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The Summer Ubyssey Aug 2, 1990

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Array $H!9» «R»_J J_vJ_LJLV__L ______ JUL*
THEUBYSSEY
The Ubyssey
Welcomes
Celebration 90
„ Founded in 1918
Vancouver, B.C., August 2.  1990
Vol 9, No 5
ACT-UP protests gov't inaction
by Paul Dayson
Members ofthe newly formed
Vancouver chapter of ACT-UP
"died" Wednesday evening to protest government policies regarding AIDS.
Under a banner which read
"AIDS deaths every hour, blood on
the hands of those in power," approximately 75 protestors from
the week and a half old organization ACT-UP, or AIDS Coalition
To Unleash Power, gathered at
Robson Square to demonstrate
against government policies regarding the AIDS virus.
In New York and San Francisco, ACT-UP has made a reputation for itself as a militant AIDS
activist organization. "Silence =
Death" is the slogan they have
made popular.
After a number of speeches,
protestors staged a die-in. The
activists lay sprawled across the
Vancouver Art Gallery steps and
sidewalk with mock tombstones
behind them. One by one the 'bodies' rose and told of their deaths by
AIDS.
"People affected with the HIV
virus are fed up, frustrated and
angry with the inaction ofthe federal and provincial governments,"
said Kevin Robb of ACT-UP.
"British Columbia is the only
province in Canada that bills
those infected with the HIV virus
for their treatments," one of the
risen victims told the crowd.
The B.C. government pays for
only 20 percent of costs such as
AZT drug treatment. "Each pill
costs a dollar", said an AIDS patient, "I take five a day." The costs
of AZT and another drug he takes,
which costs $1.50 per pill, reach
$700 per month.
Robb said that ACT-UP is
making a number of demands on
federal and provincial governments: the enactment of non-discriminatory legislation, funding
improvements and increased accurate public education.
ACT-UP is also calling for the
inclusion of sexual orientation in
the Human Rights Act to protect
people from discrimination based
on their sexual preference and the
repeal of Bill 30, the Quarantine
Act, which allows the incarceration of any individual who is considered to be willfully or knowingly spreading the AIDS virus.
ACT-UP members showed
the many sides ofthe AIDS issue
by portraying the different groups
who die of AIDS.
One portraying a heterosex-
De-inking plant
plans questioned
by Mark Nielsen
Greenpeace appears to be
alone among environmental
groups in its stance on the new
newsprint de-inking plant slated
for construction in Coquitlam.
While a coalition of ten environmental groups opposes the
project outright, Greenpeace
spokesperson Brian Killeen said
Wednesday the problems they are
concerned with may be ironed out
by the time the plant is opened.
"One of our leading reasons
for this being built is the proposed
plant won't be built for one and a
half to two years," he said.
By that time, the effluent the
plant will churn out may not be as
dangerous as the coalition members fear, because less toxic inks
are starting to come onto the
market Killeen said.
"Both major newspapers (the
Sun and the Province) have
switched away from oil based to 60
per cent soya based ink," he said.
"What was there six months ago is
not there now, and by the time the
plant is built, the whole question
of toxic sludge might not have to be
dealt with."
Killeen also hopes that Stuart
Belkin, who owns the company
who will build the plant—
Newstech Recycling Inc. of Vancouver — will bring pressure on
other newspapers to use less toxic
inks. The plant will have the capacity to de-ink newsprint from
B.C., Alberta and part of Saskatchewan.
However, Stuart Hertzog, a
spokesperson for the environmental  coalition,  said that the
plant is not necessary because
acceptable recycled paper does not
require de-inking.
"Paper that isn't de-inked will
be a bit greyer, but who minds?" he
said. "The problem is that the
industry has always sold whiteness, paper included."
Greenpeace and the coalition
are united, however, on demands
for more public hearings before
the plant is built.
Newstech has been given tentative permission to proceed with
construction from the provincial
government under the major project review process.(MPRP) providing it meets federal fisheries effluent guidelines.
The MPRP was the result of a
recent order-in-council meant to
speed up the environmental review process by combining the
authority of various government
bodies.
"It allows them to make an
end run around the process,"
Hertzog said.
Instead, the plant should run
the full gambit of public hearings
and environmental review before
it is given the go-ahead, Hertzog
said.
Hertzog also said that
Newstech has been given permission to dump the sludge in a
landfill within the Greater Vancouver regional district. However,
he said it will likely be taken to
Cache Creek because the fill-site is
half-owned by Belkin.
"It's a very cozy arrangement," he said.
Depending on government
reaction, Hertzog said court action
is being considered.
ual woman infected by a man said,
"It is estimated that 3 million
women will die of AIDS this year.
AIDS is not a gay disease." ACT-
UP is calling for recognition ofthe
special needs of women with the
HIV virus.
Another representing a prisoner demanded free condoms and
education for prisoners in Cana
dian jails.
"My death could have been
prevented", said an activist speaking for intravenous drug users
who have contracted AIDS.
%*»uf«_____£-r-'    _k3_' '
.MBSPSP*-
ACT-UP holds "die-in" at Robson Square
REBECCA BISHOP PHOTO
Christian group protests gay games
by Martin Chester
Celebration 90, also known as
the Gay Games, will promote the
gay and lesbian lifestyle, the
Watchmen of the Nation say.
The Watchmen, a privately
funded group of christian men
which organized to protest Celebration 90, were responsible for an
ad run in both The Vancouver Sun
and The Province in early November, 1989 which called for the
Games to be stopped.
Celebration 90, the third Gay
Games, will be held in and around
Vancouver from August 4-11.
"Because these games will
bring God's judgement upon us all
in this city," the ad read, *Sve therefore forbid them in the name and
authority of Jesus Christ. We believe it will not take place."
Robert Birch, spokesman and
founder of the Watchmen, said,
"(the) danger is they seek to make
acceptable the gay and lesbian lifestyle."
Birch, a Burnaby pastor, said
the games posed "moral and physical dangers" to the people of
Vancouver.
"AIDS can be traced to
homosexual relationships," he sai d,
and therefore the games are a
health threat to the residents of
Vancouver.
