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The Ubyssey Feb 9, 1973

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 DSC takes four executive positions
Vol. LIV, No. 34
VANCOUVER, B.C.,
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 1973
228-2301
Samaritans
to be fined
Motorists stopping to pick up
hitchikers along University
Boulevard are liable to be fined
two points for obstructing
traffic.
An RCMP officer said
Thursday they are especially
concentrating on the area in
front of the village, where two
signs expressly forbid
stopping, but they will also fine
motorists who stop in other
places on the boulevard.
But students will be able to
hitchhike without penalty to
those picking them up at the
hitchhiking signs along
Wesbrook.
By VAUGHN PALMER
and GARY COULL
The Democratic Students' Caucus won
four Alma Mater Society executive
positions by a slim majority of the 3,354
votes cast in Wednesday's election.
Elected were: Brian Loomes, arts 4,
president; Diane Latta, arts 2, internal
affairs; Stan Persky, grad studies 9,
secretary and Joanne Lindsay, arts 3,
co-ordinator.
The DSC candidates accumulated an
average 52 per cent majority in
defeating opponents of the rival Students'
Coalition slate which has governed the
AMS for one and a half years.
Two preferential counts of
presidential ballots were required
before Loomes was declared the winner.
The first count totals gave Loomes 1,244,
Students' Coalition candidate Bob Angus
953 and independent Tony Formby 894.
As a 50 per cent plus one majority is
required to be elected, preferential votes
of Formby and two other independents,
Stewart Foster and Doug Tuck were
counted until Loomes gained 1,351 votes
to Angus' 1,068 to finish with a 55 per cent
majority.
Vote totals for the other offices were:
internal affairs, Latta 1,631; Debbie Rota
(SC) 1,521; co-ordinator, Lindsay 1,668;
John Keating (SC) 1,531; secretary,
Persky 1,786; Pemme Muir (SC) 1,459.
Voter turnout was down 620 from last
year, due largely to a drop in the civil
engineering and education polls.
Education students are on practicum
this month and will also miss the Feb. 21
second slate elections.
Secretary-elect Stan Persky
speculated the reason for the low
engineering turnout was a. lack of
reactionary votes against DSC policies.
President-elect Loomes said Thursday
the DSC will begin immediately to work
to implement policies of student
representation on faculty committees
and equal rights for women as well as
observing the legal priorities of the
transition of student government.
Loomes said although the DSC doesn't
officially take office until March 15, their
immediate priority will be to oppose the
proposed increases in resident fees.
"These hikes are intolerable,
especially in the Acadia residences. The
increased housing  costs  for  married
I students fly in the face of economic
reality at a time when the job situation is
desperate," he said.
Loomes said the DSC fully supports
the decision by the Acadia residents to
combat the increase.
r AMS president Doug Aldridge said
Wednesday night he is disappointed with
the low turnout.
"It's a lack of understanding on the
part of students of just how big the AMS
really is. Most people deal only in a
direct relationship with the AMS for
their own problems. It's not until you get
.to the top when you realize the size of the
operation."
Aldridge said the administration will
listen to elected student representatives
but when turnout is so low they begin to
think students don't care.
Aldridge refused to comment on the
ability of the people elected.
Presidential runner-up Bob Angus
said Wednesday night he is worried
about the DSC's ability to effectively
continue the services started this year.
Angus said unless the new executive
starts immediately to take an interest in
See page 2:    FOOD
ALMA MATER SOCIETY election winners are members of the
Democratic Students' Caucus. From left to right they are
president-elect   Brian   Loomes,   internal   affairs  officer-elect   Diane
—kini mcdonald photo
Latta, secretary-elect Stan Persky and co-ordinator-elect Joanne
Lindsay. Slate promises to work towards student representation at the
faculty level and a continuation of present AMS budgetary policies.
Rent boycott urged
ByRYONGUEDES
Withholding rent on campus
residences from the
administration may be a
necessary step to take, student
senator Svend Robinson said
Thursday evening.
Speaking at a meeting of
more     than     100     Acadia
See page 3 for
further residence news
residents, Robinson said unless
they received some cooperation from the board of
governors and bursar William
White, drastic measures might
soon be in order.
The meeting was called after
the Tuesday meeting of the
board of governors at which
housing director Leslie
Rohringer presented his brief
proposing an across-the-board
9.75 per cent increase in rent
for all student residences.
The Acadia action
committee, also present at the
board meeting, submitted their
own brief opposing the hike.
The meeting adjourned
without making a decision, and
is to be resumed Monday,
presumably to allow Rohringer
to complete presentation of his
brief.
Rohringer told The Ubyssey
Thursday "the board meeting
had a heavy agenda" and the
Acadia      committee      had
Women's week set
By LEN JOHNSON
Women's week, a program of art, poetry and work shops
dealing with women's activities, will be held on campus all next
week.
Program co-ordinator Fran Isaacs said the program is
aimed both at students and women in the community.
"I like to think of it as a celebration of what women are
doing, such as artwork, poetry and music, and in another way
as a place of information and discussion such as we hope we'll
have in the various workshops, for instance, the workshops on
public speaking, daycare and women's unemployment," she
said Thursday.
In SUB art gallery a display with various women artists,
information tables with information on counselling services, the
status of women council, UBC women's action group, and other
women's groups from the community will be held.
Outside the art gallery will be literature tables selling
women's 1973 calendars, women's health books, the report on
the status of women at UBC and miscellaneous books and
reprints.
The workshops, taking place during the day and evening,
will include poetry readings, plays, discussions on women's
rights, daycare and abortion.
preceded him.
"There was just no time to
complete my proposal," he
said.
Dereck Booth, president of
the Acadia Park tenants
association, said at the
Thursday night meeting that
Rohringer's last place berth on
the agenda may have been a
deliberate ploy.
"He had insisted at the board
meeting that he see our
recommendations, but we have
not been allowed to see his, nor
have we been given permission
to attend the meeting next
Monday," Booth said.
Booth said many Acadia
residents feel the rents were
increased to pay off the
mortgage on the Wally Gage
towers.
"The feeling is still that the
Gage towers are to blame for
the rent increases," Booth
said.
"At the board meeting,
Rohringer almost stated
outright that the overspending
See page 2: WALLY Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, February 9, 1973
Wally Gage towers blamed for deficit
From page 1
on     Gage     towers      was
responsible."
But housing business
manager Keith Davis told The
Ubyssey: "We did not
overspend,   we   underspent."
"The amount spent in
building the Gage apartments
was well within the budget.
In response to Davis'
statement, Booth pointed out
Rohringer plans to use the
Gage        apartments        as
convention  accommodation
during the summer.
"If Gage towers are not
losing money then why is there
a deficit? Why is he so eager
for Gage towers to make
money from conventions?"
Booth said.
A motion was made to elect
delegates to the finance
committee to present a letter
stating the tenants' demands.
Booth told the group
appointments   were   being
made with "the people in
Victoria as soon as possible."
He specified the minister of
education Eileen Dailly, the
minister of finance Dave
Barrett and the minister of
welfare Norman Levy. Booth
said he intended to "arrange
appointments with the people
who can help us."
Present at the meeting were
the newly-elected AMS
executive members, president
Brian Loomes, secretary Stan
Persky,  co-ordinator   Joanne
Food services pull back seen
From page 1
the AMS he will phase back on
the purchase of food services.
"I think the administration
will pull out anyway and we
won't be able to buy it again for
ten years," he said.
Loomes said the DSC also
New dean
sees change
in ed role
The education faculty should
act as a resource for the entire
school system rather than
purely an institution for
teacher training, says John
Andrews, who succeeds
education dean Neville Scarfe
July 1.
"I see a faculty of education
as a critically important
resource, occupying a strong
leadership role in educational
matters, working cooperatively   not   only   with
plans to contact local labor
groups to prepare an
information programs on job
futures for students. This will
involve such groups as the B.C.
Federation of Labor, B.C.
Teachers Federation and the
Working Women's Association.
After next month's
undergraduate society
elections Loomes said the
executive will confer with reps
on student representation in
faculties and the status of
women on campus.
Loomes re-affirmed the
DSC's pledge not to cut back on
budgets for sports clubs or
undergraduate society
activities.
He said the pledge is not a
political gimmick and
regardless of an enrolment or
budget drop the percentage
allocated will not change.
Independent candidate Tony
Formby who ran a close
third in the presidential race
said Thursday he feels he
made his point that slates are
not a good thing. Formby, who
won the Henry Angus poll and
ran second at most others, ran
on the platform of an
independent service — good
government stance against
slates which he claims allow
people who normally could not
get elected to sweep in on
others' coat-tails.
\f.'
• ^ -"vj*: * im^^^f
EVERY TUESDAY
at 7:45 p.m.
Prizes in Excess of $2300.
At 10th Ave. & Camosun
Both slates said Thursday
they are preparing to run a full
complement of candidates in
the Feb. 21 second slate
elections.
The Young Socialists have
also indicated they may run
several candidates though they
will officially be independents
because the AMS constitution
forbids candidates with formal
political affiliation.
Current AMS treasurer
David Dick said Thursday he
may run for re-election. Dick
said he has reservations about
a totally politically oriented
AMS but refused to say
whether he will run as a
Student Coalition candidate, as
he did last time, or as an
independent. Dick said he will
sound out reaction before
making a final decision.
Loomes said the DSC will
have to work just as hard for
the second slate elections. He
said a tendency among
supporters might develop to
take a second slate victory for
granted.
Persky said another problem
would be a possible backlash
vote which could mean a split
executive.
Angus said he thinks the
chances of the Coalition on the
second slate will be good.
Second slate nominations
close Thursday.
ANDREWS ... succeeds Scarfe
teachers, but with trustees,
school superintendents, and
other officials of the
department of education,"
Andrews, 46, said in a press
release.
The board of governors
approved Andrews'
appointment Tuesday.
