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The Ubyssey Jan 14, 1972

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Array —doug nickel photo
PAULA ROSS DANCE workshop explodes in SUB ballroom Thursday afternoon. Dancers were reported exhausted but keen to try more. It's still not too late to join, for more
information phone 873-2569.
Charges fly in court squabble
Student Court recessed until
Tuesday, after more than three
hours of heated squabble
Thursday night over the validity
of the Nov. 24 Alma Mater
Society elections, being contested
by defeated secretarial candidate
Tom MacKinnon.
After much ado over
procedural points and a
five-minute reress for the judges
to decide how to run the court,
prosecution lawyers Ed Safarik
and George Angelomatis entered
their pleas on behalf of
MacKinnon, law 3.
The prosecution charged that
the election was not held by
secret ballot and therefore should
be declared invalid.
Alternatively, should the court
rule the election valid, Safarik said
they would enter charges
concerning election irregularities.
Further discussion ensued as to
whether the court has the power
to rule on such a plea, inspired by
an objection to that effect by
Hein Poulous and Ted Nemetz,
defence lawyers for AMS
president Grant Burnyeat and
AMS secretary Hilary Powell.
The court ruled that it has the
right to rule on the case and the
first witness for the prosecution
was called... an hour after the
hearing began.
Law student Walter Stein
testified that he had used his
invalidated AMS card to vote — at
which point Poulous demanded
that other witnesses be made to
leave the room so they "would
not be influenced by each others'
evidence."
This was done.
Colin   Portnuff,  an anthrosoc
student who manned the
Buchanan pole, said the election
was not held by secret ballot
because both ballots and voters
lists were numbered.
He said people signed the lists
in the order in which they voted
so their ballots correspond with
their names as they appeared on
the lists.
Poulous questioned the
reliability of Portnuff as a witness,
alleging Portnuff had checked the
numbering of ballots and lists
with    the    intention    of   later
contesting   the   election  on  the
grounds of irregularities.
When the court, with Poulous'
"best interests at heart", pointed
out that he was supporting the
prosecution in his'
cross-examination, he requested
the court to allow him to conduct
his own defence, ignored the
point and continued to badger the
witness as to his political
affiliations.
Evert Hoogers, assistant
returning officer for the election,
testified that AMS external affairs
officer Adrian Belshaw manned
the Sedgwick library poll and
vice-president Derek Swain the
SUB number one poll, because no
one else was available to do it.
He further testified to a
discrepancy of 14 votes between
the first count for the secretarial
position and the second count,
held two days later.
Sedgwick library employee
Shelly Criddle, said she heard
people behind the polling booths
in Sedgwick advising students "to
vote for Burnyeat and Powell" on
several different occassions.
Rob Frenton and Ted Zacks,
law students, said persons
manning the polls advised them
that "it is a good policy to vote
for those at the top of the list if
you are having trouble deciding."
Zacks identified two of those
persons as Belshaw and AMS
treasurer David Dick, both
Student Coalition executive
members elected by acclamation
prior to the Nov. 24 elections.
Court will resume Tuesday at
6:30 p.m. in SUB 207-209.
TJtfUJMF workers unionize
By PAUL KNOX
The Canadian Union of Public Employees has chalked up
another success in its current organizing drive at UBC.
National organizer Ole Johnson said Thursday a majority of the
research assistants, technicians and clerical employees at the
Tri-University Meson Facility have indicated their desire to be
represented by CUPE.
Application for certification of the bargaining unit was made to
the Labor Relations Board on Wednesday, Johnson said.
TRIUMF is a nuclear research project, still under construction at
the extreme south end of the campus. It is sponsored by UBC, Simon
Fraser University and the University of Alberta, and is largely funded
by government grants.
Johnson said the union has 31 signed cards out of the 55
employees.
"We wanted to apply for the certification as soon as we can," he
said. "It gives us the advantage if the employer tries to hire more
people to wipe out our majority."
The TRIUMF certification, if it is granted, will be the latest in
the current CUPE drive which is designed to increase the proportion
of unionized workers at UBC and to include them all in one union.
At present only about one-third of campus workers bargain
collectively with the administration.
Johnson, who has been on campus about six weeks, said there
was little opposition to unionism at the TRIUMF centre.
"This showed us how easy it would be, and it shows that any
place would be as easy if the employees are determined to organize," he
said.
However, in other areas of work on campus Johnson said he has
run up against objections from workers to attempts at organization.
"Some people are afraid their working conditions will go down
the drain, that once the union comes in and there's a signed contract
the administrators will hold them to the letter and they won't get
some of the fringe benefits," he said.
"What they should be afraid of is that although they may have
an agreeable administrator now, they might wind up with a real heel
at some future date and then, without a union, there won't be any
protection at all."
There has also been some opposition from office workers on the
grounds that they should organize separately rather than join with
maintenance and other manual workers.
"But when it's explained that we can be a lot stronger in a
union of all the workers, they understand," Johnson said.
Many workers at places such as TRIUMF are also concerned
that because the projects are operating on fixed government grants,
they may be pricing themselves out of jobs by asking for wage
increases that are too high.
"But just because someone is working on a grant-funded project
doesn't mean he or she has to be a second-class citizen," Johnson said.
"And the point of organization is that these things can then be
negotiated, regardless of the outcome." Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, January 14,  1972
Student fee could jump
By BERNARD BISCHOFF
The Alma Mater Society
student fee will likely be increased
next year.
"Costs of services, supplies
and staff are increasing steadily,
there is no alternative but to seek
a fee increase for next year, even
only to maintain current
programs," AMS treasurer David
Dick said in his mid-year report to
council.
Dick said he could not state
what the increase on the $29 fee
would be.
The fee is now divided so that
$15 goes to the SUB building
fund to pay off the mortgage, $5
goes to sports, leaving the AMS
with $9.
The total revenues the AMS
possesses this year, according to
SUB opening
delayed
Alma Mater Society
co-ordinator Rick Murray got cold
feet Thursday and decided not to
open SUB from midnight to 8
a.m. this morning.
Instead, Murray has called a
special meeting of the SUB
management committee for noon
today to discuss changes in
cleaning routine and additional
expenditures that would be
involved in opening the building
24 hours a day.
Murray said the building would
be open round the clock at
Wednesday night's council
meeting after he was rebuked for
ignoring a council directive to
take the action before Christmas.
the report, amount to
$446,835.
Of this, a very major chunk
($277,620) is allocated to the
SUB building fund.
The operating costs of the
AMS itself also account for a
considerable portion of the
budget. For example, office
salaries are $48,840 and executive
salaries are $4,500.
The Ubyssey accounts for
$36,500 of the budget. The
various undergraduate faculty and
departmental societies receive a
total of $3500.
Intramural sports and the
university clubs committee (both
of whom complained earlier this
year of not getting enough)
received $5000 each.
The Amchitka demonstration
cost $1250. Groups such as the
Non-Faculty Teachers'
Association received a mere
pittance — in this case $100.
Dick said, "The office salaries
estimate has been increased as a
result of the new union
agreement. It should be noted
that there will be another increase
on June 1 which will increase this
amount considerably next year."
He also cited a large number of
"donations and conferences" and
"referendums and elections" as
causes of the increased cost in
expenditure.
Human Government financial
critic Piers Bursill-Hall said of
Dick's budget, "It's sad but
probably true that we will have to
increase the AMS fee next year no
matter what sort of executive is in
power.
"Even     a     progressive
government which might be able
to cut down on some of the
social-club type expenses now
being paid for would find it
necessary to put the money saved
into whatever sort of constructive
action it might want to undertake.
"The office workers have
received an increase in wages
(from $300 a month to $400 a
month) which they certainly
deserve.
"Taking all this into account
we will probably have no choice
but to raise the fees." said
Bursill-Hall.
Law backs
alternate
food outlet
Members of the law students
association voted Thursday to
support the alternative food
service outlet in the law building,
even though the LSA is losing
money by allowing it to operate.
A motion stating the students'
approval of the quality of the
AFS food and a recommendation
that the service continue was
unanimously approved by the law
students' general meeting.
The students also agreed to
raise their association fees 50
cents per student to cover losses
from LSA-run vending machines.
"The losses are due to
students' preference for AFS
food," one student said at the
meeting.
Campus clubs reorganized
By DAVID SCHMIDT
The administration of campus
clubs has been totally reorganized
following the recent collapse of
the university clubs committee.
Last week former UCC
executive members asked the
Alma Mater Society to take over
the committee's functions. The
AMS council put the UCC into
receivership and appointed science
representative Piers Bursill-Hall as
UCC trustee.
After discussions with various
clubs representatives, the AMS
finance committee and AMS
treasurer David Dick, Bursill-Hall
drafted a new constitution for the
UCC which was passed by AMS
council Wednesday.
"Basically, the new
constitution means that clubs will
no longer have to go through all
the political in-fighting that was
taking place in the UCC
executive," Dick said.
The new constitution divides
clubs into five different
categories: political clubs, service
clubs, educational clubs, special
interest clubs and social and
recreational clubs.
Only the political and service
clubs will be administered by the
UCC. The educational clubs will
be administered through the
undergraduate or graduate society
in their particular fields.
Special interest and social and
recreational clubs now come
under the control of the finance
committee and are expected to
provide their own operating and
administrative costs.
Under the new constitution,
each member club will have one
representative on the committee.
The UCC executive will consist of
a treasurer appointed by the
finance committee, a
chairman/chairwoman and
secretary elected by the
representatives.
"We hope that the finance
committee will be able to appoint
a treasurer some time next week,"
Dick said.
The new constitution also
includes stricter budget controls.
Based on the budgets submitted,
the   treasurer must not set one
per-capita grant and disperse it to
each club.
The amendments to the AMS
code also call for a special projects
fund to be used by the
"self-sustaining" (special interest
and social and recreational) clubs.
"The treasurer has to set out
the funds required for special
projects," Dick said.
"The new constitution means
that the administrative budget will
be decreased though the overall
budget probably won't be."
PAYMENT OF FEES
The    Department    of    Finance,    General    Services
Administration Bldg., wishes to remind students that
the second instalment is due on or before
Friday, January 14,1972
YOUR PRESCRIPTION . . .
... For Oknsas
for that smart look in glows* ...
look to
Plesclibtion Optical
Student Discount Given
WE HAVE AN OFFICE NEAR YOU
Summer Employment Opportunities
FIELD SUPERVISORS
RED CROSS WATER SAFETY SERVICE
Several vacancies exist from May 1st, 1972 to August 31st, 1972.
The Field Supervisor has broad experience in aquatics, holds the Red
Cross/Royal Life Saving Society Instructor certificate and has proven
leadership abilities. This individual is a self-starter able to work without
supervision, works well with volunteers and has a flair for public speaking.
Apply detailing qualifications and experience to:
Director of Water Safety Services,
THE CANADIAN RED CROSS SOCIETY,
4750 Oak Street. Vancouver 9, B.C.
Applications should be received by January 31st, 1972.
