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The Ubyssey Jan 10, 1989

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Array the Ubyssey
The first day of the petition-signing
campaign against a proposed ten per cent
tuition fee hike saw over 1,100 eager signatures.
Petitions await in SUB between
11:30 to 2:30 until Jan. 19 and organizers
need students to volunteer time at the
SUB tables and pick up petitions to be circulated in classes.
TUITION RISES OUT OF STUDENTS' REACH
By Greg Davis and
Laura J. May
UBC students are
angry about the proposed ten per cent increase in next year's
tuition.
The Ubyssey interviewed random students in the Student
Union Building on
Friday to determine
student reaction to
the proposed increase.
"I don't know if I'm
going to be able to
stay in school. I have
some bursaries, but
not enough," said
Sharla Temple a first
year Science student.
"(Tuition is) already ridiculous,"
Albert Banerjee, Science 1, said. "The
quality of the teachers I've had so far
doesn't warrant the
ten per cent increase."
"It sucks. (If tuition is increased ten
per cent) I'd probably
have to get a job.
Right now my parents
are paying (my tuition)," said Christina
Nagy, also in Science.
Ditto to the "It
sucks," came from
James Holling, Arts
3. "The provincial
government should
take a' more responsible role in funding
education. The government is neglecting
its   priorities   com
pared to other provinces," he said.
"I might have to
stop (my) schooling
next year if (the) tuition hike goes
through because I'm
paying for my own
tuition," said Carolyn
Gomez, Arts 1.
"It's an increase of
$150 (which) could be
used for books instead. I disagree with
(the proposed increase) completely; I
think it's unfair,"
Aileen Ablog, Science
1, said.
Murray Allen, Arts
3 agreed. "The classes
are overcrowded, the
books are overpriced,
and now they stick the
students with more
payments," he said.
"It seems odd to increase student fees
when we have a varsity football program
costing vast sums of
money while very few
students watch and
participate in the
games.  Let's change
that money into intramural and educational funds," he said.
Most ofthe 20 students interviewed
said that little could
be done to stop the
proposed hike in fees,
despite the petition
now being circulated.
"Unfortunately the
petition will probably
not succeed due to
lack of united effort
and awareness. Students have no power
over such things,"
said Holling.
"Writing   letters
doesn't   seem  to   be
quite the
thing.   It ^
doesn't  seem  to be
enough," said
Temple, referring to
the AMS letter writing campaign.
"I       don't
know if we can
stage a protest
or something.
Are   we   allowed   to   do -
that?"     said         /
Gomez.                    /
7
VOLUME 71, Number 27
Vancouver, B.C. Monday, January 10,1989 Classifieds
Rates: AMS Card Holders - 3 lines, $3.00,
additional lines 60 cents, commercial -3
lines, $5.00, additional lines 75 cents. (10%
Discount on 25 Issues or more) Classified ads
payable In advance. Deadline 4:00 p.m.. two
days before puMlcaiton. Room 266, SUB,
UBC, Van., B.C. V6T 2A7
11 - FOR SALE PRIVATE
4 OCC. TABLES, new dinette set w/4 chairs,
2 chest drawers, lamp, futon frame, 2 blk
IKEA chairs. Sold as pkg. $300 OBO 321-
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30 - JOBS
DOOR TO DOOR WORK. No selling involved. Near UBC 7$/hr. Call Chris 244-
5468.
EMPLOYMENT - SUMMER Need summer
employment and enjoy sailing? Take our
sailing instructor course - get both - call for
details. Westcoast School of Seamanship
684-9440.	
STUDENT WITH GOOD SALES ABILITY
required immediately for p/t work at Community Sports. Resumes to 3355 West
Broadway.
PEN PALS! All ages welcome. For more
information send SASE to: International
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50 - RENTALS
MUSIC MASTER D.J. SERVICE
HIGHEST QUALITY DIGITAL SOUND
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5 HOURS IN SUB! ONLY $189
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70 - SERVICES	
GRAMMATICALLY PERFECT papere get
better marks. If your writing is less than
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75 - WANTED
VOLUNTEERS NEEDED
Healthy Caucasian male(20 - 40 yrs) Smokers (1 pack/d) are needed for a study involving drug(s) intake and blood sampling (4
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85 - TYPING
35-LOST
STOLEN - old, brown, leather briefcase.
Two straps with brass buckles. Contains
wallet, notes, books etc. Stolen from 2nd
floor men's washroom in SUB. If found, call
Gord 732-0852.
40 - MESSAGES
MESSAGE OF ISLAM 10: Muslims believe
that God revealed Koran and made it incumbent upon himself to protect it against interpolation and corruption of all kinds. Thereis
only one version of Koran. It is leamt by
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THE ALPHA PHIs would like to wish everyone a very HAPPY NEW YEAR!
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WITH
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Oscar Shumsky,
violin
Thursday, January 12
UBC Recital Hall
8:00 p.m.
For tickets and further
information call the
School of Music at 228-3113
UBC
The School of Music
The University of British Columbia
Between
THURSDAY
'Note; "Noon* *> 12:30 p.nu
TUESDAY	
UBC Peraonal Computer Club
AMIGAMeetmg,SUB 111, 11:30 -
1:30; APPLE Meeting, SUB 125,
Noop.
Jewish   Students'   Association/
Hillel
Famous. Hot Lunch, 12:30, Hillel
House
WEDNESDAY
UBC Peraonal Computer Club
ATARI Meeting, SUB 211, Nochu
Paciflc Rim Club
Lecture - Job opportunities with
CIDA, by Norman Cook, Ottawa.
1230 pm,
Asian Centre Auditorium.
Jewish  Students'  Association/
Hillel
Jewish Learning Croup, 12f30,
Hillel House.
UBC Personal Computer Club
MAC Meeting, SUB 111, Noon.
Pre-Dental Club
Riek Ornar from Time Management Systems. Lectures on Time
and Stress Management, Noon,
Woodward IRC Room 5.
Stamp Club
General Meeting,  Noon, Angus
221.
Jewish   Students*   Association/
Hillel
Hebrew   Classes,   12:30,  Hillel
House.
World University Service of Canada (UBC)
Slide show - "MALI'88: A UBC
Student's African development
experience", 12:30 pm (until 2;30),
Buchanan A203.
Jewish  Students' Association/
Hillel
Israeli Folk Dancing, 7:00 ipm,
SUB 207/209.
Film Society
Film 'Moon over Paradox, 7pm,
SUB Theatre,
Film Society
Film 'Cocktail', 9:30 pm, SUB
Theatre.
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2/THE UBYSSEY
January 10 ,1989 BoG and Senate
elections lack
women
By Deanne Fisher
Student Board of
Governor and senator-
at-large elections are
just around the corner
and only one of the 14
candidates is a woman.
Wendy King is running for senator-at*
large amongst 10 men
and four men are run-
ningfo* board of governors in the Jan, 18* 19,
20 elections. In the individual faculties, the
ratio is slightly higher
with five women out of
15 candidates.
AMS president Tim
Bird, who is running
for board of governors,
is concerned about the
under-representation
of women in tho election.
"I think there are a
lot of issues that concern women in a different way than they do
men," said Bird, citing
pay equity and ad*
vancement, daycare,
sexual harrassment,
campus safety and the
possibility of a UBC
abortion clinic as examples of women's issues dealt with at the
board level.
As it stands, the
Board of Governors is
predominantly male,
with 11 men and two
women,
"How can a group of
men sit around and
make a decision on an
issue like abortion?"
said Bird.
Last year, seven men
ran for board of governors and six for senator-
at-large with no female
candidates.
The week after the
BoG and Senate
elections AMS
executive elections
take place ,,,
The week after the
BoG and Senate elections AMS executive
elections, take place,
and though nominations have not closed,
Bird said there is only
one female candidate in
the running so far,
"They're all very
qualified candidatesbut
I know of as many qualified female candidates/
said Bird.
