff, but I
would not go to visit them any other way. I
would not go into that situation, sit down in
a room with them, even if they'd let me. Because we'd all get shot; they'd say I tried to
smuggle in a gun or some shit. I wouldn't
go to visit Peltier like that either. . . .
What is the philosophy of your group,
the Society of the People Struggling to be
Free?
We look at it, ourselves, that we are
struggling to be free, not to have another
variation of an oppressive political/economic society. The only way we can be free
— ever — is by protecting the earth. If our
struggle for freedom does not include the
protection of the earth, then we will always
lose our struggle for freedom. We will never
win. It would be impossible to win. We see
this as being natural law.
At times we feel we have to see through
man's society, man-made laws, and deal
with those natural laws. And one of those
natural laws, the main natural law we're
talking about, is that the earth is living energy and we are descendents of earth. . . So
it does not matter if we're talking about
sexism, or we're talking about racism, or
we're talking about classism, none of these
things can be dealt with in a proper way until we re-examine our relationship with
earth.
If we live in societies based upon exploitation of the earth for material and industrial comforts, if we base our whole mentality on exploiting the earth, and look upon
resources as something to exploit, then we
will always create a system that will not gain
us our freedom. . .
There are a great many illusions in our
society and these illusions lead us to our destruction. One of the illusions being that
when we look at political society, or economic society, or military society as being
powerful just because it's exploiting and
brutal, then we interfere with our own ability, because they are not powerful. They're
exploitive and they're brutal and they're violent, but that's not a power. As a matter
See page 5: WE'RE Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, February 5,1982
I
HOT NEWS THAT FITS
Show And Tell
To Reduce
Animal Experiments
In a move guaranteed to please
animal lovers, the University of
Guelph has instituted a new program in the veterinary school.
Veterinary professors and audiovisual technicians have joined to
produce videotapes of animal experiments, thereby reducing the
need for laboratory animals for research.
Without videotapes, new animals
would be used every time an experiment is demonstrated to students.
Now students can view the videotape in the classroom and review it
as often as they wish.
A spokesperson for the UBC biology department said Thursday
that although he thought it was a
good idea if used in conjunction
with live animal experiments, it still
did not replace the sense of immediacy and realism that using live animals produced.
He added that the biology building was equipped to use similar
technology, but as far as he knew
there were no plans in the near future to adopt a video program.
The use of videotapes is recommended by the Canadian Council
on Animal Care in their ethical
guidelines for animal experimentation.
Guelph's videotapes are available
for loan to other universities.
SFU To Check
Fake Exams
An investigation is under way at
Simon Fraser University into a suspected exam-writing racket.
SFU president George Pedersen
said Wednesday that some students
whose native language is not English may be paying as much as $600
to imposters who write their Test of
English as a Foreign Language
(TOEFL) exam for them.
The tests are a requirement for
foreign students to enter Canadian
universities.
At least one student has been
caught using an imposter to write
the test for him, and investigation,
or four are under investigation.
The university is checking more
than 350 files to compare English
language test scores with current
student abilities.
"We're a bit suspicious that their
performance here doesn't seem to
fit with the score shown," Pedersen
said.
The investigation has resulted in
inflating the price charged by imposters. Previous information disclosed that the asking price was
$350 prior to the issue coming to
light.
Director of counselling Dick
Shirran said UBC does not face an
impersonation problem because
about 10 per cent of SFU's students
are international students as compared to about one per cent at
UBC.	
Less Gears The
Next Few Years
The 1980s will bring an acute
shortage of engineers in Canada,
according to a recent study paper
put out by the Ministry of State for
Science and Technology.
The shortage will be most severe
at the graduate and faculty level,
the report says. Fields in high demand include aeronautics, electronics, mining, and engineering
research.
Currently there are more than
200 teaching positions vacant in
engineering faculties across the
country.
Canada will have a shortage of
12,400 engineers by 1985, says the
report. "This situation threatens to
worsen over the 1980s unless
measures are taken to encourage
graduate studies and teaching
engineering," says the paper.
Canadian universities currently
produce approximately 6,400
engineers per year, while immigration accounts for an additional
1,500.
The report calls for "special efforts" by Canadian universities to
meet the increased demand. One
suggestion put forward by the
report was that universities become
more responsive to the needs and
preferences of their students.
The paper also recommended
that industry and government play
a more active role in this regard. "It
is important also that the engineering profession continue its
longstanding efforts to ensure that
the engineering academic curricula
are fully consistent with industry
needs," the report says.
Northern Development
Disillusions Prof
The federal government's decision to allow Dome Petroleum to
drill in the Beaufort Sea was a "major disillusionment," the director of
UBC's West water research centre
said Thursday.
Andrew Thompson told 30 peo-
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INTRAMURAL/RUGBY
VALENTINE'S DANCE
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 13
ARMOURIES - 8:00-12:30
Featuring the RHYTHM AND BLUE ALL-STARS
Tickets available at
AMS, Room 203 WMG and
Rugby Members.
i
pie in Angus 224 it was upsetting to
see northern development continue
despite calls for a 10 year
moratorium.
He said there is enthusiastic support for a moratorium on northern
development, and there have yet to
be any environmental impact
studies of development in that area.
Th« ban »ppeal for everyone who h«j final-
ly realized their pue purpof in Ife, Come end
join The Ubyitey. Vou coo can te • reporter,
photographer or besk-ruDber. No experience
neceesery. The UbyMey is real fun. Not only
do wa haw a good time putting out this rag.
but we have greet parties, auchae the two today and tomorrow at Greg FJeManda and Daw
BalderMone'i reepoctwety.
WRITING
A REPORT?
Bradson
Word
Processing
886 Dunsmuir Street
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688-7791
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APPLICATION FOR GRADUATION
REMINDER
All students who expect to graduate this Spring are requested to submit "Application for Graduation" cards
(two) to the Registrar's Office (Mrs. Anderson) by Friday, February 12, 1982. This includes students who are
registered in a year not normally considered to be a
graduating year (e.g. combined B.Com/LL.B.) but who
are expecting to complete a degree program this Spring.
PLEASE NOTE: It is the responsibility of the
student to make application for his/her degree.
This list of candidates for graduation to be presented to
the Faculty and to the Senate for approval is compiled
solely from these application cards.
NO APPLICATION - NO DEGREE
KOERNER FOUNDATION
SPECIAL LECTURE
Dr. Helen Huston
Canadian medical doctor working in Nepal
Will Speak on
"WOMEN IN NEPAL"
Dr. Huston will present a lecture discussion,
with slides, on the changes, if any, in the lives
of women in Nepal.
Thursday, Feb. 11, 1982
12:30-1:45 p.m., Buchanan 218
Sponsored by the Women Students' Office
with the support of the
Lean and Theo Koerner Foundation
NOMINATIONS ARE OPEN
FOR APPOINTMENTS TO
The Student Administrative Commission (SAC)
— 10 appointments
This is a 10 member body chaired by the Director of Administration.
It's duties are to administer those policies affecting AMS clubs and
the Student Union Building.
The Ombudsperson
— 1 appointment
The Ombuds office handles individual complaints or problems concerned with University, AMS, or constituent policies.
APPLICATION FORMS MAY BE
PICKED UP IN SUB 238 Friday, February 5, 1962
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Cultures clash in whites' courtroom
From page 1
over his arm. He approached Dino,
who gave him the parka. Checking
the pocket he discovered two handguns, .357 caliber revolvers. He
told the court that he then placed
Dino under arrest.
As the day's proceedings end,
Dino and Gary are led from the
courtroom. They wave clenched
fists at the spectators, and wear
smiles. In contempt of court, none
of the spectators rise for the judge's
departure.
Security remains tight for the second day of the trial.
The two Vancouver Police officers who began the chase offer
conflicting versions of what happened.
They saw Dino in a pay phone
booth at Renfrew and Grandview
Highway. Gary sat, waiting in the
passenger seat of a car parked at the
curb. The cops called in the license
number of the Oregon-plated car to
the central computer and while
waiting they circled the block.
As the police return, Dino leaves
the phone booth and gets in the car.
Constable Craig Peters said Dino
ran to the car, and took off very
quickly. He said the men were being
pulled over for speeding.
The other constable, Ian Holden,
says Dino quietly walked to the car,
and drove off. He says they were
being stopped for a regular traffic
check.
At Boundary Road the police
switched on their siren and flashing
light. The car makes a turn onto the
freeway ramp and pulls over. As
they get out of the police car, Dino
and Gary take off, accelerating onto the freeway.
Supporters say that as the police
were getting out of their cars, they
were reaching for their revolvers,
but since there is no defense, these
questions are not raised.
The chase continues along the
freeway to Willingdon, where it
heads south. Peters says shots were
fired before they crossed Canada
Way; Holden says all shots were
fired after Canada way.
Outside the court supporters hold
a singing circle in the waiting area.
