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UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Oct 12, 1973

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Array ^Entire campus could close
Strike notice by OTEU
By RYON GUEDES
Physical plant office employees
have served notice of a strike that
would shut down the university if
the administration doesn't meet
their demands.
Irene Mclntyre, a shop steward
at the physical plant told The
Ubyssey Thursday the 40 office
workers belonging to the Office
and Technical Employees Union
had voted at a Wednesday meeting
to submit a 72-hour strike notice to
the UBC administration.
"Of the 40 votes cast, 29 were in
favor of a strike, nine were opposed, and one was spoiled,"
Mclntyre said.  "The notice has
been sent to OTEU local 15
president Bill Swanson for submission to the university."
Mclntyre said the office workers
at physical plant were the first
employees on campus to belong to
the union and comprised only one
of the many units contained in the
local.
She said she expected the administration to back down when
the notice was submitted because a
strike could seriously impair the
operation of UBC.
"An actual strike would only last
about four hours maximum before
BEAUTIFUL NITOBE GARDENS in the fall are captured in this
picture by Ubyssey photographer Marise Savaria. The little-used
gardens, one of those things on campus which everyone knows about
*•   ■ 'mt'.l1        **      •• „
but no one ever gets the time to use, are carefully manicured in the
traditional Japanese gardening style by experienced UBC outside
workers. So go and enjoy before winter sets in. That means now.
MUS dissent spreading out
By MARK BUCKSHON
Widespread dissent against the
alleged authoritarian rule of music
department head Donald McCorkle
is spreading quickly among
students and faculty in the
<7 department.
Central to the protest is the
uncertain status of part-time
lecturers in the department. The
lecturers are presently working
without salary.
At least one person, flute teacher
Harriet Crossland, has refused to
teach until the "total mess" is
settled.
Crossland said Thursday McCorkle neglected to obtain ap-
^ proval from the board of governors
for appointment of sessional lecturers and "so, we aren't being
paid," she said.
Remaining lecturers are
working under the assumption they
will receive retroactive pay once
the board gives approval of their
status in the department.
"It (failure to obtain approved
♦status for lecturers before the first
pay period) has, to my knowledge
never happened at UBC before,"
said Crossland.
Music professor Doug Talney
said Thursday the board's approval would be "pretty well a
formality".
Talney said the mix-up occurred
0. because McCorkle didn't want to
hire anyone until he was certain
how many students were going to
drop courses and course enrolment
could be finalized.
The pay arrangement of part-
time music lecturers is quite
complicated Talney said and is
based on a per hour basis which is
eventually determined by the
amount of students instructors
teach.
Enrolment figures in the
department were not finalized in
time for the lecturers' status to be
approved at the last board meeting
because the department didn't
have them ready.
In the meantime the lecturers
haven't been paid.
However according to Talney
"some arrangement was worked
out so the part-time lecturers
would be paid."
But a spokeswoman for McCorkle said Thursday she did not
know of any such special
arrangements.
McCorkle was not available for
comment.
Eric Wyness, music undergraduate society representative on Alma Mater Society
council said Thursday music
students will meet Friday to decide
future actions.
He said students, teaching
assistants, and professors have
"reached their breaking points"
with McCorkle.
Wyness said students and faculty
members were angered with the
department head's "closed door
policy".
"It's almost impossible to see
McCorkle, he's barricaded in his
office all the time," he said.
"He's the type of person who
considers it more important to get
the finest quality paints and lay
carpets in practice rooms than to
be certain students will graduate
See page 2: STUDENTS
the university would be forced to
shut down," she said. "For
example, the workers from the
power plant wouldn't cross our
picket line because they're
unionized.
"But nothing will happen while
the mediation officer is still in the
picture," she said.
"In order for a legal strike to be
conducted the mediation officer
would have to withdraw from the
case making several suggestions to
both parties," she said.
The vote to strike resulted from
negotiations last week when the
OTEU rejected personnel director
John McClean's terms for settlement.
McClean said Thursday he knew
nothing about the strike vote. "I
haven't heard anything except that
we're meeting again next week to
resume negotiations," he said.
Swanson initially denied any
knowledge of such a notice to The
Ubyssey and said the OTEU was
"not a strike-happy union"
although union negotiators found
the package proposal offered by
McClean to be unacceptable.
But upon being confronted by
Mclntyre's statement Swanson
admitted he had received the
notice, but had not yet sent it to the
university.
"The strike won't go into effect
until the notice is served,"
Swanson said. "Negotiations are
still continuing, and no action to
strike can be taken until the
mediation officer is out of the
picture and certain government
critieria are met."
Mediation officer Ed Sims said
he had no knowledge of such a vote
being taken. He maintained
negotiations were still on and said
he was setting up a meeting next
Wednesday between the OTEU and
UBC administration.
"I look forward with some optimism and enthusiasm to
reaching a settlement," Sims said.
"But the result of the meeting will
be what they make of it."
Talk of possible strike action is
premature despite last night's
strike vote, chief shop steward
Jack Lasalle said Thursday.
"Nothing's been said about going
on strike," Lasalle said. "There
has only been a vote to issue a
notice to strike."
"We have to discuss this with the
administration first. After that, the
ball's in McClean's court."
Straight tries again
Georgia Straight owner Dan McLeod said Thursday he is willing to subsidize ad revenue in
university newspapers in exchange for the right to
distribute his paper free on seven campuses around
Vancouver.
UBC and Simon Fraser University student
councils have banned free distribution of the Straight
because they feel the ad revenues of their non-profit
student papers will suffer.
McLeod said he likes the subsidy idea but will
have to study its mecJh,aniejUa«geif they can carry it
out- -€?" T^Wcfs'''• T>^N.
Further ptfShcatton of the 'Strai^t^amiversity
edition has been suspended until a compromise can
be worked qfrt with the, &ap*r§ involved ommtil the
matter is settled in Wourft, heiaiS.?^        j|
And even\tf,a. compromise is reached/fMcLeod
said, he wants-w£dAp&iffifrtiqjht thej)ri/iciple that
the councils havetli^ right ta))$Q an£^b-$cation.
He said he'd lik6^ej^ure"jffi^airy compromise
reached could not be nulliffecTDy councils invoking
the same power again.
McLeod said he will only file a suit in Supreme
Court if all compromise efforts fail.
The ad revenue subsidization would be based on
the number of column inches of story space lost in the
campus newspaper by a decrease in ads caused by
the Straight's competition.
Most campus newspapers must have a certain ad
content for a given amount of story space in order to
break even. If ads drop so must the space allotted to
stories.
McLeod said the Straight could compare the
proposed number of column inches of a paper with
the actual amount published at the end of a given
time period.
If the number of inches has fallen due to
decreased ad revenue the Straight could make up the
difference by taking out ads in the papers to boost
story space up to the proposed level.
He said he will take his proposal to the individual
newspapers rather than the councils (who act as
publishers) and see if the objection to the Straight is
really decreased ad loss.
As for his monetary loss in last week's Straight
seizure on three campuses, McLeod said 15,000 copies
were confiscated costing about $900 plus lost ad
revenue in future Straight editions.
He said quite a few advertisers had suspended
their ads while others had taken out smaller ads.
Advertisers felt they were promised a circulation
of 26,000 persons and in many cases have withdrawn
advertising until the Straight meets it, he said. Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, October 12,  1973
Students meet today
From page 1
and teachers will be paid," Wyness
said.
Many students have found
themselves screwed by McCorkle's
strict adherence to administration
rules, said Wyness. (
"For instance, McCorkle won't
allow students to take an extra
three units of private lessons
anymore," he said.
Wyness said students were
advised they could take these
course units and planned their
programs accordingly.
"Now they're stuck," he said.
Talney said he backed two
students "with strong,
memoranda" when they complained to him about not being able
to take courses he had advised
previously.
"They did end up getting up the
lessons they needed though," he
said.
"However, there were other
students who couldn't take the
courses," said Talney.
The alternative for students in
most cases would be extra private
lessons which can be extremely
expensive.
While music students pay
slightly higher fees than general
arts students special budget appropriations must be made by the
board of governors to pay for
private instruction.
Wyness said students are also
angry about  McCorkle  having,
allegedly prevented access to,,
practice and recreation in the old
auditorium.
"McCorkle has used his keys to
lock rooms with student purchased
equipment," said Wyness.
He said planned student protests
would include distributing sarcastic buttons and posters. He said
"already students have moved
McCorkle's office door sign to the
men's room."
One student, who wished to
remain anonymous, said protests
would include "blowing a piano
up".
Reely greasy
Inside your handy-dandy
Ubyssey today is a rip-roarin' issue
of our weekly critical review, Page
Friday.
And inside that you'll find a reely
greasy review of the movie,
American Graffiti, that has'
probably come to your attention by
this time.
Read it and decide yourself
whether the thing is worth wasting
a couple of bucks on.
Just don't let the review slip out
of your hands.
/^^,         Anglican-United Campus Ministry
rnan (TjJJ!)    Sundays — 10:30 — Festival of Worship
V^A   mf/       Vancouver School of Theology Chapel, Library Bldg.
^^-^ Tues. 12:30 - Eurcharist& Lunch
Lutheran Campus Centre
-
Dr. Feliciano, World Student Christian Federation
LIBERATION & EDUCATION
Sat., Oct. 13 - 8 p.m. University Hill United Church
Student Christian Movement
Student council puts on pressure
U of T cafeteria boycotts Kraft
ANNE OF 1000 DAYS
richard burton - genevieve bujold
Sat. Oct. 13, 8:00 p.m
HILLEL HOUSE
behind Brock
Campus Community invited
Members .50$ - non-members .75$
TORONTO (CUP) — In response
to requests from their students'
union and the campus committee
to support the grape boycott,
University of Toronto food services
will be boycotting all Dare and
Kraft products and non-union
grapes and lettuce.