Sarah Temple, the director of
communications for Celebration 90,
said that the Vancouver health
department stated that the AIDS
concern was completely unfounded.
"We are perfectly aware that
they have a legal right to carry on
any protest they want," Temple
said.
"We are not denying their right
to voice their opinions," she said.
"Police are involved and they are
goingto uphold the law ofthe land."
"The event is an inclusive
event," she said, "and we welcome
anyone of any background." She
said the intention ofthe games and
the cultural celebration was to show
the public another face of the gay
community.
Birch said that the Watchmen
do not intend to protest the event
because it is not how they operate.
The Watchmen's ads stated
the Watchmen believed the games
would be stopped. Birch however
said, "I am not God so I don't know
the future."
Temple said that the Games
have not run into problems so far.
Registration of athletes was double
what they had expected.
"This will be the biggest sporting event anywhere this year," she
said. Classifieds 228-3977
RATES: AMS Card Holders - 3 lines, $3.00, additional lines 60 cents,
commercial -3 lines, $5.00, additional lines 75 cents. (10% Discount on
25 issues or more) Classified ads payable in advance. Deadline 4.O0
p.m,. two days before publication. Room 266, SUB, UBC, Van^ B.C. V6T
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60 wpm very accurate, ex. Bpell/grammar
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RENT TOP QUALITY
Camping Gear, Mountain Bikes, Tents,
Kayaks (doubles and singles), etc. Lowest
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Located in Dispensary
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SETTLE IN STYLE
Specializingin unpacking & organizingyour
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VOLUNTEERS RECEIVE $100.00
For more information please call:
Blair Main 264-9876 (eves)
Dr. Peter Jones 228-6253
Division of Human Nutrition, U.B.C.
HEREDITARY
CHOLESTEROL STUDY
A 12 week study of one ofthe genetic factors
influencing cholesterol metabolism requires
male volunteers. (Ages 18 - 45)
85 - TYPING
ON - CAMPUS
WORD PROCESSING
• professional quality
• fast turnaround
• laser printing
• reasonable rates
AMS Office Services
Room 60, Student Union Building
228-5640
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST, 30 years exp.,
word processing/typing. Student rates.
Dorothy Martinson, 228-8346.
TYPING / WORD PROCESSING.
Resumes, student papers, laser printer. Call
Debbie, eves 266-8716, days 682-2366
TYPING - EDITING - PROOFING, 24
hour service, Tapes-cassettes transcribed
Located beside campus 224-2310
TYPING QUICK. Right by UBC.
All kinds, editing, $1.50 pg. dspc.
call Rob at 228-8989 anytime
QUALITY WORD PROCESSING laser
printers, student rates. Phone Agnes 734-
3928 or Lynda 736-5010.
BIND YOUR THESIS
Library quality hard cover books
$15 plus gold stamping,
anything in soft covers $1.99 + up
CaU 683-2463 today
WORD-PROCESSING
2.50/page 224-5242 Computersmiths
3726 W. Broadway (at Alma St.)
ON CAMPUS WORD PROCESSING
Need the professional touch? ... have it
done for you - you can even book ahead.
$27/hr., 6-8 double spaced pages of normal text per hour, laser printer. SUB
lower level, across from Tortellini's Restaurant; 228-5640
VOLUNTEERS REQUIRED
Genital Herpes treatment study. Volunteers
with recurrent genital herpes are required for
the testing of a potential new treatment(not a cure).
The study involves admission to the hospital for
5-6 days for the intravenous infusion of this new
agent or a placebo containing no active ingredient.
Treatment must be initiated within 12 hours ofthe
appearance of a new lesion. Volunteers must be 18
years of age or older, not pregnant, and off al!
antiviral preparations for 7 days prior to enrol Iment.
An honorarium will be provided to cover expenses.
If you are interested in finding out more about
participating in this study, please call for details
660-6704 before your next recurrence.
TALK LOVE
TALK LIFE
The Lb-yssey
SUMMER SCENE
Volume 19, No. 5
Summer Session
Association
August 2 - August 10.1990
Hello and welcome to Summer Session '90
The Summer Session Association is the student organization of Summer Session; if you
have any problems, concerns or suggestions, please drop by our office - SUB 216E. We
are there Monday - Friday, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Phone 228-3980.
SUMMER SOUNDS
Free, noon-hour concerts. Bring your lunch
and a friend. At SUB Plaza.
Thursday. August 2 Gary Keenan Quartet
(SUB)
Thursddy, August 2 Trombones To Go
(Clock Tower)
Friday, August 3 Fourtissimo
Tuesday, August 7 Under The Moss (SUB)
Tuesday, August 7 ....Chinese Music Ensemble
(Clock Tower)
Wednesday, August 8 ..Penguin String Quartet
Thursday, August 9 Soul Survivors (SUB)
Thursday, August 9 Hollyburn Ramblers
(Clock Tower)
Friday, August 10 Arrows To Freedom
MUSIC FOR SUMMER EVENINGS
Free, Music Building Recital Hall, 8:00 p.m.
Thursday, August 2-   Nicole Lee, piano. Music
of Scarlotti, Brahms,
Mozart, Schumann,
Faure and Liszt
Tuesday, August 7
Thursday, August 9-
Tuesday, August 14-
Purcell String Quartet
Music of Haydn, Purcell
and Sibelius
"Saxarama" performs
music of Loelliet,
Chatman, Rachmaninoff
and Ellington
Pacific Militia Area
Summer Concert Band
presents an exciting
evening of band music
ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING
The 1990 Annual General Meeting of the
Summer Session Association will be held
Wednesday, August 8,12:30 p.m. in Room
216E, SUB. All members are invited to attend.
2/THE SUMMER UBYSSEY
August 2,1990 NEWS
Late night escorts given go ahead
by Dale Fallon
Beginning this fall, volunteer
escorts will finally be available for
students on campus late at night,
through a program initiated by
AMS council.
Last night student council
approved in principle a motion for
a program which will provide accompaniment "from anywhere on
campus to the bus stop, parking
lots or residence".
AMS director of administration Roma Gopaul-Singh, who
proposed the program, said that if
all goes well it will be in place by
September.