SKI JACKETS
SWEATERS
CARDIGANS
DRESS SHIRTS
10%
OOFF
Wallace Berry T-Shirts $3.99 & $4.95, Chambray Prison Shirts $6.25,
Sweat Pants $4.45, Sweat Shirts $3.45, Kangaroo Shirts (Flannel) $5.40,
Sports Shirts $6.50, Corduroy Jeans $7.50. Money Back Guarantee On Ail
Shirts. Informal Fun Shopping — New Mdse. Only.
BERNARD'S BARGAIN STORE
3217 WEST BROADWAY
OPEN DAILY EXCEPT ON WED. FRIDAY TILL 9
REGULAR WEEKLY PROGRAMS AT I.H.
i&'&SH*
International = Between Nations
SPECIAL EVENTS:
FREE MANDARIN LESSONS
Every Monday-12:30-1:30-Rm. 406
INTERNATIONAL FOLK DANCING
Every Wednesday—8 p.m.
Lower Lounge
FRIDAY 'FRESHMENTS as usual
every week from 4 p.m. til ??
Bring your musical instruments!
•
Fri. Jan. 14 8:30 p.m.
GERMAN POLKA PARTY-live band - $1.50 ea.
Sun. Jan. 16 3 to 5 p.m.
SLIDE  SHOW OF MAURITIUS - FREE  - coffee and
refreshments — everyone welcome.
SAM PECKINPAH'S
ST/MWING
JASON R0BARDS
Friday 14 and Saturday 15
7:00 and 9:30
Sunday 16 — 7:00
SUB FILM SOC
presentation
50c
SUB THEATRE Friday, January 14, 1972
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
Union, workers
displeased with
AMS action
By MIKE SASGES
Carol Buzas' union and co-workers are displeased with her
threatened dismissal as Alma Mater Society executive secretary.
Bill Lowe, vice-president and regional manager of the Office and
Technical Employees Union, said the union will represent Buzas
against the AMS.
"As of today there is nothing concrete but we will represent
Carol," Lowe said Thursday.
OTEU representative Barry Hodgson is meeting with Buzas
today.
And AMS shop steward Sheila McKay said Thursday office
employees are displeased with the Student Coalition's threatened
dismissal.
"I think Carol's getting a rotten deal - that executive can't
expect her to go on welfare because she has a child," said one worker
who did not want to be named.
McKay is meeting with AMS general manager Brian Robinson
today.
"I would assume it is about this business with Carol," said
McKay.
However she refused to comment further.
AMS president Grant Burnyeat told AMS council Wednesday at
an in-camera meeting that Buzas was a "security risk" because she was
hired by the Human Government executive.
Robinson told council Buzas' child was interfering with her
work.
Science undergraduate society representative Svend Robinson
told The Ubyssey the general manager had never seen Buzas' job
qualifications until Wednesday's council meeting.
'The executive thinks Carol is a second class citizen because she
is separated with a child," science rep Piers Bursill-Hall said Thursday.
"The executive cannot find any reason to fire Carol," said
Bursill-Hall. "They can only present arguments with holes big enough
to drive a tank through."
He said the executive has escaped the responsibility of dealing
with Buzas through council by turning the decision over to general
manager Robinson.
"The executive has seen that the move to fire her is politically
too hot to take to council," said Bursill-Hall. 'They're going to do it
outside council."
Robinson refused Thursday to comment on the matter.
"I don't think it would be beneficial to anyone at this time to
talk about it," he said.
AMS treasurer David Dick, who must direct Robinson to make a
decision according to a motion following the in-camera council
meeting, and Burnyeat refused to comment.
The OTEU and the AMS signed their first contract with more
than 120 clauses over the holidays.
—kini mcdonald photo
SAY GOODBYE to those sweat socks you lost in September, 'cause a thrifty shopper probably picked them
up for a song at lost and found sale in SUB Thursday.
AMS proposes massive SUB renovations
By IAN LINDSAY
A $345,000 comprehensive
development program for SUB
was presented to student council
Wednesday night by Alma Mater
Society co-ordinator Rick Murray.
Murray said Thursday that the
proposals are still tentative and
that no money has been spent on
studies or planning.
The structural feasibility of
the proposals has been discussed
with an architect, he said.
Under the program, the
conversation pit and listening
lounge area would be re-arranged
with the carpeted areas expanded
and the lighting improved.
The door leading to the west
side staircase would be sealed to
cut down on traffic in the area
and provide a more restful
atmosphere. The reading room
would be removed as well.
Murray said he favors the
removal because of the expense of
the operation in magazine
subscriptions and because "the
library provides a duplicate
service".
The Pit development, suggested
for     the     area     behind    the
Thunderbird Shop, stresses a
flexible facility which could be
used for activities other than the
sale of beer.
Facilities for the eventual sale
of draft beer will be included.
In addition, the plan calls for a
remodelling of the small rooms in
the south west corner of the
basement currently used as a
storage area by the outdoor clubs.
Classroom Report
By VAUGHN PALMER
Professor Harry Campbell gives an
efficient and clear presentation of the
involved theoretical material in Economics
200: The Principles of Economics.
At 2:30 p.m., Thursday, in. Angus 110
Campbell used graphs and an overhead
projector to present aspects of the law of
diminishing returns to a group of 50
students, most of whom were male
engineers.
The hour-long lecture went smoothly,
marred only by some sick engineer laughs of
the "get a load of those tits" variety when a
third lonely woman entered.
The workload in Economics 200,
Campbell's section included, involves about
five work sheets and a midterm exam each
semester, plus a Christmas exam and a final.
Campbell's own hour-long Christmas
exam was relatively easy, but the hour and a
half long core exam was quite difficult.
Ihe only textbook required for
Economics 200 is Economics by Samuelson
and Scott, which is revised frequently, the
current third edition costing $10.50.
The textbook is written by Nobel Prize
winner Paul Samuelson and adapted by
UBC's Anthony Scott using the Readers
Digest "instant Canadiana" formula in
rearranging articles and substituting
"Ontario" for "California", and
"Quebecois" for "underprivileged
minorities."
The course content at times shows the
truth in the remark, "even a parrot can be an
economist: Just teach him the words
'supply' and 'demand'. Except for modern
economists one must add the words
"aggregate" and "increment".
However, the course is necessary
background material and theory for just
about every other course in the economics
department and is a better course for first
and second year students than the useless
Economics 100: A History of Economics.
Sections 30 and 31 have Math 100 as
pre-requisite and concentrate more heavilty
on mathmatical presentations. All other
sections have no prerequirements — except a
serious interest in economics because this
isn't an entertaining course.
Economics 200, section 31, with Harry
Campbell, who gives what is probably as
good a presentation of the difficult course as
possible, meets at 2:30 Monday, Wednesday
and Thursday in Henry Angus 110.
"A small coffee shop to be
operated on a 24-hour-per-day
basis is suggested for this area.
This would avoid having to run
the larger, more expensive
facilities upstairs during the
night," Murray said.
The outdoor clubs' storage
would join the alternate
bookstore in the 18-F area south
of the bowling alley.
A new staircase would provide
access to the south east corner of
the building and the service road.
The bookstore would be
located in the middle of this area
and equipped with movable walls
to accommodate the seasonal
change in book stocks.
Not covered in the $345,000
estimate is the proposal to
purchase the administration food
service facility in SUB and operate
it.
Murray said: "The only way
food services on the campus can
be improved is if the large facility
is taken over and run by the
students."
AMS council will hear further
details and be asked to turn the
proposals over the the SUB
management committee for
further investigation at next
Wednesday's council meeting. Page 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, January 14,  1972
Triumph
When grand and prestigious projects such as
the Tri-University Meson Facility are conceived,
publicized and executed, we too often attribute
their development to one or two academics or
scientists and ignore the contribution of the
hundreds of workers and technicians who make
reality out of dreams.
TRIUMF, our readers may recall, is the
nuclear research project gradually taking shape
among the trees back the other side of the
Thunderbird Stadium. We aren't sure just
exactly how the research carried out at TRIUMF
will aid nuclear scientists, but we're sure that if
the right values are applied to its use it would be
a positive contribution to science and humanity.
Thus it's good to see that the employees
now working at the TRIUMF project have
decided to assert themselves in the project's
development by organizing themselves into a
unit of the UBC local of the Canadian Union of
Public Employees.
It's good to see that because we know that
workers on this campus are all too often pushed
around. Whether they work under academics or
in services such as the bookstore or the
cafeterias, they are too often subject to
on-the-job harassment and working conditions
which few students would put up with.
But, assuming their application for
certification by the provincial labor relations
board is accepted, no one is going to push the
TRIUMF workers around.
No one's going to push them around
because they'll have a grievance procedure to
prevent arbitrary dismissals and demotions.
Their bosses will have to show good cause based
on competence before they can fire anyone.
No one's going to push them around
because they know they're backed up by union
people who are experienced in dealing with
administrators, who know the bargaining tricks
they use and how to counter them.
And finally, no one's going to push them
around because, organized together as they are
now, they have the power and the strength to
tackle the administration in fighting for their
rights and dignity in their workplaces. This, it
need hardly be said, includes the ultimate
recourse: the withholding of their labor.
Pouches
We were unable to await with anything
faintly resembling anticipation the outcome of
Thursday's student court hearing on the validity
of the Nov. 24 AMS by-election.
We've always tried to take the court
seriously, but those infant marsupials peeking
out of the judges' pouches give the game away
every time.
THE U8YSSIY
JANUARY 14, 1972
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays
throughout the university year by the Alma Mater
Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions
are those of the writer and not of the AMS or the
university administration. Member, Canadian
University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a
weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's
editorial offices are located in room 241K of the
Student Union Building.
Editorial departments, 228-2301, 228-2307; Page
Friday, Sports, 228-2305; advertising, 228-3977.
Editor: Leslie Plommer
"Ah, dig that groovy beat,, man," Vaughn Palmer
pointedly remarked before passing out in Jim Joly's
arms. Oh ya, agreed Bernard Bischoff and Mike Gidora
who halted their heavy breathing long enough to
whisper student council secrets in David Schmidt's ear.
But Mike Sasges was grooving on his own, irrespective
of Ian "the Tapir" Lindsay. Sandi Shreve smirked at
the whole affair, claiming she prefers Bach, which did
not please Jan O'Brien at all. Gord Gibson giggled at
Paul Knox, saying he really gets off on Gary Gruenke
but Kent Spencer was far too stoned to care. Doug
Nicol claimed the music while Leslie Plommer claimed
the record player which Kini MacDonald thought was
pretty cool. Sandy Kass called them all turkeys and
went to student court.
One campus employee who isn't going to be
pushed around is Carol Buzas, the beleaguered
executive secretary of the Alma Mater Society,
whose penny-ante bosses are trying" to
compensate for their political impotence by
firing  her on trumped-up charges.