A students' union executive
member said in an interview a
'grace period' of two to three
weeks would be allowed before a
survey of food services outlets
would be made to ensure that the
decision was being carried out.
While he said he felt the administrative decision had been
made in good faith, he thought
there might be some difficulty in
discriminating between union and
non-union produce. This would be
the primary reason for the survey,
he said.
The Kraft boycott was called to
support the small Ontario dairy
farmers threatened by the Kraft
monopoly. Dare and the California
produce boycotts originated to
support    the    unions    seeking
recognition and improved working
conditions.
The California lettuce boycott
might soon be stopped because of a
tentative agreement reached last
week between AFL-CIO president
George Meany, Teamster
president Frank Fitzsimmons and
UFW president Cesar Chavez.
Circle the errer
NEW YORK (LNS-CUP) — "Despite her marriage, Mrs. Berrigan
still uses the name with which she was christened 33 years ago, a
decision endorsed by her husband. "Elizabeth McAlister is my name
and I prefer to use it," she said...
"Mrs. Berrigan also was recently arrested. . ."
— the New York Times, Sept. 18, 1973.
Hie RIGHT PLACE for the RIGHT SERVICE
Z32
aaaa
Reasonable Prices
8914 Oak St.
at S.W. Marine Dr.
Fully Guaranteed
Quality Workmanship
263-8121 Friday, October  12,  1973
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 3
UBC union organizing aided
Proposed B.C. labor legislation
to relax union certification
requirements will greatly aid UBC
union organizers, Dirk Martin,
provisional secretary for the
Assocation of University and
'College Employees said Thursday.
The proposed bill tabled last
week in the legislature for further
study allows a union to apply for
certification with only 35 per cent
of employees signed up.
Following the application the
provincial   government   would
conduct a representative vote
among employees and if the result
shows 50 per cent plus in favor of
unionization the union will receive
certification.
The AUCE now has 33 per cent
membership, of which 30 per cent
enrolled* in the first month, Martin
said. However enrolment is
slowing down.
Martin attributed this to difficulties in reaching small
departments and offices such as
the law and MacMillan libraries.
Another possible cause of
decrease in recruits is by law
organizers of a new union cannot
use employers' time or materials
while recruiting.
The results are an incomplete
mailing list for union formation
circulars and meeting and
recruitments drives taking place
only during the lunch hour.
Also the fact "many employees
have not been in a union before
means an educational program
must be initiated to show how a
union can be effective," said
Martin.
The union's goal is to give the
rank and file greater control over
their jobs and allow the processing
of grievances by stewards or
stewards committees without the
fear of firings or harassing, said
Duane Lunden the proposed
union's provisional contract officer.
He said general grievances fall
into three categories.
The first is over job
classification and job description.
Another is over working conditions, especially evening and
weekend shift work.
Lunden noted employees
sometimes have worked evening
shift and returned in the morning
for work.
The third grievance is over
policy or lack of policy.
The main problem in this area is
inconsistency. For example the
arbitrary decision that some
departments can get more time off
than other departments.
The union would like to see more
employee integration in the
university, he said. It hopes to
propose further training for in
terested employees and a work-
study program whereby employees could attend some
university lectures if they wished.
Martin said a formation of a
union now would be more successful since new employees have
probably settled in for the winter.
Martin said he thought the
chronic high employee turnover
rate expressed the need for a
union. He said people do not stay
because jobs are boring and not
permanent positions.
B.C. labor leaders have reacted
strongly against the new labor
code claiming the government
didn't listen to their suggestions
during meetings in the past year.
Among the major objections are
the curtailed right to picket, the
lack of experienced B.C. labor
people on the new Labor Relations
Board and the right for a person to
be exempted from belonging to a
union on religious grounds.
Since the bill is currently tabled
in the legislature, opponents will
have yet another opportunity to
help formulate the long awaited
NDP labor policy.
Give them carrots — Hees
GENTLEMAN FARMER George Hees gesticulates to about 40 very
much washed Young Conservatives in a special meeting Thursday. Da
Consoivative brass is travelling this great land of ours — this land
which under Uncle John they helped to create — to meet students
By JEAN CLARKE
In order to encourage producers
to expand their industries "you
have to give them a carrot to make
it attractive to them to do what you
want."
This opinion was expressed
Thursday noon by George Hees,
former minister of trade and
commerce in the Diefenbaker
cabinet, during a speech in the
SUB club's lounge. The visit was
part of the Progressive Conservative Party cross-Canada
student visitation program.
"In Canada today, we are faced
with two major problems — inflation and high unemployment,"
said Hees. "We must bring
production to the point where
supply and demand are equal."
During his half-hour speech Hees
outlined his personal plans on how
to deal with these problems.
The "carrots" referred to are in
the form of cash and tax incentives
to industries if they expand their
productivity and create more jobs.
More research and development
should be encouraged as well he
said.
"We must process more of
Canada's raw materials in
Canada," he said.
To make this idea more appealing to industry, "for the first
full year of production no federal
taxes would be assessed," he said.
"After that, taxes would be
based on a graduating scale from
zero to full taxation over the next
15 years."
However, Hees avoided saying
whether this would benefit more
American concerns than
Canadian.
The $2.5 billion now spent annually on unemployment insurance
"is a dead loss," Hees said. "It is
necessary to keep people alive but
a program as I have outlined is
infinitely better. It would reduce
unemployment to under four per
cent. People would rather work for
a living than sit idly," he said.
Hees appeared to enjoy the
question period more, seeming
more relaxed and casual.
When questioned about foreign
investment, Hees said he saw it as
a necessary evil.
"I hate having to take foreign
investment, but you have to keep
people in jobs," he said.
His advocation of a very loose
immigration policy met with opposition from those present, but in
general he found a sympathetic
though small audience of about 40.
After giving his 45 minute address, Hees was quickly ushered
out of the room by his well-dressed
young assistant, stopwatch in
hand, heading for another meeting
with the unwashed at Langara.
And no, Virginia, he didn't show
his war wounds.
Sarcasm
n. a humor column
By JAKE "THE SNAKE" van der KAMP
A senate meeting at UBC is calculated
to awe the newcomer.
After handing a slickly embossed ticket to
a uniformed guard the initiate is
solemnly ushered into the 1950's. White
shirts, thin ties, pornpodour hair styles, and
baggy pants abound. The membership is
equally divided between reformed beatniks,
disapproving great-grandfathers, frowning
matrons and a token sprinkling of
bewildered students.
Jokes abound, but they're all private ones
emanating from the cocktail party the
Friday before. Cliches naturally cause a
laugh. Registrar Jock Bar-All's witty
comment the computer can't distinguish
between Ms. and Mr. but who can tell the
difference these days anyway, haw haw
haw, raises universal chuckles, the faculty
and government representatives (most on
long-term appointment from Socred days)
laughing at the joke, the students laughing
at the faculty.
The debate begins when Smart Olensky, a
recently revived student senator, timidly
raises a quivering hand and is granted
permission to speak.
"Sir, I was wondering if maybe some
students might somehow have a chance to
sit on the committee dealing with the adverse effects of the numerous mating calls
of the chickens in the barn beside C lot on the
pedestrians who have to pass by there, sir,"
he said.
Immediately, hit right smack under the
kneecap by this devastating student
demand, into the breach leaps Olensky's
Ancient Foe, Emperor of the Classics,
Praequaestor of the senate, Aspirant to the
Consulship: Doctor Malkum Macgreg-
orium.
(fanfare please . . . thank you).
Stretching out first one arm, then the
other, he dons his mighty gauntlets and
stifling a sneeze as the chalk dust flies from
his cloak, angrily bellows for the floor.
"Ah aah aaaah AH aah ah 111 have a few
remarks to make on this subject, Mr.
chairman."
Now whoever came up with the theory of
split personalities must have had
Gregorium in mind, for not only is his
personality split three ways, but his body is
split from his mind. His body is rumored to
be living in the present, his mind is certainly
not.
It is to be found either hovering over some
chunk of stone inscribed with Athenian
graffiti, or present and vocal in the British
House of Lords under George IV, or spinning
wistful dreams of sitting in the commentator's seat during period break in last
night's hockey game.
On this particular night, the senate is
treated to personality number two, Lord
Malkum K.B., B.M.O.C, S.O.B., Knighte in
Shininge Armoure out to do Battle againste
the Dragone, Studente Representation; God
Save the Kinge (harumphe).
Quothe he: "You've got to be aBle to think
to be on this senate, young man, and how
can you think if you don't know the facts
first? For instance, tell me: Of how many
men did the Athenian chariot drivers' guild
(or as we call it in my Greek class,
orachtiphionithos, heh, heh) consist in 423
B.C.
"Well?
"Don't know eh?
"Proves it doesn't it!"
Having surprisingly enough, managed to
get through several consecutive sentences
of what is for him really quite cdherent
argument, Gregorium decides it is way past
time for a few real non sequiturs.
"And I ask you, how can students who use
such dreadful language as they all do
nowadays sit on a committee? The kinds of
shocking obscenities I constantly hear were
in my time suited only to the docks", he
sprayed, frowning at his listeners, who,
since they are obviously supposed to play
peers of the realm for Lord Malkum
respond with the usual verbal alacrity of
the august body.
Leaning back in their chairs, mouths
agape at Lord Malkum's scintillating
wisdom they sagely nod assent, their eyes
narrowed in keen intellectual enquiry, and
applause thundering from their throats on
all twelve cylinders.