Many ofthe same issues of concern to
women are dealt with at
the student council
level, said Bird.
Bird said the inequities strike him "as a
little bit odd." "Especially at a university, of
all places," he added.
ufl
xr ive* *r A-H* ^JfiJ^ ?
* *
wvT ciase tv&t
Duke's employee  in fear of the Cookie Monster.
JOE ALTWASSER PHOTO
Duke's fights AMS Cookie Monster
By Deanne Fisher
The Alma Mater Society
wants to get its hands in the cookie
jar.
But the staff and owners ofthe
privately-run "Duke's 0001068" are
not giving in easily to plans that
include ousting the legendary shop
from the Student Union Building
and replacing it with a similar
AMS-operated store.
Posters urging students to
"Save Dukes Cookies" deck the
store and 400 supportive students
had signed petitions as of 2 p.m
Monday.
The lease on the space expires
at the end of April and, according to
AMS General Manager Charles
Redden, will not be renewed based
on a decision made by student
council over two years ago.
"The arguments still hold,"
said Redden. "Those arguments
are to make more money for the
AMS to support its subsidiaries,
better wages  for  students  and
lower prices."
Starting wage for an AMS
employee is $7.40 per hour while a
new Duke's employee makes $5.00
per hour.
But Duke's owner Andrew
Markus is quick to point out other
advantages of working at Duke's.
"We're more fun, we have
music, there aren't 350 rules like
the AMS, we're not regimented,
and we're not always looking over
your shoulder. Our staff are
happy," said Markus, adding that
it was the staff who started the
petitions, not himself.
Markus said he thinks it is
important for students to have an
alternative to working for the
AMS. "We're not the big AMS
machine. And ifyou don't get a job
with the AMS, where else are you
going to go?" He added that Duke's
has a more open-door policy of
hiring as opposed the AMS. "We
have people with six earrings and
long hair."
Students signing the petition
were skeptical ofthe quality ofthe
proposed AMS-produced cookies
and Markus uses current AMS
food outlets as testimony to their
competence.
"AMS stands for Absolute
Mediocre Services as far as Fm
concerned," said Markus "I'd like
to taste one of their cookies."
But Redden said the AMS has
hired a chef on a consulting basis:
"We have a new cookie recipe,
developed byachef. I've sampledit
and ifs excellent."
And AMS president Tim Bird
backs up Redden. "Apparently,
the secret lies in quality of chocolate. They [Duke's] won't give us
the recipe. We've been trying to
develop products for the last two
years," said Bird.
Bird added that students often use Dukes as a route into
employment with the AMS by
getting to know staff of Subcetera,
the adjacent AMS-run candy 100
grams to $1.10.
Duke's now pays approximately $35,000 rent to the AMS
and Redden said he expects to
increase that revenue by another
$30,000, taking into account the
increased expenses in wages, with
the takeover. Markus said he nets
approximately $45,000 per year.
In addition to operating the
cookie store, the AMS plans to
expand the store by moving the
AMS Box Office into the current
Dress For Less space.
Although Markus and his
partner once operated stores at
Langara and BCIT, they sold the
outlets when they found out that
the UBC one would be closed
down.
"Basically, if we lose Duke's at
UBC, we've lost everything," said
Markus, who may return to university to do his MBA once his
business folds.
As for his partner, "He's got
his resume out on the street. He's
looking for ventures," said
Markus.
Markus said he will offer the
AMS higher rent and will consider
hiking the staffs wages in order to
keep the space. Tm willing to talk
to anybody but no one wants to
talk to me."
And while Duke's supports
many groups in the form of donations, door prizes and advertising,
the AMS could decide to earmark
revenue from the new cookie store
to projects such as bursaries, disabled access or daycare according
to Bird and Redden.
Bird, however, has not dismissed the possibility of council
reconsidering the decision. "Any
petition with more than 1,000 signatures is impressive," he said.
Meanwhile, petition-signing
students are making comments 'o
plenty: "Dukes is my life", "The
AMS wants an unconditional
monopoly-dictatorship" and "I'd
collapse without Duke's Caps."
January 10,1989
THE UBYSSEY/3 NEWS
NEED A BREAK?
Come to Sub241K
Meet the Ubyssey
Parkade to open in March
An agreement to provide
additional parking for residents
in Gage is being drawn up by
Traffic and Security and Student
Housing. The most likely result
will be that the 120 spaces now
being constructed behind the
parkade will be rented to residents starting September 1989.
Construction ofthe parkade,
originally scheduled to be com
pleted in mid-December, has been
delayed by poor weather and a
shortage of construction workers.
According to Bob Higgins, the
construction manager, much of
the work that remains to be done
on both lots is "weather sensitive."
Completion of the parkade is
expected to be around the end of
March. While most of the spaces
will be for faculty and staff, some
places will be available for short
term parking.
The old drop-off will be reinstated with some handicapped
parking spots.
Fifteen short term metered
spots will be available near Mclnnes field while the current temporary spots in Mclnnes, along with
the old tennis courts will be the
site of the new recreation facility.
BLOW OUT PRICES
New Years
UBC 6HOE MAPNE66!
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SkyForce Hi
70.00
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Health Walker (m)
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470
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Nike Allcourt Leather liy2,13 65.00
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Maclean 3 pack Socks              12.00
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Nike 3 pack Socks                    15.00
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MLT Leather (m)            73.00
$49.99
RTP Leather (m)            90.00
$59.99
Club Classic (L)             70.00
$49.99
Charisma (L)                  70.00
$49.99
DL 6000 (m)                100.00
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BB 6600 Hi top (m)    100.00
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GL 6100 (m)                $90.00
59.99
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445 (m)
45.00
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Contour (m)
80.00
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Advance (m)
55.00
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Nemesis (m)
45.00
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Rotation Spiker (m)   40.00   $34.99
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4/THE UBYSSEY
January 10 ,1989 NEWS
UBC sexual
harassament
policy pending
By Deanne Fisher
UBC's long-awaited sexual
harassment policy is on the verge
of being implemented pending the
appointment of two sexual harassment advisors—one female and
one male—by the president.
The president's permanent
advisory committee on sexual
harassment is currently soliciting
nominations for people possessing
"objectivity, impartiality, empathy, and understanding," according to committee chair Larry
Weiler.
"It is important that the individuals be knowledgeable of the
university community, and have a
certain amount of credibility and
diplomatic skills," said Weiler.
The advisors will assist in
implementing the policy and will
deal with specific cases of sexual
harassment, determining if the
complaint is valid and attempting
to resolve the problem.
"The policy provides for both
formal and informal processes (in
dealing with a case of sexual harassment)," said Weiler. "I think
that experience at other universities indicates that frivolous complaints are not frequent and most
complaints are serious and have to
be resolved."
Weiler said he hopes the advisors, who must be university
employees, will devote half their
working time to the position, for
which they will be paid.
"We have the resources to
provide up to 50 per cent relief,"
said Weiler, adding that the conditions are subject to negotiations
with the department under which
the applicant is employed.
The committee has chosen to
appoint one man and one woman
on the advice of other universities,
said Weiler. The University of
Victoria advised us strongly to
have one of each sex," he said,
explaining that sexual harassment does not necessarily occur
between members of the opposite
sex.
"But there's no doubt that the
female advisor gets more work,"
he added.
Students are not eligible because the committee is looking for
permanent people who know the
community well and are not likely
to leave.
Applications are being solicited until Jan. 16 and should be
directed to Weiler through the
president's office. All applicants
will then attend an informational
session and the committee hopes
to recommend two people to be
appointed by the presidentbymid-
Pebruary.
"We should have the policy in
effect during this term," said
Weiler.