"It's really easy to prevent an
assault, but once it's happened,
the damage is done," she said.
She has suggested that four
volunteer teams of two people each
be on duty seven nights a week,
between 7:30 pm and 1:30 am.
The proposed budget calls for
expenditures of about $21,000 for
the 1990-91 year. The AMS will be
asked to subsidize the program for
as much as $13,500 if the university administration declines making a contribution.
In a related motion, council
approved an expenditure of $2600
within the budget for 5000 key
chains to publicize the program.
These will be distributed in a yet
undecided manner, and will have
the escort dispatching office's
phone number printed on them for
easy reference.
Gopaul-Singh has been in
contact with several other Canadian universities with similar
programs already in operation.
Squatters and police negotiate on Frances Street.
MYK GORDON PHOTO
AMS Council Briefs
GODDESS STATUE APPROVED
Students' Council unanimously approved of raising a Goddess of Democracy statue on Student Union Building grounds.
Speaking prior to the council
vote, Patrick Chen vice-chair of
the Vancouver Society in Support
of Democratic Movement
(VSSDM) said the deaths of student protestors in Beijing in June
1989 "must not be in vain".
His group has been raising
funds for the statue and intends to
pay the entire $25,000 cost of the
project.
Council was asked only to
approve the proposed site, which
is just south ofthe SUB, overlooking the outdoor seating area above
Tortellini's restaurant.
The VSSDM hopes to have the
six foot high cement and polyester
resin coated statue completed in
about two months.
I'LL HAVE FRIES WITH THAT VOTE
The Welcome Back Bar-B-Q
on September 7 will involve more
than just fun with beer. It will also
be deemed a General Meeting of
the AMS for the coming academic
year.
At last night's council meeting, a series of motions were approved which will receive final
She feels however that UBC's
program will most closely resemble that at Queen's University, which is run entirely by students.
"Students are the ones who've
come to me and said this is a problem we've got to address", she said.
Faculty and staff however will be
welcome to take advantage of the
service.
Squatters face
homelessness
Stein festival ready
This year's Stein Festival will
be held sea-side rather than on the
Mt. Currie Rodeo Grounds north
of Whistler.
Festival organizers were responding to threats by Pemberton
residents to put up blockades
which might prevent festival-
goers from reaching the Rodeo
grounds.
The Tswwassen Reserve, just
to the south ofthe causeway to the
ferry terminal, is the new location
of the Festival. There were worries that traffic to the festival
might create serious traffic problems for the ferry terminal.
Nita Brown from the festival
office said extensive parking on
fields in the reserve will be available, so causeway parking will not
be depended upon. Also shuttle
buses will transport festival goers
from more distant lots to the festival site.
Free camping will also be
available on reserve fields.
When asked if the venue
change was resulting in cancellations, Brown said that one to two
cancellations come in every week,
but the numbers are not significant.
This year's festival is attempting to be garbage free by
encouraging people to bring their
own cups, plates, and cutlery. The
organizers intend to recycle again
this year by providing bins for
separating materials and composting.
ratification on Mclnnes field next
month.
Among the several motions to
be voted on are ones which will
modify the definition of quorum
for future referenda.
To alter AMS by-laws a gathering of ten percent ofthe society's
membership is required. It is anticipated that the bash will attract
some 4000 to 5000 students.
Inmost
recent years the Annual General
Meeting has been held at the Bar-
B-Q, however last year Council
chose not to try passing any constitutional changes.
fPHOTOCOPYINGi
SERVICES
SELF-SERVES . . . 5C and 1 O*
available early morning to latenight
FULL COUNTER SERVICE
Monday - Thursday ....8:30 am - 7:00 pm
Friday 8:30 am - 5:00 pm
Saturday 12 noon - 4:00 pm
LOWER LEVEL
STUDENT UNION BUILDING
Ph: 228-4388 Fax 228-6093
by Paul Dayson
Members of what is possibly
Canada's largest squat may soon
join the ranks of the homeless af-
terthey were toldthey have just 15
days to vacate their claimed
homes.
The Frances Street squats, a
row of six houses just west of
Commercial, are home to 30 to 40
people. Ning Yee, the owner ofthe
properties, called in the police on
Wednesday to evict the residents
of five ofthe houses.
"They are our homes and we
will maintain them as our homes
as long as we can," said Penny
Singh, a Frances street resident.
Yee intended to demolish the
houses and build condominiums
on the lots, but city hall has twice
refused his development applications.
On Wednesday, Yee, who arrived with the police, said that he
intended to renovate the houses.
"The person who legally owns
these houses is asking that you
leave," said one of the Vancouver
City Police constables who declined to give his name.
The squatters have been living in the houses since the beginning of March. They said the buildings that Yee left unoccupied
should be used to house people
while he waits to demolish them.
They also said they are doing the
land owner and the community a
service by maintaining the
houses.
"We're looking after the property and its not costing him [Yee]
anything," said Bruce Gongola, a
39 year old squatter.
The squats have received the
support ofthe Downtown Eastside
Residents Association (DERA)
and the Grandview-Woodlands
Area Council, as well as various
housing and church groups.
"All the houses are paying
their [hydro and phone] bills and
have full amenities," said Gongola.
"Nobody gave you permission
to enter the buildings," said acting
police sergeant Dennis Savage,
who arrived later. "You are trespassing."
Savage said the squatters
could be charged with assault by
trespass, which is a criminal offence.
"Unless you can work out a
deal with Mr. Yee you are going to
have to leave," he said. But the
squatters felt that the prospects of
a deal with Yee are unlikely.
"We have been trying to negotiate [with Yee] since we moved
in," said Jessica Jane, one of the
squatters.
"I just want you to leave my
houses as quick as possible. Let's
make it official: 15 days," said Yee.
"I think everybody's been
appeased for the time being," said
Savage.
Some of the squatters disagreed.
"[Yee] hasn't talked to us and
he brought the uniformed police
down here, said Singh.
"I am being harassed," she
said. "I feel like my rights are
being violated."
"He's not a bad guy, personally. He's a land pimp," said Gongola.
f 114 tl
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August 3 through August 23
ALL   NEW!   18   PREMIERES!