However, his majesty, the King, Wilter
Gorge, while hitting the low D at 500 r.p.m.
suffers the great misfortune of having a
large wad of gum fall out of the sky, just. . .
just right out of nowhere, right down his
throat.
Incredible!
Seeing the astounded reaction which his
latest revelation has caused his master Lord
Malkum elaborates his theme even more
indignantly.
"Why, just this afternoon I had to
reprimand one of my students who fdrgot
not to translate literally when quoting
Sappho, Aristophanes, Catullus, Ovid and a
few hundred others. Naughty, by Jove!
There's only one word for it. Naughty, I
say," he said.
"Besides, the way these children wear
their hair nowadays is simply disgraceful.
For how can the divine seeds of fire, puros,
which spring from the contact of hairs, fall
to the heart, anima, if their hair hangs down
instead of standing up?
"Pericles would never have allowed it,"
he said.
But then, as one i observer remarks, who
aside from Lord Malkum and a few potential
fossils majoring in Latin would think of
shaving themselves smooth with a razor
blade for two inches above their ears every
morning?
Finally converted by the brilliant light of
his opponent's concise reasoning, Olensky
dutifully apologizes for his impudence.
And you, my friend, if there is a tory in
you somewhere, hidden from the probing
eyes of those who seek co destroy custom
and tradition, despair not.
This curious specimen, your hope of
deliverance, can be found in Buchanan 269.
Only remember one thing.
In his office he is not Lord Malkum, but
Molly (Hot flash) Gregorium, the ace
microphone hockey jockey, and his reply to
any question will run something like this.
"If   that   hooligan,   Derek   Sanderson,
hadn't fouled himself twice in the second
period, Boston would have won."
FINIS
[Or in the vulgar]
THE END Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 12,  1973
?oT
7?
,.^f
THIS) IT 0^f
THIS W hW
1.
5o ( iwtOMT
% WW WAT
The bucks stop here
Good buy
By ALAN DOREE
Walter Makutsov decided things had gone too far.
He'd accepted everything until now.
After all, he owed the presidency of United Trinkets to his
sugar-free diet mouthwash. His many lovers were attracted by
deodorants that made his crotch, armpits and feet smell like
tropical fruit, old leather and crude oil. His wife married him for
the spray cement that gave his hair body and control in winds of
hurricane force.
He drove a Stud GT that let everybody know he made $52,000 a
year, mainly because it came with an optional flood-lit neon price
tag.
But when the Consumer General told him that he had to approve the latest fad he said "I draw the line at chocolate covered
mice."
And he did too, right across the floor.
C.G. was angry. "I'm angry!" he shouted. Revenge was in the
air, along with cyanide scented insect repellent.
Next morning a horde of chocolate covered mice collapsed
Makutsov's office door. They surged over his giggling secretary
who thought it was some new product's publicity stunt.
"Get out!" Makutsov screamed, a touch of something in his
voice.
The mice drew nearer. He jumped out the window and fell
sixteen stories into a passing mattress that prevented morning
backache and snow blindness.
Soon he heard thousands of tiny feet scratching louder and
nearer. Terrified, Makutsov saw a dust cloud behind, reaching out
to smother him like a filthy ragged curtain.
They overtook him three miles from wherever he was and tried
to smother him with a filthy ragged curtain. Their toffee eyes
burned with hate.
Makutsov was gorged. The mice crammed themselves into his
mouth with enthusiasm. Replete, he tried to ignore their suicidal
frenzy as best he could.
It was a disgusting sight. The T.V. commentator said so. "It
could happen to you," he added ominously. "Remember, the
Consumer General needs your assistance."
"The preceding message," a new voice began, "has been
presented with the Institute for Fantastic Housekeeping and
Cleaner Living's Seal ef Approval."
You probably don't care, but the Alma
Mater Society is getting ready to spend
$684,000 of your money.
We say you probably aren't concerned
because these days most everybody is getting
used to other people spending vast quantities
of their money.
And usually you can't do much about
it.
You can scream at gentleman farmer
George Hees all day if you like but we doubt
whether it will effect how the feds spend
your income tax.
Accessible though Wally Gage and John
Bremer are (heh heh) you won't get
anywhere telling them how your $428
tuition fees will be allocated.
But in the case of the $34 AMS fee you
can, if you gather your plans, your energy
and your personal chartered accountant (or
a reasonable facsimile) make a dent in
society treasurer John Wilson's budget.
In fact Wilson says he'd like some more
feedback on the budget.
You see Wilson is a proponent of the
theory that the budget is the most political
statement the society makes each year.
And the  budget  he published   in  the
Ubyssey   Sept.   28   was  very  definitely  a
reflection     of   the   services-oriented   AMS
Wilson's Student Coalition group envisions.
Wilson is in fact daring those who feel
the AMS should spend money on political
education, or decentralizing, or rebates to
undergraduate society to say something.
The budget and Wilson ask the
question: should the AMS continue to pump
an enormous portion of the student fee into
the SUB-society administration complex?
So far there hasn't been much of a
reply.
We at The Ubyssey have some definite
ideas on how this money should be
allocated. We plan to detail them throughout
the year.
But for the moment we'd like to remind
you that Wilson's budget committee will
hold an open forum on the budget and
society spending in general, noon Tuesday in
the SUB council chambers.
Be there.
It's your $34 bucks.
Letters
Philosophy 2
It would be a pity if any would-be
philosophy major decided to take
the road to Kabul after reading
Dwight Jones' description
(Ubyssey, Oct. 5) of the philosophy
department at UBC. Jones is under
a large number of misapprehensions.
The grain of truth in the letter is
that indeed linguistic analysis is in
vogue in English-speaking
philosophy. But there is little UBC
can do about that. Consequently, it
is hardly grounds for writing off
the department.
However, is Jones quite sure that
the philosophy of language is dealt
with in "almost every course"?
How about philosophy 201, 210, 214,
301, 304, 311, 317, 333/343, 353/363,
401, 421, 440, 460, 501, 514 or 524. Is
Jones sure that it is a bad thing
that 10 or 20 per cent of each of
these courses is taken up with
linguistic issues?
Since all philosophy and most
thought is carried out in language I
would have thought it was
essential.
Thirdly, is Jones quite sure that
he cannot get what he wants at
UBC? Try philosophy 201 for
Camus, 353/363 for Sartre. Go to
Wedeking and Zimmerman. Take
reading courses.
Fourthly, Jones is confused
about Wittgenstein and linguistic
analysis. If one wants to see the
start of philosophical linguistic
analysis in Wittgenstein's Tracts tus, then one must forget that
Russell wrote the introduction to
that work, hnd that both he and
Moore saw the clearing up of
linguistic confusions as both an
essential, if not the essential part
of philosophy.
What Russell and Gellner were
objecting to is the later emphasis
of some philosophers writing
linguistic analysis on ordinary
language as opposed to constructed language. It is important
to realize that linguistic analysis
subsumes the ordinary language
philosophy of Ryle, Austin and the
later Wittgenstein, as well as the
constructed language emphasis of
the early Wittgenstein, Russell,
Carnap. . .
Whether referring to linguistic
analysis or ordinary language,
Jones' statement that the
"movement is so devoid of import
that it has not produced a
philosopher of any repute within its
duration" is more than wide of the
mark, given that Wittgenstein is
widely claimed to be the greatest
20th century philosopher.
Fifthly, in the words of a Gellner
admirer, reviewing a recent
Gellner book "when occasionally
Gellner does return to the stamping ground of Words and Things
— help stamp out linguistic
philosophy — we have more of the
wanton even willful distortions
which formed so large a part of his
first stock in trade". (Anthony
Flew in Times Higher Education
Supplement, Sept. 17.) The way to
avoid twittish books like Words and
Things is to talk to a few
professors. Of course if you despise
the department to begin with. . .
Sixthly, from the course
descriptions, it is not clear that any
course in the philosophy department is considering the ordinary
language works of Wittgenstein
and Austin. But one could start
with professor Thomas Patton.
Seventhly, if linguistic analysis
begins with the Tractatus (20th
century), then Frege (19th century) can hardly be part of the
movement.
Eighthly, many linguists would
quarrel with partitioning off of
semantics to the linguistics
department. The most recent work
in linguistic semantics looks to
Austin for key ideas.
Finally, very few academics are
earning $25,000 per year; full
professors start at about $19,000,
assistant professors about $11,000.
Vibrant inquiry my eye!
I am told Jones views in no way
represent the philosophy students
union but are, rather an embarrassment to it — who then is the
us in give us your support?
When a letter is riddled with so
many iriac curacies, who is going to
take seriously charges of
patronage and charlantarnry?
They may be true, but there is one
thing more certain — Jones would
be happier in sociology.
Come and join us. We read
Husserl every mopning before
breakfast, and I have heard that
colonialism has once again reared
its ugly head.
Peter Elgin
small groups lab
anthropology and sociology
Jones would like to inform any
and all interested readers that his
views do not represent those of the
philosophy   students   union—Eds.
Eyeballs
You don't have to have dollar
signs for eyeballs and a cash
register for a heart (like Dan
McLeod and the Alma Mater
Society accountants) to be shocked
by the suppression of a newspaper.
Most shocking, though, is the way
The Ubyssey news people have
sacrificed their freely-chosen
sacred cow: The Public's Right To
Know. In all the conflict among
special interest groups, nobody has
bothered to consult with the people
most affected — the 20,000 UBC
students — as to whether the flow
of news and opinion onto campus
should be damned up by a wall of
ledgers inscribed in black ink.
Robert Sarti, education
former member of the former
Georgia Straight former collective
r
THE UBYSSEY
OCTOBER   12,  1973
Published   Tuesdays,   Thursdays   and   Fridays   throughout   the
university year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of
B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS
or the  university  administration.  Member,  Canadian University
Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary
and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices are located in room
241K of the Student Union Building.