Andrews, a BA and MA
graduate of UBC, has
concentrated on the
characteristics producing good
leadership within the school
system. He is a well-known
scholar in the field of
organization theory as applied
to education.
Andrews won the Canadian
Council for Research and
Education Award in 1972 for
"outstanding contributions to
educational research in
Canada".
Lindsay, and internal affairs
Diane Latta, who volunteered
to set up a conference between
the residences.
"The real problem in this
conflict is that we are the only,
group of residents on campus
who are unified," said action
committee spokesman James
Authos.
The other residences,
including Totem Park and
Place Vanier, have not as of
yet taken any definite action.
Authos said the main reason
for this lack of unification was
because some residences were
told of the increase before
others.
Rohringer, earlier denied
telling The Ubyssey Feb. 1 only
Acadia Park and Acadia Camp
would have their rents
increased.
"It must have been a
misunderstanding," he said.
"It is an across-the-board
increase of which everyone
was informed at the same
time."
WINNER OF 3CJUMUHAN FtlM AWARDS
rotten
"Wedding is worth its weight in Chantilly lace"
-TIME MAGAZINE
"A powerful work of art...
Let it touch you !"
— MacLean's
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of an audience ...
—Toronto Star
"Will leave 1972 audiences
in wide-eyed amazement!"
— Toronto Calendar  tftf "\.
"An exquisite film '
achievement from first   ^
frame to last."
—Toronto Sun
starring DONALD PIEASENCE • CAROL KANE
miii H»«DOR1S PETRIE<8«* Supporting Actress) • LEO PHILLIPS
PAUL BRADLEY'•DOUG McGRATH • BONNIE CAROL CASE • CHRISTINE THOMAS
Svriter/Director BILL FRUET • Produced by JOHN VtDETTE • Photography RICHARD LEITERMAN
A Dermet Productions Picture
Varsitg
224-3730*'
4375 W. 10th
MATURE: Warning; Frequent coarse
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R.    W.    McDonald.    B.C.    Director.
Show Times: 7:36,9:30
H you steal $300,000
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It's suicide.
Vogue
91$ GRANVILLE
615-5434
MATURE:
Very violent,
much swearing and ^^^^__
coarse language. m"^
R. W. McDonald, B.C. Dir.    ANTHONY QUINN
"Exhilarating freshness... -M*,in Knetman
Extraordinarily fine movie."      Toronto Globe and Mail
GENERAL
Odeon
SIT SRANVILLE
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''SOUNDERS
SHOW TIMES: 12:00, 1:45, 3:45, 5:45, 7:45, 9:45
Coronet
"DIRTY
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mature: MICHAEL J. POLLARD
Violence and SHOWTIMES:
coarse language 12:15,2:10,4:05,
R. W. McDonald, B.C. Dir. 6:00, 8:00, 10:00
MATURE:
One complete show 8 p.m.
Added Short:
BRAVE NEW NORTH
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AUSTWRSIM
AMUR LOWE
Dunbar
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THE_
RULING CLASS
ADULT INTIMAINMINT Friday, February 9, 1973
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 3
No patchwork' decisions
TEN PER CENT of
up with the housing
the students
conditions —
ivmg
fed u
at UBC's Totem Park are fed
p enough to take the trouble
—mark hamilton photo
of giving 30-days notice Dec. 1 and search for alternate
accommodation during Christmas season and second term.
Dailly
The soon to be formed
commission on post-secondary
education will not make
"patchwork" decisions on
restructuring the present
structures, according to
education minister Eileen
Dailly.
Replying to a letter from
John Massett, Simon Fraser
University student president,
Dailly said she will not
"preside over patchwork
decisions."
She said the commission is
considered as "having broad
terms of reference" and will be
able to deal with both long-
term and immediate problems.
She said she expects the
commission to meet full-time
for about six months, and the
commissioners will be
appointed by her and the
chairman, still to be named.
She said she has already
committed herself to having
one student sit as a
commissioner.
Although scheduled to
appear On campus Thursday in
a speech sponsored by the New
Democratic Party club, Dailly
was forced to cancel the speech
because of her heavy workload in Victoria, an NDP club
spokeswoman said.
Vacancies
strain budget
Occupancy at Totem Park
has dropped 10 per cent,
according to a resident student
count.
And this low occupancy in
Totem Park is causing a strain
on the residence's budget.
"The residence's budget is
based on a 99 per cent
occupancy in double rooms,
and a 97 per cent occupancy in
single rooms," said Keith
Davis, housing business
manager.
Reasons given for student
departure were poor food, lack
of privacy and noisy neighbors.
Most of these students have
either moved into private
apartments, or returned home.
By JUDY ZAICHOWSKY
Care Labelling
Have you ever bought a garment
and ruined it through washing, or
spent many dollars dry-cleaning a
garment which could have been
easily washed?
The confusion of the care of textile
fabrics has been the result of
technological advances in the
synthetic industry. It is hard to tell
one synthetic from the other but
each one needs very different care.
In damaged fabrics sometimes the
fabric itself is faulty but all too often
the harm comes from improper
washing, cleaning or pressing.
Hang tags or wrappers with care
instructions are on some garments
but these are usually thrown away
or lost. So now the idea is to have the
new symbols as a permanent part of
the textile article. This can be done
by printing or weaving the symbols
on a label possibly in conjunction
with the makers name or trademark
and fastening the label securely to
the textile article. It will always be
there as a reminder of the kind of
care needed.
The system is based on five basic
symbols. Each of them represents a
basic care procedure. The five symbols are: washtub for washing,
a triangle for bleaching, a square for
drying, a hand iron for pressing, and
a circle for dry-cleaning.
Muck
Three colours are used to show the
need for caution. The three colours
are the same as the traffic signal
colors; red — stop (prohibition),
amber — caution (take care), green,
— go (no special precautions
needed). The system will assume
people will use proper sense.
Garment makers don't have to use
this system. But more will do so if
consumers demand it, so ask for it
when you shop.
A free color booklet showing care
symbols combinations is available
from:
The Consumer
Box 99
Ottawa, Canada
Ask for the booklet "Care labelling
for textiles".
* * *
The   following   contains   a   few
points of clarification regarding the
recent series on the bookstore.
By ETHAN SCARL
I implied that a prof could refuse
desk copies on any particular book
and get 15 per cent knocked off the
student selling price. No such luck —
there would have to an overall
policy by the UBC faculty to refuse
free copies and demand a reduction
by the 10 or 15 per cent which
publishers say they add (when asked
to justify their high prices). How
about our student senators asking
the UBC senate to do this?
However there could be a direct
saving to students on locally
published things like lab manuals if
the department paid for its own
teaching copies.
There are a few cases where the
bookstore does not meet
competition. This is when certain
suppliers, such as the National
Gallery of Art, Information Canada
of B.C. and of Ontario or the U.S.
government printing office, which
will not give the bookstore any
discount. In these cases the store
adds 25 per cent to the cost, giving a
20 per cent margin on the selling
price. You can get it for the original
price from the government agency
directly, or sometimes a downtown
bookstore will get it for one person
as a goodwill gesture (they lose
money on it), but they would not
want to supply a class.
To give you an idea how involved
such cases can be, take the case
where one fellow called me to
complain that a certain art text cost
$10 in the bookstore, but was
available at Information Canada
downtown for $8, with an even
cheaper paperback on sale there.
What had happened was this:
The course prof gave the class size
of 75 along with a list of books that
would have cost around $50 to
anyone buying them all. The prof
asked for tbe paperback and gave
the bookstore the National Gallery
of Art as the address. The bookstore
ordered 20. The gallery wrote back
saying that only hardbound copies
were available. The bookstore
checked with the prof, who okayed
the hardbound. Meantime the prof
got mad because this was a book
everyone was supposed to get, so the
bookstore ordered another 20. But by
now the bookstore had found out that
Information Canada carried the
book and ordered it from them. The
20 from Information Canada came
right away with a good discount and
were sold for $8, but the ones-from
the National Gallery came much
later and without discount, so the
bookstore marked them up to $10. If
the store had known earlier, they
would have sold them all for $9. If
they had known earlier yet, they
would have ordered them all from
Information Canada, and sold them
all for $8. If the book is used next
year, -they should know better.
In many cases where books were
under-ordered, orders on the same
book will be increased by that
amount next year, in an effort to
exactly match supply and demand.
As long as the store is forced to try to
pay its own way, it must risk
understocking, to minimize the costs
of ordering too many and returning
them to the publisher. Page   4
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, February 9, 1973
Housing
Student housing is becoming a luxury.
Soon student housing will only be available for the
very rich. And if housing director Leslie Rohringer
continues to get his way nobody will have the money to live
there.
Rent increases are scheduled for all the residences next
year.
For Place Vanier and Totem Park this is the third
consecutive rent increase in that many years.
Rohringer is asking students to subsidize his blunder —
Gage Towers.
He told students in Place Vanier that the rent hike
would not be used for improvements in their older
residence. Instead they were needed for Gage towers
mortgages. He claimed summer conventions did not
generate enough revenue to meet mortgage payments on the
new residence.
It's about time someone challenged Rohringer's
empire.
The new progressive Alma Mater Society executive
should make a review of housing policy and practice a
priority with the aim of getting adequate student representation on housing committees.
To begin with Rohringer's accounting books should be
made public. Nobody can verify any of Rohringer's allegations about deficits because students are not allowed to
look at the books. Therefore he is able to use vague and
misleading explanations for rent increases.
The paternal authority structure definitely needs
restructuring. Rohringer has very tight control of every
aspect.
He hand picks the dons and res fellows and directs
policy through them. The dons in turn are very influential
with the students councils. They encourage the right kind of
people to run and discourage political types. Students
council people often become dons the following year.
Hence no organized opposition to the rent hikes in the
singles students' residences.
Too bad Place Vanier and Totem Park don't join the
more activist-minded Acadia Park residents in protesting fee
increases.
Students have few rights. Rent must be paid four
months in advance. No other tenants are under this
obligation. There is no such thing as a months notice either
— 48 hours is sufficient.