When Buzas and the rest of the AMS office
employees joined the Office and Technical
Employees' Union last summer, they were
expressing the kind of solidarity which, if it's
maintained, could send the crew of political
Pinocchios which now controls the AMS packing
in its attempt to get rid of her.
We are sure the OTEU plans to support
Buzas right down the line in this dispute, and we
hope her union sets an example that will give an
impetus to the organizing drives currently undeF-
way on campus.
We could, at this point, embark on a
discussion of the relative merits of the two
unions now attempting to sign up employees on
the campus. We could raise the questions of
national versus international unionism;
professional versus industrial organization. But it
would be wrong to do that.
When every employee who works on the
UBC campus belongs to a union, when all of
them bargain collectively and no one is being
pushed around, then it will be time for that
debate.
But for the present, we hope the
unionization of their brothers and sisters at
TRIUMF will make the unorganized workers at
UBC receptive to any and all union
representatives on campus now.
No one can afford to be pushed around.
-P.K. FINAL REBATES
on purchases prior to and
including Dec. 31,1871 will be
given
FOR ONE WEEK ONLY
Page Friday
Joe Hill, directed by Bo Widenburg.
Spiritual medium: Joan Baez.
Once upon a time there was a
not-to-famous-but-would-be-relevant
movie director called "Bo" who Really
Understood. "Bo" was a Friend of the
Downtrodden, an Ally of the
Underdog, a Supporter of Worthwhile
Causes.
One day "Bo" heard about a man
who was Just Like Him. His name was
Joe Hill, well-known singer and
organizer for the Industrial Workers of
the World who was shot by firing
squad in 1915. In Joe, "Bo" saw a
man who personified all the Virtues in
Life, which involved, besides the ones
mentioned above, Gentlemanly
Consideration for Women, Bravery in
the Face of Danger, Defiance in the
Face of Adversity, Steadfastness
during Lonely Times, and Other Items
Too Numerous to Mention. All this as
well as Dying for the Cause.
So "Bo" made a movie about Joe in
which he exudes all these Admirable
Characteristics that everybody wishes
they had, and that only hardened
cynics would sniff at. But despite all
the overwhelmingly Nice Things, I am
afraid that this flick is a serious
contender for the All Time Grand
Horsehit Academy Award, to be given
out when the last busload of
Hollywood Movie Moguls leave for the
bushcamps of northern B.C.
A job for United Labor
You should understand that I'm
rather picky about the movies I want
to see given this prize, since the
competition seems to be getting pretty
fierce these days, what with such
classics as "Love Story" and all. The
fact is that elements such as technical
sophistication, photographic
excellence and other formal matters
hardly seem important to me anymore
since more often than not, they only
reflect the amount of Big Money
backing the filmmaker.
»No- availability of the honor must
be reserved for that variety of
"artistic" achievement whose; primary
function is to make mockery of the
historical struggles which have shaped
our lives; which suggests that our
world has been divested of any real
possibility of change; and which
presents human beings rebelling
against the repressive social order
dominating their lives, in the absurd
and lonely position of weirdo
anti-heroes who at best are loveable
but rather mentally disordered
individuals living in fantasy land. "Joe
Hill" fits these categories, and more.
In   fact,   "Joe   Hill"  is   a   most
MONDAY, JAN. 17   to
rFRIDAY,JAN.21
the
[store
2284741
alarming movie. It\is alarming because
it it points to the potential for
revolutionary energy generated in real
concrete situations to be co-opted by
the liberal mythmakers. I'm sure if
asked, "Bo" would sincerely testify
that he thinks Joe Hill was a great guy,
but his movie finally reads like a
manual on how best to mystify events
and people to the point where it
appears that only damn fools are
radicals. It used to be that bourgeois
historians just didn't bother to tell
about the struggles of people to gain
control of their lives; now it seems
that bourgeois artists more effectively
confuse the history of such struggles
by portraying figures involved in them
as sincere, but misled existenial heroes
who didn't have a hope in hell of
doing anything, but by God, they
tried.
I think its worthwhile looking at
some of the rules "Bo" adheres to on
road to Utter Obfuscation:
1. Glorify your hero to the point
that he becomes unbelievable. Give
him the qualities that make him better
than other people, or at least than the
people you've ever met (with the
possible exception of the parish
priest.) This presents all sorts of
possibilities. Since Joe is so good, you
just know that neither you nor any of
the people you've ever worked with
can ever be revolutionary leaders. Men
like Joe must obviously be called by
nature, not by circumstances.
More importantly, Joe as Nice Man
becomes Joe the Liberal; and further,
the tactic serves the purpose of making
Joe the man much larger than the
movement he was part of. The film is
filled with little innuendoes that the
Wobblies, once Joe had joined them,
were interested only in using him to
advance their organization. "Would it
be better for us to have Joe alive, or
dead?" intones one of his comrades
after Joe has been sentenced to death
for what even the liberal "Bo" has
decided was a framed-up murder rap.
Of course, when juxtaposed with Joe's
heroic calm in the face of execution,
the cold, opportunistic Industrial
Workers of the World presumably are
to leave us terribly indignant. Joe was
so — so much better than the rest of
them. To reinforce our disapproval,
"Bo" contrives it so that the movie
ends with Joe's comrades leaving his
newly-cremated remains sitting on top
of a desk, while they go upstairs to an
Anarchist dance. Such heartlessness,
such — irreverance. Why, they're no
better than the State Governor, who
becomes enraged over the condition of
his soft-boiled eggs while coldly
dismissing the last pleas to save Joe's
life.
It is this connection that leads to
rule number 2 in the race for the
ATGHS award - that is, reify and
mystify whatever movement for
radical social change you happen to be
dealing with. "Bo" does an admirable
job of presenting the OBU (One Big
Union) out of context. He somehow
misses showing us that the OBU was
made up of a vast number of working
and unemployed people responding to
their powerlessness and drudge-like
existence through organizing for the
replacement of an economic and social
system in which they were ruthlessly
screwed over, by taking direct control
over the decisions which effected their
lives, by wresting control of the
machinery of production from the
bosses.
Instead, good old liberal "Bo",
while showing us scenes of poverty,
also presents us with a few isolated
bands of classical "outside agitators"
who at best (i.e. in the beginning of
the flick) resemble a pack of over-size
boy scouts. These sincere, .idealistic
young people, so "Bo" suggests, sort
of descend on a series of towns,
immediately set up soapboxes trying
to "lead" the workers into conflict
with their (admittedly bad) bosses.
The workers in the crowds they spoke
to seemed to be like a flock of sheep
that would "follow" the OBU
organizers only if they could put on a
better street show than the local
Salvation Army band. Naturally, the
"Overall Brigade" got beaten up a lot,
.but they became pretty ingenious. We
see shots of four or five familiar and
re-occurring figures plotting, from
meat packing plant to mining town,
how to get the local populace to
revolt. It is quite clear that "Bo"
doesn't feel that the workers
themselves were really up to doing
things.
Joe himself, who we are led to
believe joined the I WW due in large
part to a couple of unfortunate love
affairs (the deep psychological
motivation angle), gets pretty good at
agitatin'. He agitates so — so
disarmingly, getting at previously
impermeable restaurant employees by
refusing to pay for large dinners, and
things.
At this point, the really pernicious
nature of the movie begins to emerge.
By the middle of the film, "Bo" would
have us convinced that the IWW was
nothing more than the efforts of a few
sincere, intense men-from-nowhere.
The fact that the union truly
represented the consciousness and
aspirations of hundreds of thousands
of working people is carefully ignored.
This situation sets the scene for the
end of the movie, by which time all
the sincere young organizers have
degenerated into ruthless, cold
opportunists. And herein lies the basic
counter-revolutionary content of the
film; finally, the IWW, as justified as
its origins might have been, is
presented as just another, corrupted
organization, no different from, say,
the Government of the United States.
Its officials are equally cold, the
victims of its drive to expansion
(supposedly Joe himself) are equally
exploited. None of Joe's friends, the
director takes pains to point out, even
came to his execution after they said
they would. As Joe dies, "Bo"
confronts us with the Tragic Vision —
all attempt to change the nature of
society is doomed to failure, since all
organizations get corrupted (where did
you hear that before?). No, there can
only be the compassion of Good
People who Understand. For "Bo",
there ultimately is no difference
between Joe's actions, revolutionary
songs and death, and the tears of
compassion  shed  by   the  nice Rich
"They say he owns 25 sweatshops but he never perspires."
Lady as she passes through New York
slums at the beginning of the film.
"Bo" sort of compensates for his glib
dismissal of the validity of class
struggle by inferring that, even if his
life was wasted, at least Joe Hill was
true to his vision and his beliefs. It's all
very Tragic and all very screwed up.
"Bo" seems to think he has paid his
dues to social injustice and
exploitation by showing Actual Shots
of the broken men of New York's
bowery district. Yessirree, nobody can
say that old "Bo" doesn't have pity on
the underprivileged. That his film
rakes in bread by exposing to
voyeuristic audiences these utterly
helpless victims of class oppression
doesn't seem the least bit exploitive to
him. It's all part of the Tragic
Understanding of Life.
The bourgeoisification of Joe Hill is
not without peril to the creator of the
new, improved variation of the real
man, however. To impose his own
liberal hangups on a man who so defies
such consciousness is not an easy task,
even by someone like "Bo", who
Really Understands. Consequently, the
plot is developed rather shabbily;
episodes don't hang together very well,
characters tend to appear and
disappear without much rhyme or
reason. "Bo's" Joe just isn't very
convincing.
There are, I must admit, some
sections of the movie that were quite
fine. Joe Hill, singing his working-class
version of "In the Sweet Bye And
Bye" over the voices of the
Sally-Anners while the crowd listens to
him, is alright, but neither it nor the
few other scenes that transcent the
blah-ness of the whole can save the
flick from disaster.
Oh well, I still think Joan Baez has
a great voice.
—Evert Hoogers This is the second part of an
introduction by Paul Siegel to the
book Leon Trotsky on Literature and
Art published by Pathfinder Press.
Siegel is the chairman of the English
literature department at the Brooklyn
campus of Long Island University.
F. R. Leavis thinks that he finds
Trotsky in a contradiction in his
acceptance of the great literature of the
past while condemning the culture of
which it is an expression: "Like all
Marxists, [he] practices, with the familiar
air of scientific rigour, the familiar vague,
blanketing use of essential terms. He can
refer, for instance, to the 'second of
August, 1914, when the maddened power
of bourgeois culture let loose upon the
world the blood and fire of an
imperialistic war.' This, however is
perhaps a salute to orthodoxy. And it
would not be surprising if he had thought
it wise to distract attention, if possible,
from such things as the following, which
uses 'culture' very differently, and is
hardly orthodox: 'The proletariat is
forced to take power before it has
appropriated the fundamental elements
of bourgeois culture; it is forced to '
overthrow bourgeois society by
revolutionary violence, for the very
reason that society does not allow it
access to culture'. The aim of revolution,
it appears, is to secure this accursed
bourgeois culture for the proletariat. Or,
rather, Trotsky knows that behind the
word 'culture' there is something that
cannot be explained by the 'methods of
production' and that it would be
disastrous to destroy as 'bourgeois.' "
Trotsky, however, defines precisely
the way in which he uses the word
"culture" in the very Literature and
Revolution that the editor of Scrutiny, an
advocate of rigorously close reading, did
not scrutinize sufficiently closely:
"Culture is the organic sum of knowledge
and capacity which characterizes the
entire society, or at least its ruling class.