Editorial  departments, 228-2301; Sports, 228-2305; advertising,
228-3977
Co-editors: Vaughn Palmer, Michael Sasges
Oyez! Oyez! In the name of his grand Satanic majesty George "the carrot
man" Hees I call the masses to order today called the little man In the weird
hat. Carrot? said Vaughn Palmer. Migod we're being overrun by the yellow
hoard which consisted of: Dru Spencer, Laureen Gunning, Rick Lymer, Tom
Barnes, Allan Doree, Marise Savaria, Jean Clarke, triple threat
Johnandersenjohnandersenjohnandersen, Mark Buckshon, Pat Kenopski,
Janice McEwan, Jake van der Kamp, Mike Sasges, Ken Dodd, Ryon Guedes
and  the   Krueger-Coull   compact  who  were  unavailable  for  comment.     I ■*» Bra
ma
Style — not sincerity
Brigid Johnston and Susan Wright... contestants in Earnest
The Importance of Being Earnest
by Oscar Wilde
directed by Bill Millerd
at the Arts Club
Perhaps it is the English tradition. The dry,
acerbic humor. The clever witticisms. The
poignant satire. Perhaps it is the English accent
which makes it all the more effective. No matter.
Be it Wilde's history of accent, his play is undeniably funny.
Written in 1894, The Importance of Being
Earnest was Wilde's last and best received play.
It is still acclaimed as one of his best, and
judging from the Arts Club production, we can
see why.
A well known comic tradition is the mix-up.
Mix and match a host of characters and
situations, juggle them around for several acts,
bring it all together in one final coup at the end —
and voila, the playwright is assured of a comedy.
However, Wilde follows the recipe with a great
deal more finesse. There is more than meets the
eye in his play, but not too much more.
John Worthington (Allan Gray) leads a double
life in London. Algernon Moncrieff (David Stein)
is a rogue who wishes he could. Gwendolen
Fairfax (Susan Wright), a prim and proper lady,
loves Earnest passionately. So does Cecil Car-
dew — romantically. The importance of being
Earnest is the fact that the two women love the
same man — hypothetically. Enter Lady
Bracknell (Micki Maunsell), the walking social
etiquette manual, and a comic masterpiece is
born.
Wilde's humor is found in his carefully and
skilfully drawn characterizations, his intricate
plotting, and most of all, his satiric social
comment. That is where Wilde throws away the
recipe, and makes The Importance of Being
Earnest unlike another Comedy of Errors.
Maunsell is the epitome of the socially conscious, sophisticated and cultivated snob. Every
motion and every breath she draws exudes
refinement and artificiality. Without a doubt she
steals the show.
The other characters are craftily designed by
Wilde,  each embodying certain nuances and
Dance
properties conducive to the play. With only one
exception, Allan Anderson as the reverend
Chasuble, the cast handles the characters admirably.
Wilde has one basic premise to the play, and it
is stretched out into three acts. It provides the
framework for the situations and humorously
•contrived scenes. However, Wilde's satire is the
backbone of the play.
He lambasts and lampoons the people in the
play, the lives they lead, the values they uphold,
social conventions, traditions — in fact almost
everything in the fabric of 1895 upper-class
English society.
"It is simply scandalous," Algernon exclaims,
"to see a woman flirt with her husband. It's like
washing your clean laundry out in public."
"A man who wants to get married," Lady
Bracknell advises, "should know everything or
absolutely nothing, and you (to Worthington) are
the latter."
Yet there is an inherent weakness in a play
which relies on one joke. Wilde's play is a full
length, full two hour performance, and after the
first two acts, the joke begins to wear a little
thin.
Millerd is to be congratulated for the fine
performance of a script which perhaps is starting to show its age. Social satires are always
welcome, but the style and approach of 1895 is
just a bit too trivial and nonsensical for a 1973
perspective to appreciate.
From the first word of the first act, Millerd had
his actors at the starting gate. Bang! They're off.
For most of the time the tremendous pace never
slackens. Without such a tempo, Wilde's play
would suffer. We do have one complaint though.
Stein adjusts to the pace too literally, and he
hardly pauses for breath. He could time himself
better, for his humor suffers when handled like a
race horse.
"Style, not sincerity, is the vital thing," Lady
Bracknell admonishes. We may never know for
sure Wilde's sincerity, but we can not doubt his
style. The Importance of Being Earnest has
plenty of it.
Steve Morris
Gloom of war cannot dint Inbal light
Tuesday night's performance of the Inbal Dance Theatre
of Israel marked the beginning of a new David Y.H. Lui
spectacular. Lui is concentrating on dance this season,
bringing nine international companies to the Queen Elizabeth.
The Inbal Dance Theatre was the first of the series, and
judging by the quality of its performance, the others will
certainly be worthwhile.
A company of thirty dancers and musicians, Inbal has
performed for audiences the world over. Its program of
pageantry, music, song and dance is derived from the history
and folklore of ancient Yemenite culture. Inbal means 'tongue
of the bell', or that which makes music in a silent shell. It seeks
to keep the tradition of a proud nation alive, while searching
for new ways to express the spirit of contemporary Israel.
Inbal was founded by Sara Levi-Tanai in 1949, shortly after
Israel became an independent state. The entire population of
Yemen was flown to Israel from the southwest corner of the
Arabian peninsula where it had existed in total isolation from
the rest of the Jewish world for 2,500 years.
During this period the Yemenites lived almost solely
according to the teachings of the Bible. Their isolation
preserved their ancient institutions, traditions and dances. In
order to keep this heritage alive, Inbal was formed, its
members being either Yemenite born or Israeli born of
Yemenite parentage.
In Israel, Inbal performs six nights a week, in cities,
villages, border settlements and army camps. It is an integral
part of Israeli cultural life and has more than fulfilled its goal;
to preserve ancient Yemenite tradition and to present the
spirit of modern day Israel.
For an average Vancouver dance enthusiast, the Inbal
dance theatre, although perhaps lacking cultural significance,
is still an exciting example of total theatre. In particular,
'Women' was a composition of dance, mime, song and
comedy; a beautiful evocation of the daily life of the Yemenite
woman. 'Shabbat Shalom' was a masterpiece of visual impact.
The frieze-like quality of the compositions, the powerful colors
and fantastic costumes, and the choreography, combined with
the spirit of the dancers, made the program exceptionally
memorable.
Lui's proposed dance program promises to be equally
good. Les Feux Follets, a Canadian folk dance company is
performing on the 23rd of November. Nov. 28, Lui is bringing
the State Dancers of Yugoslavia. The Royal Winnipeg Ballet is
scheduled for Jan. 23 to 26, followed by a Spanish dance
company, the American Ballet, Les Grands Ballets Canadiens,
Siesta Brazil and finally City Centre Jeoffrey Ballet from New
York.
Series tickets will be available until Oct. 13 at a considerable reduction of the usual rate. For more information
phone 687-7043.
Katrina von Flotow
Inbal in action
Page Friday. 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, October 12,  1973 Chinese opera
China dolls
Aristocratic young maiden from opera
From the opening gong, to the bright orange monkeys, the
National Chinese Opera created an Alice-in-Wonderland world
of huge costumed figures, strangely painted faces and an
overpowering music of bagpipes, cymbals and clackers.
The bare stage of the Queen Elizabeth Theatre was not filled
with words but with "acts". This distinction is of great importance as our judgment and appreciation of the plays must
be based on this fact. The story is only a frame for the action.
The play is not the thing — it is the playing which is.
Since there were no curtains to indicate changes of scene,
the property men were visible and at the same time, since they
are not part of the stylized nature of the play, were invisible.
The musicians were on stage, but merged stylistically into the
performance.
And what a performance! A variety of styles and types of the
Civil and Military Theatre of China, each play historical,
mythological, romantic or satirical. A tumbling stable boy
represented the strength of his master's red horse, the
movements of wind and clouds were indicated by colored
ribbons, and lavishly costumed generals attacked a bridge
where gesture replaced words in awakening the emotive
response of the audience.
During all this, the music and singing. Without it, these play
excerpts would fall apart. The singing with its strange
cadences and colored vibrato is irritating to Western ears
accustomed to Carole King and Gordon Lightfoot. We can
recognize gongs and drums as the musical equivalent of war,
but it is difficult to find sympathy in the singing style. The
high-pitched tang of a young woman's voice is not easily appreciated. Yet, there was one incredible interval of silence! It
was a calculated artistic risk since the void was meant to be
filled involuntarily by the entire audience. And the audience
responded when the Monkey King started twirling an eight foot
spear. The music, combined with the audience, provided the
psrsonality of the play.
These weren't plays in the Western sense. They were not
motivated by the emotions of a happy or sad ending. Since the
plot was known in advance, there was no suspense. Each actor
slated his name, character and intentions in an entrance
speech. "I am the Monkey King and I am looking for a weapon
to enhance my magical powers." These conversations provide
the skeleton for the play's action, songs and dramatics.
All activity, from the red table which became a bridge, the
big flag which meant a flood, the invisible boat of the white
serpent — these are the play. (The woman who narrated, by
the way, was most helpful in this respect, contrary to what
some snotty-nosed critic said). No object was without function.
The painted faces and the spectacular silk costumes were
indispensible to the meaning of the play. Every motion, the
sleeve flipping, the tossing of coat panels in anger or joy,
became expressive motifs incorporated into the dramatic
situation. But these complications would be meaningless
without the competence of the actors.