McEachern orders deputy sherriffs
to stop the singing and drumming,
but they are unable to find anyone
in charge. They ask Guenther and
Gurowitz to do something, but they
are neither singing nor orchestrating. The song ends when it
is finished.
A radio reporter asks John
Trudell where he's from.
"The western hemisphere, man,
where are you from?"
We're a natural
part of the earth'
From page 3
of fact, that's a subconscious
recognition that they do not have
power, so they must redefine
power. So in that way, when they
redefine power and get us to accept
it they will look at their atom
bombs and their guns and their
whole military sickness as being
powerful.
The snow that came here when I
came here — when I came it was
storming — that snow is powerful.
In military, in economic, in racist,
in all these political systems, in all
the industrial political systems, they
have to make an adjustment to that
blizzard. That blizzard affects the
economics of a city. It affects
everything that goes on within a city, yet they can pass no law against
it and put it in jail or indict it or
anything else. It's natural power.
We're a natural part of the earth.
We have a connection to that
power, if we will understand it.
"Around here," says the radio
reporter.
"No way" Trudell replies, "you
are all from Europe."
Another cop testifies how he arrested Gary. Barry Shannon, off
duty from the North Vancouver
RCMP at the time, saw the accident
and the men fleeing the overturned
car. Shannon told the court that he
chased the two men, identifying
himself as a police officer, but Dino
turned and pointed a gun at him.
He backed off, palms outstretched
at his sides.
'The court
only heard
half the truth'
He caught up to the men again
after they jumped a fence, he said,
and grabbed Gary who did not
struggle.
A firearms expert, Earl Hall of
the RCMP crime detection
laboratory, testified that he examined the weapons seized.
Hall said that he test fired the
guns to ensure they worked, but he
did not test for accuracy. He said he
did not check to see if the guns had
been cleaned. If the guns had been
cleaned it would have proved that
the Butlers fired no shots, otherwise it would be inconclusive.
Hall also examined the lead
fragments Graham pulled from
underneath the car at BCIT. He
told the court that they were "consistent" with bullet fragments. But
at the preliminary hearings he admitted they were consistent with
lead from a wheel balancing weight.
A Midas Muffler worker who
witnessed the accident told the
court a man he identified as Dino
had pointed a gun at him after he
approached the man.
Dennis Reilly, a B.C. Hydro
employee, testified that he and his
partner saw the natives fleeing the
overturned car and decided to give
chase. He said one man tried to
break into a garage and the other
man ran right at him. He is asked to
identify the man who ran at him.
Dino sits in the box with his head
bowed. The judge orders him to
raise it so Reilly can see if he is the
same man. He does not respond.
McEachern orders the deputy
sherriffs to make Dino raise his
head. Everybody tenses. Deputy
sherriffs surround the box and one
enters, lifting Dino's head while
Reilly identifies him.
Reilly testifies that Dino ran at
him, then pointed a gun.
"For Christ's sakes man, don't
shoot man, or we're both gone,"
Reilly testifies he said.
On the final day it is the defense's
turn. Dino tells the court: "I offer
no defense." Gary says: "1 wish to
call no defense."
The crown prosecutor Norris
waives the right to sum up his argument, and the accused have the
right to speak.
Dino speaks, telling the court he
is a Pipe carrier of the Tuney tribe
of Oregon's Siletz Indians.
"The voice you hear coming
from me today is not my voice
alone: it is the voice of generations
before me and generations to come.
Because I was denied my right to
have my Pipe in this courtroom I
felt I was not all here, a part of me
was not here."
He told the court they had only
heard half the truth.
"I am not a criminal" he said.
"(In jail) I prayed hard, really hard,
that I would not hate my enemy
that tries to suppress my spirit. We
still believe that we still have our
shackles by being denied our
religion in this courtroom. My
brother and I, we begin to feel a little bit like Jesus Christ when he was
nailed to the cross. It is not a good
feeling."
Dino explained the situation
when he would not raise his head
for Reilly to identify him. Standing
with arms outstretched, he said he
lifts his head to the sky and the
wind to pray, "and I could not lift
my head to that hypocrite who was
lying after he swore on the Bible."
Gary asks to have Trudell, his
people's Pipe carrier, to address the
jury. Request denied: Trudell is not
a member of the Bar in B.C.
The jury is out less than two and
a half hours. Guilty, but the attempted murder charge has been
reduced to attempting to wound.
Dino and Gary smile and wave at
the spectators who include Dino's
parents and his seven month old son
he has never held. They are taken
back to jail. Sentencing will come
later.
But Dino and Gary have seen the
inside of jails before. Dino and
Leonard Peltier were charged with
murder after the Wounded Knee
uprising. He was acquitted.
Gary has been in and out of institutions since he was taken from
his parents at age 2 and placed in a
white foster home.
Trudell knows. He knows the
names of Joseph Stuntz, Anna Mae
Aquash, Dallas Thundershield,
Bobby Garcia and Roque Duenas,
like Gary and Dino, all AIM wor-
riors, but now all dead. No one has
served time for these murders.
Trudell knows the reality of FBI
threats, such as the one laid on
Dino when he was last acquitted.
Once he burned an American flag in
front of the FBI building. The next
day his wife, mother-in-law and
child were killed in a house fire. "A
deliberate act of political assassination" he says.
And that is why they are called
The Society of the People Struggling to be Free.
A clever focus on sensitive character
By CHARLES CAMPBELL
The premiere of The Elephant
Man tonight at the Arts Club is an
important event in Vancouver
theatre. It is the first time that this
critically acclaimed play has been
performed here, it involves both the
leading players (Allan Gray, John
Moffat) and the director (Larry
Lillo) of the Arts Club's incredibly
successful production of Bent, and
it marks the return to the stage of
the amost dead Alan Gray who was
involved in a messy car accident last
June. The production previewed on
Wednesday night didn't disappoint.
The play, by Bernard
Pomerance, which enjoyed great
critical success on Broadway, traces
the last few years of the life of John
Merrick, a grossly deformed carnival freak who is 'rescued' by
Frederick Treves and taken to a
London hospital. There he becomes
the darling of high society and the
play explores the varied motives of
those who befriend him as well as
the dreams of the elephant man
himself.
The Elephant Man
Directed by Larry Lillo
At the Arts Club, Granville Island
Pomerance's play is one of eight
versions of the true story of John
Merrick who suffered from a
degenerative physical disorder called neurofibromatosis. This resulted
in Merrick's enlarged head and
debilitating baggy growths of flesh
on his arms and body.
Last year a movie based on Merrick's story was released under the
same name as the play. The movie
gives the story quite a different
treatment though, pandering the
the same desire for sensationalism
that it is trying to expose. The play
avoids the voyeuristic appeal that
the movie exploits by having the
elephant man's character appear
without makeup. All of Merrick's
deformities are suggested through
gestures and the actor's voice. It's a
clever maniputlation that helps to
focus attention on the character
himself.
The portrayal of the
elephant man differs from that of
the movie also in terms of
character. In the movie Merrick is
rather passive. He is simply a sympathetic and deformed character
against whom the other players
react. In the play the elephant man
is much more active. He is, in the
words of Treves, a "highly intelligent and sensitive being" who
manages through his incisive comments to make the characters think
hard about their own motives and
morals. He is not simply an object
of pity like the movie character.
John Moffat is nothing short of
brilliant as Merrick. He portrays the
Elephant man with a knotted fist, a
lame walk and a distorted voice that
never becomes maudlin.
The de-emphasis on Merrick as a
tragically deformed figure points up
the ironies of his life. When Treves
discovers Merrick and takes over
responsibility for him he becomes a
bit of the freak show manager
himself. Treves becomes the personal physician of the Prince of
Wales and recognition becomes his
percentage for administering Merrick's affairs. Treves has difficulty
responding to Merrick as a human
being. When the elephant man
wants to talk to his doctor about his
desires, Treves says "I'm more interested in finding a reliable general
anesthetic."
The hospital itself becomes an exhibition gallery complete with an
admission charge. When Lord John
comes to visit, he pays with a walking stick for Merrick. And Princess
Alexandra obliges with a signed
photograph of herself for the
priviledge of his company.
The only true friend Merrick
seems to have is a stage actress,
Mrs. Kendal, who shares his sensitivity to the decrepit human condition.  Before  her  introduction  to
Merrick, Treves tells her that
"women are rather creatures of his
imagination."
"Ah," Mrs. Kendal replies.
"Then he is already like other
men."
Mrs. Kendal seems to be the only
character who clearly recognizes
how much Merrick is like all of us.
And how much we are all like Merrick. "Too much trust has maimed
my life," she says, with more than a
touch of irony.
The play is full of
ironies, an exhibition
gallery of double
standards and
crippled states.
