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The Ubyssey Oct 13, 1967

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 SPLASH BASH requires a
log in the pond as fearsome,
frolicsome forestry undergrads take on all intreped,
unintimidated inter-faculty
competitors. Lunch hour
gawkers gather to watch
their heroes get all wet in
another log burling contest
in Library pond. It's all part
of forestry week on campus.
Never throw
Fridays
THE UBYSSEY
ft
at d\ naked
! 3 u$/   T&#eenth
Vol. XLIX, No. 11
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY,  OCTOBER  13,   1967
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224-3916
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Bill of Rights wrong P|*GS   H CI 1*6 COnSlfJprQ
The Canadian Bill of Rights is not worth the paper it is B        *   ^-►%_r#     ■    ■ ^M ■   %__►     %fl^_F___  ■ 4_lP ___ ^M \_* ■   40
cluster college plan
UBC  poli-sci  professor suggests
French school within a school
The Canadian Bill of Rights is not worth the paper it is
printed on, says self-styled campus critic Karl Burau. ;
Burau spoke to nine students Thursday in an experi-  ,
mental college lecture in Bu. 202..
"My main desire is for a real bill of rights written
according to natural law," he said in an analysis of What is
Wrong with Canada. %
"Such laws would be immune to hostile majorities and <f
transcend provincial rights," Burau said. l"~
They would also include the right to work and a guar-   ;'
anteed minimum income. "1
Burau suggested implementation of his "constructive  $
vote of non-confidence" in federal government procedure.  j
Under the vote, the main opposition forms the govern-  A
ment and topples the administration. ;?
Such a plan would eliminate present day non-confidence
motions, he said.
Do happy, happy pigs
wallow in knowledge?
By CHARLOTTE HAIRE
Students would learn more from a collection of great minds
in a mud-hole than from a collection of idiots in ideal physical
surroundings.
This was an argument in debates on the influences on university education held Wednesday in the education auditorium.
The debates, part of the Colloquium on University Education organized by four UBC professors, were to clarify the role
-of the teacher at UBC.
Topics included whether or not the physical surroundings are
vital to the quality of university education, and if organization of course sequences, course content and teaching method
is essential in university education.
Prof. Henry Elder, director of the UBC school of architecture, said material things are of the world of the senses and
there is no other.
"Education is concerned with the mind," he said. "The mind
cannot work without images and symbols from the real world."
Dr. Nathan Divinsky, mathematics professor, said students
who flunk out first are those who try to visualize and memorize
things.
"They are unable then to create anything new," he said.
Divinsky disagreed with people who concentrate on the
reaction or emotion to a subject rather than the basic understanding.
"The essence of a university education is the interrelationship of the professor (who should know what is excellent and
what is second class) with the student who comes to devote
himself to this."
Peter Watts, law 3, said physical surroundings of a university are only a means to an end.
"Not enough has been done for UBC's physical surroundings," Watts said. "The student union building could have been
a focal point for interaction of students from different dis-
'ciplines."
A central location such as the present site of the administration building would have helped achieve this, he said.
Speaking on organization of course sequences, content and
teaching method, arts dean Dennis Healy, said these would not
^matter in the future.
"The Americans have discovered in some colleges a thing
called independent study. There is evidence that students may
actually learn from reprints, periodicals, journals and books.
They can help themselves and each other."
Universities won't have to worry too much about course
sequences, he said. "The message is the mind."
By BONI LEE
Ubyssey Ass't City Editor
A campus cluster college plan for French-
speaking students has been proposed by a UBC
professor.
Carl Baar, assistant political science professor, said he presented the proposal for a
French-speaking college to president-delegate
Dr. Kenneth Hare in August.
"I think the college would be a major educational innovation in North America — a departure from the monolingualism characteristic
of most North American universities," Baar said
in his proposal.
In an interview Thursday
he said Hare acknowledged the
letter within two weeks.
"He sent a positive letter,
but only in a general sense,"
Baar said.
In   it,  Hare  expressed  interest   and  said   the   proposal
should be discussed further.
BAAR Baar's proposed college, to
operate entirely in French, teaches the introductory core of liberal arts courses. The college
would offer at least one major subject unavailable elsewhere in the university.
"This major subject will preferably be one
taught more effectively in French than in English; for example, French-Canadian studies,"
Baar said.
Both English and French-Canadians could be
students.
"It'll be good only if at least as many English-
Canadians as French-Canadians participate,"
Baar said.
He said the college is proposed as a mechanism
for coping with the increasing size of the university.
"It will draw upon the development of cluster
colleges at U.S. universities.
"It will enable undergraduate arts students to
be part of a smaller academic sub-community,"
he said.
A cluster college is similar to a 1,000 student
liberal arts college set right in the middle of a
larger university, he explained.
"Arts I is a watered down version of this,"
he said.
Baar based his proposal partly on the Elbert
Covell College at the University of the Pacific
in California.
Covell has been operating for five years as a
Spanish-speaking college.
It enables Spanish-speaking students to do
undergraduate work without college-level verbal
and writing ability in English.
It also allows English-speaking students to
major or audit courses in Spanish.
"In Canada, geographic and institutional barriers do exist for the student who wants to become bilingual," Baar said.
He said his proposal is more specialized than
former UBC president John Macdonald's experimental college plan.
"The college will bring benefits not only to
B.C. but also to the rest of Canada.
"A French-speaking undergraduate college
within UBC would give institutional form to national goals."
Baar said he has had some positive responses
from other faculty members.
Several people have suggested possible staff
to run the college.
"Someone else has to pick up this idea," Baar
said. "I can barely read French."
The beginning stage of the college could be
started within the present arts system.
Existing departments could teach one section
of their introductory courses in French.
Baar said the college could later take the
form of a dormitory complex where students
and instructors could be in constant communication.
"But it is imporant that the college develop
separately," Baar said.
"A separate college develops greater public
interest and stimulates private and government
money.
"Basically the college is to increase interaction
between English and French-speaking Canadians."