Res clerks patrol the halls at night tokenly enforcing
rules that can be ignored as lon§ as one is discrete.
Of course the food is notorious, the dining hall
atmosphere oppressive — numerous signs tell students to
take only one glass of milk or one dessert. You have to pay
to do your laundry. This is one place where money is made,
the coin-operated washing machines have been paid for
several times.
Generally speaking residence is a pretty miserable place
to live. Something should be done.
Politics
Well it looks like politics matter more than services to
the students who voted in the Alma Mater Society election
Wednesday.
We're referring to the clean sweep the Democratic
Students Caucus made in the first slate of AMS executive
positions.
Throughout the campaign the DSC stressed their
concern for academic reform through student representation at all levels of the university.
The opposition, the Students Coalition and independent candidates, indicated this was not a priority.
The second slate election for vice-president, treasurer,
external affairs and ombudsperson will probably be hotly
contested by the SC and independents.
The DSC may have to fight a backlash reaction to their
first victory. This could result in a split executive.
A split executive would degenerate into internal
bickering, back biting and in-fighting. In fact it might even
get less done than this year's executive.
To facilitate good politics and good administration
progressive votes will be needed in the second slate election.
In other words the Ubyssey staff again urges people to vote
for the DSC.
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Letters
Mamooks
Just a short note to let anyone
interested know the sad story of
the Mamooks poster society.
Mamooks has been making posters, banners, etc. on campus for
over 40 years. In the past, the
object was to provide the student
body with cheap, quality advertising at about one-quarter to one-
third the cost of non-university
outlets. Also, it was run as a
facility where people could paint
their own banners, etc. if they
wished. The set-up was essentially
non-profit. Designers were paid
for doing work (amounting to
about $ 1.75 per hour) and materials were sold at cost.
Well, enter this year's student
council (I can't help adding that
in six years here this is the
worst I've seen) who decided
that Mamooks should henceforth
be operated as a "business".
Anyway, with giving a step by
step sob story of events, this year
has seen three managers quit or be
turfed out for various reason,
usually leading back to Dave
Dick's appointed henchman, publications manager Al Vince.
The situation now is:
* the office for taking orders
is closed and one must go through
the publications office.
* nobody who is not an
"employee" of Mamooks may use
the facilities. They can only be
sold materials at a 50 to 100 per
cent mark up.
* veiled allegations have
been made that Mamooks staff is
ripping materials, entirely without
basis and I might add completely
untrue.
* customers may no longer
have the right to specify the color
of their poster unless the paper
happens to be in stock.
* the society has been ordered to produce $ 1,000 profit or be
put out of business — consequently prices have had to be raised.
These are the latest edicts from
the office of Lord Vince. Needless
to say, working in this kind of
environment is virtually impossible and quality of design and
production consequently suffers.
Nothing really can be done
about situations like this if people
of. such reactionary philosphies as
this year's Alma Mater Society go
on being elected. I know student
politics are a bore but those in
power can be bothersome. I have
enough faith left in people of this
campus to be sure that if even 50
per cent voted it would be impossible for such medieval minds to be
elected to our council.
Ken Falk, arch 3
Dave Easton, arch 2
Housing
The student residences of UBC
have at last begun to price themselves beyond the reach of the
average student. These residences
are claimed to be a "convenience"
for students, and in truth they are
in many respects, and because of
this some 4,000 students look no
farther for a place to stay, but even
"convenience" is worth only so
much.
Recently, those of us who live
in residence have been told that
we are in line for a 9& per cent
rate increase next year. During the
past year a single room at either
Vanier or Totem cost $854. This is
now going wp to $933, and Gage,
Towers goes from $543 to $593
worked on a monthly basis, and
we are not allowed in residence
before classes start in the fall or
during the Christmas holidays, unless we pay extra, so we are really
only allowed here for about seven
and one-quarter months not eight,
Vanier and Totem become $120
per month for Room and Board
and Gage Towers is now $80 for
the privilege of sharing a kitchen
and bathroom with five others.
The convenience of campus living no longer compares very favorably with living off campus.
Let's face it for $480 a month six
people can rent a pretty fair place
elsewhere. On top of that the
increase in on campus rates will
no doubt have an effect on off
campus rates as well.
To be fair I must point out
that housing director Lesley Rohringer came to all the residences
and made an effort to explain the
need for the increase, which seems
to be mostly because of the increase in wages of the staff and
because of higher maintenance
costs in general. And how can you
argue with that? He explained
that the housing administration is
entering more actively into the
summer convention business in
order to subsidize the student
rates in residence. One has to wish
him luck because if housing raises
student rent again next year they
are going to face an increased
number of empty rooms which
means that they will have to
increase the rates again which
means ...
Let me see now, how much do
you think the department of botanical gardens would want per
month for the teahouse in the
Nitobe gardens ... Hmmmm.
Keith Anderson
qua! 5
Taste
I assume that as editors of The
Ubyssey it is your job to edit out
articles lacking taste. If so, you
certainly slipped last Tuesday
(Feb. 6). How could you possibly
have wished to publish such an
obscene cartoon?
Surely it is time to end the
tiresome tirade of "engineers vs
everyone else", yet the publica-
Seepage 13
THS UBYSSEY
FEBRUARY 9, 1973
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university year by
the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial
opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS or the
university administration. Member, Canadian University Press. The
Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review.
The Ubyssey's editorial offices are located in room 241K of the
Student Union Building.
Editorial departments, 228-2307; Sports, 228-2305; advertising,
228-3977.
Co-editors: Jan O'Brien, John Andersen
There's a skating party Friday night yelled the Jan O'Brien, John
Andersen, Camtfle Mitchell, Len Johnson and Berton Woodward-type
melee. Ah yes, echoed the Mike Sasges, Oavld Mars, Vaughn Palmer, Lesley
Krueger and Ryon Guedes people. Indeed there is, opined Kini McDonald,
Sucha Singh and Mar* Hamilton. And, said Ken Dodd, Gary Coull, Simon
Truelove, Kent Spencer and Roger MacNeill, everyone should attend. And
there's Sandy Kass' birthday to celebrate too. About 1:45 ayem Saturday.
Be there. Page Friday
Nootka Whaler . . .
Victorious no longer
page 4 Movies
White wedding
Bill Fruet's Wedding in White is no doubt
one of the best Canadian feature film
productions ever. An extremely tight and
well-polished production, the film
surpasses Going Down the Road but still
falls a bit short of Mon Oncle Antoine. The
production won three "Etrogs" (Canadian
equivalent of an Oscar) at the Canadian
Film Awards Festival held recently in
Toronto, most notably the best feature film
prize.
The film is an intense examination of
social conflict; and its results: escapism,
fears, and sexual hang-ups. The story
centres around the quiet desperation and
social confinement of a young girl's life.
Carol Kane is Jeannie, a young sensitive
girl coming to grips with the realities of
Canada during the 1940's. The central
figure of the story, she is manipulated not
only by people but by social codes. A very
fine portrayal of the oppressed Canadian
woman, unable to break away from
societal roles, indeed not even attempting
or imagining anything beyond her sorry
state.
Donald Pleasance is the father, a Scottish
immigrant, who upholds the traditional
cultural values and remains blindly loyal to
these codes which eventually take the film
beyond tragedy to farce.
Diane Petrie, as the mother, assumes the
inevitable social posture expected of her,
thus completely fulfilling her
responsibilities. She accepts her daughter's
situation and resolves it as well as she can
be expected to.
Doug McGrath and Paul Bradley play the
exact same characters as they portrayed in
Going Down the Road. Still intolerably
drunk, foul mouthed and horny, they
remain unable to cope with the reality of;
life, and once again leave the scene in haste
and confusion.
However, the film does dwell on
sentimentality almost to the extreme. One
is reminded almost immediately of The
Last Picture Show when confronted with
Jeannie's antithesis, Dolly. In Dolly we
confront this bitchy, teasing, and for her
age overly endowed young lady. Still
Dolly is just as much a product of her
culture, as are the other characters. But
Dolly has learned the 'ropes' and knows
how to handle herself and other people in
order to get ahead.
Richard Leiterman's direction of
photography is more than adequate, and
Fruet's careful attention to detail add
immeasurably to the films believability.
The camera flows and weaves throughout
the stark but somehow very rich scene.
Moods are tempered by the careful
selection of camera angles and the subtle
cutting technique. Tight shots and quick
cuts are utilized to accentuate tension and
alter the pace of the film. Visually Wedding
in White is almost a beautiful film.
Wedding in White is definitely a must for
all connoisseurs of Canadian films.
—Laurence Keane
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Page Friday, 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, February 9, 1973 Commentary
Domestic disarmament
There has been, for many years,
a great deal of protest and
discussion concerning the question
of nuclear disarmament. The
history of protest groups and 'ban-
the-bomb' marches goes back to
thel950's. Despite all of this much
publicised activity, progress
towards this aim of nuclear
disarmament has been virtually
non existent, although much of the
paranoia has greatly eased.
Unfortunately, the extent of this
progress goes no further than a
few signatures on test ban
treaties, and there it stops.
Before seriously considering any
further disarmament at the nuclear
level, it would be interesting first to
examine all other levels of
armaments, down to the pistols and
shotguns owned by many ordinary
citizens.
Weapons, such as guns, were
developed and refined for two very
important reasons, for which they
have proven to function exceedingly
efficiently. The first reason was for
fighting, either in wars or at a more
personal level, and the second
reason (as a fringe benefit) was for
the hunting of food.
Since those primitive times when
the gun was being developed and
wild frontiers were being forged,
conditions have changed completely
and, for the most part, a new world
now exists. For example, the
Western countries are now heavily
industrialized and commercialized,
and have democratic (?)
governments, laws and judicial
systems. People now 'hunt their
food' in offices and factories, and
their personal security is protected
by the law. Modern social conditions
have rendered the gun primitive and
obsolete. At this 'advanced' stage of
civilization there is really not a
single reason why any private
citizen need own a firearm. Human
beings are able to live their entire
lives without ever requiring the use
of a gun. Firearms, obviously, are
lethal and therefore very dangerous,
being designed to kill the victim they
are being used upon. Besides the
obvious immorality of one human
being killing another, there is not
one possible situation in which such
an act could be justified.