From the action dances of the generals, to the acrobatics of
the water spirits, as they urged the flood waters higher into the
Buddhist temple, the National Chinese Opera moved uniquely
from one style to another. But these acrobatics were more than
vaudeville. Unlike the Peking Opera troupe of Hong Kong
which appeared here this summer, this group didn't sacrifice
sense for spectacle. This was a dance art with its roots in the
study of human and animal behavior. Their understanding of
character as translated into action is the key to Chinese
Theatre.
The mixture of reality, imagination, symbolism and expression makes the National Chinese Opera Theatre a timeless
and valuable artistic force. Those of you who stayed home
watching Gunsmoke missed something.
Geoff Hancock
Eight
fantastic
subscription
flicks.
KATHARINE HEPBURN
PAUL SCOF1ELD
LEE REMICK
KATE RED
JOSEPH COTTEiS
BETSY BIAIR
IN
EDWARD ALBEE5
™»A F1W DIRECTED BYm™
TONY RICHARDSON
__ STACY 1<EACH _
ROBERTSTEPHENS
HUGH GRIFFITH
JOHNOSBORNES
«"-»A F11M DIRECTED BV—"
GUY GREEN
■ ■— SCREENPLAY BV—
EDWARD ANHALT
ZEROMOSTEL
GENE WILDER
AND KAREN B1ACK
EUGENE ioNESCOS
m-mfi FllM DIRECTED BY-
TOM OHORGAN
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JULIAN BARRY
THE rWCNAjVTHEATRE
COMPANY OF ENGLAND
A1AN BATES
lAURENCE OLIVIER
JOANPLOWRIGHT
ATTOXICHEKHOVS
9*%-m a FILM DKECTED BV«-»
lAURENCE OLIVIER
CYRILCUSACK
lANHCHM
MICHAEL JAYSTON
VIVIEN MERCHANT
TERENCE RIGBY
PAUL ROGERS
HAROLJDPINTERS
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PETER HALL
BROCK PETERS
MELBAMODRE
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KURT WEILL &
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DANIEL MANN
bsssssssssmSCREEMR^Y BY e«H
ALFRED HAYES
LEE MARVIN
FREDRIC MARCH
ROBERT RYAN
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JOHN FRANKENHEIMER
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SIMON GRAYS
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HAROLD PINTER
Great plays transformed into
great new movies by your
kind of writers, directors,
stars.
One Monday and Tuesday
a month, October through
May. Four showings, two
evenings and two matinees,
and that's it.
Starts October 29th and
October 30th at a local
popcorn factory (see theatre
list below).
SPECIAL COLLEGE DISCOUNT
Seats.are limited. Get down to the
box office (or Ticketron) with a
check. Eight evenings: $28. Eight
matinees: $14.40 for students and
faculty, $20 for everybody else.
THE AMERICAN
FILM THEATRE
1350 Ave. of the Americas, M.Y.. N.Y. 10019
Phone: (212)489-8820
THE AMERICAN r ILM THEATRE IS A PRESE NTATION OF
AMERICAN EXPRESS FILMS, INC.
AND THE ELY LANDAU ORGANIZATION, INC.
IM ASSOCIATION WITH CINEVISION LTEE (CANADA)
HERE'S WHERE YOU GO TO JOIN
THE AMERICAN FILM THEATRE
Vancouver:
VANCOUVER
Lougheed Mall #3
Park Royal
Richmond Square
VICTORIA
Coronet
EXHIBITION DATES         m
Monday Series
Tuesday Series   ■
Oct. 29,1973
Oct. 30, 1973      •*•
Nov. 12.1973
Nov. 13, 1973      ■
Dec. 10,1973
Dec. 11,1973      ■■
Jan. 21, 1974
Jan. 22, 1974       H
Feb. 4, 1974
Feb. 5,1974        M
Mar. 11,1974
Mar. 12,1974      IB
April 8, 1974
April 9, 1974        ■
May 6, 1974
May 7, 1974         am
Friday, October  12, 1973
THE       UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 3 Movies
Cruisin9
American Graffiti, now showing at the Varsity, has been touted as a very funny movie, and
in one sense it is. There is something ridiculous
about the trademarks of any decade, and the late
fifties, with the souped-up cars, waterfall
haircuts and roller-skating waitresses, were as
ridiculous as any other. Most of the humor stems
from the differences between the eccentricities
of that time and the eccentricities of today's
movie audience.
This film follows several Californian teenagers through one action-packed evening in the
early fall of 1962, the tail end of the fifties. The
focus switches back and forth from one youth to
another, and there are many hilarious scenes as
these kids try to live up to (or live down) their
reputations. But what makes this a good film is
not simply its humor; in choosing to catch the
sense of 1962 rather than, say, 1957, director
George Lucas is able to chronicle the end of an
era. It's the period just prior to the great loss of
innocence, pre-assassination, pre-Vietnam, and
before the summers of love and hate and burning. This is an attempt to show, albeit with
hindsight, the writing on the wall.
There is a plot, although in a sense it is incidental. Two boys are about to leave for college,
both wondering whether it's the right thing to do.
It's their last day at home, and the decision can't
be put off any longer. One decides to stay, the
other decides to fly east to school, and most of
the film demonstrates how they are persuaded,
cajoled, trapped into their decisions by the
events of the night.
Steve (Ronny Howard) is the kid who wants to
get out of his "turkey-town", but his cheerleader
girlfriend doesn't see the necessity of it. She is a
potential Philip Roth-type bitch, and naturally
she gets her man. Her brother Curt (Robert
Drey fuss) who has more or less decided not to go
east when the film begins, spends most of the
night chasing a futuristic dream-woman in a
white Thunderbird. As well, there are any
number of characters that come straight out of
our collective childhood unconscious, a band of
thugs called the Pharoahs, a hoodlum with a
heart of gold, a small-time Connie Stevens, and
the inevitable hapless Creep, who can't do
anything right but never stops trying. Every
character is exact, natural, perfectly 1962. At the
end one is left with the strange sense that it
might all have been filmed eleven years ago, and
then kept in a time capsule until the time was
ripe.
American Graffiti is essentially episodic,
developing in bits and flashes. It is partially held
together by that most disgusting of all discjockeys, Wolfman Jack, with an endless parade
of Top-40 hits and mindless patter, for every car
radio is tuned to his station, and almost all the
action takes place in and between automobiles.
The music is fun, a bit nostalgic, and it paces the
picture nicely. But as one character announces,
in all seriousness, "rock and roll has been goin'
down hill ever since Buddy Holly died": the
people in this film know that things are
changing. What they don't know is that this time
things are not going to be all right.
A note of interest: Frannis Ford Coppola, who
(as everyone who reads Time magazine knows)
didn't have a penny before he directed The
Godfather, now has collected enough pennies to
be listed as the producer of American Graffiti.
Gordon Montador
Books
Insipid Borges
Borges on Writing, ed by Norman Thomas di
Giovanni, Daniel Halpern, and Frank Mac-
Shane, E. P. Dutton and Co., New York, 1973,
paper $3.50.
The trouble with any book about Jorge Luis
Borges, Argentina's most famous writer, is that
it somehow misses the point. To separate
Borges' ideas from his work is to reduce him to a
conservative, not too startling author whose
ideas about the human condition are quite
mundane. Yet, when you actually read Borges,
his fiction becomes formidable, his philosophy a
cerebral game and his prose an effective expression of the fragility of the world and men.
Borges, as head of Argentina's National
Library and author of Ficciones, The Aleph and
Doctor Brodie's Report, exerts a considerable
force on Latin American letters, even those who
write in reaction to him.
The co-editors have based this book, Borges on
Writing on tape-recorded transcripts of informal
discussions between Borges, the editors and
students in the creative writing program at
Columbia University, New York. In three
seminars, they deal with prose, poetry and
translation. Borges discusses his methods, the
use of local color and irony in his prose, autobiographical details in his poetry, and the
problems of translation.
The angle the editors take in preparing this
book is Borges' background, and how it influenced his style and molded his literary
identity, especially in the later stories of Doctor
Brodie's Report. Typically, Borges claims
everything attributed to him was really written
by that other minor South American, Borges.
" In the fiction and poetry sessions, a story "The
End of the Duel", and a number of poems were
read line by line and Borges interrupted
whenever he wished to comment, or discuss
technical matters. These general conversations,
with Borges explaining how he transformed raw
material into a story, provide the bulk of the
text.
The remainder is his official translator, di
Giovanni gushing how Borges work has changed
from a baroque and obscure style "infested with
literature" to the simple and authentic observation of his own back yard, Buenos Aires and
the pampas of Argentina. And Borges adds, by
facing up to the experiences of his own life, and
seeing there was nothing to be ashamed of, he
found his true literary voice.
As an introduction to Borges, this book is
misleading. Though the book is healthy with
Borges' scepticism, at the same time, there are
disquieting elements. Borges keeps goading his
audience to object to his statements, claiming
they are nice to him only because he is an old,
blind foreigner, that any student could write
better than he, and indeed, urges them to do so.
The students are clearly humbled by the
presence of greatness. Whenever some eager
grad offers some insight into Borges' early
writing, Borges replies, "That seems a plausible
invention." He says his subjects chose him to be
their author, that he is dreaming the audience,
that he had to change his literary style because
all the young up and comers were doing his work
for him. Again and again he insists he does not
like agreement. "I like being set right." Borges
says he is a "mere South American" with "a bad
habit of writing".
Borges on Writing is an engaging book, yet
somehow incomplete. Borges' sensitivity and
sense of humor come through. But because
Borges writes about the limitations of
knowledge, this book, though worthwhile, is a
poor substitute for his written work.
Geoff Hancock
-r Tonight and
Tomorrow Night
Sonny
Terry &
Brownie
AAcGh
STARTS TUESDAY
JOHN HAMMOND
2 Shows Nightly
9 p.m. and 11 p.m.