THE XXII INTERHATIOMAL TOURHEE OF
AH I HATIOH
; 1990 Expanded Entertainment
Advance tickets available at Ridge Box Office 3131 Arbutus 738-6311
Track Records 552s.ymour-__.7976 Octopus Books iu6comm«d«i 253-0913
Black Swan Records 2936 w. 4th Ave 734-2828
Daily: 7:00, 9:30      Sat/Sun Mats: 2:00, 4:30 Admission: $6.50
August 2,1990
THE SUMMER UBYSSEY/3 THEA
FRIDAYS SUMMER
FOLK SERIES
The Nyetz
The Wingnuts
(members of Bob's Your Uncle)
Bruch Jay Paskow
from the Washington Squares
August 10 and 17, 8pm
GARDEN ROOM, GRADUATE STUDENT CENTRE
No Cover Charge
Plus, Open Stage Talent, August 3 at 8:00 pm, Garden Room,
Graduate Student Centre, Bring your flutes, bass guitars,
violins, keyboards, bagpipes, vocal chords. ALL WELCOME!
/MORSE TTCH
1237 WEST BROADWAY
Tel: 738-3886
VANCOUVER, B.C.
Fax: 738-2881
Presenting our Back to School Specials
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All systems include a two-year labour & a one-year parts warranty.
Mon.-Fri. 9:30 AM to 6:00 PM Sat. 10:00 AM to 5:00 PM
Prices may change without notice.
Death stalks dereliction row
by Andrea Lupini
THERE are certain small
places in every city which
seem weighted with special significance. Turn a corner or cross a
street and you are suddenly aware
of history; the distant past no
longer seems so distant.
THEATRE
5 Blood Alley
Tamahnous Theatre
Until August 4th
Gastown's Blood Alley is that
kind of place, a sort of cob-
blestoned way-station in time.
With its lam posts and iron-
wrought gates, it seems like a
romantic vision ofthe past, but
underneath lies a less attractive
reality; the Alley is the home of
the derelict and the dispossessed.
That duality makes it the perfect setting for 5 Blood Alley, an experimental play by Tamahnous
Theatre that explores the intersection ofthe past and the present.
The play is performed at different spots in the Alley, with the
audience moving from scene to
scene as the five-member cast
moves back and forth through time.
Blending elements of dance,
mime, song and spoken word, this
disturbing production links the
employees of a modern day law
firm with the members of a
Victorian      family. Both groups
are affected by the presence of
evil, which transcends time to
become a moving force in their
lives.
As the play opens, an Intruder (Katrina Dunn) descends
on a rope from an upper-story
window to break into a law firm.
She is surprised by the firm's
dictatorial Senior Partner (Norman Armour) and escapes as the
Associate Partner (Stephane
Kirkland) and two Articling
Students (Megan Lei tch, Joel
Wirkkunen) arrive. The domineer- '
ing Senior Partner intimidates
the Students and sexually
harasses the Associate Partner.
When an argument ensues about
an old case involving a murder        <
committed by a young girl, the
Intruder reappears, and the group '
moves back in time to assume
roles in the past.
A dining room in Victorian
times provides the setting for the
play's "other reality". The Senior    ,
Partner is now the compulsive Father, terrorizing his wife, maid,      *
and two children. In the most
powerful section of the play, the
Father's sexual abuse of his
daughter (Katrina Dunn) is
symbolically represented by the     ^
horrifying image of his hovering
face and hands, projected on the     ,
huge canvas sheet that forms her
bed. Importantly, her Mother
(Kirkland) paces in the background blindfolded, as the final
crime is committed.
A cast of compelling actors
and the haunting musical score of
Jeff Corness (who also directed
the production with Teri
Snelgrove and Chick Snipper)
combine with the setting itself to
lend 5 Blood Alley an almost
mystical quality. Norman Ar- '
mour's tightly wound portrayal of
the twisted Senior Partner/Father '
is excellent, while Dunn's innocent, then manic Daughter is one
ofthe play's most powerful
elements.
The other is the use of Blood   -
Alley itself. The occasional
seagull's cry or ambulance siren    '
only adds to the play, which
sometimes comes uncomfortably
close to the reality of Gastown
itself. At one point during the production, when the blood-spattered
Armour staggered along a wall, an
inebriated man near me told a cop .
it was time to "step in". Not
surprisingly, the rest of us just      '
watched from the audience.
DENTAL PLAN
COORDINATOR
NEEDED
^ %
-2*.
^ Altf*
The UBC Graduate Student Society requires a Dental Plan Coordinator for the period
of August 27 through September 21, 1990.
The Coordinator will report to the Society Coordinator and be responsible for all
aspects ofthe Dental Plan fee payment process, including: coordinating, scheduling
and supervising volunteers; resolving student complaints; handling cash; distributing
information; and performing other duties as necessary.
Qualifications for this position include: excellent organization and communication
skills; the ability to work to deadline; and the ability to keep calm under pressure.
This position is full-time, includes day and evening work and pays a stipend of
$2000.00.
Resumes, including two references, should be forwarded by August 7 to:
Dental Plan Hiring Committee
UBC Graduate Student Society
6371 Crescent Road
Vancouver, B.C.
V6T 1W5
4/THE SUMMER UBYSSEY
August 2,1990 *IS
Messenjah:
^   getting in the grove
MIKE COURY PHOTO
Reggae meets Roots and Ska
by Effie Pow
^C T THAT is it about the
Y Y summer? People are
happily carefree and just want to
hop and sway to some groovy
music. Last Saturday night, the
"^Commodore was filled with such
people.
MUSIC
Messenjah with
ROOTS ROUNDUP
featuring DYM E. TREE!
J ""Commodore
July 28	
You see, it's about music that
resonates the season. The kind of
music produced by the three
bands that hit the Commodore's
-«tage. It's about dancing up a
sweat and cooling off as an ice
"tube melts slowly in your mouth .
Roots Roundup, a local favourite who provided the filler of
the nights three act sandwich, really warmed up the crowd. The
band opened their set with an infectious song that repeated the
■eimple philosophy, "move your
feet, lose your seat." It just
doesn't get any easier does it?