It embraces and penetrates all fields of
human work and unifies them into a
system." The victorious proletariat, in
seizing "the fundamental elements" of
this sum of knowledge and skill, modifies
it by rejecting that which it finds useless,
by adding to it and in general by putting
its own stamp upon it. It serves a period
of    cultural    apprenticeship,    gradually
mastering the whole of the culture before
it can completely renovate it. By the time
it will have left this period of
apprenticeship to construct a culture of
its own, it will have ceased to be a
proletariat.
In Culture and Socialism Trotsky, in
discussing the matter of the proletariat's
appropriation of bourgeois culture, from
which it has been excluded, explicitly
raises the question later raised by Leavis:
"Exploiters' society has given rise to an
exploiters' culture . . . And yet we say to
the working class: master all the culture
of the past, otherwise you will not build
socialism. How is this to be understood?"
In raising the question, far from giving up
the idea that culture is to be explained by
the methods of production, as Leavis says
he does in calling upon the workers to
become the possessors of bourgeois
culture, Trotsky insists upon it: "Over
this contradiction many people have
stumbled, and they stumble so frequently
because they approach the understanding
of class society superficially,
semi-idealistically, forgetting that
fundamentally this is the organization of
production. Every class society has been
formed on the basis of definite modes of
struggle with nature, and these modes
have changed in accordance with the
development of technique ... On this
dynamic foundation there arise classes,
which by their interrelations determine
the character of culture."
Trotsky's answer to the question is
that the contradiction is not his but is the
dialectical contradiction present in
culture itself. Technique, the basis of
class organization, has served as a means
of exploitation, but it is also a condition
for the emancipation of the exploited.
The machine crushes the worker, but he
can free himself only through the
machine. What is true of material culture
is also true of spiritual culture. After
having conquered illiteracy and
semiliteracy, the Russian worker must
master classical Russian literature.
One cannot speak of a cultural
revolution in the same way as one speaks
of a social revolution. A social revolution
is the birth of a new society. This new
society grows for a prolonged period of
time within the womb of the old society,
but the seizure of power by the new class
— the violent birth of the revolution —
takes   only   a   brief  time.  One  cannot,
Art and i
however, build a new culture overnight,
nor can one build a new culture without
having mastered the old one.
Yet this is what the Chinese Cultural
Revolution, outlawing the literature of
past cultures, would do. Chiang Ching,
Mao Tse-tung's wife and a leader of the
Cultural Revolution, has written: "If our
literature and art do not correspond to
the socialist economic base, they will
inevitably destroy it." Thus, despite her
access to the thoughts of Chairman Mao,
she flies in the face of the elementary
Marxist tenet that it is the economic base,
not the cultural superstructure, which is
the chief force in the interaction between
them, that the economic base will sooner
transform the cultural superstructure
than the cultural superstructure will
transform the economic base.
As a result of such thinking,
Shakesepeare, who was read by Marx
every year, is forbidden in China, as is
Pushkin, who was a favorite author of
Lenin's. For Trotsky, on the other hand,
fear of the effect of the literature of a
previous class is a silly bogeyman: "It is
childish to think that bourgeois belles
lettres can make a breach in class
solidarity. What the worker will take
from Shakespeare, Goethe, Pushkin, or
Dostoyevsky, will be a more complex
idea of human personality, of its passions
and feelings, a deeper and more profound
understanding of its psychic forces and of
the role of the subconscious, etc. In the
final analysis, the worker will be richer."
However, while Trotsky does not fear
the effect of bourgeois belles lettres in
itself, he upholds the right of the
proletarian dictatorship, when it is
fighting for its life, to proscribe writing
aimed at undermining the regime, even if
it appears as belles lettres. If during a civil
war the proletarian army has the right to
destroy edifices of artistic value for
military reasons (the same right which
other armies arrogate to themselves
without discussing the matter), so, he
argues, the regime has the right under
such similar conditions to suppress
counterrevolutionary literature. Its first
obligation is to safeguard the new order,
whose overthrow would mean an end to
the cultural liberation of the masses. This
right of the regime, however, should on
no account be used against those not
opposed to the revolution and should be
exercised less and less as the regime
consolidates its power. This was actually
the policy during the first years of the
Bolshevik government, as the Oxford
historian of Russian literature, Max
Hayward, no great friend of the
Bolsheviks, testifies: "Its [the
revolutionary censorship's] main
function was to prevent the publication
of overtly counter-revolutionary works
... It did not interfere with basic literary
freedom in matters of form and content
as long as the political interests of the
new regime were not adversely affected."
Trotsky formulated this policy in
agreement with Lenin with regard to the
relation between the state and the
different literary schools in this manner
in 1924, at a time when it was being
increasingly threatened: "While having
over them all the categorical criterion, for
the revolution or against the revolution,
to give them complete freedom in the
sphere of artistic self-determination."
Fidel Castro took this position,
probably without knowing it was
"Trotskyite," in a notable speech to
intellectuals in 1961: "What are the rights
of revolutionary writers and artists?
Within the revolution, everything;against
the revolution, no rights whatsoever."
This was also the position of an earlier
revolutionist, the poet John Milton, who,
speaking in the language of his own
ideology, wrote in Areopagitica: 'This
doubtless   is   more   wholesome,   more
in which Page
some more re<
coot9 9n9 hreedi
ain9t got coot, y*
prudent, and more Christian that many
be tolerated rather than all compelled. I
mean not tolerated popery, and open
superstition, which, as it extirpates all
religions and civil supremacies, so itself
should be extirpated ..."
In his 1924 speech Class and Art
Trotsky fights for the right to publish ol
the "fellow travelers", the bourgeois
literary intellectuals sympathetic to the
revolution, and at the same time remind;
the members of the Proletkult school
that, although he opposes their ideas
about proletarian literature, he has
promised them to uphold their right tc
publish their magazine. He speaks againsl
those groups which seek to become "the
monopolist representatives of the artistic
interests of the proletariat."
Shortly after Stalin used the
monopolist aspirations of these groups to
impose his control of literature.
Literature then ceased to be alive and
vital, as it had been in the energy-giving
atmosphere of the early days of the
revolution. It became instead a puppet of
the totalitarian state. At a time when
many literary intellectuals in the United
States and other Western capitalist
countries, looking to the Soviet Union for
hope in the midst of the capitalist crisis,
were ignorantly acclaiming the supposed
literary achievements there, Trotsky
wrote his eloquent words about the
"epoch of mediocrities, laureates and
toadies" created under the auspices of the
bureaucracy.
Today, however, thanks to the
development of production, the
extension of education and the growth of
a new intelligentsia, made possible,
despite the stifling bureaucracy, by the
revolution, a fresh generation of literary
rebels has grown up. In their heroic fight
for     creative    freedom    against    the
Page Friday. 2
THE  UBYSSEY
Friday, January 14, 1972 evolution
riday presents
heavy stuff on
coz folks, if ya
lin't got fuck all
ireaucracy, these rebels are continuing
the tradition of Leon Trotsky.
The literary intellectuals of the United
ates for their part no longer look to the
•viet bureaucracy as their spiritual
aster. They have grown wiser in some
lys, less wise in others. Less deluded,
ey are more cynical. Instead of writing
iroletarian literature," they write short
)ries and novels about the emptiness of
nerican suburban living and novels and
amas about the absurdity of existence.
These very works, however, testify to
e spiritual sickness of American
pitalism, the giant of the capitalist
)rld. Its intellectuals are increasingly
ienated, its youth increasingly
saffected, its blacks increasingly
bellious. The dragging on of a
jnstrously brutal, unpopular war, the
idow of a nuclear holocaust, the
ilization of the disparity between the
tential abundance made possible by
idem technology and the actual
verty of millions — these lie heavily
on the spirit. In the militarized society
today artists and scientists become
ire and more aware of the truth of the
itement in A Manifesto: Towards a
ee Revolutionary Art, a manifesto
itten or largely written by Trotsky,
iven in times of 'peace' the position of
: and science has become absolutely
olerable."
Perhaps, however, many young artists
io would subscribe to this statement
>uld not so readily subscribe to the
tement that "the artist in a decadent
ritalist society" is "the natural ally of
'olution." Proletarian revolution does
t seem to be on the order of the day.
■Jeocapitalism," making use of
ynesian measures and above all of a
antic militarization of the economy,
5 succeeded in stabilizing the economy
for a prolonged period. However,
monetary crises and inflation indicate all
is not well. The French general strike ot
May and June 1968, the largest general
strike in the history of mankind, is a
harbinger of things to come in Western
capitalism. And already many young
black writers align themselves with the
forces of revolution. For them, as will be
true of others tomorrow, the flaming
words of Trotsky will not appear passe.
Trotsky, like Engels before him,
always objected to exaggerating the
artistic worth of the purely propagandist
literature which simplifies a complex
reality in order to present an easy lesson.
In 1922 he said of the French poet and
dramatist Marcel Martinet: "One need
neither expect nor fear from him purely
propagandist activity." In 1939 he wrote
of Jean Malaquais's Les Javanais:
"Although social in its implications, this
novel is in no way tendentious in
character. He does not try to prove
anything, he does not propagandize, as do
many productions of our time, when far
too many submit to orders even in the
sphere of art. The Malaquais novel is
'only' a work of art."
But the literary work which has an
avowed "message", if that work is deeply
thought and felt so that it renders reality
in all of its complexity and its "message"
is organic to it, not an obtrusive
appendix, rises from propaganda to art.
Such is Ignazio Silone's Fontamara. It is,
says Trotsky, "a book of passionate
political propaganda", but it is "a truly
artistic work" because "revolutionary
passion is raised here to such heights" and
because Silone sees "life as it is."
Although Trotsky calls upon the artist
to become the ally of revolution, he does
not guarantee that the revolution will
enable him to produee masterpieces. The
revolutionary vew cannot be merely
intellectually accepted; it must become
part of the very being of the artist, if he is
to give expression to it in art. 'The
artist," says A Manifesto: Towards a Free
Revolutionary Art, "cannot serve the
struggle for freedom unless he
subjectively assimilates its social content,
unless he feels in his very nerves its
meaning and drama and freely seeks to
give his own inner world incarnation in
his art."