. . . for reaction to Mac's college plan,
see page 3
Pity* ' arv. -
ihffir__i i hi .m Page Jfv
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, October 13, 1967
LIBRARY, HOUSING
Four join advisory groups
Council has approved four appointments to
the library and housing advisory committees.
It approved the appointment of Don Munton,
architecture student and AMS first vice-president, and John Tilley, an English graduate student and former president of the Wesbrook Villa
students association, to the housing advisory
committee.
Council deferred appointment of Peter War-
die who applied but was not present to be questioned by council.
The appointment of AMS second vice-presi-
ent Kim Campbell and arts president Stan Persky
to the library committee was approved.
As qualifications Miss Campbell cited her
"keen brain and dazzling wit"; Persky said he
had  "slept in the library several times".
No other applications were received for the
four student positions on the library committee.
Miss Campbell who is handling the committee
applications for the AMS said no applications
have been received yet for the traffic and parking*' committee.
Arts ponder lounge name
It may be Buchanan Lounge no longer.
Arts council meets today at noon in the lounge to decide
on a new name.
"We're tired of honoring a man (UBC chancellor John
Buchanan) for whom we feel no high regard," said arts
president Stan Persky.
Obsessed people
killing relations
Br PAUL KNOX
The establishment's obsession with its environment is the
main barrier to effective communication, says Marshall Mc-
Luhan's successor.
Dr. Arthur Porter of the University of Toronto told 300 persons Thursday in Buchanan 106 that an anti-environment is
needed before people can communicate meaningfully.
Porter succeeds Marshall McLuhan as acting ctirector of the
center for culture and technology at U of T.
"Leonardo da Vinci was a great anti-environmentalist because there were two sides to his character," he said.
"Each side was able to analyze and even ibe shocked at the
other side."
Throughout history, he said, cultures have been unable to
communicate with one another because their basic necessities are
the same.
"We need to get people to know enough about other systems
and cultures so that they can communicate effectively with them."
He also criticized the over-emphasis on techniques and
methodology in society that gives rise to a distinction between
wisdom and knowledge.
It is possible to have a language that is much too rich and
therefore unsuitable for direct communication, Porter said.
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THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
Senate secrecy the issue
for students' campaigns
By BO HANSEN
Senate secrecy has emerged
as the main issue confronting
student senate candidates.
Eight candidates for the
position of student senator
spoke to a sparsely-populated
Brock Thursday noon.
\ None presented comprehensive or detailed programs, but
all favored informing students
of senate affairs.
Mark Waldman, graduate
studies, said student senators
should act as a liason between
students and senate.
"While it is not feasible for
students to govern, we should
strive for an equilibrium between students and governors
so we can have a university
where things happen," Waldman said.
(Ian Worley, the other candidate for the sole graduate student senate seat, was not at
the meeting.)
Brian Wallace, law 3, said
that students must make "responsible, forceful presentations to Senate."
"The position will involve a
certain amount of public relations," he said.
Hugh Madden, commerce 3,
said students should elect candidates who reflect their own
perspective and who will be
willing to co-operate in senate.
Kirsten Emmott, science 4,
said student senate positions
have possibilities, but the real
power in the university is in
the Board of Governors.
"I am prepared to present
student requests to senate and
will apply for a committee
appointment. However, an
overview is required: we could
be doing much better if real
democracy existed in the university."
Arnold Abramson, law 3,
said the student senator role
is to communicate student
views to the senate and information on what is being done
back to students.
Student senators should
work in co-operation with the
public relations officer to present a good public image,
Abramson said.
Mate said the student senate
positions were examples of
"tokenism" because they attempted to give an illusion of
democracy where none exists.
He promised to work for academic reform.
"If I am elected, senate secrecy will be over."
Ken Hallat, comm. 4, said
student senators responsibly
represent the majority view
of students.
"I have four years of medieval history which singularly
qualifies me for the position,"
said Ray Larsen, arts 4.
"The important thing is to
make ' the university more
democratic, a democracy of
participation rather than of
consent," Larsen said. "The
administration has become a
monster out of control."
Election of the student senators will be held next Wednesday from 10 a.m. to 4
p.m. Advance polls will be
held in residences.
Prehashed hash
in student pads
By STEPHEN JACKSON
Ubyssey Housing Reporter
Residences may adopt airline practices and serve
pre-cooked meals.
UBC housing administrator Les Rohringer said Thursday the Ponderosa cafeteria will provide most of the food
for proposed new housing to be built for senior students
behind the traffic patrol office.
The new buildings would have only serving kitchens
for reheating meals and preparing such items as toast and
fried eggs, which could not be cooked in advance and
packaged.
"We hope to extend this service to Totem and Place
Vanier (lower mall)," said Rohringer.
Ponderosa cooking facilities would be expanded, he
said.
Meanwhile, two hi-rise residences may be built adjoining the Ponderosa, Rohringer said.
"But the Ponderosa suggestion is not our immediate
concern. It is a reserve project and will be examined by
the committee on future housing," Rohringer said.
— georgo hollo photo
STUDENT SENATE CANDIDATES are caught in   the act  of  thinking   after   recovering   from
shock  after   impertinent  student  had   the   audacity to ask intelligent question to open forum
in Brock lounge at noon Thursday.
Students won't bear brunt
of administration mess
PORT ARTHUR (CUP) — Lakehead University students here are signing a petition forcing
the administration to validate the registration
procedures used this year.
Registration was fouled up because professors
did not have correct curriculum information.
The university calendar was issued two weeks
after registration was completed.
The administration issued a memorandum to
students saying that if their courses conflict with
the new regulations, their courses must be
changed.
For many students this involves buying an
entirely new set of books when they already have
books for the original courses.
Asked who would pay for new books if stu;
dents were forced to change courses, dean of
arts Gordon Rothney said, "I can't help it if you
have bought the wrong books."
The student petition, presented to student
council for approval Wednesday asks the academic senate to "accept the courses of all students as approved by members of the faculty at
the time of registration, as fulfillment of the
requirements for a degree in 1967, '68, '69 and
'70."
The petition also asks that in future each student be governed for all years of his program
by the calender issued to him in his freshman
year.