While banging a cow
bell, Dym E. Tree (a.k.a. Dym
Strachan), the trombone player,
leapt off the stage and danced
with the audience . There was
gold glitter on his face, on his
chest and around his neck hung
three large black feathers on a
string.
You can't tell much about a
book by its cover, but what about
a person by the contents of his or
her instrument case? Besides the
brass, Dym E. Tree's trombone
case contained: a small rubber
tiger mask, books by Carlos Cas-
taneda and Ann Cameron, a tube
of oil paint, his favourite reggae
tapes, a pocket sketch book, some
more feathers...you figure it out.
Many of Roots Roundup's
songs reflect their environmental
consciousness. Their closing song
summed it all up, "We have a song
called, What We Do: to ourselves,
to our world, to our future". (Ten
percent ofthe night's proceeds
went to the Western Wilderness
Committee.)
The headline band was
Messenjah, a popular reggae band
from Toronto. The band appeals to
a broad base of audiences with a
sound that expresses the sweetness of summer.
Messenjah was smooth and
cool, like a wind coming off the
ocean. Images of sun, sand and
sea were conjured up for the
audience. And crowd was pleased
and eager to participate, singing
and waving their arms when
cued, "wave your hand, the groove
is right". For a change of pace, a
rap element was incorporated into
some songs.
Me Mom and Morgentaler, a
ska band from Montreal, was first
to play. The music was whimsical
and ranged from traditional
Spanish folk to punk-reggae
performed in French. The band
consisted of colourful characters
who pranced about the stage.
Me Mom and Morgentaler is
playing again next Friday with
Bob's Your Uncle, so take the
opportunity to catch their flamboyant show.
The evening's lineup fueled
lots of dancing. The energy was
frantic, discordant and theatrical.
People danced madly, barefoot,
along with the crowd and alone,
finding solace in their own beat.
Music, a cold drink, lots of ice
cubes, maybe a slice of pizza from
one of Granville's joints—it's
summer.
GSS DENTAL PLAN
TO COMMENCE
SEPTEMBER 1
The Graduate Student Society dental plan will commence operation on
September 1! However, due to a difficulty with the University's computer
system, the $86.00 annual fee will not be collected with your tuition fees this
year. Instead, you will pay the dental plan fee separately(unless you are already
covered by another dental plan).
,%    FAILURE TO PAY the fee will result in your library book borrowing
privileges being suspended.
FULL DETAILS on payment and an invoice have been mailed to all graduate
students with addresses within B.C. If you have not yet received your information package, please come to the Graduate Student Society office, Graduate
Student Centre between 9:00am and 3:00pm, Monday through Friday, to pick
up the information. Plan details will be made available in your department near
the end of August.
We urge you to complete the plan enrollment in August to avoid the September
rush.
LOCATED IN THE VILLAGE
RED LEAF
RESTAURANT
LUNCHEON SMORGASBORD • AUTHENTIC CHINESE CUISINE
228-9114        LICENSED PREMISES
70% DISCOUNT ON PICK-UP ORDERS
ON - I'RI l 1:30 - 9:00 PM • SUNDAYS & HOLIDAYS 4:00 - 9:00 PM
CLOSED SATURDAYS
2142 WESTERN PARKWAY UBC
C_2
CLOSEST BYCYCLE SHOP TO UBC
BICYCLE STORES
open seven Days a week
12 LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU
Kerrisdale
6255 W. Blvd. 4387 West 10th Ave.
263-3240 222-8200
We Also Have a Fully Stocked Service and Repair Department
UBC Aquatic Centre
The University of British Columbia, 6121 University Blvd., FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL: 228-4521
UNIVERSITY SWIMS
Mon to Fri
Mon to Fri
Mon/Wed/Fri
Tues/Thurs
PUBLIC SWIMS —
Mon to Fri
Monday
Friday
Wednesday
Sat/Sun
Sat/Sun
7:30 am   -      9:00 am EntirefacilityopentoUBCStudenU/SUff,Facultyand
11:30am  -      1:30 pm Conference Delegates.   Upon presentation of 89/90
4:30pm   -      6:00 pm UBC Library card. UBC studenU are admitted free and
4:30 pm   -      5:30 pm UBC  staff and  Faculty  pay  $2.00.     Conference
Delegates pay $2.00 upon presenting residence keys.
1:45 pm -
6:30 pm -
6:30 pm -
7:30 pm -
1:00 pm *
6:30 pm -
4:15 pm Pool is open to all ages. Children 7 years and under
10:00 pm must be accompanied by an adult and supervised in
10:00 pm the pool (within arms reach) at all times. Fitness area
10:00 pm is open to those 16 and over for an additional charge
5:00 pm of $.75. Shirts, shortt and runners must be worn in the
10:00 pm fitness area at all times.
FAMILY SWIMS 	
Wednesday 6:30 pm   -      7:30 pm
Sunday 10:30 am -      12:45 pm
"Parents without their own children are not admitted
to this session.
Parents with their own children only. Children are
admitted free only when accompanied by their own
parents. Passes and book tickets are not accepted and
the fitness area is not available.
ADULT SWIMS 	
Tues/Thurs 8:00 pm   -      12 midnight
Saturday 10:15 pm-       12 midnight
"Fitness area closes at 10pm. Sauna and steam room
remain open and co-ed for free.
Adults only, must be 18 years old and over. Proofof
age may be requested. Fitness area open only until 10
pm for additional charge of $0.75.
FITSWIM "
Mon/WediTri       9:15
Starts Monday, June 18, 1990
Last class Friday, August 31,1990
Adults only, must be 18 years old or over. This swim
coincides with children's lessons and rentals,
therefore, the availability of the indoor and outdoor
pools is limited. Rtness area, sauna and steam
available. Cost is $2.00 for adults. Those over 65 are
$1.25. No book tickets or passes accepted.
CO-ED AQUAC1ZES	
Tues/Thurs 7:00pm    ■
•Starts Tuesday June 19/90
Last dass Thursday, August 30/90
8:00 pm Anyone 18 years and older. Exercise to music in the
shallow end. No book tickets or passes accepted. Cost
is $2.25; Seniors are $1.25.