The play is full of those ironies,
most often focused through Merrick's eyes. His curious blend of
naivety and experience — he's been
in a freak show but never in a normal living room — allows him to see
the ways in which societies rules are
applied hypocritically. At the same
time he is innocent enough to remain kind to those who perpetuate
the double standards.
In many ways Merrick is the only
one to overcome the deformities
that keep us all from interacting
with others the way we should. He
is the only character who manages
to sift some faith and love out of
science, high society and the proud
morality of the 19th century.
When Treves explains to Merrick
that God created man as copies of
platonic archetypes the one fisted
Merrick replies that God should
have used both hands. It is less a
comment on his own condition but
an expression of his understanding
of the crippled state of those
around him.
But the play is not without flaws.
While Allan Gray turns in a strong
performance for the most part he
occassionally shifts out of
character. He is too much the fawning doctor when he introduces Mrs.
Kendal to Merrick. He is too much
the patronizing father when he lectures Merrick on his responsibilities. But a flawless second act
redeems these trifles.
The supporting players are far
from uniform. Donna White is excellent in the important role of Mrs.
Kendal but Dermot Hennelly is
quite forgetable as a freak show
manager who plays too much to the
audience.
And the script sometimes
belabours the obvious. The audience doesn't need to be reminded
that Merrick's death is imminent by
the coffin paraded across the stage
before the last scenes. It's unnecessary forshadowing in a play
that's well constructed enough to
stand on its own.
But on the whole the play's flaws
are small ones that time will refine.
It is fair to predict that the Elephant
Man will settle in for a long run.
Certainly for the former
Tamahnous Theatre mafia — Gray,
Moffat and director Larry Lillo —
the play is a successful reunion and
a fitting encore to last year's production of Bent. Page 6
THE    U BYSS EY
Friday, Febn
South Pacific
plea
ses masses
By CRAIG YUILL
It is usually hard to bring
freshness and life to a musical that
has been performed everywhere
from here to Nantucket, but UBC's
Musical Theatre Society has done
just that.
South Pacific, the Rodgers and
Hammerstein musical playing at
the Old Auditorium until Saturday,
is an entertaining and lively production.
South Pacific
By Rodgers and Hammerstein
Directed by John Brockington
The Old Auditorium building
until Saturday
The cast and orchestra are largely
UBC students. The most notable
exception is actor Richard
Sutherland from the Canadian Actors Equity Association, who plays
Emile De Becque.
Another bright spot is Shauna
Baird, who plays Nellie Forbush, a
naive woman who never seems sure
whether or not she loves Emile.
Both Baird and Sutherland are fine
actors who possess sharp singing
voices.
But those two actors were not the
only shining lights. Lori Dungey
was well cast as the shrewd native
merchant Bloody Mary and
Michael Robinson gave a well-
seasoned performance as the crafty
and mischievious Luther Billis.
(This should not come as a surprise:
according to one source, Robinson
played the same role character in a
high school production).
For all those who have never seen
the movie or any of the stage versions, here is a brief capsule of the
South Pacific story: set in a small
American naval base during the early stages of Second World War, the
plot mainly concerns itself with the
on again-off again relationship
between Nellie and Emile.
Although the musical contains
elements of a soap opera, the fast
action, wit, color and excitement
keep the pace enjoyable and interesting.
Director John Brockington with
co-ordinator and choreographer
Grace MacDonald kept the play
and musical sequences flowing
smoothly.
Alex McLeod and Bruce Kellet
deserve credit for the fine musical
direction, but the sound near the
sides of the stage was a little muddled.
Nevertheless, the cast and crew
received enthusiastic applause from
the packed audience.
By STEVE McCLURE
What happened at the Soft
Rock Cafe Monday night was
criminal.
No, I'm not referring to the
fine music of jazz group
Oregon, which was the reason
I'd headed down to the Kitsilano haven of mellowosity.
That was fine, though there
wasn't enough of it. The apple
cider at the Soft Rock was OK
too.
What really bugged me and a
whole lot of other unfortunate
people was the concert's poor
organization. The promoter,
who is known to the world by
the curious appelation 'Goo
Goo productions? evidently
thinks the most important
thing about putting together a
concert is to sell as many
tickets as possible no matter
how small the venue is.
Which is exactly what happened Monday night.
Though my friends and
I were not even at the end
of the line-up we were forced
to scramble madly for seats.
Those waiting behind us were
not as lucky, having to sit on
any horizontal surface if they
wanted to see the group at all.
Not many people could actually see Oregon as it turned
out, since the Soft Rock is so
poorly laid out. The overcrowding, coupled with the
lack of visibility and the
crashing and banging of the
kitchen right next the where I
was sitting, the result was a less
than perfect listening experience. The $10 ticket price
didn't help either.
Now to the good stuff.
Oregon was interesting, playing as well as they could be expected under such unsympathetic circumstances. Since
the last time they were in Vancouver at the Ridge theatre
they've moved towards a more
improvisational style of music,
less melodic than their earlier
work but in many ways more
satisfying.
Again the standouts were in-
trumentalists Collin Walcott
and Ralph Towner though
woodwinds player Paul McCandless stood out more than
he seemed to in the past, turning in a couple of outstanding
solos on bass sax that were
reminiscent of John Coltrane's
phrasing.
Towner actually broke one
of Oregon's unwritten rules,
which implicitly prohibits the
use of electric instruments. At
the beginning of the first set he
timidly advanced towards a
small synthesizer, using it to
produce some spacey warblings
and background sounds which
actually complemented his
fellow Oregonians.
But Towner was at his best
at the guitar, the uses of which
he continues to explore
eliciting   some   very   strange
Oregon plays fre
overcrowding crc
Walcott
McCandless
FOUR MUSICIANS...and one instrument, th«
chords and runs from both his
six and twelve strings. His
piano playing was subtle,
delicate and at all times bore
his own stamp. A brief instrumental foray on French
horn was also interesting.
But for sheer multi-
instrumental talent one need
look no further than Collin
Walcott. If you handed him a
sandbox he could probably
play a Mozart sonata on it in a
few minutes. Monday night he
stuck to somewhat more conventional instruments
however, confining himself to
sitar, tablas, cymbals, drums
(one of which, looking like a
large gourd and from some ex
otic locale no doubt, he hung
around his neck while playing
it), clarinet, flutes of various
types, and God knows what
else.
Bassist Glen Moore also excelled, turning in a fine performance that leaned more in the
jazz direction than some of his
earlier stuff. At one point he
too got into the multi-
instrumental mood and played
violin, though he treated it
more like a bass than a
Stradivarius.
What one senses in an
Oregon performance is that
there really only is one intru-
ment the four musicians play,
and   that's   the   band   itself.
Celtic harp, bombarde, pei
BAIRD AND SUTHERLAND...two bright lights
By STEVE McCLURE
Alan Stivell plays country music.
Sort of.
Only in his case the country is
Brittany and the music doesn't bear
the faintest resemblance to North
American country music. This is
because Stivell plays a traditional
Celtic harp instead of a pedal steel
guitar",
s And play it he does. As soon as
•f he began playing the first tune of
| Sunday's concert, everyone
a transfixed by the haunting and sub-
| tie tones he made this most ancient
1 sounding of instruments produce.
His playing tended towards the solo
harp versions of folk tunes from
Brittany, Wales, Ireland and
Scotland that made his best albums
what they were.
Stivell got his start in the general
European folk revival of the late
1960s but soon branched off into
different forms, still playing harp,
but in a more rock-oriented format.
Sunday night, though, he played
the simple and effective harp of his
first albums with the added element
of the singing of his later work. His
voice was much more pleasant to
listen to than some of the political
harangues that he's done on some
of his records. With the harp, it
made a perfect combination, taking
one's   mind   back   to   music   of
He played the
simple and
effective harp
of his first
album »y 5,1962
THE   U BYS S EY
Page 7
>sh but
imps fun
"\
Towner
band itself
Everything else is incidental,
each member of the group
alternating between instruments just to keep things
interesting and thus adding to
the over-all texture of the
sound.
Oregon hasn't been together
for 14 months and have only
recently gotten back together.
The vacation from the group
seems to have done them all
good, their performance being
generally fresh and innovative.
If only one could see them
under better conditions then
the re-birth of Oregon would
be complete. A friend of mine
has this huge back yard, you
see....
Too literal a production
By KERRY REGIER
Shakespearean tragedy is not
classical Greek tragedy.
In classical tragedy, the actors are
faceless, masked archetypes of
humanity, slowly ground down by
inexorable fate. While Shakespeare
retains some of the features of ancient tragedy, his characters are
multidimensional, his plots more
dreamlike and fantastic, and his
mood is always lighter, wittier, and
less superhuman.
Romeo and Juliet
Directed by Bob Baker
At the Playhouse until Feb. 6
Nor can Shakespeare be considered mimetic of reality: the plays
are all too dreamlike, the magic all
too powerful to be part of the real
world, but only a child's fantasy,
with implied innocence. Even in his
tragedies Shakespeare is only lightly
self-aware, as opposed to the
agonized self-awareness of classical
tragedy.