The first step towards domestic
disarmament in Canada would most
probably be a total ban on hunting.
This is held by many to be a cruel
and unnecessary 'sport' which
satisfies only the sadistic appetites
of a few bloodthirsty men.' This
'sport' continues despite the current
concern for the ever increasing
threat of extinction of so many of
this country's animal and bird
species.
If the so-called 'true' hunters want
to continue to stalk wild animals
they can still do so armed with a
camera and telephoto lens, rather
than a rifle with telescopic sights.
Such a banning of hunting in Canada
would not only nullify the excuse for
owning a gun and help in the
preservation of our animal species,
but would also, more importantly,
save the lives of the many possible
victims of accidents and of criminal
gun misuse.
There may be certain segments of
the Canadian population to which
the banning of hunting may impose
severe hardships, such as Eskimos.
However, this need not be a barrier
to the ultimate goal of domestic
disarmament. To those whose lives
depend on hunting for food
(primarily those who live in isolated
areas) special hunting licences may
be issued which can be valid for any
predetermined length of time that is
deemed suitable. As an alternative
to using guns, where they have been
used previously, traditional methods
of hunting, such as were common
before the introduction of the gun,
could be used. With a general ban on
hunting being in effect, a greater
quantity of food would be available
for these people to hunt, just as their
needs determined.
Once the hunting ban has been put
successfully into effect the second
step towards disarming the public
could be taken. This would be a total
ban on the ownership of firearms by
private citizens. All pistols, rifles
and other firearms would be
collected for the melting pot by
government agencies set up for that
purpose. Amnesty on all previously '
illegally owned firearms would be
simultaneously affected during this
collection phase. All of this would
culminate in the eventual total
outlawing of the manufacture and
sale of all firearms in Canada.
Unfortunately, a major problem to
this operation comes to light in
considering this second step. Would
the existence ever be possible of a
government strong enough or
determined enough to implement
such measures, and at the same
time resist the considerable
pressure which would be exerted by
hunters, gun clubs, and, most of all,
the firearms and munitions
industry? It should be stressed by
such a government that the power of
the Dollar must not be permitted
forever to remain victorious at the
expense of humanity and life. The
lives and security of people are
surely much more important than
the business and commerce which
surrounds firearms, including
tourism.
Once all guns have been removed,
and it would probably take some
considerable time, it would be
possible to disarm the police forces
throughout the country, thereby
ending the probability of further
human deaths in 'shoot-outs'
between the police and illegal
possessors of guns. If deemed
necessary, though it should be
avoided if possible, the police could
use harmless drug pellets or
disabling gases' to overcome
troublesome assailants. This would
contribute towards saving the lives
of many unstable social aggressors
and also ensure the safety of the
police officers.
It would very likely be necessary
to impose very severe penalties for
the possession of a firearm in order
to discourage concealment, let alone
use, of such weapons. Very strict
border controls would have to be
undertaken in order to prevent the
illegal importation of weapons,
possibly by means of small portable
metal detectors, or X-ray
instruments. Whichever method is
used, it is quite within present day
technological capabilities to devise
some accurate systems of control.
Through all levels of education,
including television, society could be
taught of the evil and immorality of
firearms. Examination of the role
and end products of these weapons
would show them us, as being very
negative in function and totally
detrimental in effect to society.
Such an undertaking in Canada
would be a model whose example the
world, particularly Britain and the
European nations, would be certain
to follow eventually. Such a scheme,
massive and difficult as it would
prove to be, would be a tremendous
booster to life and life-styles in the
United States. It would ease so much
of the fear and tension the ordinary
citizen lives with, and would
undoubtedly change the way of life
and national character of the
American people.
Once the problem of disarmament
on a national level has been taken
care of by the countries of the world,
the matter of international
disarmament would be a much
easier task to approach. The social
benefits to be derived from the
abolition of small arms are just as
obvious as those to be derived
internationally by the removal of
nuclear weapons and other weapons
of war. But when will the first small
step towards this goal be taken?
This would truly be a giant step for
Mankind.
—Robert Mitchinson
Books
Sacrificial ovaries?
Any Woman Can, By
Dr. David Reuben
Any woman can.
Any woman can what, David
Reuben?
Any woman can catch a husband.
She can?
Yes, if she recognizes the tools she
has and knows just how to use them.
Tools?
Yes tools. For instance, "Sex, in
its full meaning, if used
constructively, can be a girl's most
effective tool in achieving a durable
and satisfying marriage."
Reuben seems a master at this
type of exploitation, and he puts it so
well that it almost becomes
plausible. The book is well-written,
often witty, with amusing
metaphors throughout. Yet he uses
his wit to set out and promote the
techniques of exploitation, through a
"catch him if you can" program of
husband-hunting.
It consists of:
"1. Finding a man.
2. Making him like you.
3. Motivating   him   to   marry
you."
And, says Reuben: "Every man
who crosses the path of a single girl
must be matched against the list of
qualifications and evaluated as a
prospective husband."
Well, once he's caught (and there
are   techniques   for   this   too,   of
course), there's the final test.
In a passage too lengthy to quote,
Reuben rhymes off last minute hold-
the-wedding-for-a-while-Jack
checks that every girl shoud make.
Things like checking with a credit
bureau to discover a man's
employment, credit and even
marital history.
Or hiring a reporting agency
staffed by ex-FBI agents for a
chronological history "from
grammar school on" as Reuben so
coyly puts it.
Or obtaining a history of his
divorce proceedings.
"Hearing what his ex-wife said
about him may make interesting
reading for the woman who is going
to take over where she left off."
And this text rests in a rather
obscene heap atop his main thesis —
that the goal of every woman is to
get married, and if she won't admit
to this desire, the woman is sick.
Which is a ratner shaky base at best.
Uh, Dave. Maybe any woman can,
but does she want to? Catch a
husband, that is?
Well, some women say they don't
want to. But this is largely because
of a cold and unloving mother and a
barren      childhood.      So      this
"unfortunate young lady has no
basis on which to build a loving
relationship with another human
being — least of all a husband.
But a career, Dr. Reuben. Can't a
woman have a job either within or
without a relationship?
A career without a marriage is
only a substitute. A career within a
marriage threatens the relationship
by challenging the man's
domination, because the career
takes over the marriage. And what
these women turn into, well! One of
my patients, dear girl, put it well.
"Our great bank has 200 branches.
There are exactly seven women
managers. Fourteen little ovaries
have ben sacrificed to advance their
careers. They still wear skirts, but
deep inside these ladies are more
masculine than Joe Louis."
So all women want to get married ?
Of course.  As another of my
patients said:
"What do you think I'm doing
here? Of course I want to get
married. If I could manage it on my
own, do you think I'd have made up
one thousand excuses for not doing
so. Can you help me?
This is the base the book rests
upon.
It is the cliche-ridden view of men
and women, their "proper" roles
and their "true desires".
Women should be soft, supportive
creatures, their roles summerized in
the sentence: "No matter what
happens, the woman should side
with her man," or subjugate herself
to him, if you wish.
A man "ideally takes care of his
wife — like Mother takes care of her
children. He guides her and protects
her, sends her to the doctor when she
is sick, brings her presents, supplies
her with food, shelter and the
material necessities of life." Or, he
takes on the terrible role of having to
be strong all the time.
There is no room for any sort of
relaxing equality within these rigid
roles defined so explicitly by Reuben
and the society he serves. To him,
any other boundaries are sick—and
he can point this out through
Freudian psychiatry and innuendo.
This makes for such a basically
bad book that none of the
entertaining give and take between
the patient and doctor fleshing out
the book can save it.
But David Reuben is smiling.
Any author can.
Any author can what, David
Reuben?
Any author can make a million.
—Lesley Krueger
Friday, February 9, 1973
THE       UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 3 Maquinna:
Our nati
Michael Ruttan, a fourth year
anthropology student here at UBC, has
been studying the West Coast Indian
cultures for several years. A book is
forthcoming.
Canada is guilty of two great crimes
against her first citizens. The first crime
was the breaking of the backbone of
Indian culture through ignorance. The
second crime is the continuation of the
first, the conspiracy to destroy those that
survived the first onslaught.
Harold Cardinal, in his book The Unjust
Society, accuses us of destroying the
livelihood of our native peoples and
substituting it for welfare rather than a
cultural and economic redevelopment. At
one time Indians had their own economic
impetus and now they want it back.
Because the Canadian government
substituted welfare for self-supporting
Indians it assumed the responsibility of
Indian leadership. The government in all
its largesse decided that "As long as
we're footin' the bill for these people we'll
decide how they will live their lives."
Unfortunately, at the same time they also
made the decision to quietly forget about
Indian development; possibly hoping that
if the whole question of Canadian natives
was ignored it would disappear.
Consequently Indians have gained little
in the way of materialistic trappings.
They still inhabit for the most part, tiny
tarpaper shacks with no plumbing or at
the very best, standard plan BZ10296-style
houses. Nor has the Canadian Indian
gained many of the trappings of self-
determination: like forceful tribal
councils, like economic control of
reserves, like guarantees of aboriginal
hunting rights, like fear from job or
residence prejudice.
Unlike Harold Cardinal, I don't see
there being much hope in the near future
for Canadian Indian political progress.
The fact remains that for the most part
Indians are Federally funded and
manipulated, with the overt implication
that they will soon be embarked upon a
program of assimilation that will likely
destroy their heritage.
Again and agaii
alienation surface;
process of forced as
alienated from th
conjunction with th
the division of their
taken from parei
placed under the j
schoolroom discipl
comes the problem
merits in intra-
squabbles. Is the
Catholic missionar
believe the United
believe the Pr<
Methodists?