Join
Loin
Join
Loin
Join
Loin
Join
The Ubyssey
•;•::-:■::;: " 1*
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Laurel serves as a makeshift fig leaf for a modest Snowperson.
HEATHER JENKINS PHOTO
UBC
The University of British Columbia
Call for nominations for:
Sexual Harassment Advisors
Nominations are being sought for two people, one male and one female, to
act as Sexual Harassment Advisors with the University community.
The nominiees must be:
- able to act objectively and impartially
- empathetic
- regular university employees
- aware of and able to advise on university and community
resources
- knowledgeable or willing to learn about Sexual Harassement
issues
Please submit nominations to:
Professor Larry Weiler
Chairman, President's Permanent Advisory
Committee on Sexual Harassment
c/o President's Office
U.B.C.
Nominations close January 16, 1989.
January 10,1989
THE UBYSSEY/5 SPORTS
Basketbirds brawl to
weekend series split
By Joe Altwasser
The pressure on the UBC
men's basketball team to qualify
for Canada West play-offs led to
fisticuffs with Lethbridge in the
second game of a double-header
this weekend.
UBC's Mike Clarke was
ejected as tempers flared late in
Saturday's game which the 'Birds
won convincingly, 92-63, redeeming Friday's 88-78 loss to the
Pronghorns at War Memorial.
After the weekend series with the
Pronghorns, the 'Birds are now 3-
5 in the Canada West conference.
Clarke became involved in
the fracas with less than two
minutes remaining as both sides
raised the intensity level—especially under the boards where
elbows were utilized illegally.
Tensions finally increased to
physical violence when Clarke
and a Lethbridge forward ended
up in a swinging match that eventually led to both benches emptying, including coaches.
The combatants were ejected,
the game restarted and finished
without further incident.
The 'Birds, coming off an excellent tournament at York University over Christmas, started
the new year in a shaky fashion
Friday night. Poor rebounding
against the larger Pronghorns was
the reason for the loss according to
UBC head coach Bruce Enns.
"We were beaten in the pink,"
said Enns in reference to the
Pronghorns domination ofthe key.
"You have to realize that the
Pronghorns are a big team and
that we were overmatched in two
positions."
Al Lalonde led the 'Birds with
32 points with Mike Clarke adding
14.
Saturday's match was a complete turnaround for the Thunderbirds as they outhustled, outshot,
and, most importantly, outre-
bounded the prairie hoopsters.
UBC was almost perfect in
the first half playing a tight, disciplined game under the cool orchestration of point guard Perrie Scarlett.
Scarlett and forward Al Lalonde carried the "Birds to a 54-38
half-time lead against the never-
say-die Pronghorns who, through
their plucky perseverance and
crashing of the offensive boards,
closed the gap to 37-34 at one point
before the 'Birds regained their
composure andopened up their big
half-time lead.
Enns felt the game was a
turnaround of sorts for the 'Birds
who have had a difficult year. "You
know Aaron Point was cut this
morning," said Enns in reference
to the UBC forward. "After this
morning the guys realized he
wasn't here and they had to go out
and play hard."
The second half the "Birds
were not as convincing but still
managed to stretch their lead over
obviously poorly conditioned
Pronghorns.
Enns was pleased with the
play of the 'Birds and singled out
sophomore Jason Leslie as the
game star for his 15 points and
team high 17 rebounds Saturday
night. Scarlett and Lalonde also
earned the praise of Enns for their
team leading 21 and 24 points respectively.
The "Birds travel to Edmonton next weekend to play the
Golden Bears.
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#60 SUB
228-5640 [j
COPY OT*  COLOUR AND
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ask us about
Special Ordering
Student Union Building
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228-4388
I; life o little
blond?
up oc
UBC
Student Union Bldg
Main & Lower
Concourse
CALL FOR NOMINATIONS
for A.M.S.
Executive Positions
President
Vice-President
Director of Finance
Director of Administration
Coordinator of External Affairs
Close of Nominations:
4:00pm, Tuesday, January 17th
Elections will be held on January 25, 26, & 27/89
Nomination forms can be obtained and then returned to the A.M.S.
Administrative Assistance, SUB 238.
Paul goes for two
JOE ALTWASSER PHOTO
BASKETBALL
This past weekend in women's basketball the UBC women lost a
double-header to the Lethbridge Pronghorns at War Memorial.
The efforts of T-Birdguard Tessa Valg, who had 53 points over the
two games was not enough to stop UBC from losing 72-68 Friday and
75-64 Saturday. Shawna Molcak.led the Pronghorns in scoring with 26
points on Friday following it up with 18 in the second game Saturday.
HOCKEY
The UBC men's varsity hockey team split a pair of games in Brandon on the weekend, losing 4-3 to the Bobcats Friday and taking
Saturday's rematch 4-1.
The road points, coupled with the T-Birds' home sweep of Brandon
before the Christmas break, leave UBC one point out of first, with
league-leading Calgary coming to town next weekend.
UBC is undefeated at home so far this weekend (5-0-1), while
Calgary took both games from UBC in the Dinos' home opener. Game
times are Friday the 13th at 7:30 and Saturday the 14th at 7:30 at
Thunderbird arena. Both games will be broadcast on CiTR 101.9 fm.
ELECTION POLL CLERKS
NEEDED
($4.00 per hour)
Board of Governor/Senate Elections:
Jan 18th, 19th and 20th
AMS Executive Elections:
Jan 25th, 26th and 27th
SIGN UP IN THE S.A.C. OFFICE, SUB ROOM 246
6/THE UBYSSEY
January 10,1989 John Stevenson in better times
JOE ALTWASSER PHOTO
Two Basketbirds
slam dumped
By Joe Altwasser
Scandal rocked the UBC
men's basketball team this past
week as star forward Aaron Point
and trainer John Stevenson were
dismissed by head coach Bruce
Enns.
Point, the B.C. high school
boys' provincial MVP in 1984, was
cut Saturday morning at a UBC
shooting practice following
Friday's loss to the Lethbridge
Pronghorns.
Enns said, "Aaron is a good
person, but his output was beginning to match his input into the
game."
Enns added that the presence
of Point was beginning to have a
detrimental effect on the team. "It
is important that we move along
quickly with the players who want
to play so that we can get back into
the thick ofthe conference race for
the play-offs."
Point said he was surprised,
but did not feel bitter about his
dismissal from the team.
"When he saw my performance on Friday, he (Enns) took it as
a lack of desire," said the 22-year-
old Point. "It was a total surprise
because he knew I had been sick
and I had missed two practices
during the week."
According to Point, Enns
"called me out and said it wasn't
going to work anymore and that
my attitude is hurting the team
and the players."
The dismissal was the final
episode in a series of disagree
ments between Point and Enns
dating back to November.
Point said he quit the "Birds in
late November because Enns had
gotten out of hand in practice and
in games.
"He was taking the games a
bit too serious, more serious than a
lot of the players," said Point.
Point rejoined the 'Birds two
weeks later following a series of
negotiations between him and
assistant coach John Ritchie.
Point was in his third year of
eligibility with UBC and while
seeing only limited playing time,
and suffering through a series of
injuries, managed to average fifteen points per game.
He is now trying to reclaim his
third year of eligibility and will
attempt to find another basketball
program in Canada.
"Right now I'm just going to
concentrate on finishing school."
Last Tuesday, Stevenson was
dropped as trainer for the UBC
men's basketball team.
According to Stevenson the
reason for his dismissal was that
he was "incompatible" with the
team. But he feels that the fact he
was outspoken about the athletic
department's function to the press
played a role in the decision.
"I was not compatible with the
team because of my attitude towards the department," said Stevenson.
"I don't want a pound of flesh
out of it, but I do feel an injustice
has been done," he said.