So in the Playhouse production
of Romeo and Juliet, the stark,
angular, and supremely tragic set is
deeply disturbing; dirty white steps
across the whole stage, reminiscent
of Svoboda's set for Oedipus Rex.
Romeo is hardly an Oedipal figure.
And director Bob Baker seemed
acutely aware of his concept of
tragedy taking Shakespeare too
literally in the term "chorus."
Baker presents a classical chorus,
reappearing throughout the play,
and singing an offensive mixture of
plainchant and the Swingle Singers.
But despite Baker's excessively
literal (in every sense) interpretation
of The Tragedy of Romeo and
Juliet, some of the actors manage to
make it a worthwhile evening.
Romeo and Juliet are young
adolescents. Juliet is two weeks
from her fourteenth birthday and
Romeo is also just discovering sex.
Played by Stephen Ouimette and
Martha Burns, the pair have much
of adolescents' sudden excitability
— quick to anger, quick to love,
quick to anguish. Their movements
are still a little gangly, not yet
graceful, still unformed. Juliet is
especially childlike in her sudden
movements and small clumsinesses;
at times Romeo is by contrast a little deliberate, a little 'acty', but only a little.
The other actors wen: less interesting, though most had a fine
sense of Shakespeare's lightness.
But some took themselves perhaps a
bit too seriously: Mercutio sounded
for all the world like Woody Allen,
and Capulet, though strongly and
clearly played, is not a powerful
figure but obviously a doddering
old man, grasping at some shreds of
power as he nears senility. He can't
even remember what day it is.
And the production in general
suffers from a disease common to
nearly all productions of
Shakespeare: the lines are spoken
with such speed and with such
deliberate and unnatural rhythm
they often become unintelligible.
The fight scenes were marvellous,
funny and serious, flashing graceful
blades and dropped daggers snatched up in clumsy haste; and the love
scenes were magical, radiant with
the innocent delight, the quivering
fear, the ecstasy of young lovers not
yet jaded by experience.
Winter's night
not for hairdryer
By CORINNA SUNDARARAJAN
Some books are fluff and can be
read while dozing under the hair
dryer; other books are Art and must
be translated through Coles notes.
Italo Calvino's novel, If On A
Winter's Night A Traveller, is a
self-consicious work stalling
somewhere in between.
Translated from the original
Italian by William Weaver, this
novel is structured on so imaginative a concept that one could
forgive the author any fault — except the inability to see it through.
Unfortunately Calvino coasts on his
imaginative power without refuelling the structure on character or
plot, so when the novelty sputters to
a halt it lacks enough Artistic Merit
to be noted by Coles.
If On A Winter's Night A Traveller
By Italo Calvino
Translated by William Weaver
Lester & Orphen Dennys
260 pp., $13.95
But while the structure is novel,
the novel is game. Calvino has written a book where you, the Reader,
become the central character.
Beginning If On A Winter's Night
A Traveller, you discover that a
printing error has reproduced only
the first chapter of the story. Your
irate return to the bookstore in pursuit of the remaining chapters
draws you into a surrealistic global
hunt from incomplete book to incomplete book to . . .
Calvino's strikingly original concept of a never-ending book is an
adventure to read, a literal experience of fiction's endless potential. But the characters that
populate this cunning game and
their madcap antics tire ihe reader's
understanding. It is as if Calvino,
not knowing how to end a never-
ending book, hopes to lose the
reader in a complex confusion of
obscurities and thus avoid the problem.
He does end the book — with an
ingenious twist — but the last title
in the list of interrupted books neatly capsulates Calvino's failing. The
title, He Asks Anxious to Hear the
Story, expresses this lingering
dissatisfaction that, however ingenious the novel's structure, there
must be some enduring content to
justify the game. Although the
novel sparkles with comic invention,
it is too wild a toss of nonsensical
characters and events to do
anything but fatigue or exasperate
the reader.
If On A Winter's Night A
Traveller should be rewritten with a
stronger story fuelling the structure.
Until then the novel is neither art
nor fluff, but a delightful exercise
in imagination that could have been
so much more . . .
BURNS...•specially childlike in her clumsiness
Badham's film wrong
mywhistle a thrill
otherworlds. Not Nashville.
Stivell was relaxed and though he
joked about jet lag when he forgot
the lyrics to a song at one point, he
usually managed to communicate
his enthusiasm for his music to the
audience. One of the best aspects of
the concert was the music's simultaneous warmth and crystal precision.
As well as harp, Stivell played
pennywhistle and at the end played
a bombarde, a small kazoo-
sounding horn, leading some of the
audience in a Breton dance.
Stivell was accompanied only by
guitarist Bernard Coutelan, who remained mainly in the background
except for a few songs using both
vocalists. At times there was an interesting interplay between the
guitar and the harp but generally
Stivell's harping overshadowed its
accompaniment.
Breton music is not arcane and
obscure but actually can be enjoyed
by anyone who likes Celtic,
Quebecois, or just plain ordinary
folk music in general. It is Stivell's
unique vocation to be Brittany's
musical ambassador to the world
and on Sunday at the Queen
Elizabaeth Playhouse he proved
that there really is no finer exponent
of exponent of this ancient music
than himself.
By SHAFFIN SHARIFF
Brian Clark's recent play Whose
Life Is It Anyway? forced
theatregoers to confront the lead
character's sense of claustrophobia
and anger at not being able to end
his or her life. The audience, having
to stare at the bed-ridden man or
woman for almost two hours,
shared their feelings because they
could feel the restraint the invalid
felt; the play was uncomfortable
because it was meant to be.
Whose Life Is It Anyway?
Directed by John Badham
Playing at Vancouver Centre
John Badham's film Whose Life
Is It Anyway?, based on Clark's
adapted screenplay, is uncomfortable for entirely different reasons.
It is, quite simply, a shoddy movie;
not in terms of the performances,
although John Cassavetes is at his
hammy worst, but in its style. In its
own way, this film aims right at the
heart; any questions about
euthenasia are totally emotional.
There is no question about whose
side the audience is on because the
doctor who opposes Ken Harrison
(Richard Dreyfuss), the victim, is a
one-dimensional clod.
Badham is like other American
directors such as Sidney Lumet and
Sidney Pollack; none of them is
capable of sustaining understatedly
strong moments; there is always
some distraction. When Ken
reminisces about his life and relationship with his girlfriend (Janet
Fulber), Badham interjects an unnecessary black-and-white ballet
striptease. It is a jarring sequence.
Dreyfuss performance is the best
thing about Whose Life Is It
Anyway? but it isn't a virtuoso
performance. In order to make the
movie last for two hours, Clark and
Badham have decided to take their
character into different locales; first
in flashbacks, when Ken was suc
cessful as a sculptor, and then during trips in the wheelchair around
the hospital. Any sense of the
character's claustrophobia is lost.
Perhaps Badham was afraid he
would lose his audience if he confronted them with incessant close-
ups of Ken lying in his bed, unable
to move. But why tackle a play like
Whose Life Is It Anyway? Why not
go for something safer, more commercial, like Saturday Night Fever
II? (Incidentally, there is a totally
misplaced intelligence when a director backs away from the complexities of his subject matter the way
Badham has done.)
Whose Life is it Anyway? is being
promoted as a love story about an
invalid, in the vein of the Other Side
of the Mountain. It isn't. There is
much more at hand in Whose Life Is
It Anyway? than meets the eye in
Badham's film. Save your money
and spend $1.95 on the published
copy of the play. Clark's play is a
far more rewarding experience. Page 8
THE    U BYSS EY
Friday, February 5, 1982
Tuition hikes: a question of hanging on.
Xl@tt6.f*S'
Get down withPerrier
You are cordially invited to join
with us in the First Annual UBC
Mineral Waters Challenge Cup and
Boat Races to be held at 12:30 p.m.
on Tuesday, Feb. 9, 1982. This
sporting event and festive occasion
will take place on the SUB Concourse.
The organizers are recruiting
threesomes to compete for the
Challenge Cup and prizes. All
undergrad societies, AMS executive, clubs, committees, The
Ubyssey, and CITR are encouraged
to sign up! A modest fee of $3 per
team should accompany the entrance form to be submitted by
Monday, Feb. 8, 1982 to SUB 237b
or Box 9, SUB.
Competing teams will be judged
on the combined basis of their
speed in guzzling mineral waters
and their flair and finesse at which
they do it. Among our honoury
judges   will   be   Marlea   Haugen,
AMS president; George Herman-
son, UBC chaplain; and our Faery
Godperson!!!!
The Prize List includes:
First Prize: The Cup!, one bottle
of Tanquery Gin, two bottles of
tonic water and three limes.