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v 739 Beatty St.    687-4613 j
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We Trade Used Pocketbooks and Magazines
Located Near the Varsity Theatre at
4393 W. 10th Ave.       224-4144     Open 11 a.m.-8 p.m.
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MON.-THURS. tifl
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SHOWTIMES:
12:20, 2:00
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7:45 9:40
Odeon
881   GRANVILU
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JOANNE
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SHOW
7:00 9:10
Vogue
SUNDAY:    2:30    4:45
7:00 9:10
MATURE:     Occasional
coarse     language     and
»i» bKANviLLt    brutality     —     R.     w.
685-5_434      McDonald. B.C. Dir.
JESUS CHRIST
SUPERSTAR
GENERAL
SHOW TIMES:
CA8M7B6E2V4'78,h    SUNDAY MAT. 2 p.m
••   MATINEE SUN
and MON. 2 p
'EASILY THE BEST MOVIE SO FAR THIS YEAR!" — N.Y. TIMES
jfaALCAfc
A-%. ..
224-3730V       GENERAL
4375 W. 10th SHOW TIMES: 7:30 9:30
II
". . . Fritz is enough to set
Disney spinning in
his grove, but it's a funny,
brilliantly pointed and
executed entertainment!"
#£$rwcrev
fo#A/ortf/A/:
The first
RESTRICTED
Full-length cartoon feature
HiIJiIiUI
R.   W.
Very   crude   suggestive   scenes   and   dialogue.
McDonald, B.C. Dir.
    PLEASE   NOTE   SPECIAL   FRIDAY  &  SATURDAY
851   GRANVILLE     TIMES:   12:15   2:05   3:55   5:45  7:30 9:20 and 11:05
6856828 SUN.-THURS. 12:35 2:25 4:15 6:05 7:50 9:40
Page Friday, 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, October 12,  1973 Friday, October 12, 1973
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 9
After rail strike
Books finally in store
Books held up by the rail strike
are all now on the shelves in the
bookstore.
Bookstore manager Bob Smith
said Thursday the rail strike has
not affected the price of the books.
"We are pleased with the way
things have turned out. The books
from the armouries are now back
on the shelves and we have the
books held up by the strike," he
Smith said there had been some
trouble with late shipments.
"We are short 300 English texts,
but the English department has
made arrangements to use other
texts," he said. "Books which have
sold out but are still in demand will
be re-ordeired."
"Beginning today we are sending
gcess books back to the
publishers, but of course we will
check with the department heads
first to ensure that students have
obtained the books they needed,"
Smith said.
Smith denied the bookstore is
marking up prices.
SFU cou
fees for
BURNABY (CUP) — Claiming
'the continuation of tuition fees
liscriminates and belongs to the
9th century", the Simon Fraser
Jniversity students council
:xecutive has asked the provincial
government to abolish tuition fees.
"We believe tuition fees should
iox be part of an education system
if a democratic and progressive
iociety," the council executive
.aid in a motion to be presented to
he NDP cabinet and back-
>enchers.
This motion was contained in a
lumber of recommendations from
he council executive to the
'overnment in an attempt to in-
luence  the  content of  the  new
"It's not true," he said. "We sell
books at the price the publisher has
set less a 20 per cent discount.
"You'll find the same prices at
the University of Toronto
bookstore.
"Publishers charge extra for
books which have been sitting in
their storage for a year but aside
from that there are no mark-ups."
"Even with the 20 per cent
discount we are having a hard time
breaking even, and we've got to
sell paper and school supplies to
make up for our loss," Smith said.
"We'll know in March how well
we've done but at the moment I
think we are doing okay."
Smith said shoplifting was a
serious threat to the bookstore's
finances.
"They do great damage, and
we've prosecuted everyone we've
caught stealing. One person we
caught was convicted and four
more will be brought to court this
month," he said.
cJLindi
"King of
Corned Beef
DELICATESSEN   -   RESTAURANT
PHONE 738-2010
3211 W. Broadway
VANCOUVER,  B.C.
UofA students in jeopardy
EDMONTON (CUP) — Students
at the University of Alberta are to
be disciplined under a system of
double jeopardy.
Many of the offences on which
the university's discipline hearing
board may rule are also covered by
Canadian law.
A student is therefore liable to be
punished twice for the same offence.
And the recently approved
discipline, law and order report,
which sets the guidelines for the
board, does not clearly define an
"offence". For example, such
crimes as "mental indignities"
may also be included.
The report states although "any
person" may bring action against
any student whom she considers to
have committed an offence, only
students may stand accused before
the board.
Ignored are those offences
committed by faculty or administration members against
students.
Patrick Delaney, students union
academic   vice-president,   called
ncil wants free
students now
Universities Act the provincial
government has promised.
The students also requested a
reorganization of the university's
board of governors giving students
and the non-university community
more representation. They also
want a freeze on the creation of
new departments or new programs
or other restructuring until either
the new act is passed or a majority
of students in a department agree
to proposed changes.
Council officials are seeking
other B.C. universities to support
their proposals.
The government has created an
education commission headed by
John      Bremer,      a      liberal
educationalist who started the
highly successful Parkway "school
without walls" in Philadelphia. He
is asking for students' views on
changes in the antiquated
Universities Act.
the report "somewhat reactionary". He told a students
council meeting the hearing board
is nothing more than a "kangaroo
court".
Student council had previously
voted to condemn the report.
The report itself is the result of
deliberations of a committee on
discipline, law and order created in
response to student power
initiatives during the late 60s.
Max Wyman, U of A administration president, seems
anxious to obscure the issue.
In an interview, he insisted it is
not a question of "double
jeopardy" but of "double
jurisdiction".
He did not comment on what the
practical difference would be to a
student facing two trials and two
punishments for one offense.
Gary Draper, a student
representative on the committee
approving the report, said the
campus law review committee is
still studying controversial sections of the report. Many of the
recommendations of the report
would not represent a major
departure from the present
university regulations, he claimed.
'■*X,*»^i
Bursary &
Scholarship
Refund Cheques
-      NOW AVAILABLE FOR PICKUP
3rd Floor New Admin. Bldg.
Benefit concert held
A jazz benefit concert will be held 7:30 p.m. on Sunday in the New
School on Fifteenth and Commercial.
The proceeds will go to the New School, a counter-culture effort.
The band consists of several well-known musicians, including
Oliver Gannon on guitar, P.J. Perry on sax, Tony Nickels on bass and
George Ursan on drums.
Admission is a donation of $1 or more. So if the milk of human
kindness is affecting you, or you just want to hear some good music, you
know where to go.
Sielits
H50   E.  Hastings
! 35-5831
Now Through Sat-   STARTS   SUNDAY
SI
VCtwliU
...the uncommon movie.  :
JULIE CHRISTIE GEORGE C SCOTT
LO!
GEORGt SEGAL- SANDY DENNIS
M
MIDNIGHT
fri; sat; sun.
SijiJI'  $.§§!
MARLON!
BRANDO  \
festival   film 3 \
[VIVA
ZAPATA!    !
'Abbott ,& Costellol r        ; ~
Tneet    Dr. iieckyll j Saturday   and
and    Mr Hyde"!   Sunday,  2 pm.
PANAVISION* TECHNICOLOR*
BP1; —-
r*%
*
W&SKKKWKIWWM
The many styles of our diamond
rings are constantly changing. Here
are but a few of the modern designs
we sell. You could come in and see
many more — try it!
Budget Terms or Chargex
LIMITED
Granville at Pender Since 1904
REGISTERED JEWELLER _C
AMERICAN GEM SOCIETY Poge  10
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday,  October 12,  197^
Hot flashes
Chili prof est
meeting held
A meeting will be held Friday
night to protest the recent
takeover of Chile's government by
a military junta.
The meeting, co-sponsored by
the Chilean Solidarity Committee
and the NDP area council will
take place in the YMCA
auditorium, 955 Burarrd (at
Nelson) at 8:00 p.m. and is open
to the public.
Resolutions before the meeting
will include a condemnation of
American involvement in the coup
through their support of the
present fascist government and a
statement of support for all forms
of   resistance.
Copies of the resolutions
passed will be sent to various
resistance groups around the
world including the widow of the
former Marxist president of Chile
who is now in Mexico.
The main speaker will be
Heather Dashner, a translator in
Allende's government. Dashner
was a member of the Chilean
Socialist party and was in Chile at
the time of the coup.
Other speakers include Brian
Campbell, NDP area council
president; George Johnston B.C.
Federation of Labor president,
and Harold Steeves, NDP member
of the provincial legislature for
Richmond.
Cfiifi group
A group called Canadians for
Democracy in Chile has been
organized to oppose the fascist
junta in Chile.
The group will spread
information about the situation in
Chile, organize support in Canada
for Chileans opposing the junta
and send medical financial and
material    support    to    Chileans
"■>"&&*' <t -*%;* m'V/ -
fighting against the fascists.
Persons wishing to join the
CDC are asked to phone Phil
Rankin at 872-2128 or Juan
Nebot at 435-4812.
Nutrition
A conference on nutrition will
beheld Jan. 21-25 in SUB.
The Alma Mater Society
approved the proposed plan
Wednesday evening during the
weekly council meeting
Discussion will focus on the
nutritional needs of students,
vegetarianism, fasting, diets, the
high cost of living and related
issues.
A salaried person is needed to
aide in co-ordinating the
conference from now until Jan.
26. Volunteers are also required
to work at the conference.
Those interested in
contributing time or ideas contact
Les Rose at 228-3961, 228-4924
or in SUB 254.
Tween classes
TODAY
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
Meeting, noon, IH lounge.