M.fifinirwfrwn
NEWS
Forestry undergrads
demand fair shake
By Katherine Monk
Foresters are misrepresented in the media, and any
lecture series featuring forestry issues should be aimed
at educating the public, and
not at foresters, according to
Forestry Undergraduate
Society president Ian Maclver.
Maclver made the comments following an FUS
meeting yesterday in which
the Students for Forestry
Awareness (SFA), an independent group of graduate
and undergraduate forestry
students, requested the financial support from the
FUS for an upcoming lecture
series.
No decision was made
about funding the SFA at the
meeting, as FUS members
felt they needed more time to
think about the issues.
The SFA had encountered problems previously
with Maclver when he denied the room bookings
which had already been
made because did not know
what the SFA was doing
"behind our back."
The rooms were re-
booked by the SFA through
the Graduate Student Society.
Maclver said he wanted
to make sure foresters' viewpoints were represented
fairly within the department.
"I think industry has
tried to educate people, and
they are getting slapped
down—their efforts are being
criticized too much," he said.
Maclver's concerns were
echoed by a majority ofthe approximately twenty FUS
members attending the meeting.
"All this is doing is creating
a bunch more issues, and stirring debate between people,"
said one member, who added
that industry has made many
attempts at education, but has
largely been ignored by the
popular media.
Third year forestry student Dave Christie said he
wanted to know both sides of
the issue, as long as the lectures really were balanced.
"There's a lot of touchy people
in this city who don't know
anything about forestry and
they take what they see in the
paper as fact."
The members also said
they were concerned about
who selected the speakers, and
if the FUS were to support the
SFA, if FUS members could
make their own suggestions as
to who would speak.
But all the FUS really
wants is the power to veto
speakers who they don't agree
with, said Audrey Pearson,
forestry grad student and fellow organizer of the SFA lecture series.
"Some ofthe people believe
our role is to be an apologist for
the (forest) industry," she said.
Pearson said foresters may
indeed be misrepresented in
the media, but that is because
the foresters who speak to the
media are company hacks.
"There may be a basis for
(the FUS) to feel threatened,
but they should not be afraid
of hearing another point of
view—whether you agree or
not, people should be heard."
Pearson said calling the
public ignorant would be
shifting the focus where it
doesn't belong. "How can the
public expect to know, if the
foresters don't? We have to
educate ourselves before we
can expect to educate the public."
"Obviously forest companies do good things, and they
do bad things as well. But
they are terrible salespeople,
which may or may not be a
fault ofthe profession, or the
faculty," she said.
Suddenly, the profession
has been called upon to explain itself, according to Pearson. "Meares blew things up
in 1980, now foresters have to
explain themselves to the
public."
But Pearson said it is a
shame that foresters are
fighting amongst themselves,
when "instead of bashing
each other over the head with
labels, we might find we have
something in common." We
all care about the forest and
responsible forest management, she said.
The first lecture is today
in MacMillan 166 at 12:30.
Forestry consultant Keith
Moore addresses the issue:
"You are responsible: what a
professional forester expects
from his peers.
Looking For Priority Service?
Let's
TaQi
STUDENT
LOANS
The Bank of Montreal is ready for the new school year. Thanks to our experience with
students, we're able to offer you more of what you usually want from a bank ... fast,
priority service.
You're young, you're dynamic, you've got a lot ideas. Come to a bank that can measure
up - the Bank of Montreal.
For more information on our Student Loan Program
contact our Student Loan Centre at:
390 Main Street
Vancouver, B.C. V6A 2T3
(604) 665-3768
or our branch in the Student Union Building
(604) 665-7076
tt
Bank of Montreal
Doing more for you.
January 10,1989
THE UBYSSEY/7 Hong Kong
Chinese Foods
5732 University Blvd.
Lunch Specials (combination)
$3.45
MSG FREE
Licensed • Self Service
224-1313
FREE
GOURMET BURGER
(B-Mt or Tofu)
OR ENTREE
The good deal is, your least expensive meal is FREE when two or more of the
above items are ordered. Not valid with any other coupons. Dining in only,
please. Valid only when this ad is presented prior to placement of order.
3431 WEST BROADWAY 738-5298
UBC   BOOKSTORE
RETURN POLICY
COURSE BOOKS
Sessional course books may be returned (accompanied by the original
receipt) for full refund any time up to the following session deadlines:
Winter session January 20,1989
Intersession May 13,1989
Summer session July 15,1989
Books must be unmarked and in saleable-as-new condition. After
the respective deadlines all course books will be non-returnable.
NON-COURSE BOOKS, MERCHANDISE & SUPPLIES
Returns will normally be accepted up to 10 days from date of purchase,
when accompanied by sales receipt.
No returns or exchanges on sale items, special orders, electronic and
computer goods, protective eyewear, lined shorts, bathing suits and
swimming accessories.
REMEMBER TO KEEP YOUR RECEIPT.
NO RECEIPT • NO REFUND • NO EXCHANGE • NO EXCEPTIONS
Refunds for purchases by cheque will be made
after 10 business days from the date of purchase.
BOOKSTORE
6200 University Boulevard • 228-4741
imm AWARDS
HAVE YOU PICKED UP YOUR B.C. STUDENT LOAN
OR EQUALIZATION PAYMENT?
Students who applied last summer and fall for aid through the B.C. Students Assistance Program and qualified for B.C. Student Loans are reminded that their loan documents (Certificates 1) are available for pick
up in the main lobby ofthe General Services Administration Building all
this week between 8:30am and 4:00pm. You will be required to present
picture I.D. Loan recipients are urged to claim their Certificates 1 as soon
as possible. This document must be taken to the bank for negotiation.
Students who qualified for Equalization Payments should report to the
Awards Section ofthe Department of Financial Services in Room 60 of
the General Services Administration Building to claim their cheques.
Photo I.D. will be required.
BCSAP applicants are also reminded to complete their Statements of
Personal Responsibility and return them to the Ministry of Advanced
Education promptly. Failure to do so by the end ofthe term could disqualify applicants for Loan Remission after graduation.
Students who have not paid their second term tuition fees by January 16,
or made other arrangements with the Department of Financial Services,
will have their registration cancelled.
Awards and Financial Aid • Room 50, General Services
Administration Building • Telephone: 228-5111
INIOTAINMfeNT
Film club offers
Spanish films
by Catherine Lu
Few second year Arts students can boast of having tutored
actor Martin Sheen in Spanish.
Alberto Rubio was recently hired
to do just that for Cold Front, an
American film in production in
Vancouver.
INTERVIEW
Cinema 16's
Alberto Rubio
Rubio had to translate the
English script and for three days
he taught Sheen and co-star Kim
Coates how to express themselves convincingly in Spanish
for a few tense moments at the
film's climax.
The job was easy for Rubio,
who has spent every other summer vacation in Spain since his
birth, and who lived and studied
there for one year during his
early teens.
Cold Front may be typical
Hollywood filmfare, but given
Rubio's European background, it
is quite distant from his personal
cinematic preferences.
As president of UBC's Cin-
ema-16 this term, Rubio has selected an international variety of
mostly obscure films, featured in
three film series which include
new Spanish cinema, the erotic,
and literary works.
He believes the films in the
series offer viewers "completely
different perspectives" on the
world.
"North Americans are very
self-centered," says Rubio. "Fifty
per cent ofthe films shown in
Spanish theatres are American.
This American presence is so
great in Europe, and yet there's
no European influence really in
America," he laments. "It's not a
virtue on our part—we're doing
ourselves harm in that we're
closing ourselves up."
While Rubio admits that the
films will not change anyone's
life, he believes their artistic excellence should be most appreciated by university students.
Given his Spanish background, it is not surprising that
Rubio has chosen to show a
series on new Spanish cinema.
The Spanish director Carlos
Saura, whose works are featured, is one ofthe most important filmmakers of the new
Spanish cinema movement that
"artistically speaking, resisted
the dictatorship, and was
involved in Spain's transition to
democracy" after the death of
Franco in 1975, says Rubio.