Second Prize: Two homemade
quiche, and a long stem red rose.
Third Prize: One tub of plain
yogurt, fresh fruit and three
spoons.
Consolation: Free Bzzr with with
the Gay/Lesbian Wednesday After
Classes Pit Pubbing Collective on
Wednesday Feb. 10, 1982.
Any further questions should be
directed to SUB 237b or
228-4638.
Edward K. McLaren
for the 1982 Gay and Lesbian Week
Organizing Committee
It's all deja vu
Well, grandfather Reagan and his gang of sabre-
rattling, goose-stepping degenerates have done it
again. Every day San Salvador looks a little more like
Saigon.
While the government of El Salvador wages a
search and destroy war against the Democratic
Revolutionary Front (FDR),the Reagan administration
continues to depict the civil war in that country as an
ideological conflict—a fight between communism
and democracy.
Reagan recently announced that the military junta
was not guilty of flagrant human rights violations.
This clears the way, he said, for the U.S. to send $55
million to the beleaguered right-wing government,
with a further $100 million in military aid and food to
follow.
Reagan, Haig, Weinberger et al contend that the
money is necessary to defend the population from
"leftist terrorists." Unfortunately for the White
House hawks, the so-called terrorists are part of a
widely based opposition movement.
The truth of the situation in El Salvador has been
totally reversed by the Reaganites. The ruling oligarchy deprives the Salvadorean people of the very
human rights and freedoms which Reagan and his
neanderthal neo-nazis claim to defend.
The repression practised by the military relies on
sophisticated and expensive methods. The millions
Reagan wants to send to El Salvador are intended to
maintain "stability" there. To achieve "stability" the
junta has implemented state terrorism.
But don't be fooled by the doublethink that is an
intrinsic part of American foreign policy. "Stability"
as used by the Washington war-worshippers does
not mean peace and harmony among the masses —
it means "a healthy climate for investment." Watching out for the business interests of the multinationals is Reagan's real concern.
Nor does the contention that El Salvador is Central America's keystone to democracy withstand
scrutiny. What democracy? Reagan would have us
believe the FDR opposes democracy, when in fact
that is what the "terrorists" are fighting for.
El Salvador is a decisive battlefield, but not the
kind described by Reagan's advisors. It is a fight
against totalitarianism, a fight by the majority to oust
a powerful and repressive elite. Reagan says he
wants self-determination for the people, but not if it
means nationalization of foreign owned property and
other reforms which a socialist government would
implement in El Salvador.
Reagan  cares about capital,  not people.
Letters
We don't need the AMS
On Feb. 4, 1970, a student
referendum was held on the following question: "Are you in favour of
the membership in, and the paying
of fees to the Alma Mater Society
(AMS) being made voluntary?"
Recently, it occurred to me that
another attempt should be made to
recussitate this. Five hundred
signatures are needed to force a
referendum, and collecting these individually is going to take far too
long. If any of the clubs,
undergraduate associations, etc, are
willing to help collect signatures, I
hope they will talk it over and drop
me a line at SUB Box 154.
Right now we are in a "closed-
shop" situation. We are FORCED
to join the student union, whether
or not we agree or disagree with
their policies and use of our $24.
The issue is simply one of having
an individual choice, but the
arguments I have been confronted
with against holding this referendum have not even been worthy of
comment. NO, the library will not
be closed to students if it passes,
NO SUB will not be closed, NO
Filmsoc will not suddenly charge $5
a shot to see a show, etc., etc.
These attitudes of ignorance are
quite representative of the generally
uninformed, unwashed masses out
there. But just stop and think about
CHANGE for a while. There's
nothing to prevent us from having
fee levies for particular purposes
afterwards, for example for SUB
Needless waste at UBC
maintenance, subsidized Pit prices,
etc., but right now we have absolutely no say about the spending
of our money. We simply give them
$24 carte blanche and say do what
you want with it.
Not just money, either. The AMS
has become a self-perpetuating
bureaucracy which has become an
incessant regulation-maker rather
than simply the custodian of
students' interests. Members of
clubs know what I mean.
What about the USE of that
money? What about the money
(and time) wasted on such idiotic
self-help schemes as Lifespring?
(Remember?) How about the
massive grants given to clubs such
as VOC (Varsity Outdoor Club)
and the Women's Committee which
affect only a tiny portion of this institution's students? How about the
constant meals taken by various
AMS politicians at your expense?
And now the crunch. What about
all those general mangers (sic),
business Managers, Assistant so-
and-so's, and secretaries who are
PAID good money to push around
all this AMS paper which is entirely
unecessary in the FIRST
PLACE??? AT YOUR EXPENSE!
No, the world is not going to collapse if this petition gains support.
Many students automatically
assume that something is going to
be taken from them whenever a
change is made . . . forget all the
rah-rah and cheerleading. This is
the only referendum which promises to give students something
rather than take something. All it
needs is your support.
Chris Fulker,
student senator
Arts week
groundhogged
You have no doubt noted that the
infamous Arts Week is scheduled
for next week. However, as the
groundhog has not been sighted in
the vicinity of the Buchanan building, we have decided to postpone
the celebration until the week of
March 8-14 in the hope that by then
the weather will be more agreeable.
So look out for us in March.
Eva Busza
arts undergrad executive
The Ubyssey welcomes letters
from all readers.
If your letter is not published
right away, it may be because it
wasn't typed, triple-spaced, on a 70
space line. Typewriters are available
in The Ubyssey office for this purpose.
Pen names will be used when the
writer's real name is also included in
the letter for our information only,
and when valid reasons for
anonymity are given.
Although an effort is made to
publish all letters received, The
Ubyssey reserves the right to edit
letters for reasons of brevity, legality and taste.
Neatness counts.
The biggest worries at UBC today
are (or should be) economic ones.
Inflation, high interest rates, and
especially provincial cutbacks
threaten our university programs.
The inability of so many departments to hire new, young professors
hurts not only undergraduates
whose classes become larger and
less diverse but also those graduates
from PhD programs who, after
years of hard work, face unemployment. The "last hired, first fired"
syndrome makes life very difficult
for many young people today. One
would think, then, that students
and faculty alike at UBC would be
making every attempt at thrift. Yet
I am continually appalled at what
seems to me to be unnecessary
waste.
The university could save
thousands of dollars (and jobs!) by
lowering   the   temperatures   in
buildings. Having lived in a poor
country where people use and reuse
every bit of paper, string, cloth, and
so on, I am continually angered at
the way we waste everything in
Canada. In poorer countries, when
winter comes people put on several
layers of clothing, eat a lot of hot
food, and drink hot water continually if they must sit at a desk to
work.
Yet here in Canada, you can sit in
shirt sleeves in the middle of
January and may often be forced to
wear sweaters in July when the air-
conditioning is up too high. Several
times this week, I have had to open
windows in classrooms that were so
hot we were all falling asleep.
Moreover, there are buildings on
this campus where the lights are
never turned off because there is
one master switch rather than individual ones. It seems really crazy
to me that we are overheating
buildings while at the same time
cutting back on staff. Where are
our priorities?
Carol Town
medical student
More rants
about graffiti
I wish to hell those jerks who supposedly represent the SFA would
stop smearing the place with their
idiotic graffiti.
Besides avoiding an illegal act
(defacing of public property), they
might even help keep their tuition
fees down by reducing the university's expenditures for sand-blasting
equipment and paint.
Dave Janis
aplied science 2
THE UBYSSEY
February 5, 1982
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout
the university year by the Alma Mater Society of the
University of B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the
staff and not of the AMS or the university administration. Member, Canadian University Press. The
Ubyssey's editorial office is in room 241k of the Student
Union Building. Editorial departments, 228-2301; Advertising, 228-3977.
The Ubyssey was in a chaotic state. It's beteagured military junta was barely in control. "We must
crush the vermin where they write," screeched co-despot Julie Wheelwright. Her cohorts, Nancy
Campbell and Eric Eggertson, lay on the desk, moaning from em ruler wounds inflicted by the lefthand-
ed typist guerrillas. They were led by Brian Jones, Arnold Heddstrom and Brian Byrnes, three of the
most wanted people on the tiny isthmus of UBC. "We must destroy the faceless, I mean fascist,
regime before they destroy the paper," they shouted in unison with Peter Francis and Kerry Reiger.
Meanwhile, back in the office, it was a state of seige. Haig Brooks, captain of city desk, was busy
throwing typewriter ribbons at the oncoming mass of guerrillas. Shaffin Sharriff took a direct hit, but
gamely continued the charge. "We must have democracy, or at least a little bit of fun," demanded
Corinna Sundararajan. She was joined by Charles Campbell and Allen Stevens, two more lefthanded
typist guerillas. "This is the best revolution I've been to in my entire life," said Craig Yuill, the youngest
of the group. "Nah, we've been to better ones," sneered grizzled correspondents Tom Hawthorn and
Keith Baldrey. Suddenly, the fighting stopped. Religious leader Muriel "Moral Dogma" Draasima
demanded, and got, a ceasefire until the editorial elections in March. Just then. Glen Sanford woke up
and dreamily asked what all the commotion was about. "Go to El Salvador and find out!!" Friday, February 5,1982
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 9
viste
And here beginneth the eight inch
quota of cultural content.