He must freely seek to communicate
his own inner world, not present a view
of the world which has been dictated to
him by anyone else or even by himself,
not allow any internal inhibitions or
external compulsions to cause him to
withhold a part of his vision. Gorky, after
beginning as a tramp poet, honorably
turned toward the proletariat when the
proletariat and the radical intelligentsia
came into opposition with each other in
1905. However, he never organically
assimilated the revolutionary view, and
consequently his best period as an artist is
that of his first days, when his work had a
spontaneity it did not have when he was
seeking to apply literary and political
lessons. Mayakovsky, devoted to the
revolutionary cause, squandered himself
meeting the daily demands of newspapers
and seeking to adhere to the "correct
ideological line" that hack critics imposed
on him. Malraux, after producing some
significant works, found that his
pessimism and skepticism made him need
"some outside force to lean in, some
established authority", and his novels
about Germany and Spain became
apologies for Stalinism.
These comments, written by Trotsky
at different times, are crystallized in his
words to Andre Breton: 'The struggle for
revolutionary ideas in art must begin once
again with the struggle for artistic truth,
not in terms of any single school, but in
terms of the immutable faith of the artist
in his own inner self. Without this there is
no art. 'You shall not lie!' - that is the
formula of salvation."
Artistic truth, Trotsky states in
defending his History of the Russian
Revolution, consists of the work of art
following its own laws in the unfolding of
the chain of events, in character
development, and so on. To attain it the
artist must be true to his own vision.
Historical truth is analogous to it. Truth
in history, as in art, does not demand
impartiality, which indeed is impossible.
It demands a rigorous regard for the facts
and a scientific method through which
"facts combine into one whole process
which, as in life, lives according to its
own interior laws..."
In his wittily devastating analysis of
Winston Churchill's history of the period
immediately after World War I and its
portrait of Lenin, Trotsky demonstrates
how false to historical truth Churchill is:
inaccurate in his facts, confused in his
visualization of the time and persons he is
describing, artificial even in his verbal
antitheses. It is interesting to compare
Churchill as historian and biographer with
Trotsky. None of the political antagonists
who attacked the History of the Russion
Revolution and the biography of Stalin
were able to challenge Trotsky's use of
fact, for which he had a scrupulous
concern.
What is true of Trotsky in the
quasi-literary arts of the historian and
biographer is also true of him as a literary
critic. He does not disguise his
sympathies, he is devoted to accuracy of
statement, he seeks to get at the essence
of things through the Marxist method.
Committed to the cause of revolution, he
is especially interested in literature
written by those of revolutionary
tendencies. To the writers of this
literature he is sympathetic and generous,
but he is also honest and judicious.
Despite Gorky's friendship with the
leading Soviet bureaucrats, Trotsky pays
tribute to him as a man and as a writer of
great talent, if not of the genius for which
he was uncritically lauded by the hacks in
the service of the bureaucracy. In his
obituary articles on Mayakovsky and
Essenin he is warm and moving, yet
discriminating. In writing to Jack
London's daughter, he expresses his
sincerely great admiration for The Iron
Heel but refers to its artistic limitations.
Although Trotsky is especially
interested in literary works written by
writers of revolutionary tendencies and
summons writers to the revolutionary
cause, which he believes can save them
from demoralization, he is appreciative of
all kinds of literature. Political partisan
though he is, he does not demand that
writers be of his political camp or even of
his general political sympathies for them
to receive his acclaim. He is aware that, as
Rosa Luxemburg said, "With the true
artist, the social formula that he
recommends is a matter of secondary
importance; the source of his art, its
animating spirit, is decisive."    "
The young Trotsky probes the social
roots of the art of Tolstoy, who was then
still alive, finding them to spring from the
soil of his aristocratic upbringing, but he
finds the animating spirit of Tolstoy's art
to be his "priceless talent for moral
indignation" and his "unbending moral
courage." The Trotsky of later years, who
had suffered unprecedented blows but
had retained his youthful faith in life and
the revolution, only tempered by
experience, find Celine's Journey to the
End of Night a novel of the utmost
pessimism, but a novel which in its
relentless honesty in confronting life
strips aside the official lies concerning
society. It thus helps to bring about the
future already manifesting itself in the
present, to which the novel itself is blind.
"Exposing the lie, he instills the want for
a more harmonious future. Though he
himself may consider that nothing good
can generally come from man, the very
intensity of his pessimism bears within it
a dose of the antidote."
In his literary criticism, then, as in his
other writing, Trotsky's revolutionary
optimism and his fighting revolutionary
spirit express themselves. He does not
write either in the impersonal manner of
the scientist or with the genteel
enthusiasm of a taster of fine wines. He
writes as one for whom literature is an
essential part of human life and for whom
humanity, despite the degradation,
sordidness and misery which surround us,
is grand in the heroism of its struggles and
noble in its potentiality. His literary
criticism, in short, has its origin in the
vision of social humanism that animated
his whole life.
Friday, January 14, 1972
THE  UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 3 Here are two lemons, The Primal
Scream by Arthur Janov and The Black
Beret by Marvin D. Resnick. Let's shit on
them in order.
Once upon a time there was this
frustrated gestaltist or encounter group
type, who, in- one of his therapy sessions
drove one of his patients around the bend
by picking what was left of the man's ego
to sheds. The poor bastard screamed his
head off.
This incident set psychoanalysis back
about twenty years since the therapist,
Art Janov decided that he had heard his
very first primal scream. Dig it.
Janov says we are all fucked over by
our parents when we are young. So what?
A. S. Neil has already told us that. We are
products of a myriad of painful
repressions. Freud spent his whole life in
order to show us how. Janov, by the way,
lives in Beverley Hills and charges roughly
$15,000 for one of his cures.
He decides that life must be made ten
times more painful in order to discover
the basis of our neurosis, something he
calls a series of "primals" leading up to
one big trauma. Any student of
psychoanalysis will tell you that our
behaviour is caused in large part by our
unconscious or those impulses and
feelings which have been repressed in a
repressive civilization.
Through some straight-line, mechanistic
bourgeois thinking Janov decides that if
we go through enough shit under his
benign guidance we experience our primal
and scream "I want my mama" or
something. After that we're all right.
Two lemons
What it boils down to on a theoretical
level is that Janov typifies the confusion
of our own civilization. A quick answer
and a groovy cure and the ills of society
are solved. His book is subtitled Primal
Therapy. The Cure For Neurosis. Freud
knew very well that a cure for neurosis
was impossible in an essentially sick
civilization. He even went as far as to say
at one point in his life that
psychoanalysis would have to turn people
into revolutionaries in order to cure
them.
Janov gets around all this by saying
there is one reason why we are neurotic.
Our parents didn't love us. In a culture
devoid of any real love, in a culture in
which the nuclear family can be set up
which institutionalizes so-called love, it is
difficult to see how Janov can point to
one reason as to why we're fucked up.
If that is not enough his book
continues with some reactionary
philosophy on homosexuals and drugs.
Gays and drugs users are hung up on
cock, see. If you're gay then your life is
run by your penis. If you use drugs then
you crave for the day you can use that
symbolic penis, the needle.
Wasn't it Freud who said to a mother
who was worried about her son's
homosexual tendencies, cool it, we are
sexual beings and homosexuality
represents the other half of a complete
erotic life. Not for Janov. I wish I could
tell Janov to his face that I have friends
who are gay and as far as I can make out
they're less hung up about cock than I
am, a died in the wool (pardon the
Elizabethan pun— hetero.
Don't bother with Janov. Read Freud,
Wilhelm Reich and A. S. Neil. They tell
you everything Janov tries to twist
around and much more besides.
As for Resnick's book, all I can say is
if you take a close look at U.S. foreign
policy you will find it mirrored in The
Black Beret. The book deals with 'The
life and meaning of Che Guevara".
Resnick is very positive about Che while
the man is still a guerilla in Cuba's Sierra
Meastra. All of a sudden Che is a
communist with a very prominent
position in the Cuban government. Exit
Che the good guy. Enter Che the cigar
smoking Latin American dictator.
I suppose that Resnick wants to use
the abstraction "Power corrupts" but
since his sources are the U.S. state
department and Cuban bourgeois who
fled the revolution his yarn lacks
credibility to say the least.
-Dick Betts
WESTERN PROMOTIONS PROUDLY PRESENTS
MCONCERT
B. B. KING
THURSDAY, JANUARY 27
Q.E. THEATRE
8:30 P.M.
$4.00, $5.00, $6.00
Tickets: Concert Box Office, 680 Robson — 687-2801
Outlets: Black Sheep, Rohan's, Thunderbird, Grennan's, Totem Music
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Adult Entertainment
Warning—Frequent   swearing   and
coarse language.      —B.C. Director
El     SHOWTIMES:
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FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE'
BIRTHDAY PARTY
by Harold Pinter
JANUARY 21-31     8:00 p.m.
Directed by KLAUS STRASSMANN
Set and Costumes by KURT WILHELM
Lighting Designed by RICHARD KENT WILCOX
SPECIAL STUDENT PERFORMANCE
Thursday. January 27       12:30 Noon
Student Ticket Price: $1.00 - AVAILABLE FOR ALL PERFORMANCES
* Box Office    FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE   * Room 207
, SUPPORT YOUR CAMPUS THEATRE
IN THE UF1-
OF IVAN DENISOVICH
224-3730V
4375 W. 10th
SHOW TIMES: 7:30, 9:30
Fiddler on the Roof"
Park
AMBIE Mt  18th
• 76-2747
TECHNICOLOR
Tickets on  sale at  Box  Office or  by  mail
Odean Theatre,  881 Granville St.
For Phone Reservations Call
688-2308 Daily 11:30-7:30
JEAN LOUIS TRINTIGNANT
"THE CONFORMIST"
by BERN AN DO BERTOLUCCI
Dolphin
Hast, at Willingdon
299-7303
ONE COMPLETE
SHOW 7:30
Marcello
Mastroianni
"THE
STRANGER"
by LUCHINO
VISCONTI
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Hsst. >t Willingdon
299-7303
COMEDY CLASSICS
SUNDAY AT 2 P.M.
JAN. 16
"MY LITTLE CHICKADEE"
W. C. Fields - Mae West - Gene Austin
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Technicolor* CnC
HEBB THEATRE UBC
Fri. Jan. I 4th - Sat. Jan. I 5th
7:30 & 9:30 p.m. - 75 cents
LE CHATEAU
"a step ahead"
776 Granville 687-2701
Page Friday, 4
THE  UBYSSEY
Friday, January 14, 1972 Friday, January 14, 1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 9
Campus land plans non-existent
By SANDI SHREVE
No concrete plans for either
the immediate or remote future of
the University Endowment Lands
exist.
That was the upshot of
endowment lands manager Robert
Murdoch's discussion Wednesday
with more than 50 persons in
Buchanan 104 on the future of
the lands.
The     endowment    lands
members) don't want to listen to
recommendations."
He said excellent proposals
have been rejected in the past but
he refused to identify those
proposals because "it would
embarrass the provincial cabinet."