Many of Saura's films are
social and political allegories—
imperative due to the strict censorship laws which existed in
Franco's regime.
Raise Ravens, the third film
in the series, is about the life of
an 8-year-old girl, as recalled by
her adult self. "In a purely
allegorical way it touches on the
Civil War and the dictatorship,
but on another more superficial
level, it's a study of childhood
memory," says Rubio.
The second series features
films with an erotic flavour,
which Rubio thinks will probably
have the most appeal.
"They're not all measured by
the amount of sexual content,
but by the erotic quality of their
theme," says Rubio. The Blue
Angel, showing this Wednesday,
"is a very erotic film, in the sense
that it's about the power of the
erotic. It doesn't mean there's
going to be a lot of sex in it," he
says.
... engaged in three
hours of continuous
sexual activity
without emotion ...
In contrast, the last film in
the series, Casanova, by Italian
director Fellini, offers a repelling
portrayal of the adventurous
lover, engaged in three of hours
of continuous sexual activity
without emotion.
Rubio believes the last series
featuring films based on literary
works should be of special
interest to UBC language
students, as all four films will be
shown with their original foreign
language tracks, with subtitles.
Cinematic adaptations of
Dostoyevksy's The Idiot, August
Strindberg's play Miss Julie, and
Gunter Grass' The Tin Drum are
featured, as well as an outstanding Japanese adaptation of
Shakespeare's Macbeth, by Akira
Kurosawa. "It's very original,"
says Rubio.
Cinema-16 films are shown
every Wednesday evening.
Donald Sutherland after three hours of continual sex. Its enough to
curl your hair.
8/THE UBYSSEY
January 10 ,1989 ENTERTAINMENT
Theatre misses jackpot
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Halina's Fitness   2989 W. 41st  261-8020
Actors and cards at the Arts Club. Where did these guys park?
by Leah Postman
"They come and they go and
that's life."
So says one of the characters
from Snake Eyes, the Arts Club
Granville Island's production of
two one-act plays about gambling. And so go the plays.
Both plays, The Gambler by
Nikolai Gogol and Hughie by
Eugene O'Neill, feature the talents of Stuart Margolin, best
known for his role as Angel on
The Rockford Files.
THEATRE
Snake Eyes
Arts Club Granville Island
Until February 11
The more enjoyable play of
the evening is The Gambler, a
19th century Russian comedy
depicting a slippery aristocrat
cardshark who winds up being
taken by an equally slippery
band of gambling aces. Margolin
directs with a lighthearted touch,
choreographing the play in a
farcical manner.
Make-up and costumes are
colourful and stylized, the characters are caricatures, and the
action is fast and furious. The
actors all wear boxing shoes,
suggesting the nature ofthe
match in which the characters
find themselves. Tom McBeath
as the scheming Iharev rises
wonderfully to the demands of
this mini farce.
Unfortunately, the play
proves to be more amusing than
outright funny and more irrelevant than irreverent. Some of the
actors looked uncomfortable,
seeming more worried about losing lines than becoming involved
in the action at hand.
If The Gamblers breaks
about even, Hughie, the
evening's second show, leaves a
deficit. Alex Diakun directs and
Stuart Margolin acts. Margolin
plays Erie Smith, a two-bit New
York hustler who has lost
confidence in his game after the
death of his night-clerk friend
(the Hughie of the play's title).
He tries to win over the new
night-clerk in order to sustain
the illusion he holds of himself as
a high roller.
Tom McBeath nicely controls
the role ofthe bored night-clerk,
performing with quiet comedy.
Margolin as Erie Smith is just
desperate enough, just lonely
enough. But the direction is
muddy.
Margolin and McBeath
share the stage but often there is
no sense of connection; the
dynamic between them does not
build but ebbs and flows.
Director Diakun keeps them in
their own worlds and when the
night-clerk has a change of
heart, we wonder why.
Some of the blocking is awkward. Often Margolin is placed
facing an elevator door, with his
back to the audience. It feels as
though that was a convenient
place to put him until his next
monologue. Both actors work
admirably within this lack of
clarity, but the stakes just aren't
high enough in this play to
generate a big pay-off.
All in all, Snake Eyes is an
evening that promises a backroom poker game ambience, but
delivers all the pizzazz of playing
pinochle with your grandmother.
The Ubyssey
needs Arts Writers
especially
for Visual Arts.
Come to
SUB241K
and show os how
visual you can be.
Jan 11 Warren Nipp
finger style guitar
Jan 18 Peter Huron Quartet
Jan 25        Gary Keenan Trio
Feb 1 John Fossum
Rhythm & Blues D.J.
Feb 8 Gary Keenan Trio
Feb 15        Warren Nipp
Feb 22        Peter Huron Quartet
JAZZ
LIVE
S
Wednesdays
6:30 - 9:30 p.m.
FIRESIDE LOUNGE
GRAD CENTRE
■NO COVER CHARGE-
Videc
Videos
IS
Fireside Lounge
1 - Grad Centre
Every Thursday
6:30-
10:30 pm
•   Jan5
Little Big Man-t/5
The Trap - UK
Feb2
Times of Harvey Milk - US        *
The Naked Civil Servant - UK     *
* Jan 12
* Janl9
Au Revoir les Enfants - France
Manon ofThe Spring - France
Who Has Seen The Wind -
Canada
Calling The Shots - Canada
Feb 9
Feb 16
Colonel Redl - Hungary
When Father Was Away On
Business - Yugoslavia              t
Small Change - France             .
Jules and Jim - France              ,
•   Jan 26
Bread and Chocolate - Italy
Miracle In Milan -Italy
FA 23
Buiiit-ro                  •
The French Connection - US      •
AU Videos Supplied By Videomatica
Sponsored By The Creative Writing Department-
5784 University Blvd
Phone: 224-1922 or 224-9116
i^m^
>ti*i
YOUR STUDENT
TRAVEL BUREAU!
Visit the experts on Campus:
SUB 228-6890
UBC DEPARTMENT OF STUDENT HOUSING
Invites Applications for the Postion of
RESIDENCE ADVISORS FOR 1989-90
These positions are open only to registered UBC students. Successful applicants will be required to live in the Residences. Application forms and detailed job descriptions are available at the Student
Housing Office, Ponderosa Bldg., and at the Front Desk of each single
student residence area: Totem Park, Place Vanier, Walter Gage, and
AcadiayFairview Crescent.
INFORMATION MEETING FOR PROSPECTIVE APPLICANTS:
6:30 p.m. Tuesday, January 10,1989, in the Maclnnes Lounge, in the
Gage Residence Common block.
Applications will be accepted from January 3rd to January 16,k, 1989 at the the
Front Desks ofthe Single Student Residences, orat the Studenl Housing Office.
January 10,1989
THE UBYSSEY/9 ***!
*     *]
^ 4*5 ^**f rr^~. ^N,~^ ^
v.s->v.   ■.        ^"^rj^ss    .     M      *        . *
Top ten
reasons to
live or die
The Ubyssey's Top Ten List of Editorial Topics for Tuesday, January
10.
1. The lack of women running in
the student Board of Governors
and Senate elections and the lack
of women on the Board of Governors and Senate in the first place.
2. Tuition Fee Increases.
3. The AMS takeover of Duke's
Cookies.
4. Free Trade. What about it?
5. Tuition Fee Increases.
6. The hypocrisy of the Americans
with regards to chemical weapons
and how easy it is for the Soviet
Union to look good these days.
7. The Informant's Weekly Witticism.
8. The clique of student unquotable resume-builders that pop up
every time an election rolls
around.