If staring at a sculpture isn't your
idea of a meaningful relationship,
how about having sculpture stare at
you? At the Arts, Sciences &
Technology Centre until April,
Dennis Vance will display his
techno-sculptures which respond to
individual visitors by singing or
pulsing with light. For a real charge,
you can try asking one out as your
Valentine's date.
Meanwhile, back in the land of
sinew and soul, the Ballet Fantasio
of Romania will make their debut
Canadian performance at the
Queen Elizabeth Theatre on
February 26. Trained in the tradition of Russia's Imperial Ballet, this
company will present such classics
as Les Sylphides, Le Corsaire and
Carmen. See the dancers flit, soar
and die respectively.
It's a wonderful world of whirling wonders, and the Ukrainian
Shumka Dancers will inspire you
with fear of vertigo at the Queen
Elizabeth Theatre on February 27.
Dedicated to the preservation of
our Ukrainian heritage, this Canadian company will whip through
Vancouver complete with a 25
musician orchestra. Warning:
patrons are not insured against
dancer's mishandlings of swords,
axes and harvest sycles during peak
moments.
Heart of my heart, how I love
that melody . . . said good ol'
Rodgers, but then he would do just
about anything for a raise. Judge
for yourself at the Vancouver
Musical Theatre's production of
Rodgers & Hart — A Musical
Celebration of Love. This orgy of
Valentine Day sentiments will run
until February 27 at the Metro
Theatre.
*R<SI Bradson
«® Word
Processing
8Rr* Dunsmuir Street
Suite 880    V6C 1NH
688-7791
Hairlines gives
students a break!
1(\Q/    OpF our re9u,ar prices
U /0 Monday - Wednesday only
(Student I D   required)
Combining top professional hairstylists
with a very comfortable atmosphere.
PmU  _   Mon Slfsnn      Women S22 00
Cuts -   Men $15 00     Women $22.00
Perms -   Men S35.00     Women $40 00 and up
Streaks.color, hennas and conditioners also competitively priced
2529 Alma St   at Broadway Mon.-Fri   — 9:00-7:30
Telephone: 224-2332 Sat   - 9:00-5:00,
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Every little thing she
does is magic?
Tell Her
Ubyssey Valentine
3 lines $1.50
Deadline:
Feb. 11th 10:00 a.m.
IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII
RHYTHM-FIT
Exercise to Music
DROP-IN $1.00 per session
BEG-INTER
Mon/Wed, 12:30-1:30 p.m.. Gym B*
Tues/Fri# 4:30-5:30 p.m.. Gym B*
INTER-ADVANCED
Mon/Tues/Thurs, 7:30-8:30 a.m..
Gym B*
Fri., 7:30-8:30 a.m.. Gym E*
ALL LEVELS
Sun, 11:30-12:30 p.m.. Gym B
Sun, 3:30-4:30 p.m.. Gym B
'except those who have already registered.
Illlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll
NOMINATIONS ARE OPEN FOR
ONE REPRESENTATIVE TO
THE PRESIDENT'S STUDENT
PLACEMENT COMMITTEE
This committee works in co-operation with the campus
branch, Canada Employment Centre to ensure that all
concerns related to Student Placement are considered.
Application forms may be picked up in SUB
238.
Forms must be returned by Wednesday,
February 10, at 3:30 p.m.
llllllllllllll
Wi
SALESPERSON
required to sell
Ubyssey
Advertising
Earn as much as
you want to.
Apply: Sue Cadeny
Room 241 SUB
COMMUNITY SPOI
WINTER
SPECIALS
Bauer 96 Ice Skates	
Di Trani Down Jackets	
RTS
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Mohair Ski Packages	
(Poles, Bindings, Installation)
Gortex Rain Jackets	
Nuna Tuk Sleeping Bags	
Wilson NFL Footballs	
Heavy Duty Basketballs	
Osaga Track Suits	
Ultralite Squash Racquets  	
Bauer Lightfoot Joggers	
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Leather Soccer Boots	
Wilson Racquetball Racquets .
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Grev Sweat Pants 	
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AND PLENTY MORE
at 3615 W. Broadway
733-1612 Page 10
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, February 5, 1982
Tween ill;
isses
i
TODAY
STUDENTS FOR PEACE
AND MUTUAL DISARMAMENT
Steering committee meeting, noon, Angus 412.
CITR UBC RADIO
Campus Capsule, 6 p.m., cable 100 fm. A review
of the week's campus news.
TROTSKYIST LEAGUE CLUB
Marxist  literature and discussion,   noon,   SUB
foyer.
AMNESTY UBC
A fHm about Chile, The Most Painful Hour,
noon, SUB concourse.
PROGRESSIVE CONSERVATIVE CLUB
Wine and cheese party, 7:30 p.m.,  SUB 212.
New members welcome.
KNOWLEDGE NETWORK
Bucket Bucks, half-time event at the men's varsity basketball game where contestants shoot
from mid-court for prizes, 8 p.m., War Memorial
gym.
STUDENT LIBERALS
General meeting, noon, SU8 224.
UBC SPORTS CLUB
SUB loop, 6:15 p.m. Valley rally. $3 per person
for non-members.
MUSSOC
South Pacific, 8 p.m., Old Auditorium.
AMNESTY UBC
Human rights information library, noon, SUB
230.
SPEAKEASY AND
STUDENT HEALTH SERVICES
Film, Everything you wanted to know about STD
{also known as VD).
Speaker from the ministry of health Ron Labonte, noon, SUB 111.
MUSLIM STUDENT ASSOCIATION
Friday prayers. All Muslims are requested to attend, noon. International House.
HISTORY STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Meeting,   general   business,   noon.    History
lounge, 12th floor Buchanan tower.
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Worship,   Eucharist  with   Rev.   Ray   Schultz,
noon, Lutheran Campus Centre.
INTRAMURALS
West-east mall run, 3 km, men and women,
noon between SUB and Main library.
THUNDERBIRD BASKETBALL
Games starting at 3 p.m.. War Memorial gym.
SATURDAY
MUSSOC
South Pacific, 8 p.m.. Old Auditorium.
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Second annual badminton tournament, $1 entry
fee, 5 p.m.. Gym B Osborne.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Party 8 p.m., SUB partyroom.
SAILING CLUB
Work party, 9 a.m. Jericho Sailing Centre.
THUNDERBIRD BASKETBALL
Games at 3 p.m.. War Memorial gym.
THUNDERBIRD RUGBY
McKechnie  Cup  game,  2 p.m.,  Thunderbird
stadium.
THUNDERBIRD SWIMMING
T-Birds vs SFU Clansmen, 2 p.m.. Aquatic cen-
SUNDAY
AFRICAN STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Discussion, Indigenous African religion and
Christianity. Everyone welcome. 2 p.m., SUB
205.
UBC CYCLING CLUB
Touring ride, 9 a.m. Meet at south side of SUB.
UNDERWATER HOCKEY
Practice, 10 p.m.. Aquatic centre.
INTRAMURALS
Seymour Mountain snowshoeing trip (rescheduled). No place or time given.
MONDAY
CITR UBC RADIO
Off Beet, highlights of off-beat news, street level
activities and the Hot Air Show, 7 p.m., cable
100 fm.
UBC SPORTS CAR CLUB
General meeting, 7 p.m., SUB 213.
CARIBBEAN STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
The Grenada Situation, a talk and film, 4:30
p.m., SUB 212. Question and answer period
with people from the Grenada government.
UBC CRIME PREVENTION PROJECT
Radar demonstration, noon, SUB concourse.
TUESDAY
CITR UBC RADIO
Thunderbird Report, S p.m., cable 100 fm. A
review of the weekend sports.
In Sight, 6 p.m. after the news. It has nothing to
do with eyes. You see what we mean.
FINE ARTS DEPARTMENT
Lecture Archeology and contemporary affairs,
noon, Lasserre 102.
UBC CRIME PREVENTION PROJECT
Breathalyzer demonstration, noon, SUB foyer.
CREATIVE WRITING PRISM INTERNATIONAL
Poetry reading, noon, Buchanan penthouse.
UBC CYCLING CLUB
Film,  Tour du St.  Laurent,  noon,  Buch.  102.
Scenes from the Quebec cycle race.
LAW STUDENTS LEGAL ADVICE PROGRAM
Law students give free legal advice or referrals,
noon to 2 p.m., SUB 211.