GAY PEOPLE OF UBC
General    meeting   for   all    campus
gays, noon, SUB 105B.
WAG
General     meeting,    Ubyssey    staff
invited, noon, SUB 205.
CROSSROADS
Information   meeting   for   overseas
summer trips, noon, SUB 215.
GERMAN CLUB
German practice session, 7:30 p.m.,
SUB 215.
GAY PEOPLE OF UBC
Dance,  social   refreshments  will   be
provided,   7:30   p.m.,   Arts   1   blue
room.
EAST ASIA SOCIETY
Information       meeting,       noon,
Buchanan 204.
EUS
Bums    Ball,    $2.50    a    couple    for
Sparkling    Apple,    8    p.m.,    SUB
ballroom.
CAMPUS CRUSADE FOR CHRIST
Life meeting,  7 p.m., Gage towers
lounge.
ANTHROSOC
Professor J.J. Hester will speak on
the  Namu,  B.C.,  work, 1:30 p.m.,
Buchanan 322.
SATURDAY
SHITORYU KARATE
Practice, 10:30 a.m., SUB ballroom.
SUNDAY
CVC
Rice Bowl championship, 12:30
p.m., Eric Hamber secondary,
Thirty-third at Oak.
SAILING CLUB
Laser practise races, FJ fun racing in
afternoon, Kitsilano yacht club.
MONDAY
WEIGHTLIFTING TEAM
Olympic    training,    7    p.m.,   John
Owen 101.
NDP CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 105B.
TUESDAY
CHARISMATIC FELLOWSHIP
Weekly    prayer    and    share    time,
noon, Lutheran centre green room.
GERMAN CLUB
General meeting and film, noon, IH
402.
PRE-MED SOC
Medical    dean    David    Bates    will
speak, noon, IRC 1.
SUS
Dr.   E.N.   Vogt   will   speak,   noon,
Hennings 200.
WEDNESDAY
Occupation of Block 80, 6:30 p.m.,
at   the   old   Dawson   school   across
from St. Paul's hospital.
COPE
Rally  on  the  ward   plebiscite and
by-election, noon, outside SUB.
PRE-SOCIAL WORK
Social   work   students,   noon,   SUB
113.
at
4560 W 10th.
919 Robson St.
1032 W Hastings
670 Seymour
FOR THE ABSOLUTE LATEST
IN EYEWEAR
LOOK TO.. .
Prescription Optical
STUDENT DISCOUNTS
We have an office near you!
EYEWEAR FASHIONS WITH A FLAIR
duthie
BOOKS
burhe's
world wide travel
HOME FOR XMAS?
To Avoid Disappointment Book Early
We have seat allocations with PWA for
Kamloops, Kelowna, Cranbrook, and
Penticton.
CALL A'ND SEE US FOR DATES AND TIMES!
We're in the Village
5700 University Blvd. 224-4391
AGENTS FOR ALL MAJOR AIRLINES
burke's
world wide travel
BOWvWOW
IS FOR VOLKSWAGENS.
THE
SPECIALITY
STORE FOR
VOLKSWAGENS.'
WHERE
YOU DO
SAVE $$!
WE'RE THE CATS
588-6011
9553-120 ST. DELTA
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: Campus - 3 lines, 1 day $1.00; additional lines, 25c;
Commercial - 3 lines, 1 day $1.50; additional lines 35c;
additional days $1.25 & 30c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m., the day before publication.
Publications Office, Room 241 S.U.B., UBC, Van. 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost & Found 13
BLACK WALLET LOST NEAR
library. Personal papers desperately needed. Reward. Please
phone  Norma,. 988-7432.
Rides & Car Pools
14
RIDE NEEDED DAILY FROM
New Westminster to UBC. Mostly 9:30 classes. Will pay. Phone
Glen, 522-6216.
Special Notices
15
WHERE ELSE ?
■JSp          Agfa, llford, Kodak,
TjjlSjL   Gaf, Colortone, Uni-
MW  color, Luminos and
■«   Dalco.
"Where «ls« In town will yon
find inch a full  selection of
B at W pap*r ?
t()<> Hens, ano gutter
Cameras
3010   W.   Broadway            736-7833
EMPLOYMENT
Typing
40
EFFICIENT, ELECTRIC TYPING,
my home. Essays, Thesis, etc.
Neat accurate work. .Reasonable
rates.   Phone  263-5317. *
Help Wanted
51
PTTBUC SERVICES
AUDITING.   AND
ACCOUNTING.   VACANCIES
with National Revenue Taxation
and Office of the Auditor General. Information at your Student Placement Centre. Competition 74-4400. This competition
is open to men and women.
SALES CLERK FOR DELECA-
tessen 2 or 3 eves, per week.
Apply    848,    Granville.    Van.     2,
681-8853.
 jv
SUTHERLAND ANTIQUES
Fraser St.  at  51st   —   325-5895
Gifts  of quality  from  the past.
Clocks,   Furniture,   Paintings   &
many small things.
CHARGEX OR LAYAWAY
Browsers  Welcome
RESEARCH — THOUSANDS OF
topics. $2.75 per page. Send $1.00
for your up-to-date, 160-page,
mail-order catalog. Research Assistance, Inc., 11941 Wilshire
Blvd., Suite 2, Los Angeles,
Calif.,   90025.    (213)   477-8474.
DISCOUNT STEREO EXAMPLE:
AM-FM Stereo receiver. 2 speakers, turntable, base, cover and
cartridge, list $200. Your cost
$125. 2-year parts guarantee.
Call  825-0366  for  savings.	
AUDITION FOR MUSSOC'S PRO-
duction of ' "No, No. Nanette",
October 13th, 1:30 to 5:30 p.m.
in SUB Auditorium and October
14th,   7-11   p.m.   in   the  Ballroom.
THEI AIRMAIL HAS ART DECO,
Jewellery and Kitsch. 3715 Main
St.,   at   21st,   Phone   S79-7236.
PUBLIC  SERVICE VACANCIES
in Pure, Applied and Health
Sciences. Deadline for submitting UCPA application form
October 17, 1973. Further information available at your Student
Placement Centre. This competition is open to men and women
INSTRUCTION & SCHOOLS
Music Instruction
PIANO LESSONS BY GRADUATE
of Juilliard School of Music. All
grade   levels   welcome.    731-0601.
Special Classes
82
JUDO INSTRUCTOR, REQUIRED
two evenings per week. Prefer
Japanese or, Korean - trained.
Please state qualification. Submit applications to Rm. 241J,
S.U.B.
Tutoring
64
Special Events
ISA
FREE! — FRIENDLY DOG.
Spaniel cross, 1% years old
needs home because owners moving. Phone 327-9300 or corne and
see me at  810 W.   63rd Ave.
AUTOMOTIVE
Autos For Sale
21
•68 MINI, 1071 c.c. COOPER'S EN-
gine recently thoroughly overhauled. Phone 263-5392. $1100 or
near   offer.
Speakeasy SUB Anytime!*
228-4557 - 12:30-2:30
TUTORIAL
CENTRE
For Students and Tutors
Register Nowl 12:30-2:30
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
SWEDISH ARMY SKI COAT.
Sheepskin lined, canvas back,
$80.   736-0844.
Rooms     81
ROOM AVAIL. FOR 1 STUDE*Pi\
Bedroom, kit. orivileges. $45/mo.
Dunbar area.  733-2819 eves. Friday, October  12,  1973
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 11
Birds reach
halfway
By RICK LYMER
The UBC Thunderbird football team has reached their halfway mark
this season.
Their record stands at 0-4. They've lost to every team in their
conference. Their starting quarterback is sidelined with an injury.
Their fans, never numerous since the move to the new stadium, are
dwindling. Even the officials seem to have given up on them.
This is how it stands.
However, no one should abandon them without several things being
said. First, the Saskatchewan Huskies now breezing through undefeated
had exactly the same record last year at this time.
Secondly, Jim Tarves, the Thunderbirds starting quarterback is
expected to be ready for action when the Birds play Calgary Oct. 20.
Thirdly, while fan support isn't what it might be, this could be
caused by the lack of winning football. How quickly they remember is
the usual call when a loser turns into a winner. This is up to the football
team.
Fourthly, the poor officiating is bound to balance out. The breaks
always have a way of going both ways. If the Birds have had terrible
luck or officiating then expect it to even out over the latter part of the
season.
As the bye team in the Western Inter-Collegiate Football league,
this Sunday, the Thunderbirds travel to Seattle for an exhibition game
against the Seattle Cavaliers. The Cavaliers are a semi-pro club who
play in the Pacific Northwest football league.
Women winning
Will the UBC women's field
hockey team maintain their six
year winning streak?
They are playing in the Canada
*   West       University       Athletic
Rugby team
triumphs
Fresh from their tour of Britain,
the UBC Thunderbird rugby team
took to a cold wet field Wednesday
-   night in an exhibition game against
^  the Red Lions.
UBC, fielding a combined first
and second division side, showed
what depth they have by overcoming the Lions 20-3.
After a slow first half which saw
the home side consistently close to
the opposing goal line, Frank
Carson went over on a good scrum
rush. Dave Whyte converted to
give the Birds the lead at half time,
6-0.
■■ The Red Lions retaliated early in
the second half with a penalty goal
to close the gap to 6-3. Then Whyte,
whose father was captain of the
Birds in the mid-50's, showed what
extraordinary potential he has as
he capped a brilliant run with a try
beneath the uprights. He kicked
the conversion himself, and UBC
led 12-3.
It was the Thunderbirds game
from  men on.  Colin  Grady  and
%f Colin Gibson scored tries to finish
off the scoring.