Because the cabinet does not
direct development for the land
designated to UBC there have
been "several master plans for the
development of that area," while
MURDOCH.
encompass 3,500 acres of the
Point Grey area and are part of
the greater Vancouver regional
district.
The provincial education
department controls the 1,000
acres of the lands which were
designated for university purposes
by the crown.
The remaining 2,500 acres are
under the jurisdiction of the
lands, forests and water resources
department but the provincial
cabinet controls all decisions
involved with developing them.
He said the department has not
drafted an official master plan for
development of the area because
"the provincial cabinet would
have to authorize it and they (the
. . no plans
there is a total dearth of such
plans for the other 2,500 acres of
land.
Murdoch expanded his
explanation for the lack of a
master  plan, saying private real
estate and planning consultants
present all development proposals
because "this reduces the amount
of staff required to administer the
lands."
He said the proposals are then
reviewed by the department in
consultation with the university
administration (through a board
of governors representative) and
the ratepayers on the lands
(leaseholders of private homes,
commercial and miscellaneous
areas), before they are submitted
to the cabinet.
Students have no formal say in
decisions concerning the proposals
but Murdoch explained that
general public opinion is often
solicited to provide guidelines for
those making the decisions.
He said that according to the
Turner Report (the 1956
commission of development of
the lands on which the
administration of them is still
based) the intentions for the lands
are to "realize a monetary
endowment for use at UBC and to
develop the lands to enhance the
beauty and dignity of the
environment."
There is a proposal before the
cabinet for which the ratepayers
and the department have paid and
are ready to implement.
"But the recommendations
have been before the cabinet for a
long time and we have had no
word on them at all," he said.
He refused to say what those
HILLTOP GULF
SERVICE
- JOE    MIZSAK -
Tune-Up Specialisfs For All Makes
Specializing in Repairs to
JAPANESE & EUROPEAN CARS
All Repairs Guaranteed - 4000 Miles or 90 Days
Student Special: 20% Discount off Labor Charges
4305 W. 10 Ave. at Discovery 224-7212
BOUGHT
&
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A. H. FALSTAFF, books
^11 subjects of University interest
NEW ON 10th   .
4529 W 10th—224-4121
Come and Browse-Fair Prices
WHY PAY MORE?
+ factory trained
mechanics
+ fully guaranteed work
+ reasonable cost
+ WHY  PAY   MORE
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL
NOTICE
ELECTIONS FOR 72/73
Elections for the AM.S.
Executive will be held as follows
FIRST SLATE— Wednesday, February 2
PRESIDENT
SECRETARY
INTERNAL AFFAIRS OFFICER
EXTERNAL AFFAIRS OFFICER
SECOND SLATE-Wednesday, February 9
VICE PRESIDENT
TREASURER
COORDINATOR
OMBUDSPERSON
The Nomination periods for the 2 slates are:
FIRST SLATE - 9:00 a.m. Wednesday, January 19th to 12:30
p.m. Thursday, January 27th.
SECOND SLATE - 9:00 a.m. Wednesday, January 26th to 12:30
p.m. Thursday, February 3rd.
All students interested in running in these elections should pick up
nomination and eligibility forms at the A.M.S. General Office, or from the
A.M.S. Secretary, SUB 248.
recommendations entail.
Murdoch  speculated  that   "if
Sixteenth Avenue is developed to
its maximum potential there will
be a direct flow of traffic to the
parking areas."
Hairstyling to Please
ON CAMPUS
SHAG    *  MOP    *  BROOM
SUB   LOWER FLOOR   SUB
Appointments if desired 224-4636
9 a.m. — 5:30 Mon. - Fri.
CAMPUS STYLING & BARBER SHOP
H
The University of British Columbia
Centre for
Continuing Education
READING & STUDY £EKE
SKILLS PROGRAM      ""
Reading Improvement Courses
The University of British Columbia Reading and Study Skills
Centre offers individualized programs for those who wish to
improve their reading and study skills for academic, professional
and personal reasons.
Course work emphasizes increase of reading rate and
comprehension — previewing, skimming, scanning and flexibility
— study habits and skills — critical reading skills — special interest
areas.
The fee of $30 for Grade 11 and 12 secondary school students
and full-time university students* and $60 for adults includes
testing materials, counselling and use of reading laboratory. Class
enrolment is limited to 18.
Classes   are   held   in   the  East  Mall  Annex   (Rooms   118-119)
beginning January 24, 1972. Two hour classes meet two evenings
a week for five weeks; three hour classes meet Saturday mornings
for six weeks.
CLASS SCHEDULE
Section
Time
Day
Room
Type
1
3:45-5:45
Tues.-Wed.
119
Student
2
7:00-9:00
Mon.-Wed.
119
Adult
3
7:00-9:00
Mon.-Wed.
118
Student
4
7:00-9:00
Tues.-Thurs.
119
Adult
5
7:00-9:00
Tues.-Thurs.
118
Student
6
9:00-12:00
Saturday
118
Secondary
Student
7
9:00-12:00
Saturday
119
Adult
* Students — 3 courses (9 units or more) — student card may be requested.
Writing Improvement For Students
Writing Improvement is an 18 hour non-credit course designed to
improve writing skills. The program will be of interest to adults
who wish to improve their writing for education, business and
personal reasons. The courje will deal with common problems
and with more specialized topics such as report writing, written
communications in business, research paper and bibliographic
techniques, and other topics of interest to the class.
COURSE OUTLINE:
1. Basic Topics:
a. basic organization of
the expository essay
b. sentence structure
c. punctuation
d. word choice
2. Special Topics:
a. report writing
b. written communications
in business
c. research paper and
bibliographic techniaues
d. special topics of interest
to the class
Classes are small and students are dealt with on a individual basis.
Students will have an opportunity for writing practice every
week.
DATES AND TIMES: 6 Wednesday evenings, 7-10 p.m., January
26-March 1,1972.
LOCATION: Room 3252, Buchanan Building, U.B.C. Campus
FEE: $60.00
INSTRUCTOR: Miss Lilita Rodman, Instructor,
U.B.C. English Department
APPLICATION FOR REGISTRATION
Name of Course	
Name	
Address
City	
Occupation  . . .
Daytime Phone
Zone   	
Employer   . . .
Evening Phone
For Reading Improvement please indicate section	
Please make cheques payable to the University of British Columbia and
mail with this form to: Registrations, Center for Continuing Education,
University of British Columbia, Vancouver 8, B.C. Telephone: 228-2181,
local 220. Page  10
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, January 14,  1972
Hot flashes
Crossing
meeting
A public meeting to urge a
plebiscite on the issue of the.
proposed Brockton Point crossing
of Burrard Inlet will be held
Sunday, Jan. 16 at 8 p.m. in the
Queen Elizabeth Playhouse.
The meeting, sponsored by the
Citizens Committee for Public
Transportation, will include
presentations by leading
spokesmen both for and against
the proposal.
Additional information is
available from Bruce Yorke at
1924 McNicoll - phone
733-4953.
Urban resource
The Continuing Education
Centre needs grad and undergrad
students to act as resource people
for a community and regional
planning course. The idea of the
course is to have small groups of
people walking on straight-line
routes through the urban area and
relating to the various
environments they come across as
they travel.
There will be a short training
course for the resource people and
111
some money for their work. For
further information call Jill at
228-2181 (local 260) within the
next six weeks.
Cfiarufcftcf
In aid of the Bangladesh
refugees the film Charulata will be
shown Saturday, at 2: 30 p.m., in
the SUB auditorium.
Admission is $1.50 for Oxfam
of Canada.
Bens more
Even the alternate food service
is not immune to inflation.
Due to rising costs at the
Chelsea Bakery, supplier of AFS
baked goods, the service has
increased its price of Chelsea buns
from 12 cents to 14 cents and
butter horns from 12 cents to 13
cents.
The new prices take effect
Tuesday.
Alchemy
"Art Play and Heavenly
Alchemy" is the title of a lecture
to be given by Sam Black, UBC
professor of art education,
Saturday, at 8:15 p.m. in
Buchanan 106.
'Tween classes
TODAY
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Beer garden every Friday 4-8 p.m.
in    I.H.   upper    lounge.    Musicians
invited to jam.
PRE-SOCIAL WORK
Speaker from Browndale at noon in
SUB 119.
COFFEE HOUSE
Lutheran  campus centre at 9 p.m.
SATURDAY
DANCE CLUB
Mixer in SUB party room from 8:30
to ?
SUNDAY
UBC TAEKWON-DO CLUB
New  members welcome in new p.e.
building, gym B from 6-8 p.m.
LSM
Play  at 7:30 p.m. in the Lutheran
campus centre.
LUTHERAN CAMPUS CENTRE
Worship   service   at   10:30   a.m.   in
Luther campus centre chapel.
UBC FENCING CLUB
General practice in new gym B from
2 - 4 p.m.
MONDAY
UBC PROGRESSIVE
CONSERVATIVE CLUB
General   meeting   in   SUB   211   at
noon.
TUESDAY
SAILING CLUB
General   meeting   in   Buch.   104  at
noon.
WEDNESDAY
OPEN BIBLE FORUM
Rev.   Bernice   Gerard   at   noon   in
Lutheran campus centre.
VARSITY DEMOLAY CLUB
General   meeting   at   noon   in  SUB
215.
THURSDAY
NVC
General   meeting   in   SUB   205   at
noon.
STUDENT LIBERALS
Discussion:   Economic   Nationalism
in SUB 213 at noon.
NOTICE
Late Payment of Fees
A late payment fee of $25.00 additional to all other fees will be
assessed if payment of the second instalment is not made on or before
January 14, 1972. Refund of this fee will be considered only on the basis
of medical certificate covering illness or on evidence of domestic affliction.
If fees are not paid in full by the following date, registration will be
cancelled and the student concerned excluded from classes. Second
instalment — January 28, 1972.
If a student whose registration has been cancelled for non-payment
of fees applies for reinstatement and his application is approved by the
Registrar, he will be required to pay a reinstatement fee of $25.00, the late
fee of $25.00, and all other outstanding fees before he is permitted to
resume classes.
CHARTER FLIGHTS
VANCOUVER—LONDON—VANCOUVER
Return Flights    $225.   UP
ONE-WAY
$145 Vancouver to London
$120 London to Vancouver
We have numerous return and one-way flights each month
to and from London. Ring our office for information and
free list of flights.
GEORGIA TRAVEL
AGENTS LTD.
1312-925 W.Georgia, Van. 1
687-2868 (3 lines)
DIVE!
7 week course begins this Sunday,
Jan. 16 at 6:30 p.m. at St.
George's School.
(close to campus)
N.A.U.I. Certification
$45 — All Equipment Supplied
For more information phone:
Neil McDaniel-738-0343
MarkeNoble-731-5482
Professional Diving Instruction
NEW and USED
BOOKS
• University Text Books • Quality Paper Backs
• Pocket Books • Magazines
• Largest Selection of Review Notes in Vancouver
BETTER BUY BOOKS
4393 W. 10 Ave.
224-4144 - open 11-8 p.m.