SENIOR'S SHAPE-UP ■
Tues/Thurs
Fifty-five years and older welcome. Stretch and
Strength deck exercise class, 9:35 - 10 am, followed
by water exercises to music, 10- 10:30 am, or just do
your own thing. Restricted use of pool due to lessons
and rentals. Steam, sauna, weights are open with
limited Supervision. No book tickets or passes
accepted.
•Starts Tuesday June 19/90
Last dass Thursday, August 30/90
FITNESS AREA (Check schedule for hours)	
The fitness area is equipped with universaVglobal stations, hydra-gym exercise machines, stationary bicycles,
dumbells, wall mirrors, exercise posters, weight scale, steam rooms and saunas. All the equipment is suitable
for every level of fitness, so drop by to start your fitness program or to maintain your fitness level. Fitness area
is supervised by an attendant during the University, Public and Adult swim sessions and is open to anyone 16
years and older. Cost is $0.75 extra, over and above single admission pool fee. T-shirts, shorts and runners
must be worn when using the fitness area.
ADMISSION FEES   	
Single admission
Book Tickets (10)
Passes; 4 Months {no Prcwating)
Under 3 years old
#1
January 1 - April 30
admitted free
*2
*3
Mjy 1 - August 31
September 1 -December 31
Chi-ken: 3-12
$1.25
$10.00
$30.00
Seniors: 65 and up
$1.25
$10.00
$30.00
Youth: 13-17
$1.75
$15.00
$35.00
UBC Student Valid Student Card
$1.75
$15.00
$35.00
Adult  18-64
$2.00
$17.50
$40.00
Keep fit and Swim
$2.75
$22.50
—
FITNESS AREA:
To use the weight room, sauna and steam rooms
during Public and Adult Swims there is an additional
charge of $.75.
Please Note: Sw.mKheduleau_dadrmsfionfec_.are
subject to change and/or cancellation without
prior notice.
August 2,1990
THE SUMMER UBYSSEY/5 vwg**%™
"■■fr <?**•*•& w
AIDS funding needed
AZT is a drug. It may help people with the HIV
virus to combat AIDS. In most of Canada it is available to AIDS patients free.
Each pill of AZT costs a patient in B.C. one
dollar. That seems cheap enough. Until you start to
add up the costs of taking it over and over again.
Patients normally start at five doses a day.
That's $5 a day, $150 a month and $1825 a year.
And that's just AZT.
Besides AZT, patients also take other drugs—
some of which counter the toxic effects of AZT itself.
Patients can have bills easily in the range of $700 a
month to pay for the drugs they take as part of their
treatment.
Its a lot to pay for a slim chance of holding off
AIDS when the onset ofthe virus, or social discrimination, may prevent a patient from working.
Why then is British Columbia the only province
in Canada that charges those infected with the HIV
virus for treatment?
The Vander Zalm government it would seem
has stuck its head in the mud once again and
allowed its version of morality (or immorality— you
choose) to colour its health care policies.
Other provinces recognize that AIDS requires
action and patients infected with the virus need
assistance.
This is probably due to the homophobia, misanthropy and holier than thou attitude our provincial
government appears to possess. This allows them to
dismiss those infected with the HIV virus as immoral gays. And when it is discovered that I.V. drug
users are also susceptible... Well they're just criminals, aren't they? As are prisoners, which is the
reason they are in prison, isn't it?
When it becomes apparent that all sorts of
people (the sexually active, drug users, hemophiliacs, those in the sex trade, the unborn, rape victims,...) are susceptible to the virus, they'll still find
an out.
AIDS does not afflict homosexuals only. If one of
Vander Zalm's family had hemophilia perhaps he
would see differently.
TBS^ffYSSEY
August 2, 1990
The Summer Ubyssey is published Thursdays by the
Alma Mater Society ofthe University of British Columbia.
Editorial opinions are those ofthe staff and not necessarily those of the university administration, or of the
sponsor. The Summer Ubyssey is published with the
proud support of the Alumni Association. The editorial
office is Rm. 241k of the Student Union Building.
Editorial Department, phone 228-2301; advertising,
228-3977;   FAX# 228-6093
I'm Aussem, Ted Aussem. I'm a private dick. My partner, Ernie
Stelzer, and I had taken on a new client, EfBe Pow, who wanted us
to help protect her from someone who's been following her. Ernie
took the job and got all the necessary information from her. I took
a swig from the bottle in my desk and reclined with my thoughts.
I must have dozed ofT for the next thing I remember is the police
barging into my office. "Wake up, Awesome!", Sergeant Paul
Day_on yelled, sarcasm dripping from his voice, "I've got bad, or
good, news for you." Shaking my head I groggily poured myself a
drink. Dayson, and his crony Martin Chester, glared at me. "Your
partner seems  to  have found  himself a  new  home,  at  the
morgue Now you wouldn't happen to know anything about this
would you? We happen to know about your relationship with
Ernie's wife Rebecca, and thats enough motive to take you downtown!"
"Fuck you!" I yelled. "You've got nothing on me and you know
it. He was working on a protection case for some dame. Talk to her."
I then left the office and went to the area where old Ernie was
scragged. It was raining out, and I didn't spend long there, but
when I returned to my office, the dame was there. "Oh, Mr.
Aussem. I just heard about Ernie. I'm so sorry. I feel I should be
fully honest with you. My name is really Andrea Lupini, and most
of what I told you is true. In fact, I'm running away from my former
fiancee, Dale Felon. He's a truly horrible man. Help me, Mr.
Aussem. Please "
"Oh, you do that well, lady, but I don't buy it. How much of
that is really true, and what is your real name?"
"I'm not sure anymore. I'mgettingso tired of having to lie all
the time. I'm really Dawn Buie."
"Well, sugar. Go home and wait." After she left, I poured
myself a drink, and sipped it for a while until suddenly my door
flew open, and some guy stumbled in, bleeding all over my new
carpet. He collapsed, and dropped a bundle of newspaper at my
feet I searched him for ID, and discovered his name: Greg Davis.