The culture of t
studied to determii
and the Indians o
really conquered, I
eased aside. So w
oppose them?
As a white man I
about the plight of t
been fouled by n
apologies on my
eloquent, will cleai
the centuries oi
territorial annex
genocide".
Indians have nevt
to articulate their
that they have i
perverted and br
efficient communu
been perverted tas
initial Indian
completely ignorec
They have not al
today.
On Vancouver Isi
One of Their gre
always been consic
simply a Moachat.
Theirs because
Mamathnee's) o
insensitive to the
society. Now Thej
Maquinna, this G
but an hereditary
great chief, this Tj
fortune to have In
first arrived on ou
Kwakiutl wedding picture, bride
Page Friday , 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, February 9, 1973 peopies
i
failed revolt
fact of Indian
their lives. By
ation Indians are
root culture. In
similation comes
lies. Children are
jurisdiction and
nee of parochial
Along with this
ing to sort out the
;ious dogmatic
i to believe the
r is the child to
*ch? Or is he to
erians   or   the
idian was never
s relative merits
lada were never
vere just quietly
is our right to
y shouldn't write
iians. My life has
icestors and  no
no matter how
e stain of years,
>ken   promises,
and "cultural
1 their own media
tion. Everything
said has been
ist  by  our own
services. It has
i point where the
ion    has    been
lived as they do
ved a great man.
en. He has not
so. He used to be
now he is one of
iteman's (the
,sion has been
rences in Their
2 a brotherhood.
Vlan of Theirs, is
. However, this
ad it as his good
hen James Cook
st and found sea
otter in abundance. Maquinna perceived
the greed that was in Cook's and
subsequent fur-traders' eyes and
determined that he should manipulate
this trade to the best advantage for his
People, the Moachats.
The Mamathnee came so long as he
could maintain his 1,000% profit, and as
long as he kept coming Maquinna was
able to plan for Their future. But that's
getting ahead of myself.
This Tyee knew the benefit of a
powerful, well armed group of warriors.
He also knew the poetry of his life and its
harmony with the environment. They
moved with the seasons, molded their
villages into the beach and the forest,
revered and celebrated all animals, and
were universally aware of their dynamic
history.
By a long involved process Maquinna
pursuaded the Mamathnee to trade His
guns and ammunition for the valuable sea
otter. He had to go about this quietly for
he realized that insufficiently armed, he
could never withstand the whiteman and
if He suspected the purpose He would stop
the trade. But He was always too blind
Maquinna dangled the bait and played one
off against the other. None suspected — or
none admitted that he suspected.
Maquinna had to lay his foundations
carefully, bringing other Indian groups
into obligation to him, so that they would
support him but not know the purpose.
For they would reveal the secret to the
whiteman to gain dominance over
Maquinna.
All things remaining equal, he would
have had his force, with its popular
support through unbreakable bonds of
obligation, and been in an unquestionable
position to resist the Mamathnee. To end,
before it really started, the economic
imperialism.
This didn't happen of course, for the sea
otter trade ended and ultimately that
force of trained and armed warriors was
destroyed not by battle with the
whiteman, but with his diseases, his
liquor, his concept of time.
What could have happened?
—Michael Ruttan
lie figure, from Western Indians
Nootka bowman ... from Curtis' Western Indians
Friday, February 9, 1973
THE       UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 5 Commentary
Canlit:
A mythical heritage
"Most of the false fronts were blown
down, and Mrs. Ellington had lost her
chicken coop and nearly all her
hens."— Sinclair Ross
When Northrop Frye made his great
exposition of myths, he neglected the
one closest to him — that of Canadian
Literature.
"Canadian Literature" achieved a
virgin birth at the beginning of the 60's,
quite coincidentally with the
establishment of a journal of similar
label. It was, of course, no coincidence.
Jobs were getting tight and new fields,
had to be sought. PMLA could accept
no more statistical analysis of the
periods in Hydriotaphia, which
necessitated the invention of new
critical areas. A spurt of chauvinism,
culminating in (and ending at) Expo,
caused Canadians to look back over
their past, and, to their surprise, they
discovered that people had actually
written on Canadian soil (and other
topics as well).
Also at this most opportune time,
Canadian publishing houses were
suffering. It seems that they could no
longer consider publishing books as
their artistic obligation. In short, they
found that they needed money now (or
$ NOW!, as Marshall McLuhan would
have it).
And so the publishing houses
invented "Canlit". The Romans had
had Virgil's 'Aeneid, but, it was
learned, we had Susanna Moodie's
Houghing It in the Bush (sounds like
the Prince George version of Last
Tango in Paris.). The exhumations did
not stop at Roughing it, either. In quick
succession, Leacock, Ross, Wilson,
Richler (tokenism) and MacLennan
were called back to life (although in the
last case there is still some doubt).
Immediately, pleasant little editions
of these great writers began to appear
in our local bookstores. Libraries
dusted off Thirty Acres, took Wild
(ieese out of storage, and rescued
Woodsmen of the West from the
furnace.
The effect was wonderful. For the
first time in his life, Richler didn't feel
terrified  that  someone,   somewhere,
might reveal that he was a (blush)
Canadian. Suddenly "Canadian" was
in — and a way in to big money.
Publishers would accept any junk, as
long as it had some weary connection
with things Canuck. Richler proved
this by writing Cocksure. Crap now had
a new name: "Canadian".
Not content with having invented the
novel, the publishers wanted to do the
same for poetry. Earl Birney was
acceptable again. He was recalled
from exile and crowned with plastic
laurel (made in Canada). His epic
about how a pimple-faced queer pushes
his partner off a mountain and then
makes it with a slug was lauded as the
Canadian Com media. Even Bliss
Carmen's name could be mentioned
without snickering (although smirking
was still permitted).
The Canada Council wasn't slow to
scramble onto the bandwagon. Irving
Layton could now consort with French
whores and the Government would pay
htm — to write about it, that is. Politics
had never been so Canadian.
Academics, of course, had to remain
fashionable. Departments of Canlit
sprang up overnight. Journals were
created. Articles were written. In their
haste, they wrote articles on works that
hadn't yet been written, and published
unfinished works in order to write
articles on them. Nothing evaded their
grasp. Wyndham Lewis, it was
discovered, had been born in Canadian
waters. He has regretted that day ever
since his Canadian critics found out.
But the hot stuff was yet to come. Big
Northy saw that his chance to make it
really big had come at last. His tony
tentacles spread into the deadest
reaches of The Canadian Mind,
garnering every tidbit of thought and
might-have-thought.
Marshall McLuhan arose like the
Phoenix, shedding light on darkest
Toronto, and parlaying a misprint into
a fortune. Only in Canada, we thought,
could "Massage" mean "Message".
But Marshall was not satisfied. He took
his deathless prose (when he said that
the book was dead he meant his own) to
Madison   Avenue,   and   became   the
archetype (down, Northy, down!) of
Canlit, selling himself to J. Walter
Thompson. Marshall proved that
CanLit could sell Alka-Seltzer to
Americans. Arthur Hailey went one
step further, and sold the Americans to
the Americans, writing, in rapid
succession, Hotel, Airport and Wheels
(soon to be followed by Urinal].
"Canadian Literature" exists only as
a title under which articles are bound,
and as a tax exemption for Jack
McClelland. Canadian Literature has
not grown up because it has not been
given the chance. It is to our honour
that we have produced the respected
names of Northrop Frye and George
Woodcock, but it is to bur shame that
critics predominate in a land bereft of
great literature.
Canada has produced good writers,
but our understanding of them lacks
perspective. Criticism must foster the
growth of literature as a way of
understanding, and not stunt that
growth by trying to explain it.
Publishers must realize that they are
not the madams of a bawdy house.
Teachers must learn to weight their
judgments, and not to label as "great"
what is merely "timely". Students
must read the literature of their
country, and they must write it.
Yet we see around us a generation
who are in practice, illiterate. Those
who have no feeling for the word will
have no desire to read it or to write it.
To remedy this we must not "Can." our
literature, packaging it more cleverly
for them. Canada has no need of a
particular literature. That as such is a
chauvinistic ideal. What Canada does
need is to embrace Literature as her
own, and to see her literature as part of
the great tradition. Margaret Atwood's
Survival, which treats works written in
this land with literatures,of other lands,
is the most positive step in that
direction.
It is this open receptivity to
Literature that we must nourish, in
order that we may speak of
"Canadian" Literature not by way of
explanation, but as -a way of
understanding.
—Richard Cavell
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CALL TO ALL
ARTS ONE STUDENTS
All Arts One students formerly
enrolled in the programme and
those presently enrolled are
invited to attend a meeting at 2
p.m. Saturday, February 10, at
Cecil Green Park. Students will
be asked to share their views
on what they've gained and are
gaining from the programme.
They will also be asked if they
wish to act as liaison people
between the students
graduating this year from the
high schools and the Arts One
programme.
ECKANKAR
The Ancient Science of Soul
Travel presents a lecture by a
6th initiate, one of the highest
in Canada, on the topic:
"Karma and Reincarnation"
Free Public Lecture:
Tues., Feb. 13 in SUB 211
at 7:30 p.m.
For information: 255-2835
Winter snows
don't slow you down
You love long walks in the
woods, and even the
mounting snows of winter
don't stop you. You just
take along a pair of snow-
shoes and set off on a hike.
Menstrual worries don't
stop you, either. You just
make sure to include
Tampax tampons, the
internal sanitary protection.
They're easy to carry—
small enough to fit the
pocket of your parka. Yet
they do a big job of
protecting you, expanding in
three directions to fit your
inner contours. Such
absorbent protection can
really free you to enjoy the
winter sports scene: skiing,
snowshoeing, skating.
So if the urge to be active
drives you on—if a heavy
snowfall means adventure—
then count on Tampax
tampons to help you go.