CLASSIFIED
Rate*: Campus - 3 Unas, 1 day $1.00; 3 days $2.50.
Commercial - 3 lines, 1 day $1.25; additional lines 30c; 4 days price of 3.
Classified ada are not accepted by telephone and are payable in advance. Deadline is
ttOO a.m., the day betote publication. Publications Office, Rtn. 241 SVB, UBC, Vat*, B.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
COME   TO   THE   POLKA   PARTY
Jan. 14 I.H.  9-1.  $1.25 per person.
Greetings
12
Lost Jt Found
13
JAKE. LEFT MY WARMUP
pants in your 1952 Che v. at Hemlock.   Please  phone Al.   688-2241.
Rides & Car Pools
14
Special Notices
15
  3 FOR $1.00 ???? 	
Why pay this much for your prophylactics ?
We will mail you 24 assorted brand
name prophylactics for only $2.00 in
a plain sealed envelope by return
mail.
Clip and enclose this ad. for additional bonus of 3 prophylactics to:
POSTTRADING
Box  4002 Vancouver,  B.C.
DISCOUNT — STEREO AM-FM
FM - Stereo Tuner - Amplifier,
Turntable, base, cartridge, plexi-
glas cover, two speakers, 2-year
guarantee.. List $200.00, your cost
$125.00 Call 732-6769 for savings.
Also carry Sony, Dual, Akai and
Sansui.	
GENTLEMAN FLUENT IN POR-
tuguese wishes to exchange lessons with person fluent in French
224-0392.
FIRESIDE SUNDAY JAN. 16, 8:00
p.m. Lounge 6050 Chancellor:
"The Place of V.S.T. on the Campus", Dr. R. Clark (UBC), Dr. W.
S. Taylor (VST). Worship in the
Loft,   7:00-7:45   p.m.   Welcome.
1 NEED SENIOR POLL SCI. STU-
dents for exciting (non-profit)
project on civic affairs. 732-3470.
AN EXPERIENCE IN LIFE AND
growth, Gestalt Awareness Groups.
$12 month. Contact Allan Cohen,
224-5445 or John Mate, 922-4481.
SUNDAY SERVICES at Campus
Churches on Univ. Blvd. St.
Anselm's Anglican—8 and 11 a.m.
Holy Communion. University Hill
United—11 a.m. Morning Worship.
Church School at both churches
for children through grade 8 at
11   a.m.	
ANN MORTIFEE IN CONCERT—
12:30. Jan. 20th S.U.B, Auditorium
Admission   50c.	
ZAZEN-BUDDHIST MEDITATION
Zen Centre. 139 Water St. T. Th.
7:30  p.m.   Sat,   morning  8:00  a.m.
UBC BOWLING CLUB NEEDS
more bowlers, especially girls to
bowl Monday nights. New bowlers
welcome. Banquet Dance in
March. To join call Walter at
228-8225.
Travel Opportunities
16
Wanted—Information
17
Wanted—Miscellaneous 18
AUTOMOTIVE
Autos For Sale
21
1969 PONTIAC LAURENTIAN 4-
door, PS, PB, automatic. Excellent
condition. $1650. A good buy! 278-
6354.	
1960 MERCEDES BENZ 180 GAS.
Body and paint excellent shape.
Completely rebuilt motor. 224-
9769. George.	
1961 V.W.; NEW ENGINE, KING
pins, clutch, radio. Phone Penny
738-3392 eves.
Auto Repairs
24
If you own a British Car
we can offer:
+ Low Labour Rates
* Below   Retail   Parts
■k Repairs  and  Modifications
+ Personalized Attention
■k Guaranteed Work
BRITISH CARS ONLY
1906  W.  43rd       266-7703
(rear) at Cypress
Bring in this ad. It entitles you
to  a  10%  Discount on   labour.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Babysitting & Day Care
32
Duplicating & Copying
33
Photography
35
tije TLeni ano Sautter
Wj       Cameras
3010 W. BDWY. 736-7833
alto at Denman  Place
Some High-Quality
GADGET BAGS LEFT
at $13.88
ENLARGERS
Starting from $49.50
Scandals
37
A.G.S. C-90 CASSETTES G-UARAN-
teed against all defects. Quantity
price $1.50 each. Minimum purchase 6. Can arrange for delivery
or pick-up on campus. Call 732-
6769 for savings.
Typing
40
EXPERIENCED TYPIST. ESSAYS,
theses. Reasonable rates for quali-
ty work. Telephone 682-4023.
FAST ACCURATE TYPING OF
essays and thesis. Reasonable
terms. Call Mrs. Akau, days 688-
5235 — evenings 263-4023.	
EXPERT IBM SELECTRIC TYPIST
Experienced essay and thesis typist. Reasonable Rates — 321-3838,
Mrs.   Ellis.	
TEDIOUS TASKS — PROFESSION-
al typing. IBM Selectric —■ Days,
Evenings, Weekends. Phone Shari
at   738-8745—Reasonable  Rates.
EXPERT TYPIST — ELECTRIC
typewriter—Would like to type
students' papers, etc. at home.
Phone   926-3478.	
EXP'D TYPIST — THESES, ES-
says, etc. Phone Mrs. Brown, 732-
0047.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
81
WANTED—PIANIST FOR SATUR-
days 9:15 a.m.-12 noon. Anna
Wyman Studio of Dance Arts.
656 15th St. West Vancouver.
926-6535.	
INTERESTED IN SELLING? THEN
why not be an ad. sales rep. for
The Ubyssey. The AMS Publications office needs a business
minded student preferably Commerce who will work hard about
6-8 hours a week. Transportation
is essential. This is an excellent
opportunity to gain worthwhile
sales experience and to earn commissions for part-time work. Apply Publications Office. SUB after
2:30 p.m.
SUMMER   1972
CAREER   -   ORIENTED
SUMMER    EMPLOYMENT
PROGRAM
IN THE FIELDS OF: Administration, Biological, Chemical, Life
and Physical Sciences, Engineering and Applied Sciences, Economics, Social  Sciences.
ELIGIBILITY: All full-time university students in the above
fields who intend to return to
university in 1972-73. Canadian
citizens have statutory preference
for appointment.
TO APPLY: Submit a UCPA application form (available from
your University Placement Office)
and a list of courses taken, to
the Public Service Commission of
Canada Regional Office, 203-535
Thurlow St., Vancouver 5, B.C.
Apply   before    January   31,    1972.
THE GREATER KAMLOOPS
Aquatic and Summer Swim Club
are currently accepting applications
for swim instructors for the season May-September, 1972. Applicants are requisted to submit
qualifications and two written references by January 31, 1972.
Salary is presently open to negotiation. Applications submittable
to: Chairman. Personnel Committee, Kamloops Aquatic Club, 249
Bestwick Court West, Kamloops,
B.C.
INSTRUCTION & SCHOOLS
Music Instruction
81
Special Classes
62
MAKE YOUR! OWN POT ! MUGS,
bowls, jugs, etc. Morning or evening, all levels. Just outside UBC
gates.   224-5194,  733-3019.
Tutoring Service
63
THESES, ESSAYS CORRECTED
by retired publisher for grammar,
syntax, spelling, punctuation, redundancy,   etc.   263-6565.
Tutors—Wanted
64
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
MUST SELL BRAND NEW OLYM-
pio skis, 190's, call 596-0680.
OLDS RECORDING TRUMPET.
Good condition. Offers above $200.
Call Doug at 261-6810.
RENTALS fe REAL ESTATE
Rooms
61
CAMPUS ROOMS WITH KITCHEN
privileges $60/month, co-ed. phone
224-9549. 5745 Agronomy Road, be-
hind village.	
BASEMENT ROOM PRIVATE EN-
trance, bathroom, 3360 W. 29th
Ave. $50 monthly. 261-0771, male
only please.
Room & Board
82
ROOM & BOARD—$110/MONTH —
sauna, colour T.V., excellent food.
5785 Agronomy Rd. 224-9684.
MEAL PASSES —ALL COMBINA-
tions/per month—dinners: 5 days
wk.—$30, 7 day wk.—$40. Lunches
—7 days—$20; combined L.&D.—
$55 or 20 meals good anytime—$25
on campus 224-9691.	
ROOM AND BOARD FOR FEMALE
in exchange for. babysitting services. Private room and bath. All
facilities of home available. Close
to campus. 263-4764.	
ROOM AND BOARD $85.00 MONTH
Doubles. 2120 Wesbrook Cresc. 224-
9073.   Ask for Dan  Dalton.	
ON CAMPUS ACCOMMODATION
St. Andrew's Hall, 224-7720.
IT'S NEW
STAY AT
THE DKE HOUSE
5765 Agronomy Rd.
224-9691
The Modern Accommodation
on Campus!!
—Large, spacious rooms with
Balconies
—Semi-Private Wash Room
—Color   TV
—Complete  Laundry  Facilities
—Sound-Proof   Rooms
—And Much  More
Furnished Apts.
83
FOR RENT FOR GRADUATE OR
4th yr. Non-smoker-newly constructed self-contained basement
suite.   2  bedrooms.   Ph.   263-8441.
Unfurnished Apts.
84
GIRL WANTED TO SHARE 2 BDR.
apt. with same. Dunbar area. $60
mo. Available now. Phone 224-
7438
Communal Houses
85
Houses—Furn. & Unfurn.      86
FOURTH PERSON NEEDED TO
share house near 4th & Macdonald
phone  732-0454.	
GRAD STUDENT WANTED TO
share small house with same.
Easy hitching, $75 plus % utilities.
732-6118.
Use Your
Ubyssey
Classified Friday, January'14, 1972
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 11
Swim team beaten
UBC clash Monday
By MIKE GIDORA
At about 9:30 Monday night
the Buchanan Trophy will be
presented to the captain of either
the UBC Thunderbirds or the SFU
Clansmen. But not until then will
we know who is going to win the
fifth annual Buchanan Classic.
'Bird coach Peter Mullins
wisely preferred not to speculate
as to how the game would end,
saying "I expect that it is going to
be a tight game. It should be close
and much like the last game, but
hopefully with a different result."
The last time these two teams
met was in early December in the
final of UBC's Totem Tournament
where the game was decided
71^64 in favor of SFU.
Even that narrow seven point
spread is misleading as the game
was infinitely closer than that,
being decided in the last minute
of play from the foul line where
Larry Clark sank four straight foul
throws and Eilan Sloustcher
added a final two with seconds
left in the game. Until then it was
as exciting a game of basketball
that you could hope to watch,
neither team willing to give an
inch and both teams playing fast,
crisp basketball.
And it is precisely that type of
basketball that should be played
Monday night. It sounds like a
cliche, but it's true; for these two
teams this is not just an ordinary
game, and the Buchanan Trophy
is not just an ordinary trophy.