The petition says if a reply is not forthcoming
from the senate by today, the students will consider this a negative reply.
The petition further asks the university president to define the function of the university
president, the board of governors, the senate, the
deans of arts and science, director of university
schools, registrar, the director of admissions,
dean of students, chairman of teaching staff,
lecturer, and student placement officer.
These definitions are requested no later than
Monday. The students have also called for a
joint student-faculty-board of governors committee with equal representation from each group
to review all facets of university government
structure.
This committe is to be formed by Nov. 3.
Healy raps Macs idealism
By MIKE FINLAY
Former UBC president John
Macdonald's proposed experimental college was a nostalgic
dream, says dean of arts Dennis
Healy.
Healy was commenting
Thursday on the small experimental college proposed by
Macdonald in 1963. The plan
was disclosed by The Ubyssey
last week.
It called for an enrollment
of 160 students in a small college on campus, with emphasis
on small classes, seminars, and
student participation.
Healy said this is too idealistic,  and does not solve the
f^PN MOUNT FWI-OGNAP... |@H,THE TROUBLES OF mmm l-XLO0K!<$Q'S CAVE! FOllOU HE!
r-n fr)f1E HERF BOV. T THINK I S&tt^Ml/SM&nO THE i1ASSESl>yfj.^>,PT IN front? -MI
main problems in education.
"Macdonald's proposal would
not meet the needs of the
growing student population
and would create an elite
among students," he said.
Asked to comment on the
plan, acting UBC president
Dean Walter Gage said there
was little he could say on the
subject.
"The university has no policy
on it at present," Gage said.
The experimental college has
been compared by some to the
Arts I program now in operation.
Dr. Ian Ross, an initiator of
Arts   1,  said  he  agreed  with
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the basic principles of the college plan.
"However, I think it was unwise to apply for a grant without something concrete to
show," Ross said.
Macdonald applied for a
Ford Foundation grant to finance the college, but was
turned down.
It is believed Macdonald was
discouraged by the inaction
and pessimism of a faculty
committee he appointed to
work on the experimental
college.
"This is not a new thing; we
have had plans like this before," said Gage.
Icwhatfor?.
HONKl s *'..'<£« y *\v* r;
THE UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the editor and not of the AMS or the university. Member,
Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey subscribes to the press service*
of Pacific Student Press, of which it is founding member, and Underground
Press Syndicate. Authorized second class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash. The Ubyssey publishes Pago
Friday, a weekly commentary and review. City editor, 224-3916. Othar
calls, 224-3242; editor, local 25; photo. Page Friday, loc. 24; sports, loc.
23; advertising, loc. 26. Telex 04-524.
OCTOBER 13, 1967
Truth & senators
Only one man associated with the UBC oligarchy
has ever told the truth about the four new student seats
on the university's academic senate.
The man who told the truth was ex-president John
Macdonald — and he had to leave town to do it.
The day after he left, The Vancouver Sun published
a remarkable interview with the great man.
According to the Sun interview, Macdonald "clearly" felt that the four student seats we're "just a public
relations move."
"What will four students, among perhaps 80 senate
members, accomplish ? I think, not very much," said
Macdonald.
This statement by the normally circumspect Macdonald shocked many people — as the truth, plainly
stated, often will.
It was doubly shocking because Macdonald's view
of the four student senate seats was identical to the
views of the campus activists he had scornfully labelled
"crusaders."
The crusaders, like Macdonald, were fully aware that
students have no voice whatsoever in the running of
UBC. The only difference between Mac and the crusaders was that Mac liked it that way.
The crusaders opposed Macdonald because they
believed that decisions in any community, universities
included, could only be arrived at legitimately from the
consent of the governed.
If responsibility includes telling the truth, then only
Mac and the crusaders have been responsible.
The irresponsible ones are the gaggle of last-minute
keep-out-the-radicals candidates who claim that—armed
with their own version of responsibility — they're going
to accomplish great things in the senate.
Just as irresponsible are the university officials who
claim that the four students will be able to achieve
effective "communication."
There is no doubt those in control will permit the
student senators to do all the talking they want — as
long as their speech has no consequences.
We urge students not to be fooled by fraudulent
claims of responsibility when they vote for their senators
on Oct.  18.
Only if we elect senators with an awareness of the
truth—as Macdonald told it—can we expect even the
smallest advance toward a democratic university.
STUDENTS SAUNAS M
• • •
Haw, haw
"Come on, ifs just those sauna people again!"
Dave, Tony wrong
entrance exams no
again:
good
There have been few phenomena funnier in the
uneventful history of UBC student government than this
year's notorious Neanderthal gang.
At Monday's council meeting the gang was in better
form than ever as they waxed indignant over AMS
president Shaun Sullivan's report of last weekend's B.C.
Association of Students' congress.
The Neanderthals—who represent a few unfortunate
technical faculties — seemed to feel that an association
of all the province's students was not really a worthwhile
or promising project.
This was an amusing line for the Neanderthals
to take since they had earlier urged that UBC drop its
membership in the Canadian Union of Students and concentrate on organizing provincially.
Plainly, the Neanderthals aren't against national
student organizations — they are simply against any
student organization outside of their own small faculties.
We think that's pretty funny.
Haw, haw.
EDITOR: Danny Stoffman
City  -  Stuart Gray
News   Susan Gransby
Managing Murray McMillan
Photo  -  Kurt Hilger
Associate .... Al Birnie, Kirsten Emmott
Senior  Pat Hrushowy
Sports Mike Jessen
Wire  Charlotte Haire
Page Friday  - Judy Bing
Ass't. City   Boni Lee
Near the torture rack, ragged
ragas raged as gruesome guru groans
grew irreatly grating. While Ann
Arky sprinkled confetti and Irving
Fetish hummed an Irish pub song,
two editors swore in Ukranian they
were engaged. This is a stick up,
cried a tubby blorg, waving a grass
hockey stick. Gripping 597 tubes of
toothpaste were Steve Jackson,
Hew Bwynne, Mike Finley, Jane
Kennon, Paul Knox, Irene Wasllew-
ski, Fran McGrath, Mark DeCoursey
and Judy Young. Meanwhile Scott
Macrae felt at loggerheads. Nigel
Thursfield, Fred Cawsey, Richard
Baer, Luanne Armstrong, Susan
Gordon, Ted Syperek and Dennis
Newman played monopoly.