The internal protection more women trust
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Page Friday, 6
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, February 9, 1973 Books
Thanatology
Stone dead, he was. Eyes wide open,
staring at nothing. A thin veneer of blood
curling at the corners of his lips. Two
gaping holes in his chest. My first combat
fatality. Violent death had raped me and
usurped my virginity. A lifeless corpse
where only moments before a heart beat its
customary seventy pumps in one orbit of
the second hand. It is one thing to hear
about death; it is quite another to watch it
happen. I went over the nearest tree and
vomited my guts out.
Death and the College Student
Edited by E. S. Shneidman
Behavioural Publications 1972
The above quotation is only a brief
passage taken from Joel Baruch's Combat
Death, one of the several brilliant brief
essays to be found in this anthology on
death.
All the authors published in Death and
the College Student are college
undergraduates who were enrolled in a
course on Thanatology taught by
Shneidman at Harvard University. The
statistics are as follows: median age for
male enrollment was 20, female was 19, all
but four members of the class were single,
most of the students were Caucasian, and
annual family incomes averaged $30,000.
Perhaps the above does not meet your
criteria for the average college student.
Well, the Harvard-Radcliffe academic
milieu is not average. Consequently, and
fortunately I might add, the essays aren't
either.
The new consciousness said to have
merged in today's student has focused on
yet another conventional taboo. Sex is now
passe; frank and open discussion, as well as
practice, prevail. However, the subject of
death and dying either is discreetly
ignored or sweetly euphemized. Geoffrey
Gorer, in his Pornography of Death,
succinctly writes:
The natural processes of corruption and
decay have become disgusting, as
disgusting as the natural processes of
birth and copulation were a century
ago . . . those who have passed on are
changed into flowers or lie at rest in
lovely gardens.
Thanatology courses (study of death) in
universities provide students with the
opportunity to seriously and realistically
approach death. The personal reflections
and revelations expressed in this book are
the result.
The common concern of most authors is
suicide. Manny Rap is euthanasia by
heroin, My Suicide ~ Attempt and the
Encouragement of Herman Hesse is a
fascinating documentation of despair. The
book does not indicate if the suicide rate for
college students is higher than non-
students. Nevertheless, even if student
rates are not higher, I believe that the
contemplation of suicide is a firm reality in
the student population. The pressures from
alienation, isolation and disillusionment
can pose seemingly insurmountable
obstacles. Private hopelessness and
despair, while certainly not monopolized by
students, is acutely felt by maturing
adolescents in a tension-ridden
environment. —Stephen Morris
Coming event
In the several months since we have
heard from Chilliwack, the band has set out
to build a completely new, independent
approach. The fruits of their labors will be
presented in the Gardens Auditorium
tonight at 8:30.
The three members, Ross Turney
(drums, percussion), Bill Henderson
(guitar, piano, vocal), and Glenn Miller
(bass guitar), had refrained from
recording for a time, wishing to avoid
repeating musical forms. Claire Lawrence
has left the group. Glenn Miller, who had
left before the group's first A&M album,
has returned.
One of the few rock 'n roll bands in
Canada to enjoy any real success,
Chilliwack's music is distinguished by its
simple, undiluted approach, its unification,
and its heavy back-beat.
At least part of the group's program
tonight will be devoted to their new A&M
album All Over You. Most of the material is
written by Bill Henderson, while the
remainder is co-written with Ross Turney.
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Friday, February 9, 1973
THE       UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 7 WITH PYNAOO - FROM A&B SOUND
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Oversize standard power transformer has dual primary windings for 120/240 V, 50/60 Hz
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Page Friday, 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, February 9, 1973 Friday, February 9, 1973
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 13
Letters
SUB
obscenely sterile reflection
From page 4
tion of that utterly gross picture
can only provoke further hostility. It carried no relevant message,
no possible enlightenment: it only
disgusted and degreaded the readers of The Ubyssey. Aren't we
entitled to something aimed at a
higher mentality? And isn't it
time the mud-slinging stopped so Sc % M/» A ^
that Ubyssey space could be used
for more intelligent purposes?
Sheila Burgar
arts 3
Engineers but your motives in g\%/_f%Z%MZmn%_\ 4»
using the same tactics they use \W m9 wmwm>%W mw9
don't make sense. I'd like to know
how you can justify that type of
"joke" when you purport to be
against all discrimination.
Jim Emslie
science 3
subugly
.   Well I've been here almost five
years now. yeh, really.
Not only that but I started
almost seven years ago.
Yeh, really.
Did some time in business you
see?
So before you go cutting me
up for improper punctuation, I
give you a "poem" the ugly
cement monolith forced me to
write a few days ago.
I give it to you cause your
offices are in it. Lucky you!
George Ewonus
grad studies
jesus!
sub is ugly.
more man that too.
all sorts of people
huddtetiup
m futile caresses of
blandbrickcement
desperately
trying to come.
well.
reminds me of the day in age
when physical orgasm stops.
too bad.
but much worse
are those
attempting mental intercourse
with/in
the obscenely sterile reflection
of our novalue world.
sub
is
ugly!
ge
jan/73
from "songpoems to"
While thumbing through the
current issue of The Ubyssey I
came to an abrupt halt on page
five; for, lo and behold, there I
was - David L. - placidly pedalling through the lanes of UBC.
Dredged out of The Ubyssey
"Pictures from Days of Olde" file
I was displayed right there on
page five in breathtaking black
and white. And not a mention
that I haven't pedalled in such
fashion for two (count 'em) years.
Let the world be warned that
this is a black day in the history
of literature. After all, if you can't
trust that bastion of accurate
information, The Ubyssey, to
print up-to-date items, who can
you trust?
I hasten to add that while I
realize that the fearful Campus
Cowboys hold a gestapo-like
death grip o\fer all UBC cyclists, I
was never hassled during my long
career of pejdalHng on forbidden
avenues.       j
I      Bavid Ltttlejohn
! Nanaimo, B.C.
Many students are aware that
the senate, at its January meeting
adopted four principles which
would allow a limited form of
student representation. The
priciples suggest voting student
represention at the division, department, school and faculty
levels, but forbid participation on
committees dealing with budget,
salaries and other financial business; scholarships and other student awards; and appointments,
tenure and promotion.
The senate committee on student membership in faculties is
now considering possible ways of
implementing these principles. As
a student member of that committee I would like to ask for
student opinions on the form that
representation could take. Topics
such as eligibility of students,
methods of election, (by individual department, by all students
in the faculty, or by year), and
also length of term should be
considered. In many cases the
differences in the administrative
set up of various faculties makes
the implementation a difficult
task.
I am aware that many students
are not satisfied with the principles passed by senate. I appreciate
their position but am directing my
efforts to the implementation of
these four fuasoiples.
Cofin MacKenzie
education 5
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Joke
I'd like to comment on the
cartoon which appeared in Tuesday's Ubyssey picturing four
gorilla-like Engineers carrying
Lady Godiva. I think you'll have
to agree with me that the cartoon
is discriminatory. On numerous
occasions The Ubyssey has cut
down the engineers for the racial
jokes which appear in the Red
Rag yet now you resort to the
same type of discrimination.
Don't you think that's a little
hypocritical? I'm not saying that I
condone all the activities of the
-me*****. *  ^   ■ .^uirxj
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serving
British Columbia
Drop in soon to your  Royal Bank Branch — They will be
pleased to help you.
UNIVERSITY AREA BRANCH
DAVE STEWART, Manager- TERRY COTTON, Loans
10th at Sasamat 224-4348
FILM NIGHT AT HILLEL
Saturday, Feb. 10
at 8:00 p.m.
SELECTED SHORTS
including
Toys — Barbershop
Freefall— 21-87
CAMPUS COMMUNITY INVITED
SUB FILMSOC PRESENTS
Para^iount Pictures Presents
A Sagittarius Production A 80 WI0ER8ERG FILM
"Joe HOT
Tonight 7:00 & 9:30
Sat. 7:00 & 9:30
Sun. 7:00
SUB
AM
50°
Feb.
8-11
"SPLENDID
BEYOND REALITY!
Thommy Berggren
is mythically
■ handsome,
toughingiy mortal
4 &}d radiant
YOUR FRIENDS AT BUS STOP PRESENT
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BE SURE YOU'RE
19 AT LEAST
DADDYO! Page  14
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, February 9, 1973
Hot flashes
Free, Stones
gallery display
Recent works of Michael
Kupka are on display at the Free
Mind Gallery, 40 Blood Alley
Square in Gastown.
Included in the display, which
runs until Feb. 21, are the paintings Free for All Seasons and The
Rolling Stones.
Peking opera
The East Asia society is presenting a revolutionary Peking
opera next Thursday noon in
Buch. 106.
"Taking Tiger Mountain by
Strategy" is the title of the film,
produced by the Peking Opera
Society.
Swim-or-ffion
The Jericho Hill school deaf
students are sponsoring a swim-a-
thon to raise money to attend the
1973 deaf Olyrrjpics in Sweden.
Swimmers are needed to swim
up to 25 lengths of the 60-foot
pool any time between
3:30-10:30 p.m., Feb. 22.
They  can  sponsor  themselves
or get others to sponsor them
from between 1 cent and $100
per length.
For   further   information   call
224-1331.
Creative
Genetics
A new department of medical
genetics is set to open at UBC,
making this the first campus in
Canada with such a department.
The senate gave departmental
status to medical genetics, previously a division of pediatrics, at
the Jan. 24 meeting, although the
board of governors still must
ratify the move.
Clinical facilities will continue
at Vancouver General Hospital, where members provide genetic counselling and other services
for patients.
Head of the department,
located in the James M. Mather
building on Fairview near Wes-
brooke, will be Dr. James Miller.
Vanguard
The   Vanguard   forum   is  presenting   their   History   in   Song,
featuring    Hilda    Thomas,    Phil
Thomas and Jon Bartlett today at
I 8:30 p.m., 1208 Granville.