Kneeling, I opened the package and discovered a medium sized
blackbird, resembling a pigeon. I set it down in the bottom drawer
of my desk just as the dame strolled in with two really ugly lugs.
"Finally we meet, Mr. Aussem," the fat slug said. "I am Myk
Gordon, and I have been tracing a black pigeon all over the world
with the help of Miss Kurahashi and Mr. Nielson. We know you
have it so please give it to us, or we shall be forced to kill you."
"I know nothing of this bird you speak of," I said.
"Too bad. Goodbye!", the fat man said just before he shot me.
Editors
Rebecca Bishop  •  Michael Booth •  Martin Chester •  Paul Dayson
Letters
Renovation
wasn't delayed
Re. your article Back to
the Drawing Board, which
appeared in the Thursday,
19 July issue of The Ubyssey, concerning the recent
space dispute in the SUB:
contrary to what was said in
the article about what happened at the 18 July Council
meeting, the decision on
renovation of the Dress for
Less space has not been
delayed further, nor has
Council forced the issue
back in the lap of Renovations Committee.
Early this year, Council
The Ubyssey welcomes letters on any Issue. Letters must be typed and are not to exceed 300 words in length. Content
which is judged to be libelous, homophobic, sexist, racist or factually incorrect will not be published. Please be concise.
Letters may be edited for brevity, but it is standard Ubyssey policy not to edit letters for spelling or grammatical mistakes.
Please bring them, with identification, to SUB 241k. Letters must include name, faculty, and signature.
delegated the authority to
make decisions concerning
this issue to Renovations
Committee. Last month,
Renovations made its decision. Supporter of the
Global Development
Centre, some of whom sit on
Council, were not happy
with the decision, and have
sought to force Council to
debate on whether to overturn or modify it so as to give
the GDC office space on the
SUB concourse. To this end,
they brought forth a motion
during the 18 July Council
meeting, which would have
had Council approve the
division ofthe Dress for Less
space into five offices instead ofthe four offices proposed by Renovations.
Simply put, this motion
would have had the effect of
turning Council into a very
large Renovations Committee. This is hardly an efficient way to do business,
especially in view ofthe fact
that Renovations had already done what Council
asked them to do in the first
place.
My motion of postponement was not brought forward with the intent of putting Council's decision off
until a later date. My point
was, and still is, that Coun
cil's committee structure
should not be abused simply
because a few vocal individuals don't like an administrative decision which was
not made in their favor.
Most councillors seemed to
agree with this point of
view, and the postponement
passed by a wide margin. It
is my hope that we can now
put this issue behind us, and
allow Renovations Committee, SAC, and the Director of
Administration to do their
jobs without undue interference.
Derek Riehm
AMS Council Rep, Grad
Students
Reflections on fundraising
Universities, along with
hospitals, political interest
groups and hosts of worthwhile charities, have embarked on fundraising campaigns. I just received a
friendly letter from the UBC
Development Office asking
for my donation.
Current economic realities make private-sector donations necessary to build a
university's "margin of excellence". But while I understand UBC's needs, I have a
number of worries about
this fundraising campaign.
First, fundraising from
private sources makes a
university sensitive to private interests. Major donors
have the President's ear.
When they speak, he and
other senior administrators
listen. A multi-party state
with a free press has checks
to protect a university from
too much government interference; but no effective
controls exist - apart from
the integrity of senior administrators - against insidiously subtle pressures
from donors.
The rich are rarely society's most progressive element. Many U.S. universities which are closely
aligned with the economic
elite tend to block the upward mobility of children
from disadvantaged backgrounds.
The university curriculum as well as academic research projects may become
friendlier to industry and
business. Academic chairs
endowed by business may
well go to staunchly conser
vative apologists for business. Tenure may become
harder to get for academics
who are strongly critical of
prevailing business practices, the distribution of
wealth or the actions of
prominent donors.
There are troubling
signs that concern about
causing offense to donors may already influence UBC policies. For example, President Strangway's original decision to
deny commercially available space to the Gay Games
may well have been motivated by a perceived need to
kowtow to the prejudices of
donors. It's also an interesting question whether his
censorship of the infamous
engineering students' newsletter reflects a deep caring
for gays, native people and
other downtrotten groups -
or again only fear of donor
perceptions of UBC
Second, fundraising requires donor recognition. At
UBC, words of gratitude to
major donors are flowing
freely from the lips of university officials. Campus
media have published flattering donor profiles and
shallow propaganda about
UBC's excellence. How unabashedly will UBC celebrate money when it comes
to naming buildings and
conferring honorary degrees? There's something
sickening about heaping
honors on millionaires, just
because they give money to
a   university   instead   of
goldplating the bathtubs on
their yachts.
Of course, not all donors
are rich, and not all rich
donors are stock market
tycoons, real estate racketeers or environmentally
destructive corporations.
But for some major donors, a
well-publicized tax-deductible gift to UBC may have
considerable public-relations value and help whitewash    their
ective
reputations.
If they get
their names
on a UBC building and perhaps receive, in due course,
an honorary degree, they
can do business under the
guise of being public benefactors.
Third, fundraising
warps a university president's priorities. It turns
academic leaders into glorified fundraisers. Donors
become sacred cashcows,
and the success of university presidents is measured
by how well they milk them.
The university community
is deprived of access to their
president who must roam
all over the globe courting
potential donors. Other concerns hardly get due attention. Even President
Strangway probably feels
that there should be better
ways to use his genius than
wining and dining donors
and asking for more money.
Fourth, fundraising
has social costs. From
UBC's perspective, the Development Office pays for
itself many times over, but
from the perspective of society's overall good, the thousands of people working in
such   offices   all   over   the
country produce nothing
useful. They fill the mail
with solicitation letters,
lock social institutions into
fundraising battles, and allow governments to shirk
their funding responsibilities. A university's fundraising success may well
come partly at the expense
of charity dollars available
for crippled children and
similar important charities.
No doubt, the injection
of a hundred million dollars
from private sources will
propel UBC faster toward
world-class status. I'm
happy about UBC's fundraising triumphs and may
even contribute my own tiny
share.