Jo-Ann Canning made the best
of a sporting chance on the jock
bench.   Mike  Fitzgerald  had  a  ball.
Feeling in an expansive mood,
George Hollo, Chris Blake and Bob
Brown gained five pounds each eating chocolate ants in the darkroom.
Despite 1967 not being a leap year,
an editorial board meeting will be
held today at noon to decide on a
St. Valentine's Day card for Col.
McGugan.
By KIRSTEN EMMOTT
Ubyssey Associate Editor
Dear Dave Suzuki  and  Tony
Warren:
After reading your rebuttal
in Thursday's Ubyssey of an
argument of mine, all I can say
is Wow!
I don't like having to thrash
this out in print again, but here
goes:
I said lower year classes full
of apathetic students are
wasting everybody's time and
suggested the government give
us more money so we can hire
more profs to teach more people the way Messrs. Warren,
Suzuki and Chitty do.
I said entrance exams were a
poor way of judging ability.
This was justly attacked as a
fuzzy statement. Here it is, de-
fuzzed: three-hour exams requiring recall of detail, like
most exams here, are not a
good measure of anyone's ability to think, willingness to
learn and desire to carry out
some clear-cut plan of education. O.K. ?
My authorities are people
like Dr. Chitty, Dr. Ross of Arts
1, and Dr. Tussman of the
Berkeley experiment.
The rebuttal is also correct
in saying poor students should
be kept out of college if they
cannot beneift by it. My point
was, high school records do not
make it clear if a person has
always done poorly, and entrance exams will do little more.
In other words, I think the
admissions system we have now
will not greatly be improved by
having entrance exams, and if
someone can show me a really
good entrance exam I'll change
my mind.
The two dissidents should not
run away from the question,
"why should students have to
pay for more profs ?" by asking another question. I still say
if the public is providing an
education it might as well provide a proper one.
That other question, however, is a good point. Why
should the public pay to educate those who won't benefit
by it ?
Well, to repeat: those who go
to university should be assured
of having teachers with enough
time and ability to make sure
they benefit and that means
money.
Also, the idea that everyone
has to go to university instead
of a technical or vocational
school is a flaw in our society
which will have to be worked
on.
Dr. Warren to the contrary,
I've never thought students
were an apathetic mass of
morons. But a few are, indeed,
apathetic, mostly because they
are only at university because
it's the thing to do.
Now, as to the "basic question" — can education be improved by raising the standards
required of students?
Yes, sir, but my article was
not an evasion of your question
but a request that we ignore it.
We should improve education
by so structuring universities
that only the talented, the in
telligent and the curious wil
want to enter.
Then you would ibe free ol
your heavy teaching load anc
universities would no longei
attract crowds of teenyboppers
uninterested in learning. (Anc
before you sail into that com
ment, let me state that I was
and perhaps remain a teeny
bopper, but interested in lean,
ing.)
Any statement that I am no
deeply concerned for the talent
ed people, who deserve the toes
education possible, is pompou:
and dogmatic, but I love yoi
anyway. We're tooth on th«
same side. Thanks.
LETTERS
Petition
Editor, The Ubyssey:
The present Alma Mater
Society constitution, by-law 1,
section la, states that "all
registered undergraduate students" of UBC shall be members of the "society."
It seems to me that students
should have the opportunity
to choose to belong, or not to
belong, to a campus association.
I have therefore suggested to
Shaun Sullivan that he, as
present leader of the AMS,
move to democratize this constitution with the insertion of
an optional clause which would
permit voluntary association
in the AMS.
Obviously the entrenched
council activists are not going
to support such a move which
would require a referendum
(and could, if students were
made aware of a choice, possibly "destroy" the present
centralized AMS structure).
I have met a number of students who have spent three or
four years on campus without
either participating directly in
central campus government, or
in any way supporting the
AMS. This, out of choice and
a pre-occupation with their
studies.   It  seems   that   many
students  have   paid  an  AMS
fee because it was easier to pay
it than to waste time fighting
it.
The apathy of the studen
population to student govern
ment and elections is probablj
evidence of this.
Therefore, I am preparinj
a petition calling for a ref$r
endum on the principle tha
student membership in thi
AMS be voluntary.
The petition will be printec
and circulating by this com
ing weekend.
MARTIN McLAREI
arts •
Bowl
Editor, The Ubyssey:
I realize that student partic
pation in bowling has bee
declining, but there are sti
enough interested bowlers x
keep the campus bowling clu
supplied with 80 members.
Replacing the proposed alley
in SUB with some other f acilit
is a good idea. -,
However, some consolatio
should be made to those wh
must still use the six alleys i
the war memorial gym.       ^
If SUB alleys were to h^t
automatic pinsetters, wouldn
it be a good idea to install si
of them in the gym alleys?
N. WATKIN
science !?
mWMZ
&sg&sss$g
^W*?3M2N»:
_J^3^l_Jt?Wg!j"
friday pf
October Friday 13th
ON THE COVER:
gordon fidler conjured this
cover with the help of the
magenta frog . . . and so
from ragas to riches.
aesthetic guidance:
judy bing
intellectual stimulus:
Stephen scobie
political exhortation:
bert hill
winged creatures:
arnold saba
celluloid images:
kurt hilger, george hollo
Here it is — The Ubyssey inside paper with the
inside dope. You could get
busted reading  it.
People wishing to go on
a guided tour please form
queue. Are you ready?
On our right, Arnold
Saba (the one that looks
like Maharishi) propounds
the Death of Hip school of
theology.
Under that, Keith Fraser
reviews Luther. On page
three, Andrew Horvat,
who is well over six feet
tall, says he felt like Gulliver in Lilliput while
studying in Japan last
year.
More reviews on pf4,
by Alan Bell and Sherry
Sandwell.