9. What Oil Spill?
10.Timely decisions by Socreds.
theUbyssey
January 10, 1989
The Ubyssey is published Tuesdays and Fridays
throughout the academic year by the Alma Mater Society
of the University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions
are those of the staff and not necessarily those of the
university administration, or ofthe sponsor. The Ubyssey is published with the proud support of the Alumni
Association. The Ubyssey is a member of Canadian
University Press. The editorial office is Rm. 241k of the
Student Union Building. Editorial Department, phone
228-2301; advertising, 228-3977;   FAX# 228-6093
They all gathered in a circle, chanting. Deanne Fisher, the
head of the coven, demanded that the group repeat her
name three times. "Deanne Deanne Sig... Deanne," they all
moaned. Katherine Monk raised the gleaming blade high
over Victor Chew Wong's heaving chest. "Blood! Blood!"
cried Keith Leung, as he salivated all over Mike Laanela,
who only pawed at the body, while Greg Davis howled in
savage delight. Whining, Robert Groberman demanded to
be sacrificed next, muttering something about pimps,
whores and talent agents. The knife came down, creating a
vertical slash down the torso, splattering blood all over
Laura J. May. Bonnie Schneider started the cauldron
cooking, while Monica Brunner and Michael Vaney played
around with the intestines. Cathy Lu set the table as Olivia
Zanger rubbed her hands and drooled in anticipation, all
the while trying to get stories about Japan into the conversation. "Phooey!" said Leah Postman, demanding to eat the
flesh raw. Joe Altwasser only sniffled, blew his nose and
complained that there was nothing wrong with being a
squishy liberal. Laurie McGuiness and Elizabeth Turner
eyed Jon Treichel, the coven janitor, hungrily, who only
swept up the mess and sulked.
news:
entertainment:
city desk:
Dunn* Fisher
Robert Groberman
Katharine Monk
Letters
Bathroom
bandits
Dear Mr. Thief:
You know who you are.
Last Friday you nabbed my
nice leather briefcase out of
the washroom on the second
floor of SUB. I just thought
Fd write to you and explain
how much you screwed up
my life.
First, the briefcase has
sentimental value. It was
given to me many years ago
by a good friend. I used it
during my undergraduate
years at UBC and planned
to carry it with me through
life.
Inside the case was my
wallet. Because of you Fve
had to reapply for credit
cards, get a new driver's licence, SIN card and UBC
library card. I hope you like
my five-leaf clover and Jerry
Rubin business card.
You also stole a mystery
novel I was reading. My Dad
bought it in Hong Kong and
I doubt 111 be able to get a
copy here. 1.1 never know
what the Field Marshall
reveals in his memoirs,
which frankly pisses me off.
In addition, you stole
my notes from Chemistry
and my Christmas exam
which I didn't get a chance to
look over. Ill never know
where I have to put more
effort next term. When the
final comes, I also won't
have my first-term notes to
study. From my mark you
can see I need all the help I
can get.
Finally, you stole the
separation slips from my
last two jobs. I put those in
my briefcase Friday because
I was planing to apply for
unemployment insurance
that day. Now I have to
write my former employers
to get those forms, delaying
my UI. I need the cash.
Fm out on campus these
days. I may see you walking
around with my briefcase. It
was hand made in Africa
and is quite distinctive. If I
see it, I can assure you there
will be a scene. The RCMP
know about the theft and if I
catch you 111 make sure you
are prosecuted.
Why don't you be a good
laddy,   save   yourself  a
The Ubyssey welcomes letters on any Issue. Letters must be typed and are not to exceed 300 words in length. Content
which Is jutted to be libelous, homophobic, sexist, racist or factually Incorrect will not be published. Please be concise.
Letters may be edited for brevity, but It Is standard Ubyssey policy not to edit letters for spelling or grammatical mistakes.
Please bring them, with Identification, to SUB 241k. Letters must Include name, faculty, and signature.
hassle, clear your conscience and make me happy
by dropping the briefcase off
at The Ubyssey or the
proctor's office. Otherwise
the theft may come back to
haunt you.
If anyone else on campus notices a friend suddenly using an old briefcase,
ask them if they're the thief.
Gordon Clark
Unclassified
Tuition hike
blasted
I live at home in Cosy
Kerrisdale. I have a job. I
have a bike. I have no money
problems.
To many students like
myself, the proposed 10%
tuition increase, if implemented, will certainly be a
pain, but will not mean the
difference between a university education and the
lack of one. To many, the
opposition to the hike may
not seem to involve them, as
they have no stories of hardship to tell the Premier.
Well, the fact that you
can pay it doesn't make it
just. Consider carefully;
but, if you object to this increase, speak up.
Whatever your position, it is certain that the
tuition increase would result in fewer people being
able to afford going to UBC.
This, I feel is in itself a loss.
A big part ofthe University
Experience is the people. To
form a realistic conception
ofthe world, one must hear
it described by as many different people representing
as many different perspectives as possible and then
amalgamate these images
with one's own, using one's
own value system. I didn't
come to UBC to meet with
people united in common
affluence; I came here to be a
part of a group united in
common intelligence. I object to any trend toward
creating a UBC whose population is weighted in favor of
any group with one thing in
common (other than
brains); be it an Anglo-
Saxon background, money,
a big car, or a yearning for
the spiky hills of Tebet.
James Rowley
Sciences
Gay Games
clarified
Your news story headlined "Gay Games get UBC
go ahead" contains some
misleading information.
First, the headline
could be taken to imply that
the future of the Games was
in some way imperiled by
UBC's decision. This is not
the case.
Second, in noting Dr.
Strangway's intransigence
on the issue, Don Whitely is
quoted as saying "he still
didn't want UBC to host or
sponsor the Games."
Strangway need never have
worried. No one wants or
has asked UBC to host or
sponsor the games. The host
organization has no connection whatever with UBC.
It is regrettable that a
handful of policy-makers in
a publicly-funded institution could have used their
personal biases to lead policy outside the terms of the
constitution. While it is
commendable that this
anomaly has been corrected,
it remains reprehensible
that Games organizers were
made to suffer the indignity
of discrimination as they
attempted to do business
with the university.
Robert J. Harris
Arts 2
Languages
valued
The mistake that Michael and Alex Doll make in
their assertion that the languages and cultures of the
native people in Canada
should not be preserved is
their belief that the anglophone language and culture
contain all the information
and knowledge about this
world.
The loss of language,
the vehicle of culture, is synonymous with the loss of
knowledge. It is naive to
presume that we hold all the
answers about life's mysteries and can not learn anything from other cultures.
When he attempts to
criticize native languages
for being "directly out ofthe
Old Stone Age," Alex Doll
once again errs by assuming
that languages are formed
at one point in time and do
not evolve and expand to
incorporate new experiences. Would English, at its
"inception", have contained
words to describe the technology that has only
emerged since World War
II?
To quote the anthropologist A. Alland, "all languages are capable of expressing everything that
needs to be expressed in a
particular culture. There is
no such thing as a primitive
language." Native languages speak equally well to
their experience as English
speaks to our own.
The example that many
people are familiar with is
the wide range of Inuit
words for snow, which permit more refined communication than English speakers are capable of about a
material of real importance
to the Inuit culture.
The Dolls may be awed
by the powers of white culture, but in reality we have a
lot to learn about living on
this planet. We cannot risk
losing vital information that
other cultures have gained
through the centuries of
their existence.
L. Lavallee
Unclassified 5
Read
this one!
Notice to Ubyssey
Letter-Writers:
The Ubyssey requires
picture I.D. of everyone
submitting a letter to the
editor—we have to make
sure you are who you say
you are so we don't get our
pants sued off. If you have
submitted a letter either
under the door or through
the mail lately andithas not
been printed, you now know
why. Please come in and
show your I.D. to any Ubyssey staff member ifyou want
your letter(s) printed. We're
dying to print some of them
but can't due to fear of lawsuits.
In the future, please
deliver letters into our hot
little hands in person.
Thank you.