Tween classes
TODAY
EXPERIMENTAL COLLEGE
Education in China, noon, SUB
111.
PRE-SOCIAL WORK
Speaker from Neighborhood Services, noon, SUB 105-B.
ALLIANCE FRANCAIS
General meeting, noon, IH upper
lounge.
SATURDAY
VOC
Square dancing party,  8 p.m., SUB
party room.
NISEI VARSITY CLUB
Bowling, Valentine's Party, 7 p.m.,
Stry Co-op Lanes, Main and Seventh.
MONDAY
FILMSOC
General election meeting, clubroom,
7 p.m.
PHOTOSOC
General    election    meeting,    clubs
lounge, 7 p.m.
KUNG FU
Practice,   4:30  to 6:30  p.m., SUB
207-209.
EL CIRCULO
El  Sr. Licenciado  Bassols, Mexican
consul, noon, IH 402.
A 10-week creative arts program, sponsored jointly by UBC's
centre for continuing education
and the Burnaby art gallery, starts
Feb. 12 under the direction of
Canadian artist  Leonard Woods.
The first five Monday lectures
will deal with The Mandala: Rebirth in the Modern World. The
second five will be about The
Zodiak: A Synthesis of Science
and Art.
Lectures will be illustrated
with slides and original works, to
be held at the gallery, 6450 Gilpin, Burnaby.
Cost for the program is $22.
$15 ski trip
The Nisei Varsity Club is sponsoring a ski trip to Manning Park
Feb. 22 and 23 for a total cost of
$15.
The price includes transportation, accommodation and food.
Group rates have been arranged
for the lifts.
Only a few spaces are left, but
these can be reserved in SUB
216B any weekday at noon with a
down payment of $5.
TUESDAY
GERMAN CLUB
Slides of Norway, noon, IH 404.
CHARISMATIC
Controversial   film  on  Israel, noon,
Bu. 202.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
HORIZONS 73
Free films, 9 p.m., Walter Gage film
room.
ECKANKAR
Karma    and    re-incarnation,    7:30
p.m., SUB 211.
TUXEDO
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BLACK & LEE
Formal Wear Rentals
631 Howe 688-2481
at
4560 W 10th.
919 Robson St.
1032 W Hastings
670 Seymour
duthie
BOOKS
WED , FEB. 14
LUTHERAN CAMPUS CENTRE
7:30
"Facing Our Sexuality"
RODMcKENZIE
Campus Chaplain at Bellingham
Support St. Valentine
ATTENTION
ALL
STUDENTS
NOMINATIONS
for the following AMS
Executive positions are now
open:
Treasurer
External Affairs
Vice-President
Ombudsperson
Deadline for the Nominations is 12:30 Thursday,
February 15, 1973.
For eligibility forms and information, would you
please come to the office of AMS Secretary Sally Clark,
SUB 250.
CLASSIFIED
Rates:
Campus — 3 lines, 1 day $1.00; additional lines, 25c;
Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $1.50; additional lines
35c; additional days $1.25 & 30c
Classified ads are nut accepted by telephone and we payable in
advance. Deadline it 11:30 a.m., the day before publication.
Pubbcatians Office, Room 241 S.U.B.. UBC, Van. 8, B.C
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
TEEN ANGEL & THE ROCKIN'
Rebels Valentine's Ball at the Commodore. Dress Greaser or Ivy
League.  Tickets $1gQ0 at Bus Stop.
VALENTINE DANCE AT ST.
Mark's Sat. 9-1, Continental Cavalier's Band, $1.50, refreshment
food,  fun.	
POLKA PARTY, LIVELY GERMAN
Band, Friday, Feb. 9, International
House, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. Refreshments.
Lost & Found
13
LOST: LADIES GLASSES JAN. 30.
Tortoise shell, round frames, blue
case.   Ottawa   doctor.   731-4706.
LOST: LONG NECKLACE, GOLD &
pearls. Sentimental value. Please
call:   224-6355   eves.	
FOUND FEB. 6 IN CURRICULUM
Lab Typing Room, ring with initials. Owner may claim before 7
a.m.  or after 10 p.m.  Ph.  921-7925.
LOST: STERLING SILVER PEN.
Buchanan Towers last Friday. Reward. Ph. 228-2788, office hours,
9-4:30.	
LOST: BROWN WALLET, FEB. 6.
Need ID badly. Please contact 733-
0829. Reward if all money returned.
BLACK RUBBER HAT LOST FRI.
night, SUB or en route. Sentimental value.   Call  224-7322.
Rides & Car Pools
14
Special Notices
15
BOOK AND THESIS MANUSCRIPTS
edited by retired publisher for
grammar, syntax, puncuation, re-
dundancy,   clarity.   263-6565.	
YET MORE DOCTOR BUNDOLOS'
Pandemonium Medicine Show, this
Friday, Feb. 9, 12:30 in SUB Movie
Theatre. It's FREE!!	
LARRY: MET YOU ON THE TRAIN
to Jasper in Aug. 72. Please contact—Celeste—6210 Curtis St., Bur-
naby 2, B.C.	
DISCOUNT STEREO, EXAMPLE:
AM-FM stereo receiver, turntable,
base cover, cartridge, two speakers,
2-year guarantee, list ?200, your
cost $125.00. Carry AKAI, A.G.S.,
Zenith color TVs at savings. Call
732-6769.	
RENT WHISTLER CONDOMINIUM
near gondola. Day/Wk. Ph. 732-
0174 eves, or before 8 A.M.
Special Events
15A
$75 FOR 75*
40 Bonus Coupons In This
Year's Bird Calls
AVAILABLE   NOW
BUY  YOURS  TODAY!
Bookstore and SUB
Travel Opportunities
16
SEE MEXICO AND CENTRAL
America. 3-month "bus trip to
Panama, $465 return, leaving May
(i and Sept. 15. Contact Club Pan-
aventure,   980-1091   or   731-5672.
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
AUTOMOTIVE
Autos For Sale
21
1966 CORTINA GT 2-DOOR SEDAN.
Very   good   condition.   Phone   John
Bell,   224-9706   after 7:00   p.m.
GOOD   BUY   MY   '63   ACADIAN
S /Wagon.    Good    condn.    Autom.
radio.  Offers,  733-3315.	
1972      PEUGEOT      304.      PERFECT
condition. Still on warranty. Front
wheel, delight to drive. 9,000 miles.
$2,495.   684-0749.
Motorcycles
25
'66 HONDA 305. EXCELLENT CON-
dition, c /w helmets, pack sack,
sissybar.   $350.   O.B.O.   594-0043.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Photography
35
kfjje Hens! anb iHjutter.
Camera*
THANKS
To  Your  Support
WE ARE EXTENDING -
WE NOW HAVE A BIGGER
FLOOR SPACE TO
SERVE  YOU   BETTER!
Watch for our In-Store
Expansion Specials!
3010  W.   Broadway
Note our New Phone No.
736-8375
Scandals
37
VALENTINE'S DAY GREASEBALL
Dance with Teen Angel & The
Rockin' Rebels. Comodore Ballroom. Advance Tickets $1.00, Bus
Stop  for  Jeans,   Wow! .
"INSANE, ... A WASTE OF OUR
hard earned tax dollar"!! Just a
few of the comments about Doctor
Bundolo's Pandemonium Medicine
Show, this Friday, Feb. 9, 12:30 in
SUB Theatre. It's FREE!
Typing
40
ESSAYS AND THESES TYPED —
Experienced typist. Mrs. Freeman,
731-8096.	
TYPING OF ESSAYS, ETC., DONE
efficiently. 35c per page. Phone
224-0385 after 5:30 p.m.	
EFFICIENT ELECTRIC TYPING.
My home. Essays, thesis, etc. Neat
accurate work. Reasonable rates.
263-5317.	
TEDIOUS TASKS — PROFESSION-
al typing service. IBM Selectric —
Open days, evenings, weekends.
Call Shari at 224-5886.	
ESSAYS TYPED — NEAT ACCUR-
ate work. 35c per typed page. 325-
9976, if I'm out leave your phone
number.	
EXPERT IBM SELECTRIC TYPIST.
Experienced Thesis Typist. Specialize in Formula and Math. Reason-
able Rates.  Mrs.  Ellis. 321-3838.
FAST ACCURATE TYPING OF ES-
says and thesis. Reasonable terms.
Call Mrs. Akau, days 688-5235
weekends  and   evenings   263-4023.
EMPLOYMENT
51
Help Wanted	
PART TIME DISTRIBUTORS,
wanted. Any hours of work. Phone
228-8836.	
ESTABLISHED DIAMOND IMPOR-
ting firm requires 12 senior student
sales representatives for the UBC
Campus. Clean, Neat Dresser.
Good Sales Ability. 3rd or 4th Year
students with pleasant personality
and some sales experience. Fluent
in English. Excellent commission
structure. Include in your application a recent photograph of yourself. Mr. Mel Battensby, General
Delivery, Vancouver Postal Station
A, Hastings & Granville, Vancouver,  B.C.
Special Classes
62
Tutoring Service
63
Speakeasy SUB Anytime!
228-6792 - 12:30-2:30
TUTORIAL
CENTRE
For Students and Tutors
Register Now! 12:30-2:30
INSTRUCTION & SCHOOLS
Tutoring
64
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
145 LB. VINYL WT. SET. EXCEL-
lent condition. $40 firm. Phone Jim
(Rm. 325) 224-9817. May leave message.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
ROOM, MEN ONLY, BASEMENT.
Warm, quiet, private entrance,
near gate. Available now. 224-7623.
ROOM FOR MALE STUDENT —
Kitchen and laundry facilities $40
per month. Near UBC area. 224-
1678.
Room & Board
82
ROOM AND BOARD AVAILABLE
at Delta Kappa Epsilon fraternity
house, 5765 Agronomy Rd. Reasonable rates. Colour TV, laundry
facilities. Ph. 224-9691 after 5:00
for  details.
Furnished Apts.