Our next stop is India
with Marilyn Hill. That's
on pf 5. If you don't know
a raga from guru, poor
you.
For a sneak preview of
the Vancouver International Film Festival, there
is bearded Scottish cine-
maniac Stephen Scobie on
the same page.
Two of our regular features, The Outside In and
Zap! are on page pf 6.
If you take the first turn
to the right after that, you
will find yourself on the
Left, with Bert Hill who
discusses the powerless
UBC Senate.
Che is alive and well in
Bolivia! See pf8 for details.
Glad you could come!
pf 2wo
h . • *_»^
By ARNOLD SABA
There have been reports that San Francisco's hippies
have been holding hippie-movement funerals. This is not
to say, as is every parent's fond wish, that the hippies are
finished their childish games, and are packing their beads,
cutting their hair and vowing no more nonsense.
Not that. The world may never understand, but some
people just never get in line. Society has not killed the
hippies, as much as it has tried. But things have changed.
They lived the impossible dream, all summer. It was
love, trips, music, flowers, and everybody was hip. Comes
the fall, and North America's youngest rebels are back in
school. The others are holed up. On Fourth Ave. the heroin-
pushers and underworld thugs — society's other dropouts
— are trying to take over. Violence is increasing.
The height was glimpsed, and briefly attained. But,
"between the idea and the reality . . . falls the Shadow."
This is the frustration of the human condition.
The hippie movement, per se, doesn't matter. What
does matter is its people, its directions, and its roots. What
now?
Evidence points to our society becoming increasingly
totalitarian. There is not yet a rule of law, but social and
moral convention is harsh with those who deviate from
the path . . . view the Georgia Straight squelch.
It is deceptively  calm  and  ordinary.  There  are no
This could not be entirely so — all the hippies will
armies in the streets, or Fuhrers on the balcony — yet.
But the Big Lie is being spread.
I'd wager that in the Soviet Union most people have
no sense of being suppressed. Nor here, but deviance is
looked down upon just the same.
The United States is on a crazy course of self-righteousness.
Countries less under the cultural influence of the U.S.
than our own are getting a picture of America not unlike
the  evil  picture  that  Germany  presented  in  the  1930's.
"The American Dream, has, in its latter stages, become a
nightmare.
The personal realization of creation, evolution, and
the possibility of destruction renders the power and political games pointless. And in America, fortunately this has
happened.
A slight ripple of what W. Macneile Dixon called "the
gospel which, long ago, like a mounting tidal wave, swept
the East and submerged its vital activities" has run across
North America. As a matter of fact, it is the same tidal
wave which launched Christianity, today the world's greatest justification for destruction.
The "peace-lovers and sensitive hearts" of the East
were of two types, mystical and ethical. The mystics stayed
in the Orient and mystified everyone. The ethic-preachers
travelled as far as the Mediterranean.. And we know the
story of the ethical religions from there.
It is a question whether hippies are rebelling against
the Christian Protestant ethic, in a Western way to return
to early Christian beliefs, or turning to Eastern mysticism.
They quote both Christ and Zen.
Perhaps they are returning to pre-Christian days
when the two, ethical and mystical, were one . . . following
the tidal wave back to its beginnings.
What of these people in a rampant America? Will they
be its last gasp, or will they undermine its present folly-
ridden structure?
The American senator Fullbright said recently, in one
of his anti-Vietnam speeches, that he could be speaking
for the last time the dissent of which America is disaprov-
ing. He may have been exaggerating, but he too feels the
foreboding. The political climate which allows me to
publish such an article as this may disappear.
It is becoming more dangerous to be a dissenter. Will
the dissenters save America in time — or is it already too
late?
There is no precedent to show that even the best movements* in history have done much good. Christianity is a
failure, as are all other religions. Man has not made his
heaven on earth. The Beat Generation dissolved in a
muddle of cynicism and middle-age complacency. The hippies could be taken as a new, deeper revival of the Beats
— of they could fail in the same way.
Subtly, the American ethos does creep in. Most un-
mystically the Jefferson Airplane does Levi ads on the
radio. Where are all the hip bands? The stations play
soul. Some expert or other predicts that in a few years
the hippies will be "political radicals."
This could not be entirely so — all the hippies will
not un-hip. There is, to quote E. M. Forster, "an aristocracy
of the sensitive ... to be found in all nations and classes,
and there is a secret understanding between them when
they meet. The represent the true human tradition, the one
permanent victory of our queer race over cruelty and
chaos."
It is through these people that civilization is really
handed down. To them social factors mean less than mortality and existence.
"On they go, an invincible army, yet not a victorious
one. All attempts to organize them fail. Authority, seeing
their value, has tried to net them ... as Egyptian priesthood, or the Christian Church, or the Chinese civil service.
But they slip through the net."
They will exist in any society, cruel or lenient. But
how much better if it is a lenient society.
Is Hip dead, even if its people are not? It could never
be, in spirit, but as a force . .. all my brave words will not
revive it, if it is so, but all I can say to everyone concerned
is, "don't stop!"
BLOODY MARVELOUS  THE WAY
HE CHIDES  THOSE SIMPLETONS
By KEITH FRASER
At any of the local productions this
seasons your chances of meeting Darryl
Dramah are quite good. For instance, I
recently discovered his polished verbosity
after a presentation of Luther (currently
at the York Theatre) when the following
questions were put to him:
Q: In your opinion, Darryl, does this
play come off ? (a steady opener)
D: Surely does. For an amateur company to assume such a difficult assignment
is encouraging, and the result is worthwhile indeed.
Q: What particularly appealed to you
then?
D: The language of John Osborne, the
playwright. (He began to warm up in typical British fashion.)
Q: Really ?
D: Yes. Peter Jaenicke as Luther
makes the place hop with verbal pins.
Bloody marvelous the way he chides those
simpletons for believing they had purchased a piece of Our Lady's girdle, or a
leftover loaf from the Last Supper. In this
age of ecumenicity we tend to forget the
past excesses of the Church which originated the current need for reunification.
Q: So there's a contemporary focus?