The Ubyssey
10/THE UBYSSEY
January 10 ,1989 OP-ED
Unfair corporate intervention in election '88
Abraham Lincoln once called democracy,
"goveitwaent of the people, by the people, for the
people," But does the common man really determine who governs his country? Judging bj> our
recent Canadian Federal election, Abe should
have substituted "big business' for "people'.
This past election clearly showed exactly how
influential Canadian big business can be on the
average citizen.
The tnid*eIeetion Liberal surge in popularity
after their adveridsingblitz and the final Conservative majority after their $2 million advertising
spree shows how the effectiveness of media-ad*-
vert_zingon the often muddled Canadian eitizen.
With this in mind, how can big business not win
when both major parties are corporately financed?
Yet this election more than any other involved corporate interests and received corporate
intervention.
As soon as ihe trade deal was in danger,
newspapers across Canada were filled with huge
three^page Free Trade advertisements produced
and placed by 'non-partisan* groups such as
Chambers of Commerce, corporate exporters and
business associations.
PERSPECTIVE
Isn*t it convenient for the Conservatives to
have organizations like these with so much con*
cem for Canada and so much money to expre ss it?
To combat this Free Trade push, eleven anti-
Free Trade coalitions Scraped together barely
enough money to publish a booklet—equally
filled with one-sided opinions—that was distributed in twenty-three newspapers across Canada.
The disparity in the funding levels of the two
sides was dramatic.
While the spending and advertising were
probably the most effective forms of big business
intervention, they were not the most controversial methods used to influence voters.
The worst cases of corporate intervention
were the attendance-mandatory discussion sessions where the only view presented was that of
company managers who, strangely enough, always believed Free Trade will benefit their employees, Many companies including Crown Life
Insurance Co, and Alcan Aluminum Ltd* held
these information meetings while others such as
James Eichardson and Sons Ltd. and Canfor
Corp. distributed a pro-Free Trade supplement
called Straight Talk.
Why weren't both sides of the issue made
available? And because they weren't, wasn't this
a form of brainwashing?
Perhaps a better way of informing employees
would have been to assign one manager to present the pros and another the con s in a paper to be
posted on the office bulletin boards. This way
both sides are given and employees are not forced
to read anything*
Sometimes corporate lobbying can be constructive if itis reasonably accurate and informative. Unfortunately, this was not the case in this
election.
Warren Whyte
Arts 3
Marking system
suggested
With Christmas exams fresh
on everyone's mind, I thought that
it might be an opportune time to
suggest a new method of representing academic achievement on
the UBC transcript.
I'm sure that most of us, at
times, have experienced the frustration of receiving a mediocre
grade in a difficult class, while a
fellow student receives a first class
in a course which required much
less work.
In fact, I'm sure that we all
know or have heard of students
who choose courses which they
regard as easy credits in order to
boost their overall academic average.
Because ofthe huge variety of
courses and professors at this
university, a standard level of
course difficulty is very hard to
achieve. However, with the entrance to graduate school and
possible career employment becoming increasingly competitive,
it is worthwhile to make an attempt to have a more representative mark on the transcript of a
student's effort and success. I feel
that this could be achieved
through the inclusion of numerical
fractions representing the
student's standing in relation to
others in the class, as well as their
overall point score out of 75 or 150.
For example: Student A
might receive a 58/75 point score
while achieving the 31st position
in a class of fifty students (31/50).
Conversely, in a different class of
fifty students, Student B might
receive a 54/75 point score but
have the 7th position in the class
(7/50).
The inclusion of a class standing fraction would indicate Student B fared quite well in relation
to the other classmates in a seemingly difficult class, while Student
A, though achieving a relatively
high point score, achieved only the
31st position among the other
students. In this hypothetical
situation, it is obvious that Student B's class was more difficult
than Student A's.
Overall, I believe that the
majority of UBC students who
have worked hard for their degrees would be in favour of a fraction representing class standing
on the transcript. The only casualties of such a system will be the
students who intentionally seek
easy courses and the professors
who instruct them. So isn't it time
to change the University of B.C.'s
marking system and make it much
more representative of our years of
hard work?
L. Robson
English 3
Charter must take
supremacy
Katherine Monk and Richard
Sevigny have missed the point
entirely: French Canadian culture
is precisely the central issue in
this political debacle. Culture is
the way by which we collectively
represent our sense of identity and
values. The issue of language is
the focus of the problem of perpetuating and preserving French
Canadian culture within Canada,
inside or outside of Quebec.
Robert Bourassa is correct
when he says that he has a duty to
protect the use ofthe French lan
guage in his province; however,
this does not give him license to
abrogate the rights accorded to
minorities. The "inside-outside"
language law formulation is fatuous; an attack on minority rights
will not preserve French culture
and language, it will only exacerbate the issue. The Premier of
Quebec has targeted a manifestation ofthe problem, not the source
of it.
The Supreme Court of Canada struck down two sections of
Bill 101 because each violated the
Charter and Quebec's Bill of
Rights, i.e., both federal and provincial law.
For the Charter of Rights and
Freedoms to have any efficacy or
meaning, no law, policy, agreement or constitutional amendment must supercede it. The "distinct society" clause in the Meech
Lake Constitutional Accord and
the added measure permitting the
province of Quebec to take whatever steps it deems necessary to
preserve French Canadian culture
legitimize any Quebec legislation
which violates the fundamental
freedom of expression guaranteed
in the Charter. Use of the "notwithstanding clause" is a repudiation of the Charter (and hence, of
the Constitution, also, which Quebec becomes officially subject to
under the terms of Meech Lake).
Bill 178 is a rejection ofthe Charter, the Constitution, Quebec's
Bill of Rights and Meech Lake.
Meech Lake and Bill 178 are both
unconstitutional and should be
scrapped. Sovereignty-Association by any other name.
TomAndrews
Unclassified 5
SSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSS
GMAT LSAT
GRE
Weekend Test
Preparation
atUBC
Next Courses:
GMAT & GRE -
Jan. 13,14,15
LSAT - Jan. 27,28,29
CALL: 222-8272   J%
&exton §j
Educational Centers 'ft
Professionals In Test Preparation
11
IlpllIB
Sat. Matinee - Jan 21st at 2pm
BOX OFFICE • FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE • ROOM 207
Support Your Campus Theatre
This is
vour 5DOC&,
Write us a letter, pontificate,
spout off, get bitchy, get even.
5hoy off mr superior
understanding of life and all its
complexities.
Or be reallv bold and send us a
'perspective'.
)lou have profound things to say,
deep thoughts fo share,
and yho the Hell else yill print
vour verbose driveP
A
Bzzr Garden
G.S.S. Tradition since 1952
Be A Part Of
The Thirst!
Every Friday!
Now serving Hot food
Ballroom 4:30 - 7:30
January 10,1989
THE UBYSSEY/11 Trip the Light Fantastic
Pursue the Total Experience
with
RECREATION UBC
CALL 228-3996
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION
1989
January - March
A Comprehensive Non-Credit Instructional and
Activity Program in Leisure Pursuits.
The RECREATION UBC OFFICE is located in
Room 203, WAR MEMORIAL GYMNASIUM.