COMMITTEE AGAINST RACIST
AND FASCIST VIOLENCE
Literature table, noon, SUB foyer.
PRE-MED SOCIETY
Dr. Dodek lectures on Training of a cardiologist,
noon, IRC 1.
UBC-JAPAN CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 212.
WEDNESDAY
INTRAMURALS
Final registration for cross-country ski trip to
Manning park, 3:30 p.m.. War Memorial gym
203.
WOMEN STUDENTS' OFFICE
Free lecture on Interview Techniques, noon,
Brock 106.
ARTS UNDERGRADUATE SOCIETY
Election, all day, polling stations in Buchanan.
HSSC
Health sciences career day, noon, SUB concourse.
WOMEN STUDENTS' OFFICE
Free program on Interview Techniques, noon.
Brock 106.
VARSITY OUTDOOR CLUB
General meeting and slide show on hiking in Nepal, noon, Chem. 250.
THURSDAY
WOMEN STUDENTS' OFFICE
Lecture, Women in Nepal, noon, Buch. 218.
SAILING CLUB
Skippers meeting, noon, SUB 205.
CITR UBC RADIO
Thunderbird Report, 5 p.m., cable 100 fm. Preview of upcoming sports events.
In Sight, 6 p.m. after the news, insight on a major campus issue.
INTRAMURALS
Referee club meeting, no time given. War
Memorial gym 211. New and old refs welcome.
Bring your own whistle.
SCIENCE PSYCHOLOGY CLUB
Meeting, noon, Angus 426.
[
Hot  Flashes
Artsie* go
fo the poll»
Hot flash! Hot flashl Arts
Undergraduate Society holding
elections Wednesday Feb. 10.
Ballot boxes in Buchanan building
all day! Vote soon, vote often for
arts reps to council.
Another Hot flash! Yet another
hot flash! All candidates meeting in
Buch. 102, Monday Feb. 8 at 12:30.
Fourteen (count 'em, 14) candidates meet for bafflegab and
blathering intermingled with gabbing. Help, I'm falling asleep!
VD and more
Do you have VD? Have you ever
wanted to know more about it?
Well, now is your chance to almost
experience the real thing.
Student health services and
Speakeasy are sponsoring a talk on
everything you always wanted to
know about sexually transmitted
disease. By STD, they actually
mean VD, plus a few other things.
A film on the subject will be
shown and Ron Labonte from the
provincial health ministry will give a
talk and probably answer questions.
Play polM€9
Politics is alive and well at UBC.
Today, students from almost all
phases of the political spectrum can
take part in one or more events.
The Trotskyist club, who are called nuts in a letter from Marxist-
Leninist    that    appeared    in
BLACK & LEE
Thursday's Ubyssey, is holding a
Marxist literature and discussion at
noon in the SUB concourse. Need
we say more. If Marx was alive today, or if Trotsky hadn't been ice-
picked to death, maybe they could
figure out what these groups stand
for and why they are always
disagreeing with each other.
The student Liberals will hold a
general meeting today at noon in
SUB 224. On the agenda is a
speech from their leader, and there
will be a discussion of replacing him
as soon as possible. He says he will
resign soon, since he is graduating.
Speaking of leadership problems,
the political party that specializes in
stabbing itself in the back, yes
folks, the Regressive Preservar-
tives, will be holding a wine and
cheese party at 7:30 in SUB 212.
They will be discussing their leadership,getting drunk and discussing
why they were in office only seven
months. Only 65 per cent of the
membership welcome.
We wiff Iose
"Hey, Bobbie, are you going to
the varsity b-ball game tonight?"
"Gee, I don't know, Pat. Should
I?"
"Sure, the T-Birds are playing
the UVic Vikings at 8:30. I wouldn't
miss it unless there was something
good on teevee."
"But aren't those games sorta
dull?"
"They used to be, but now
Knowledge Network is televising
the games, so we wear purple wigs
and scream and cheer. Besides,
they have a Bucket Bucks contest
at half time. Jocks shoot from mid-
court for prizes. It's real neat."
"Wow! I'm going too! But first
I'm going to the junior varsity
games at 3 and 4:30 p.m. and the
women's team game at 6:45 p.m.
See ya there I"
Pacific iiulrecf
Yes folks, the UBC Musical
Theatre Society's production of
South Pacific is winding down its
run at the Old Auditorium. Last
shows are at 8 p.m. tonight and
Saturday.
The production has been described as "fantastic, wonderful, great,
and good." One well known
reviewer even commented "It is the
best production I have ever seen in
my life." Vincent Canby also called
it, "the best version in the last 10
years. No, make that the last 25."
Dracula drips
Drip,drip, drip, drip.
Just a drippy reminder about today being the last day of the Red
Cross blood drive in SUB 207/209.
Come and support your favorite
dracula.
TUX SHOP
1110 Seymour St
688 2481
OUTDOOR ADVENTURE
CROSS
COUNTRY
SKIING
MANNING PARK
Saturday, February 13
Register in Room 203 W.M.G. before
Wednesday, February 10.
WOMEN
Getting ready to look for a job?
Come and get some hints on
INTERVIEW
TECHNIQUES
Speaker: DR. LORETTE WOOLSEY
Wednesday, Feb. 10, 1982
12:30-2:20 p.m.
Brock 106A, B & C
Sponsored by the Women
Students' Office
wmmmmmmmm.
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: Campus — 3 lima. 1 day 12.00; additional Unas. GBc.
Commercial — 3 Unas. 1 day $3.63; additional linos
66c. Additional days 43.30 and 60c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance. Deadline is 10:30 a.m. die dey before publication.
PubBcetions Office. ftoam$4T, S.U.B.. UBC. Van.. B C. VST2A5
5 — Coming Events
COMMUNITY SPORTS: A store full of ski
wear, hockey equipment, sleeping bags,
jogging shoes, soccer boots, racquets of all
kinds, and dozens of other items at very attractive prices. 3615 W. Broadway.
THE VANCOUVER INSTITUTE
Free Public Lecture
DR. MAURICE McGREGOR
McGill University
AN ANGLOPHONE IN Quebec
Dr.  McGregor,  an  internationally
known  cardiologist,   has  been  a
keen observer of the political and
cultural evolution of Quebec.
LECTURE HALL 2,
WOODWARD BUILDING.
Saturday. Feb. 6 at 8:15 p.m.
11 — For Sale — Private
HAWAII - $279.00 return Feb. 25 to
Mar. 7. Phone 734-5939 after 6 p.m.
15 — Found
STUDENT RESUME
SPECIAL
$60 Resume fo $25
"The best resume you'll ever have"
The Write People
in SUB:
Feb. 4, Thursday 9-6
Feb. 9, Tuesday 9-6
* Bring all relevant info *
or phone 688-9737
20 — Housing
SOUTH GRANVILLE two bedroom suite
fire place, in-suite laundry. $800. Available
immediately Peter 261-6890.
25 — Instruction
30 — Jobs
35 — Lost
40 — Messages
50 — Rentals
60 — Rides
MODE COLLEGE of barbering and
hair styling. Student hairstyle, $8.50. Body
wave, $17.00 and up. 601 W. Broadway,
874-0633.
80 — Tutoring
85 — Typing
EXPERT TYPING: essays, term papers,
factums, letters, manuscripts, resumes,
theses. IBM Selectric II. Reasonable rates.
Rose 731-9857.
TYPING: $1 per page. Legible copy. Fast,
accurate, experienced typist with IBM
Selectric. Gordon, 873-8032 (after 10 a.m.).
TYPING SERVICE for theses, correspondence, etc. Any field. French also available.
IBM Selectric. Call 736-4042.
TYPING — Special Student Rates. Fitness
& Cameron Public Stenographers, 5670
Yew Street, Phone 226-6814.
EXPERIENCED UBC TYPIST will type your
thesis, papers, essays, fast and accurate.
946-2185 after 6:00.
MICOM WORD PROCESSING - $10.00/hr.
Equation typing available. Pickup and
delivery. Phone Jeeva, 826-5169 (Mission).
65 — Scandals
90 — Wanted
70 — Services
HOMESTAY PROGRAMMING
IN FRANCE
3 week stay with French family, language
study course, excursions. Depart Vancouver
from $3,000.00.
11 June — 3 July
8 July — 1 August
4 August — 26 August
CONTACT: Kathy Ronnquist
Kay-Dor Travel
Travel Service Ltd.
210 N. Front St.,
Sarnia, Ontario
N7T 7H9 1519) 336-0820
EDGAR CAYCE type deep trance readings
to guide you in 1982. Any question in the
world. 228-9865.
U.S.   CANADIAN   TAX   RETURNS   V.P.
Sharma 430-5629
$$$$ MAKE MONEY *$$♦ Bring your fine
quality used clothing to Ruby Tuesday.
Opens Feb. 6 4476 W. 10th 224-4318 or call
Annie 733-6856, Christy 228-9674.