D: Not so much as a human focus
which makes the play live for us. Klaus
Dorr is very human as Tetzel — the infamous indulgence pedlar. And imagine
Luther, lost to most of us in an aura of
history, complaining about his bowels and
always doubting his own theological endeavors.
Q: Do you th—
D: I liked the second act ibest. So ribald,
despite an occasional dramatic lapse. You
can tell Osborne wasn't impressed with
Pope Leo. However, I thought act one
moved slowly. But it was so holy you
could smell the candle wax. Didn't you
think so ?
Q: Weren't they —
D: Then we see Luther with his own
son in the denouement. This contrasts
neatly with the incompatibility of Luther
and his father in act one. As I suggested,
the human focus becomes significant and—
Q: Darryl, would you recommend this
play for the average student ?
D: Certainly. I would even recommend
it for the engineer. You see in this age ol
technological advancement one often loses
aesthetic as well as historical perspective.
Q: I agree, and thank —
D: Damn disenchant ing that there
should be any empty seats for this production. You'd think that students in the
humanities would at least ...
He went on for some time about the
leukemic attitude to theatre or something.
In short, he reiterated his recommendation
for each student to see Luther and judge
for himself whether the protagonist is
really what one contemporary called him;
"the virgin heretic."
contents
hip _ pf2 film	
theatre    Pf2 outside in
japan    pf 3 zap   	
architecture    Pf4 senate
art           pf 4 revolution
music    pf 6
1
. pf 5
. pf 6
-pf 6
■ PfT
. pf8
Friday, October 13, 1967 And how did you like Japan?
By ANDREW HORVAT
- To idealists with egalitarian beliefs, the words
"national character" reek with racism. For aren't
we all humans under the skin? Indeed within
the boundaries of the North American continent
this sort of egalitarianism is very noble..
The differences of Jews, Catholics, Anglo-
saxons, and Orientals seem rather petty when
for generations they've been speaking the same
language and working under the same economic
^conditions. And yet they wish to perpetuate an
image of being intrinsically different from each
other.
; ISOLATION
When I left Canada for a year's study in Japan
it was with this sort of egalitarianism, a reaction
to the artificial barriers of Canadian society,
Jbarriers which exist only because Canada is not
Strong enough as a cultural entity to mould her
people into indentifiable images of Canadians.
Japan, however suffers from quite the opposite
dilemma.
Geographically, historically and racially, the
Japanese lived isolated from the rest of the
world experiencing relatively few contacts with
continental peoples until the last century. The
results of these few contacts were to increase
national sentiment rather than to develop an international outlook.
My biggest surprise was to hear racist ideology
from people whom I was made to believe had
always been the underdogs.
For anyone staying in Japan longer than a
tourist, there seem to be three phases of adjustment.
ENCHANTED
The first is one of awe. Travelling along the
Tokaido, the electric appliance factories seem to
^iave sprouted from the rice paddies by the railway tracks.
The ruins of bombed out munitions plants
are not part of the same drama..
The whole place is enchanted if not with cherry
blossoms, geisha, or scenes of Fuji, then by train-
ful of uniformed students, office workers in many
shades of grey wearing the familiar Mitsui, Mitsubishi and Sumitomo company badges on their
lapels. Strangest of all are the old women giving
their seats to the children on the train. For my
first three weeks, Japan was a very enjoyable
.Jootnote to Western culture. I felt like Gulliver
m Lilliput.
PRISONERS
The second phase was the horrible discovery
that I did not belong. That somehow the social
structure of these people did deserve a discriminatory label.
The Japanese began to appear to me as a
group of clandestine people whose welcome was
something they wore like a holiday mask. The
communter trains, the roller coasters of a few
days before, turned into cattle cars full of prisoners. They were prisoners of a social order
that had condemned them to go thru robot-like
conventions: to stare at me without the least
inhibition, to ask me where I came from and
whether I can use chopsticks, to try to speak to
me in English and be earnestly disappointed if
I attempted to reply in Japanese.
Now that I look back on this phase, I see myself as a paranoid outcast. I can also confess that
I hated the smiling girls from the Midwest.
They called everything cute and quaint, never
learned more than a few words of the local
c tongue, had never heard of sukiyaki (except for
the song) and if they had ever gone to a Chinese
restaurant in Boise or Duluth, they always asked
for forks.
STEREOTYPES
Yet the paranoia was not entirely mine. The
Japanese, for reasons which I'll go into later
demand that the foreigner fit a stereotype image
of America or France or England, which fact
might explain the initial successes of the short-
timers from the Midwest.
It's difficult to speak about a nation as a
whole, but generally the Japanese are certain
;sthat no matter what they do, foreigners can
never understand the Japanese. Some Japanese
are pleased when a foreigner makes an attempt
at learning Japanese language and customs, some
,,are disappointed, but I think many are skeptic,
knowing that the foreigner shall never achieve
by study what every Japanese gains by birth.
The national hangup is the belief that every
nation is just as proud and nationalistic as Japan.
Therefore quite naturally every Japanese
expects every foreigner to be selling his country
as a paradise on earth. With Canadians it's a
paradox.
It was truly amazing to notice how everyone
felt somehow responsible for the history of
Japan.
The defeat of Japan in the last war is felt
by university students who could not have been
involved in the effort.
PROUD
I once pleased a student by telling him that
Japanese cars were very popular in Vancouver.
He said that this fact made him very proud.
I don't know how most Canadians see wheat
sales to China, but the thought of Chinese sitting
down to a meal of Saskatchewan wheat-noodles
does not make me a prouder Canadian.
But to a Japanese, the individual is more
easily indentified as a member of a group than
as a single free body. So while I was complaining
about being treated like an ambassador on a
state visit, my Japanese counterpart in Canada,
could, I think just as easily have claimed that his
intrinsic Japaneseness was being ignored by a
most aggressive unroganized sex-mad society.
The failures of the second phase reveals a lot
about Japan. First are the stereotype images that
the Japanese, because of their isolated position
have had to adopt. The number of Japanese who
have actually met let alone communcated with
foreigners is infinitesimal. And yet the outside
world nevertheless continues to exert an overwhelming influence on Japan.