My concern is that the
obvious benefits of private
philanthropy should not
blind us to very real costs
and risks. "Whoever pays
the piper calls the tune" -
this mentality could easily
seep into the academic decision-making process. Management structures at UBC
are already getting more
centralized and authoritarian to allow the Administration to control information
and to move rapidly against
"troublemakers" - including
student groups - that may
hurt its reputation in the
eyes of donors.
The desire to please
donors and the fear of losing
donations could lead to a
creeping paralysis of university autonomy, democracy and free expression at
UBC.
Kurt Preinsperg,
Philosophy Graduate
Student
6/THE SUMMER UBYSSEY
August 2, 1990 The Goodwill Games
STEVE CHAN PHOTOS
Chinese gymnast performing an incredible back leap in her balance
beam routine.
Australian cyclist Darren Winter races around Mary moor Park
,4    Velodrome in 4km pursuit qualifying race.
ONE HOUR
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For a limited time only the UBC Bookstore is offering a
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BOOKSTORE
UBC Computer Shop 228-4748
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Macintosh Ilex and Macintosh Ilci are registered trademarks of Apple Computers, Inc.
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HOMEMADE
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August 2,1990
THE SUMMER UBYSSEY/7 ARTS
Marsalis sizzles
by Mike Coury
HHow do you create
pure ecstasy for 1000
jazz fans? A concert headlined by Wynton Marsalis
backed up by six talented
musicians. Although the
concert started only 10
minutes late, the crowd's
anticipation was almost
tangible. I think Larry
Alexander of MEI productions, who put on the show,
summed up the concert as
well as anyone could, "You
are hearing the best jazz in
the world tonight."
MUSIC
Wynton Marsalis
Commodore
July 26
The energy was intense
as Marsalis walked out on
stage with his custom crafted
Monet trumpet and introduced the first tune, Uptown
Ruler.
The first set of the
concert was composed of 5
pieces, all revolving around a
basic theme, the life ofthe
uptown ruler, a term used to
describe the upper class.
Harmonique and Down Home
With Homey are a single
composition divided into two
movements: a slow beginning
featuring slow blues style
solos and a fast conclusion
introduced with a spectacular
drum solo by Herlin "Homey"
Riley. Marsalis then pro
ceeded to effortlessly play phenomenally high notes and
inspired solos, while the trombonist, Wycliffe Gordon, waited
his turn to make his horn talk
with an amazing array of
sounds and tones.
After an intermission, the
group came back on stage and
played two tunes. Blue Interlude, the first piece, was a
thirty minute jazz epic. The
beautiful blues was complemented by some of the smoothest tempo changes I have ever
heard performed live; the
transitions between fast and
slow sections were so subtle
that one had to be listening
specifically for them. The
septet then whirled into a crowd
pleasing rendition of The
Majesty Of Blues to finish off
the second set.
But that was not all that
the night had in store. After a
full minute or two of steady
tempo clapping from the crowd,
the ensemble returned to play
their own brand of New Orleans
style jazz, featuring Gordon on
tuba and upright bassist
Reginald Veal on trombone.
Even after that encore
though the crowd demanded
another, this time a quartet:
Marsalis, Riley, Veal, and Eric
Ree, on piano, playing a beautiful slow blues ballad style
trumpet feature.
The entire evening was
highlighted by great solos from
all members ofthe group, and
accompanied by Marsalis' own
highlighted touch of humour
during the breaks.
Adlerian Psychology
Association of BC
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Degree is granted by the Alfred Adler Institute of Chicago.
Courses are taught in Vancouver on weekends and evenings by
Alfred Adler Institute approved instructors. Ideal for those in the
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The program is founded on the theory of Individual Psychology originated by Alfred Adler with a focus on holism of
individuals, mutual respect, equality, encouragement, cooperation and goal oriented behavior.
POST GRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN COUNSELLING
Provides specialized training in Adlerian techniques and is
designed for practicing professionals who already possess a
Masters or Doctoral degree in counselling or related fields.
For more information phone 874-4614 or write
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PATIO AND SUBMIT YOUR SUGGESTION ON ONE OF OUR ENTRY
FORMS. THERE WILL BE WEEKLY DRAWS FOR THUNDERCHICKEN
T-SHIRTS IFY0UR"SUGGESTI0N IS CHOSEN BY THE COMMITTEE
AS THE PATIO NAME YOU WILL WIN THE GRAND PRIZE.
WHERE ARE WE?
THE PATIO LOUNGE IS LOCATED ATTHE SOUTH END OFTHE WINTER
SP0RTSCENTRE OVERLOOKING THEOUTDOORTENNISCOURTSAND
FIELDS.
WHY SHCILDI VISIT
THE NEW PATIC LCINGE?
BECAUSE IT HAS A GREAT VIEW, GREAT FOOD AND GREAT PRICES. ALSO
I CAN WIN WEEKLY PRIZES SUCH AS T-SHIRTS OR EVEN THE GRAND
PRIZE OF THE CHRISTMAS SKATING PARTY AND CHILI DINNER FOR 25.
PHONE 228-6121 FOR INFORMATION
OPEN MON-FRI     11:00A.M. -11:00 P.M.
SATURDAYS 11:00 A.M.-  6:00 P.M.
LUNCHEON SPECIALS
SPORTS T.V.
V PARKNG LOT
THUNDERBIRD
3
cn
8
T.W.S.C.
PATIC
10UN
TENNIS  I
COURT  |
SUMMER CAMPUS TOURS
AND INFORMATION
Visit the Information Desk in the main concourse of the Student Union Building. An AMS information officer is available 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. weekdays
to answer your questions. Information is available on campus events, services
and facilities open to both students and the community.
Free walking tours of the campus are also available at the desk until Aug. 31.
Tours include gardens, museums, sports facilities and other UBC attractions.
Drop-in tours leave the desk weekdays at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. You may also
book 3 p.m., weekend and special tours by calling ahead.
FOR INFORMATION ABOUT UBC,
OR TO BOOK A TOUR,
CALL 228-3777.
19 15-1990
IS
ANNIVERSARY
■__aa
8/THE SUMMER UBYSSEY
August 2,1990

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