Attention
Ears & Eyes
* STEREO
COMPONENTS
* COLOR TV's
* CAR STEREOS
* RADIOS
* FULL LINE OF
ACCESSORIES
Association tournament held at the
University of Victoria fields. In a
round robin tourney they will play
six games over three days.
Seven of the 11 players from last
year have either graduated or
dropped out of competition.
Consequently, this year's team will
be younger and less experienced
than the teams in the past. Three
players, however, were members
of the Canada summer games
team. These are Shelly Winter,
Janice McClintock, and Teresa
Parker.
Under the coaching of Barbara
Schroot, the UBC team has come
along well. Marilyn Russell,
women's athletic director, says she
expects the team to win the
competition for the seventh
straight year. Team manager this
year is Brenda Lawson.
Competition this year will come
from the University of Alberta, the
University of Calgary, and the
University of Victoria.
Games are today at 11:30 a.m.
and 4 p.m. and Saturday and
Sunday 10 a.m. and 2 p.m.
IS IT COMING or going? That's the question 'Bird quarterback Bob Spindor asked himself at a recent
football practice session. According to Ubyssey football writer Rick Lymer the team is really shaping up and
with a little fan support may be able to pull off a win or two yet this year. Nothing's impossible ...
Soccer team on U.S. tour
For those not paying attention to
the local sports section, the
Thunderbird soccer team is on a
tour of American colleges.
Saturday, the Birds beat Metro
State College 5-0. On Monday, they
Triviatrivia
1) In a basketball game between Georgetown and Homer, Illionis,
played in 1930, only one point was scored.
2) In a Pennsylvania high school football game Southmont defeated
Dale 33-27 without making a first down.
3) D. McFayden struck out 32 batters in one game and lost.
beat Denver University 4-0,
Wednesday, UBC defeated
Colorado State 9-0.
In the game against Colorado.
Danny Lomas scored a hat trick in
the first half of play. Al Chell
complemented this first half effort
by scoring twice, the first coming
on a penalty kick.
In the second half, Chell scored
again, with Phil Sanford, Daryl
Samson and Stan Bourne each
getting a single. There were no
replies from the opposition.
The UBC tour continues until the
Oct. 15. They played California
State yesterday, and will play San
Jose State today. They end their
trip with a game against the U.S.
Naval College in Monterey,
California.
Last year on the southern swing,
the Birds won five, tied one and lost
one.
Their present record for this
season is 5-1-2, with wins over the
Greek Olympics and the
Hungarians as well as the tour
successes.
Exclusive Leak &
Wharfdale Dealer
FACULTY & STUDENT
DISCOUNTS
RHODES
ELECTRONICS
2665 W. Broadway
733-5914
Rudy & Peters Motors Ltd,
VOLKSWAGEN SPECIALISTS
Quality Workmanship
Competitive Prices
Genuine Volkswagen Parts Only
All Work Guaranteed
Complete Body Repairs and Painting
225 E. 2nd Ave.
879-0491
HILLEL HILLEL HILL HILLEL HILLELHILLEL HILLEL
-I T-
III -»-
Coming Oct. 11-14 in SUB Aud.
Rod Steiger & James Coburn
FISTFUL OF
DYNAMITE
Sat. 7:00
50'        & 9:30
Fri. 7:00
& 9:30 Sun. 7:00
Thurs. 7:00
Ol
-J
I
-J
LU
FREE LUNCH
Hillel House
12:30 p.m. x
_i Tues., Oct. 16
Campus community inyited
m
r-
X
r*
r-
m
m
T3TTIH 13TllH13TTIHT3niH 13TTIH 13Tl!Hi13*ni
MIDNIGHT SHOWING FRI. & SAT. ONLY
BONNIE
& CLYDE
SUB Aud. 75'
ANOTHER SUB FILM SOC PRESENTATION Page   12
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, October 12,  1973
Student's stay granted
By DRU SPENCER
After spending two-and-a-half
years hassling with Canadian
immigration officials a South
Vietnamese student now at UBC
has been allowed to stay in
Canada.
Thien Ke Chu came to Canada
nine years ago on a student visa on
the Colombo program, which is
sponsored by groups such as
Canadian University Students
Overseas, Care and Hope.
For four years he studied
electrical engineering at a Montreal college where he learned to
speak fluent French before his
student visa expired in 1968.
Chu said he then tried to contact
the South Vietnamese government
and the director of the Columbo
plan to try and renew his visa.
He hasn't heard from them
since.
Chu explained that in '68 the Vietnam war was in one of its worst
stages of bombing and killing and
this probably accounted for their
ignoring him.
He has no idea why the Colombo
plan didn't answer any of his
requests.
Even though his visa papers had
expired Chu applied for and
received a $2,500 UBC fellowship
grant and came to Vancouver
unable to speak English.
Chu spent six weeks in the
Buchanan language laboratory
learning English.
He received his masters degree
in applied science here in 1970.
Chu has been involved in many
campus activities such as Alliance
Francais, dance club and
executive of the photo society.
He was studying for his doctorate but when called to court he
said the constant worry of being
sent back to South Vietnam hindered his studies.
However he has now resumed his
studies.
Under the Colombo plan the
students trained are sent back to
their countries to help their own
people.
Chu said he couldn't go back
because there wouldn't be a job
available suitable for his
education.
"I would have wasted nine years
if I went back now," he said.
"I could suffer some punishment
if I returned home now, because I
didn't receive official permission
from my government to stay. It is
difficult to say what kind of punishment I would get whether it would
be a jail term or drafted into the
army."
When Chu left South Vietnam
he was 18-years-old and had his
draft number. The draft ends at 30
and so Chu, now 27, is still eligible.
Chu said: "The conditions in
South Vietnam are bad.  Honest
people cannot support themselves
unless they have two jobs."
He would like to bring his family
to Canada but cannot afford it.
Now applying for landed immigrant status in Canada, Chu
says he would like to go back to
South Vietnam but only if his
training in Canada could be put to
practical use.
However, he says he owes
Canadians a debt for letting him
stay nine years.
"Once I become a Canadian, I
belong," he said.
Brock collection emerges
after three-year storage
ByGARYCOULL
The mysterious $40,000 Brock
Hall art collection will once again
show its face in the SUB art gallery
after a three year stint in storage.
Ken de Rooy, chairman of the
Alma Mater Society art gallery
program committee, said Thursday he hopes to put the valuable
all-Canadian art collection on
display as soon as the 1973-74 AMS
budget is finalized.
He said his committee's
proposed $500 grant will go toward
hiring adequate supervision in an
effort to avoid vandalism which
has plagued previous art showings.
"The reason the collection hasn't
been displayed in the past few
years is rip-offs, theft and vandalism. People were throwing
apple cores in the gallery and the
paintings were just generally
abused," de Rooy said.
Paintings among the student-
owned collection, started by the
AMS in 1955, include several pieces
of the world-famous Group of
Seven landscapes. The set was
painted by seven Canadian artists
who specialized in landscapes of
Canada's north.
TheUrock collection has Group
of Seven paintings by Lome Harris
and A.Y. Jackson.
The entire collection is currently
stored in a vault adjacent to the
SUB art gallery.
De Rooy said the storage
facilities are inadequate with
paintings lying on top of each
other.
"Three years of neglect have
caused the condition of the paintings to go downhill and many of
them are in very poor shape."
A SUB art gallery committee has
been formed to take care of the
collection   and    administer    a
Med students ask refund
ST. JOHN'S, NFLD. (CUP) — After voting to
withdraw from the university's students' union,
Memorial University medical students now face a
legal battle in their attempt to have their student fees
channeled to the medical students association.
In a referendum Oct. 3, the medical students
voted 87 per cent in favor of withdrawing from the
students' union. They are now trying to have medical
students' $8 per semester students' union fees given
to their own organization.
The medical students feel they could handle their
finances better than the students' union and many are
dissatisfied with their representation on the students'
council.
As well, since most of them already have one
degree, many medical students feel that they are not
undergraduates and aren't, therefore, a part of the
undergraduate students' union. Nevertheless, they
are officially classed as undergraduates.
Efforts to transfer their fees may fail.
Last March, a campus-wide referendum
narrowly approved the compulsory payment of $8 per
student per semester to the students' union by all
undergraduate students. The university's board of
regents agreed to follow the direction of this
referendum.
It is this same administrative body that the
medical students will approach to approve the
transfer of their fees.
If the regents agree to the medical students'
request, the students' union may contest the decision
in court. The students' union officials fear that if the
medical students are allowed to leave the union other
faculties may follow suit and thus weaken the union.
proposed $1,000 AMS grant to
restore and maintain the Brock
collection.
Each year since 1955, AMS
council has given the committee in
charge of the collection $1,500 to
add pieces to the collection.
De Rooy said much of the
restoration grant will be used to
build better storage facilities in the
vault to provide separate shelves
for each painting.
"In the last several years the
$1,500 grant to add to the collection
has been used to buy art which is
not suitable to be shown with the
Brock paintings," he said.
De Rooy said there is a
possibility the Brock collection will
be shown around Vancouver after
the SUB exhibit. He said the
publicity attracted to the collection
could increase off-campus
donations to buy more paintings.
The criterion for what is shown
in the SUB gallery this year will be
high quality art, de Rooy said.
"Theoretically we want to put in
good student art but in the past bad
student art has appeared there. If
it's a choice between good
professional art and bad student
art, I'd like the professional."
The Brock collection is composed of contemporary Canadian
^ art which is purchased by the SUB
art committee on the basis of
quality and price. Selection is
made on a national scale.
Students were originally levied a
20 cent per capita tax in 1955 to
support the collection however in
1962 council opted for a yearly
$1,500 grant to pay for added
paintings.
Macleans magazine donated
several paintings to the collection
,  in 1958.
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