This fact should not stand as an apology for
Japan's insular outlook on the world.
No American soldier on leave in Japan nor.
any Frenchman touring the countryside nor
Canadians of pseudo European origins have been
comforted by historical reasons for being made
paranoid.
COFFEE  HOUSE
Phase three is the realization that though the
foreigner stands outside he does not stand alone.
Oh yes, there are other foreigners too but who
wants to go drinking Canadian Club at the American Club?
My third phase began when I got off at the
wrong streetcar stop almost exactly this time
last year. I saw a coffee house, and stopped in
for some pudding and black coffee. Armed with
a huge book on Canada, I sat glum in my chair.
A girl in a green dress with flowers in her hand
walked in and sat down near me.
The third phase is where the social critic's
attitude of non involvement breaks down. You
begin to discover that desires are universal only
satisfaction is afforded in different ways from
those at home.
The bars are the places to meet people at their
best. The Japanese do not attach sin to drinking
and the results of their overindulgence lie in
puddles on the sidewalk or indiscreetly in the
last trains from Shinjuku.
Waiting for a taxi at 1:00 a.m. in a line
thirty people long, a drunk was yelling in loud
Osaka dialect. Empty taxis kept whizzing by.
It looked like we were all in the same predicament. So we exchanged cigarettes and I still
have the lighter the Osaka drunk gave me.
DEVIATES
Coffee houses or kissatens deserve several
volumes in themselves. They are the meeting
places of lovers, housewives, businessmen, students and profs and all kinds of deviates from
lesbians to American draft dodgers.
In the third phase you can consider men
pissing in the alleyways, or strangers shouting
"haro" (hello) as part of the scene. The idea is to
lose the paranoia without losing a basic critical
point of view.
^f Try the  KINGS-way ...
on Seymour Street
(Full Facilities For Your Enjoyment)
King of Cubs
1275 Seymour St.
D. W. GRIFFITH'S
INTOLERANCE
Begins
THE SILENT CLASSICS - SERIES 3
Oct. 16-8:00-Aud.
in
Cinema   16's 7th   Season
SERIES  PASSES AT THE DOOR
FREDERIC WOOD STUDIO
Canadian Premiere of a New British Comedy
LITTLE MALCOLM
AND HIS STRUGGLE AGAINST THE EUNUCHS
by David Halliwell
October 12-21    —    8:30 p.m.
STUDENTS: 75c ADULTS: $1.50
Tickets: Frederic Wood Theatre
Room 207 or 228-2678
Set your sight in College
with glasses
from...
OPTICAL DEPT.
GLASSES from 9.95 Complete
CONTACT LENSES one price only $69.50
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Opp. THE BAY  I I I I ill i I I I 111 _ I    New   Wertmin>,er
681-6174       ^^^^^^^^^^_^_^^^ Opp.  Army  & Navy
Friday,  October   13,   1967 Walkway still wet
By ALAN BELL
UBC planners have come up with
a new form of architecture intended
to protect us from the rain. In fact one
section of the covered walkway system,
which will eventually link all of the
major buildings in the central campus,
has already been built.
If you feel so inclined, you can walk
under cover from somewhere near the
auditorium cafeteria to somewhere near
the Freddy Wood Theater. However,
you will still get wet if you want to
go to any particular building in this
area, as the small portion of walkway
constructed so far does not directly
connect to the auditorium, the Lassere
building, or the theater. At present it
starts nowhere and ends nowhere, and
has been built in this form merely because it was convenient to have it included in the contracts for building
and landscaping the new music building.
Despite its present irrelevance as a
means for travelling from A to B without getting wet, it does raise some important architectural issues.
Among the assets of this one section
of covered walkway is the role it plays
as a gateway to the music building
plaza( as you approach it), and as a
boundary for the plaza (when you are
there). It helps give the plaza a sense
of place. It makes the plaza a specific,
defined open space with unique spatial
characteristics.. The same plaza set in
the main mall would have none of the
pleasant sense of enclosure that it enjoys in reality.
Moreover, the covered walkway
operates to some degree as a visual
link between the buildings of the Fine
Arts Center. Its function as a visual
link is no more successful than its present use as a physical link (to keep
people dry in wet weather). It is neither
a large enough element, nor is it sufficiently similar in detail to the buildings it purports to link, to seem like
much more than an unrelated afterthought.
Each building here, as on the campus as a whole, is a distinct entity set
apart from its neighbors by an expanse
of pavement or greenery. No little
walkway will be able to provide a true
visual link between buildings as unrelated as the library and Buchanan
Yet this is one proposal of the campus
master plan report, presented this year
by Wurster, Bernardi and Emmons,
Inc., of San Francisco.
Simon Fraser University was designed as a totality and the covered
walkways there are an integral part of
the complex in form and in detail. The
basic flaw in UBC's planning, based
on the beaux arts tradition, is the large
verdant open spaces. The conception of
academic buildings as islands in a natural park may be appropriate to small
campuses with short walking distances,
and is quite pleasant in good weather.
But this type of planning is totally inappropriate for this rainy climate and
for today's multiversity where communication between disciplines requires
close proximity and short walking distances.
However, UBC's physical structure
was set by major decisions in the past
and the only possible solution to the
problem of long walks in the rain is
the proposed network of walkways.
The question remains whether walkways similar to the one segment now
built will in fact keep people dry. Size
is one problem—in the central campus,
walkways 13 feet wide will only accommodate a fraction of the people wanting to use them. And the problem of
wind-blown rain remains largely unsolved — on windy days, rain blows
right through this colonnade.
Thus, UBC residents appear destined
to suffer from the rain in years to come,
despite the benevolent efforts of campus planners.
Norwegian print
wins big prize
By SHERRY SANDWELL
Well, and what would you
do if you were a printmaker
sitting in Ljubljana and the
women's auxiliary to the Vancouver Art Gallery offered a
$5,000 prize for the finest
print?
Some of the finest prints in
the world are in the gallery
during Vancouver Print International, the first show of its
kind in Canada. On wall after
print-lined wall, aesthetic feats
unfold the decisions of honour
committees from Europe, Asia,
North and South America.