HELP
WANTED
We'll pay you $40 per hundred
to process and mail advertising
letters and brochures. All
postage paid, no gimmick. Send
name, address, phone and $2
(refundable) for processing to
Textron Inc., Postal Unit 235,
Avon, Illinois, 61415.
99 — Miscellaneous Friday, February 5, 1982
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 11
Be good
to yourself—
eat out
at one of
the fine
restaurants
advertised
in The
Ubyssey!
"BplHr^SfrJi^lndcJi^JcJf-Jr-Jr-JrJr^irJrir-J!
II
ji
Traditional
Greco-Roman Cuisine
7 Days a Week: 5 p.m.-1 a.m.
Fri. and Sat: 5 p.m. to 2 a.m.
FREE fest delivery I
228-9513
4610 West 10th Ave.
^[-jpJj-jMM^^HNr^dFJi^^piiEipJgiglg^
HONG KONG
CHINESE FOOD
(Self Serve
Restaurant)
«* 5732 •>
>**• UNIVERSITY BLVD/-*?
/-T     Eat In and Take Out    J>£"
■$       OPEN EVERY DAY     ^,
4:00 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.     ***
Phone: 224-1313 ft
LIVE ROCK NPROLL
V
Vfc£S#£lOn*OLL
LIVE R<ftfi¥jftT ROLL
FEB. 8-13
KENNY McCOLL
Open Mon. - Sat. 7 p.
932 Granviile Mall      687-6418
(Efte (EittBtfirt QHizzbz 3nn
A Srnuitinnal Engliah fieataurnnt
4E8E Dunbar at 30th 224-2S21
3 COURSE LUNCH SPECIAL      3.96
[DINNER SPECIALS from 4.16
Ptus complete Menu Selection
s of Salad, Sandwich and
\ House Specialties
LUV-A-FAIR
Vancouver's #1
New Wave Club
175 Seymour St.
'Open: 11:30 - Midnight
/ Monday thru Saturday
'ENJOY ENGLISH PUB-STYLE
FOOD IN AN AUTHENTIC SETTING
Fully Licensed Premises
Make "The Cheese" Your Local
RED LEAF
RESTAURANT ^
Luncheon Smorgasbord
Authentic Chinese Cuisine
228-9114
" 10% DISCOUNT ON
PICK-UP ORDERS
LICENSED PREMISE
Mon.-Fri. 11:30-9:00 p.m.
CLOSED SATURDAYS
Sunday* and Holiday*
4:00 p.m.-9:00 p.m.
_      2142 Western Paifcway
"      UEL. Vancouver. B.C.
(Oppoalte Chevron 8tatlon)
Make a date
to try one of
the fine
restaurants
advertised in
The Ubyssey!
ROTIMAN DELI
CARIBBEAN FOODS
Rotl— Curry Chicken—Beef—
Stew—Poulourri Rice W Pees
Take Out—Catering—Delivery
Tel: 876-6066
Open Tuesday through
Sunday 11:30 a.m.-10 p.m.
922 Kingsway — Opp. ICBC
UBG Gampas
Pizza
Steak & Pizza — Lasagna
Spare Ribs — Ravioli
Chicken — Greek Salads
Souvlaki
Fast Free Local Delivery
224-4218 - 224-0529
Houf,    Mon   Thurs    11.30 a.m   2 00 p m     Fn
11 30 d in   3 00 p.m     S.H   4 (XI p in   3 00 ., •■
Sun   4 00 p in    100 ,| in
2136 Western Parkway
TOP LIVE BANDS NIGHTLY
FBI. & SAT.
THIS WEEK:
TWO BANDS
Trama &
Lizard King
Tribute to the Doors
(Feb. 12 Er 13 only)
NEXT WEEK:
The City Band
First 50 Ladies Friday & Saturday get in FREE.
315 E. Broadway 879 4651 Free Parking
MON. Wet "10" T-shirt
Contest
TUES. Whip Cream
Wrestling
WED. Ladies Night
THURS. Hoser Night
Wear toque, scarf or
earmuffs and  get in
free.
It makes good sense;
patronize advertizers
in The Ubyssey!
has School efft you down7
You can ha*e_a days stiiry at
GROUSE MTH. plustKMspor+arion On
The ^
UBCSH Express
Bus leaves SUB 7:15 a.m.^jn Feb.
Have a «?££ rr	
ihe Pit onryour return.
Tickets Available AMS Ticket Office SUB
NOT UABLfe FPS LOSSES 0* H-JJUgr' suppee**^
C.I.T.R.
and
THE PIT
The Nabobs of Noise
proudly Present
"THE
HOT
AIR
SHOW"
FEATURING LIVE
BANDS
—The Cheapest Free
Entertainment in Town
Monday, Feb. 8, 1982
9:00 p.m.
NO COVER
AMS EVENTS
South Pacific,
Feb. 5th & 6th
Wildroot, Feb. 5th
Villains, Feb. 12th
Valentine's Dance,
Feb.13th
UBC Ski Express,
Feb. 6th
Western Express, Provincial,
Super Loto Tickets also
available.
AMS
TICKET
OFFICE
AMS PRESENTS
UPCOMING EVENTS
CBO
Doc and Merle Watson,
Feb. 5th
Maynard Ferguson,
Feb. 6th
The Great Guitarists,
Feb. 7th
John Prine & Steve Goodman.
Feb. 16th
Bruce Cockburn,
Feb. 16th
Marcel Marceau,
Feb. 23rd
Andres Segovia,
Feb. 24th
MacLean &• MacLean,
Feb. 26th Er 27th
'vf'jfe'v-**   *&'*-<
FULL
MEAL
^■-R**--*^ ^BmW^m^^^JQjLWwt f.
TIL FEB
It's the best meal deal going. Our 100% pure
beef double burger with "More Burger Than
Bun™". A small order of crispy, golden fries.
Your favorite small drink. And, to top it all off
a cool and creamy 5 oz. DAIRY QUEEN®
Sundae. All for only $2.99. Get a good deal
on a full meal. Head for your participating
DAIRY QUEEN®   BRAZIER®   store.
<c; AM D.Q. Corp/1981
Dairy
Queen
brazier.
2601 W. Broadway
at Trafalgar Page 12
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, February 5,1962
•    I
JVC H404
Headphones
$29.95
JVC ME-60
METAL TAPE
$6.99
Hfire s another Great JVC and Vancouver Sight & Sound Super Buy
li features an the Latest 1982 models with the newest technology
and styling    This complete music svstem does everything   even equalise
the sound    >ee adioinmg blocks foi  more info   The complete svstem
is oacKed bv  our  in sto>e b  Year Warranty   Compare this system value
We challenge anyone to show anything that s even close
Sepetatelv
on Salp
S1349 00
■H--
PRICE
20
SPECTACULAR
SYSTEMS ON SPECIAL
BY JVC, PIONEER, AKAI, MISSION
"JVC MU-103f
Microphones '
$15.00
JVC RC363
Port. Stereo
$199.95
JVC QL-A51
Semi-Automatic, Direct
Turntable, Quartz Locked
Technology. Straight
Low Mass Arm.
Price Includes JVC[
MD1033 Mag.
Cartridge
Seperately
on Sale
^^^fa-
195
tiluaftzLockl
..I m
*   «i a Tl, r-ii~2
HSwerANRS
33 3 ai;
W
KITSILANO
*
>-
4MAVE
CO
■
WEST END
DOWNTOWN
Seperately ^^^^■^^B9*>
on Sale
JVC SK 505 STEREO
SPEAKERS
Deluxe finish with Tweeter
and Midrange Controls,
This 3 way will handle
up to 120 Watts Peak Power
60 RMS continuous 35 to
20,000 Hz Frequency
Response Cross Over Freq.
at 3000 & 8000 Hz
5 Year Warranty
Introductory
Price -
RICHMOND N. WESTMINSTER N  VANCOUVER
JVC R-S77 AM/FM DELUXE
1982 Model, Super-A, Digital PreSet
Stations, 120 Watts Power, A Real
Winner with Equalizer.
KAMLOOPS
VICTORIA
to
IM
2
DAVIE
*
o
_J
K
3
X
►-
■
1
SEYMOUR
■
DUNSMUIR
*o|
PARK   1
r~| 0| ANDERSON!
■    J
GRANVILLE
1       WOODWARDS
liOlAVE.   1 1
M
i
■
UJ
s
*
13ttlST
to
m
©
5
t
m   *\
VICTORIA
PANOORA
7199 W 4th AVE
1114 DAVIE ST
536 SEYMOUR ST.
6900 NO. 3 RD.
702C 6th AVE
1309 LONSDALE AVE 230 VICTORIA ST
858 PANDORA AVE
736-2468   689-3408  687-6455   270-8171   525-6351  985-0577  374-3155   386-4433
VANCOUVER..

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