MARTIAL ARTS - $45.00
CODE COURSE _ LEVEL
200 JUDOl
201 JUD02_3
202 KARATE 1
203 KARATE 2 _ 2
204 KARATE 3
205 AIKIDO
206 WUSHU (ADULT)
207 WUSHU (CHILDREN)
208 TAI CHI
209 TAEKWONDO
211 SHORINJIKEMPO
212 SHADOW BOXING
213 KENDO
HUCE PROGRAM WITH
DAYS
MON/WED
MON/WED
MON/WED
MON/WED
SATURDAY
TUE/THUR
THURSDAY
SATURDAY
WEDNESDAY
TUES/THURS
TUES/THURS
TUES/THURS
MONDAY
WEDNESDAY
SOME WORLD CLASS
TIME
8:00-9 _0pm
8:30-1 OrOOpm
6:00-7_0pm
6:30-8:00pm
lO.-00-HJOpm
6:00-7_0pm
7_O-9_0pm
8:30-10-00pm
7:30-9_Opm
4:30-6:00pm
&00-7_0pm
6:_0-8.00pm
7:30-9:00pm
6:00-7_0pm
INSTRUCTION
PLACE
GYME
GYME
GYME
GYME
GYME
GYME
GYME
GYME
TASK FORCE
TASK FORCE
TASK FORCE
GYMG
TASK FORCE
j\RM203
THE NUMBER ONE HEALTH CLUB
WAR MEMORIAL GYMNASIUM WEIGHTROOM SCHEDULE & FEE STRUCTURE
for
January - April 1989
WEIGHTROOM MEMBERSHIP CARDS AVAILABLE at
RECREATION UBC OFFICE, 203 WAR MEMORIAL GYMNASIUM
PLEASE NOTE - NO refund - LOST or STOLEN CARDS - Replacement Charge
SKATING S45.00
CODE COURSE i: LEVEL
400 BEGINjMING SKATING 1
401 FIGURES _ FREESKATING 2
402 ICE DANCING 2
DAY(S)
FRIDAY
MONDAY
WEDNESDAY
TIME
12_0-l_0pm
12*30-l_0pm
12_O-l_0pm
PLACE
TWSC*
TWSC*
TWSC"
♦THUNDERBIRD WINTER SPORTS COMPLEX
#1 HEALTH CLUB
EARLY RISERS
TOTAL HEALTH CLUB
AEROBICS PLUS
VARSITY PLUS
OFF CAMPUS
S30.00
$10.00
$50.00
$70.00
$50.00
WEEKDAYS
WEEKENDS
(Closed Mon-Thur
WEEKDAYS ONLY
WEEKDAYS
10:00a m-10:00pm
12:00-4:00pm
5:00-6:00pm)
7:00-9_Oam
7:00-9:00am
10:00a m-10:00pm
12:0O-4:00pm
5:00-6:00pm)
WEEKENDS
(Closed Mon-Thur
ALL Aerobics Classes see above
per term PLUS Health Club
WEEKDAYS lft00am-3:00pm
6:00-10:00pm
WEEKENDS 12.0O-4.-0PM
(No Athletes Weekdays 3:00-6:00pm)
SameAs Same As
TOTAL HEALTH TOTAL HEAI.TI I
RED
ORANGE
PURPLE
NAVY BLUE
GREEN
CODE COURSE _ LEVEL
600 YOGA
601 CENTERING'ftotal fitness)
602 SQUASH I JAN.l 6-FEB.8
603 SQUASH I FEB. 20-MAR.15
604 KAYAKING
605 GOLF JAN.l 7-FEB_l
ACTIVITIES
DAYS
MON/WED
MON/WED
MON/WED
MON/WED
MARCH TBA
TUES
TIME
4_0^:00pm
6:00-7:00pm
4:lS-5:45pm
4:15-5:4Spm
EVENING TBA
12_0-2:00pm
PLACE
ARM. 203
ARM203
TWSC
TWSC
POOL
GYME
MONDAY
TUESDAY
WEDNESDAY
THURSDAY
FRIDAY
5:00-6:OOPM SCHEDULE
BODY BUILDING
STRENGTH TRAINING
POWERLIFTING CLUB (see ad this page)
TRIM GYM
MEMBERSHIP - #1 and TOTAL HEALTH
WEIGHT COURSES - $40.00
CAMPUS FITNESS with REC UBC
600 - $45.00
COSTS
601-$35.00      602-$50.00      603-$50.00      604-$45.00      605-$35.00
Participatory Classes and Instructional Courses for all levels of fitness
100 AEROBICRS - $45.00
DANCE - $45.00
CODE COURSE & LEVEL
500
501
502
503
504
505
506
DAY(S)
BALLROOM 1
BALLETROOM 2
BALLET 1 _ 2
ADVANCED BALLET 3
JAZZ I
JAZZ II
MODERN I
TUE/THUR
TUE/THUR
MON/WED
MON/WED
MON/WED
TUE/THURS
MON/WED
TIME
7_O-9_0pm
9:00-10_0pm
4:30-6KMpm
2.00-3_0pm
12_0-_00pm
l:00-2_0pm
6:00-7_0pm
PLACE
TASK FORCE"
TASK FORCE*
TASK FORCE*
TASK FORCE*
TASK FORCE*
TASK FORCE*
TASK FORCE*
• TASK FORCE LOCATED AT 2352 HEALTH SCIENCE MALL
CERTIFICATION COURSES
CODE COURSES LEVEL DAY(S) TIME
701 ST. JOHN'S STANDARD FIRST AID ($50.00) THURSDAY 6_0-9_Opm
702 FITNESS INSTRUCTOR ($90.00) THURSDAY 3_O-6_-0pm
MON      TUES
1_30-W0
3:30-4:30 A
4:40-530 B
WED
1_30-1JO
THURS
330-4:30 A 3:30-4:30 B
4:40-5:30 B
•WAR MEMORIAL GYM
WMG*
1.30-2:30 B      OSBORNE
OSBORNE
4:40-530 B      OSBORNE
101 AEROBICS PLUS - ALL 100 CLASSES PLUS NUMBER ONE HEALTH CLUB $70.00
102 FACULTY, STAFF AND OLDER STSUDENT FITNESS $45.00
PLACE
OSB. 203A
OSB. 203A4B
MON
1130-1:05
103 DANCE FIT $30.00
MON TUES
TUES
1230-1:05
WED
12:30-1:30
THURS
1230-1:05       GYM B
FRI
12-30-l:30pm   GYME
*
9{tiv
9{ezv
RECREATION UBC
NUMBER ■ CLUE-
WAR MEMORIAL GYM
WEIGHTROOM
Freeweights New Machines
Term II Memberships Available Now
$30.00
Recreation UBC Office 203 WMG 228-39%
No. 1 Club Operation Hours
Weekdays 10:00am - 10:00pm
Weekends 10:00am - 2:00pm
Closed Daily 5:00 - 6:00pm except Fridays
WEIGHT LIFTING
CLUB
president Grant Carder
Thursdays 5:00 - 6:00 pm
WAR MEMORIAL GYMNASIUM
register - 203 WAR MEMORIAL GYM
LIFT YOUR WAY
UP THE LADDER
SQUATS ^~~
BENCH PRESS
DEAD LIFT
Welcome serious
powerlifters of all levels
0\[cw
THE REC UBC SATURDAY
SEMINAR SERIES
YOUR BEST BET FOR $25.00
Register EARLY Limited enrollment in each class. Register
in Room 203 War Memorial Gymnasium. ALL CLASSES
HELD ROOM 211. WAR MEMORIAL GYMNASIUM(after
lecture, some classes proceed to different locations).
MASSAGE: April 1st, 10:00am- 1:00pm - Systematic
manipulation of soft body tissues for therapeutic
purposes.
STRENGTH TRAINING: Feb 18th. l:00-4:00pm - BREAKING
DOWN THE BARRIERS; techniques to power through
barriers and plateaux.
STRENGTH TRAINING: Mar 18th. l:00-4:00pm -POWER
FOR ALL SPORTS; lifts and techniques to unlesh power.
KAYAKING: THE ESKIMO ROLL: Mar 25th. 8:00-11:00am -
Kayak experience necessary. Come prepared to get
wet.
WOMEN'S SELF DEFENCE: Jan 28th. 10:00-1:00pm -
Manoeuvers to overcome unwelcome physical
difficulties. Gym E Osborne Centre.
12/THE UBYSSEY
January 10 ,1989

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