83
Unf. Apis.
84
l-BDRM. APT. $140 MTH. MARCH 1
1 slpg. rm. $45 mth. immed. On
campus. 224-7736 Sat. a.m.
Communal Housing
85
Use Ubyssey Classified
TO SELL - BUY - INFORM
The U.B.C. Campus
MARKET PLACE Friday, February 9, 1973
THE       UBYSSEY
Page  15
Y'all come to the UBC
squash tournament
This year, UBC's annual C and D squash
singles championships will be held at the courts
in the Winter Sports Complex Feb. 16-18.
Entries close 6 p.m. Tuesday.
All those interested, whether beginners or
veterans, are invited to come out, compete and,
if nothing else, help dispose of the suds and
snacks that will be served on the Friday
evening of the tournament.
Squashers can enter either by picking up a
form from the bulletin boards outside the
squash courts or by phoning Bob Shutz at 288-
4479. The playing schedule may require local
competitors to begin on the evening of
Thursday, Feb. 15.
Play would then resume on the Friday
evening and continue through Saturday
morning and afternoon, concluding Sunday.
For the person reaching the finals this would
mean playing about five matches. This is a
single loss knockout tournament, however,
consolation play will be held for first round
losers in bouth C and D classes.
Spectators too are welcome to come out and
see what's happening in Canada's fastest game
next to hockey. There is a large gallery
overlooking UBC's four courts and there is no
admission charge.
Last week in the Washington State squash
championships, UBC's only two entrants both
reached the finals. In the D class, Len Johnson
won the consolation round and finished third,
while John Hungerford won the B class event.
In the city C and D league this week, UBC's
squash team lost to the Jericho Club 3-1. UBC
remains in fourth place in the nine team league
with a 23-21 win-loss record.
Next week UBC visits the Vancouver
Racquets Club.
■     pap** f"'
rB-irn
JEFF MULOCK grabs the ball
—sucha singh photo
Inframural tourney coming
By SIMON TRUELOVE
The biggest basketball
tournament UBC has ever seen
starts Monday, Feb. 26.
Sixteen teams, playing in
three divisions, will reach the
playoffs beginning at 10:30
a.m. every day during the
week.
There will be nine, teams
from Division I, five from Div.
II and two from Div. III.
The Div. I final will be 8:30
p.m. Friday, March 2,
proceded by the consolation
game at 6:30.
The games have been
scheduled to coincide with
Open House Week, and will be
held in War Memorial gym.
If last year's final is
anything to go by, it should be
well worth watching.
The top teams so far are
education at three wins no
losses, Totem Park, also at 3-0
Score card
Friday
HOCKEY
8 p.m. Thunderbird Arena — UBC
vs. Saskatchewan
Sunday
WOMEN'S VOLLEYBALL
10   a.m.   War   Memorial   gym   —
Thunderette Invitational
SOCCER
2 p.m. Thunderbird Stadium — UBC
vs. Inter-ltalia.
UBC SQUASH TOURNAMENT
February    13    entry    deadline   —
phone 228-4479  or sign up at the
Winter Sports Centre courts.
and p.e., law and engineering
all at 2-0.
Last year recreation beat
Fort Camp in the final.
Two minor activities were
completed this week: snooker
and tennis. Tennis has been
dragging since last term but
Mike Marshal of Gage Towers
has finally emerged as the
victor, having beaten Bill
Darrough of grads.
Information on intramural
leagues   and   how   they   are
progressing should appear in a
newsletter which will be
distributed soon, perhaps
today.
Other events coming up soon
are the hockey playoffs, and
rugby, which starts Monday.
Plans are also being made
for the intramural awards
banquet March 13. This is our
annual sumptuous feast with
prizes for everyone.
All intramural participants
are welcome.
Intramurals 'bouncing'
Women's intramural events are just bouncing along this
term.
In volleyball, education teams netted first, second and third
places, while Totem Park girls bumped off other rivals to
capture fourth place.
In basketball, Place Vanier II sank first place with
education I dribbling behind in second with a 24-8 victory. There
were many teams entered and all seemed to have a hooping
good time.
The girls will not attempt to handle smaller balls when they
take to the squash courts. Clinics will be held Feb. 5, 6 and 9
from 1:15 p.m. and Feb. 5 and 6 from 5-5:45 p.m. One squash
clinic must be attended if you want to participate. Sign your
name on the attendance sheet provided.
The girls are now in the process of sticking it with floor
hockey which runs three days a week.
Participation in all sports this term has been great. If you
want to play any of the sports offered, sign up on your
organization's intramural board in War Memorial gym.
Kashmir Curry Restaurant
For the Finest Food of India
STUDENTS!! We offer 10% concession on a full dinner. Groups
of 6 or more — 20% concession.
LIMITED OFFER - SO VISIT US SOON
Open every day 5 p.m. ■ 11 p.m. — Free Delivery of Complete Dinners
3934 Main at 23rd Phone 874-5722
YOUR
for that smart lode in
VMK nP
Pusciiftion Oftkal
Studant Discount 6hVm
WE HAVE AN OlflCE NEAR YOU
<za
arsity Sports
45io w. io Ave. Centre Ltd. 2244414
SALE
ON
SKIS — BOOTS — CLOTHING ETC.
Save up to 50% on some items
OPEN ON FRIDAY TIL 9 P.M.
BE A U.B.C.
"BIRDWATCHER"
JOIN THE FUN - FREE ADMISSION
WEEKEND HiatUBHTS
FRIDAY, FEB. 9— 8:00 P.M.
rCE HOCKEY -Winter Sports Centre
U.B.C. Thunderbirds vs. Univ. of Saskatchewan
SUNDAY, FEB. 11— 2:00 P.M.
SOCCER -Thunderbird Stadium
U.B.C. Thunderbirds vs. Inter Italia
NEXT WEEK
NOON HOUR — THURSDAY
FEB. 19-— 1:00 P.M.
BASKETBALL -Memorial Gym
U.B.C. Thunderbirds vs. Athletes in Action
(Touring United States Collegiate All Stars)
FREE —JOIN THE FUN! Page  16
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, February 9, 1973
SPRING HAS SPRUNG at UBC and if you can find the pansies in the picture, the
Ubyssey staff will award you with a pound bag of fertilizer for your spring garden.
—mark hamilton photo
Locale is behind Acadia park, but rules disallow entrants from running over there to
compare picture and real thing. No triflers need join the event.
Lock of support kills daycare rally
MONTREAL (CUP) — A
rally held Thursday at McGill
University failed to draw more
than 30 people to discuss the
problem of campus daycare
facilities and the present
occupation of a campus
building over the issue.
No decisions were made,
although the rally was held to
decide the exact nature of
direct action of the members of
the alliance for child care.
About 35 parents, children
and student supporters took
over a room on the eighth floor
of the campus Leacock
building early Jan. 30 and
vowed to remain until the
administration met their
demands or the police evicted!
them. The children were taken1
home the evening of Feb. 1 and
about 40 people remained to
continue the occupation
despite an order from the
administration to leave.
The ACC is demanding the
university provide facilities
and money for daycare
facilities for McGill students,
faculty and members of the
surrounding community. The,
group also demands the
administration agree to foot
part of the bill with parents
paying on a sliding scale.
The McGill baby-care co-op
was told to leave an unused
language laboratory it had
used as an unofficial daycare
centre since November, on
Jan. 26.
Parents and students
attending the Tuesday ACC
meeting unanimously
supported an escalation of the
action.
"We have everything to gain
and nothing to lose by
escalating our actions, and this
can be achieved by making
people aware of the situation
through increased press
coverage and by hitting the
administration where it
hurts," one ACC member
declared.
The rally was supposed to be
the culmination of these ideas
and the work done on campus
since the occupation began to
bring the issue to students for
discussion.
The ACC agreed at their
meeting a stalemate had been
reached over the fundamental
question of who is responsible
for daycare on the McGill
campus. The administration
maintains that children should
be their parents' responsibility
and not the university's.
The ACC called the  stand
Pit tenders next week
By DAVID SCHMIDT
Tenders are to be called for the new pit
within the next week, Alma Mater Society coordinator Bob Angus said Thursday.
Angus was answering questions about the
new pit from interested students in the SUB
party room noon Thursday. About 15 people
attended and Angus noted it was "the biggest
meeting yet to discuss the pit."
"Formal board of governors approval has
not yet been given but we can call the tenders
pending formal approval," he said.
"It will seat over 400 people and be the
biggest pub area in B.C.," said Rick Murray,
who has been working with Angus on the pit
project.
Angus said he doesn't expect a draft beer
licence within the next two years. However the
bar will be built as a temporary fixture so it can
be easily converted when UBC does get a draft
licence.
"Right now we're trying to get a yearly-
private club licence rather than the current
daily licence," he said.
Murray said there would be a food outlet but
no grill service.
"To put in a grill we would have to put in a
chimney right through the lounge and out the
top of the building and the costs of that are too
prohibitive," he said.
Construction of the new pit is expected to
start in March and should be completed by next
fall.
Newly elected co-ordinator Joanne Lindsay
was also present but wouldn't comment on the
plans because "this is the first time I've seen
them."
"pure sexism and typical of the
administration's total
disregard for the McGill
community."
The participants agreed the
administration still has to meet
certain demands: the
admission daycare is its
responsibility, and that a
mechanism be set up to give
people the organizational tools
so they continue to improve
and expand daycare.
The university has said if the
ACC amalgamates with the
McGill community family
centre, negotiations for space
and increased co-operation will
then be possible.
The ACC members decided
amalgamation would put them
in the disadvantageous
bargaining position of that
"puppet of the university" the
MCFC, and they would lose
both their independence and
their leadership.
"When the MCFC's
government grant runs out in a
few months, there is no
guarantee that it will be
renewed and people will be out
on the street again.
Amalgamating with the MCFC
at this point would simply
provide a temporary solution
to get the university off the
hook," an ACC representative
said.

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