The Buchanan Trophy was first
up for grabs during the 67-68
season, and SFU won the
inaugural two-game, total-point
series 125-118. .The Clansmen,
with what was probably their best
team ever, took the two game
series again in 1968-69, this time
132-115.
In 1969-70 the 'Birds had what
eventually proved to be a national
championship team, and they
took time out from their drive to
that crown to demolish SFU
103-67 in a single game played at
the Pacific Coliseum.
Last year the 'Birds evened the
series at two wins each when they
topped SFU 66-62 in the single
game. ■
This year it's just too close to
call. Leading the 'Birds will be
their two high-scoring guards,
Stan Callegari and Ron Thorsen
Volleyball tourney Saturday
The seventh annual
Thunderette Volleyball
Tournament will be staged on
campus this weekend.
Rated as one of the top
Volleyball Tournaments in the
Northwest, the 'Thunderette' is
the only tournament of its kind in
B.C. Since its inception in 1966 it
has regularly attracted top
women's volleyball teams from
B.C., Alberta, Washington, Oregon
and Montana. This year is no
exception with 22 entries in from
such teams as the Portland
YWCA, the 1971 tournament
champions, Vancouver Calonas,
reigning Canadian champions, and
the University of Calgary, one of
Canada's top collegiate teams.
The     'A'     division    of    the
tournament involving the above
teams and others commences at 9
a.m. with the final matches being
played at 5 p.m., Saturday, at the
War Memorial Gymnasium, with
the 'B' division commencing at
the same time in the Physical
Education gymnasia next to the
Winter Sports Centre on campus.
UBC has three teams entered
this year, the Thunderettes in the
'A' division and the Junior Varsity
team and the Totems in the 'B'
division. The Thunderettes,
coached by Marilyn Russell, are
having a highly successful season
and are considered to be one of
the top teams in the 'A' division
of this 1972 tournament.
Admission is free to B.C.'s
number one volleyball
tournament for women.
Campus league action
A new concept in recreational participation on campus gets into
full swing Monday when Campus Leagues, a project of the Women's
Athletic Association begins its 1972 program.
Designed for women students, but including co-ed participation
in badminton and volleyball, the program is intended to involve
students who desire a more competitive program than intramurals but
who are not aspiring to the level of an intercollegiate team.
The one advantage of the program is that a student can select a
sport, and participate in it for the entire term, without feeling
obligated to attend on a regimented basis.
The first special event of the season will be the Campus Curling
Bonspiel beginning Monday, Feb. 7, with no entry fee being charged.
For more information on where you can fit into Campus
Leagues, phone 228-2295 or drop into the Women's Athletic Office,
room 202, Memorial Gym.
Weekend Action Box
Date
Sport
Opponent
Place
Time
Jan. 14
Hockey JV
BCIT
Forum
8:15 p.m.
Jan. 15
Hockey JV
Richmond Redwings
Home
3:30 p.m.
Jan. 14
Basketball JV
Junior All-Stars
Gym 'A'
8:00 p.m.
Jan. 14
Hockey
U. of Winnipeg
Winnipeg
8:00 p.m.
Jan. 15
Hockey
U. of Saskatchewan
Saskatoon
8:00 p.m.
Jan. 14
Swimming
Lewis & Clark
Portland
4:00 p.m.
Jan. 16
Gymnastics
U. of Victoria
UBC
1:00 p.m.
Jan. 15
Wrestling
U. of Washington
Seattle
TBA
Jan. 15
Volleyball
(Thunderette)
Tournament
UBC
9:00 a.m.
who are averaging 14.8 and 19.5
points per game, respectively.
Both Thorsen and Callegari are
excellent ball handlers and deadly
outside shots, but that's SFU's
problem.
UBC's problem takes a slightly
different shape. It's the shape of
6'7" centre Larry Clark. The last
time these two met, it was this
San Francisco native who did
most of the damage.
"Clark is definitely going, to be
a big factor. We're going to have
to try and keep him off of the
boards if we're to win," said
Mullins.
In a final assessment of
Monday's game, Mullins said,
"Well have no special game plan.
We'll just go out there and hustle;
and hope we do better than last
time."
Game time is 8:00 p.m.
Monday at the Pacific Coliseum,
and if you're a student it's a buck
to get in. Tickets are available at
the UBC athletic office in the
gym.
UBC's swim team was in
Tacoma last weekend swimming
against the University of Puget
Sound, and they're in no hurry to
go back.
The UPS Loggers were not the
most gracious hosts in the world,
beating back the 'Birds 79-32 in
the dual meet.
Coach Jack Pomfret expected
nothing else. "They're tough, no
doubt about that," he said "we go
into some meets knowing that
we're going to get skinned, but it's
good experience."
"It was better than past years
against them though. We were
way ahead of last year's times,"
he said.
UBC won two events. Carl
Waterer    won    the    200    yard
butterfly in a time of 2:14.5 while
freestyler Andy Keir pulled off an
upset in the 500 yard freestyle
with a clocking of 5:21.4 to take
first place.
This weekend, the team travels
to Portland to take on Lewis and
Clarke    University.
AQUA SOC.
SCUBA DIVING COURSE
and
AQUA SOC MEMBERSHIP
'42.00
N.A.U.I. Certification
Register at Aqua-Soc Cage
at Noon
(Behind T-bird Shop
Basement of SUB)
Course starts Jan. 18
CAMPUS LEAGUES
START MON. JAN. 17
SPONSORED BY THE WOMEN'S ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION
MON. 8:30-9:30 P.M. - GYMA - BASKETBALL
MON. 5:00-7:00 P.M. - Armouries - TENNIS
TUES. 8:30-10:30 P.M. - GYMA - COED BADMINTON
WED. 6:30-8:30 P.M. - GYMA - COED VOLLEYBALL
THURS. 9:00-11:00 P.M. - Armouries - TENNIS
• MON. FEB. 7 - CURLING BONSPIEL - 1st Draw
— No Entry Fee
Phone 228-2295 To Enter
CAMPUS LEAGUES ARE DESIGNED FOR
THE NON SUPERSTAR       See You There!
^
COMING EVENTS - WOMEN'S ATHLETICS
SAT., JAN. 15
9:00-6:00
memorial    Thunderette Women's
gym Volleyball Tourn.
FRI., JAN. 21 -
4:30-11:00
SAT., JAN. 22
PHYSICAL
EDUCATION
GYMNASIA
9:30-11:00
Invitational Women's
Basketball
Tournament
FREE ADMISSION TO UBC STUDENTS
THUNDERBIRD
BASKETBALL
5th ANNUAL CLASSIC
UBC
SFU
PACIFIC COLISEUM
MONDAY, JAN. 17-
8 p.m.
STUDENTS $1.00 — RESERVED $2.00
Tickets at Athletic Office & Vane. Ticket Centre Page  12
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, January 14, 1972
Urban vehicle more than a car
By MIKE GIDORA
It's taken almost a whole year,
but it's beginning to look like a
car.
But don't tell that to any of
150 engineers working on it.
because to them it's a urban
vehicle that they're building for a
contest sponsored by
Massachusetts Institute of
Technology.
Student co-ordinator of the
project, Don O'Conner, explained
the contest Thursday.
"It's basically a contest to
develop, the ideal urban vehicle.
All cars will be judged on exhaust
emissions, overall safety,
production capabilities, handling,
drivability. braking, turning
ability, being able to withstand a
five mile per hour crash from both
front and rear, energy efficiency,
as well as size and attractiveness
of design," he said.
O'Conner said the engineers
had been working on the car since
March, 1971 when they first
heard about the contest, which is
open to al! universities in North
America.
They spent the first two
months organizing the project and
worked from May to September
on the design of the vehicle.
They   went   into   production
during    the    third    week    of^
September and have been working
on it since then.
"We have the chassis and road
cage completed and ready to go,"
O'Conner said, "and we have the
engine running on natural gas.
"We're running tests on the
engine right now and they should
be completed in about six weeks.
"As for the body we have the
molds ready and last night we
poured the first two pieces."
OPTOMETRIST
J.D. MacKENZIE
E ye   Exaiitnat ion s
Contact   Lenses
3235  W.   Broadway
732-0311
A very special offer!
GRADUATION
PORTRAITS
in
NATURAL
COLOUR!
Select fro'n a series of 8 poses
taken in natural colour. We will
finish:
• One  8"   x   10"   portrait   in
natural color (one person)
$21.95
« One 8" x 10" portrait in
natural color (group) 'W4.95
Ask about our special reduced
prices on additional portraits
ordered at the same time.
• Complete selection of Caps
and Gowns available.
campbell
studios
2580 BURRARD STREET.
VANCOUVER 9, B.C.*
736-0261
DON O'CONNER AND DEAN MACKAY of the engineering urban vehicle project put the vehicle through its gears.
—garry gruanfc i photo
The body is being made from
fibreglass, so that if a fender was
smashed it would just snap off
and could be replaced.
"We were originally hoping to
use plastic for the body, but we
found that it required much too
much work, and a much stronger
mold than we were prepared to
build," he said.
A project .of this size requires
money, about $30,000 according
to O'Conner's estimates.
"Most of it has been raised
from outside sources. B.C. Hydro
is interested in the natural gas
angle and have given us some
money. We got the rest from
organizations like the Chris
Spencer     Foundation,     the
Vancouver Foundation and the
Canadian Transportation
Development Commission."
The project is divided into
various teams, each one working
on a specific aspect of the project.
One group is working on a
service module.
"This isn't required by the
contest rules, but if we're ever to
go into production we'll have to
have something like this,"
O'Conner said.
"It electronically checks all of
the essential parts such as the oil,
headlights, brakes and tire
pressure while the car is re-fueling.
"This is all done through one
large plug-in unit located at the
rear of the car," he said.
CLEARANCE
All FLOOR STOCK must
be cleared
AMAZING LOW PRICES!
• Teakwood and Rosewood Furniture
• MING Rattan and Wicker Furniture
• Seagrass Rush Matting
• Wide Assortment of Bamboo Baskets
• Paper, Capiz & Glass Lights
• Ornamental Gifts and Curios from the Orient
HANGING CHAIRS,
Orig. 46.00    $ 2.9*2?,
BASKET   CHAIRS
Orig. 9.00
$0.99
«■» Ea.
IRREGULAR SPECIALS AND Aeo/    t£
DISCONTINUED ITEMS up to DO%0ff
TABLE TOPS v|[r Only 9.95 ea.
For Coffee Tables and Other Purposes
ROUND
38" Dia.
RECTANGULAR
18%"x 36"
SQUARE
281/*"
RATTAN
COFFEE TABLES-Reg. $50-On Sale $25.00
CORNER TABLES-Reg. $50-On Sale $25.00
OBLONG WICKER TABLE-30x16x32
FOO HUNG CO. LTD.
"HOUSE OF MING"
In the heart of Chinatown
129 E. Pender St.
684-0613
Open daily 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. including Sunday 1 p.m. to 9 p.m.

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