The $5,000 prize print was
given to Rolf Nesch, a German
pacifist who adopted Norwegian citizenship in 1946.
The selection was made by
William S. Lieberman, director of drawings and prints at
the Museum of Modern Art,
New York.
Called "Snake-Easter", the
print is small and though brilliantly expressionistic in form,
is not as impressive as others
with more depth-sounding content, such as "My Life of Mexico" by Shinzaburo Takeda,
"Reality, from, as is when" by
Eduardo Paolozzi; or with
mtisterly visual effects, like
"Boum-Boum", a colour serio-
" graph by Miroslav Sutej. And
there are many others which
could be named.
However, the choice of the
prize-winner probably signifies the difficulty in separating technique from artistry in
the modern field of graphics,
where invention has become
all-important. Nesch discovered
the process, later used by
others who appear in Vancouver Print International,
whereby holes could be bitten
through the plate from which
the paper gets its impression.
What is confusing is that he
discovered it not a few years
ago but in 1927, when he was
working with woodcuts of the
expressionist school in Germany.
The show, which opened
Wednesday, continues to October 29, with all the prints
on sale from $30 to $600. It
includes such famous names
as Joan Miro, Victor Vasarely,
Jean-Paul Riopelle, and Emil
Schumacher. Out of 157 artists, most of whom are painters and sculptors as well as
print-makers, there are 15
Canadian, including Helen
Piddington, Harold Town, and
John Snow.
4our
indian
ragas
ai
akbar
khan
Renowned  Musician  and   Brother-in-Law
of Ravi Shankar
AM Akbar, sarode; Mahapurush Misra, tabla; Ashish Khan, tamboura.
Presented by Special   Events
TONIGHT
AUDITORIUM 7:30 P.M. FRIDAY, OCT.  13
Tickets at A.M.S. or at Door
Students $1.50
Adults $2.50
Friday, October 13, 1967 \rf
:fcSsg«f
SMILING ARTSWENCH crouches in doorway of traditional
Haida entrance facade, formerly exhibited at Vancouver Art
Gallery's Arts of the Raven. Donated to AUS by artist Bill
Reid, it now decorates Buchanan lounge.
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Ragas like religion
By MARILYN HILL
In an interview Thursday, Dr. Elliot Weis-
garber, musicologist and specialist in Oriental
music at UBC described North Indian ragas as
"veritable storehouses of melodic motives."
Ragas are the main part of all Indian music
and are the basis for improvisations which are
an inherent part of the Indian tradition—modes
which have been passed down for thousands of
years.
"The music is played on long-necked lutes
such as the sitar and the sarode. These lutes
are evident all across Asia and originated in
Sumaria in the Tigris-Euphrates valley." Dr.
Weisgarber also explained that although the
music depends on improvisation for its freshness, and that one raga is never performed
exactly the same way twice, it must adhere to
certain conventions just like jazz.
"Religion is a reflection of national consciousness and fulfills a need in life itself. Ragas
being spiritual music are comparable to religion
because they originated many years ago and
elicit certain responses from the native listeners,"
explained Dr. Weisgarber.
Because ragas are a matter of associations,
and because time, geography and racial consciousness influences them, one raga in South
India  might mean joy and springtime to the
performers and listeners there, and the same
one might mean sadness in North India. As well
as ragas for seasons and times of day, there are
ragas with themes such as pity, serenity, love,
passion and excitement. In this way, the tradition is analogous to the Roman Catholic church
service which has chants for specific holidays,
seasons and ceremonies.
The structure of a raga is laid out simply
but is really quite complex. The octave has
practically 22 intervals with theoretically 65
scruti (small tones). The performance begins
with the tamboura expressing the main aspects
of scale and begins with a statement of the
elements. They then begin to improvise and the
music livens up. The tabla enters and works
on the tala which is a kind of time cycle. The
communication develops between the instruments as they answer back and forth and then
it works back to a simple structure and ends
serenely. Some can last 24 hours.
An exceptional performance of North Indian
ragas will be given tonight in the auditorium
by Ustad Ali Akbar Khan. Described by Dr.
Weisgarber as "one of the greatest living musicians in the world," Mr. Khan has been playing
the sarode since the age of three and will be
accompanied in his performance by Mahapurush
Misra on the tabla and Ashish Khan his son on
the tamboura.
It's Film Festival time again, and the abundance of top quality movies on show in Vancouver over the next ten days is enough to make
any cinema addict feel, in anticipation, bloated.
Top attraction is next Saturday night's closing film, the Dick Lester/John Lennon How I
Won the War. This is the Festival's biggest scoop,
coming directly from its world premiere in
London two days before. Already widely known
as the war film to end all war films (even
though it won't), it has gained the ultimate
accolade of having the British 6aily Express
advise its readers editorially to stay away from
it. Which is just what you may have to do,
unless you can find a ticket on the black market.
Sensational highlight of the Festival comes
on Sunday, with the showing of Andy Warhol's
split-screen epic The Chelsea Girls, the underground movie that made it big overground.
The new Czech cinema, the brightest and
most attractive in Europe right now, is well
represented by Ivan Passer's Intimate Lighting,
which I unreservedly recommend as a major
masterpiece and probably the best film on view
in the whole Festival.
The best known of the Czech directors, Milos
Forman, who made Loves of a Blonde, will be
in Vancouver as a judge for the Festival, and
one of his early features will be shown next
Thursday. Forman will also take part in a seminar on film at UBC, in Ed. 100, at 10 a.m. next
Saturday, October 21st.
The world premiere of a full-length docu
mentary on Charlie Chapin, The Funniest Man
in the World; the second feature of young Canadian director David Secter, whose Winter Kept
Us Warm was shown at UBC last year — his
new film concerns a Romeo-and-Juliet affair
between a Toronto stagehand and a Chinese
singer, and is called The Offering.
Poland sends Barrier, a semi-surrealistic examination of a real-gone kid, much influenced
stylistically by Godard. There are several films
from Rumania; and Japan contributes a rather
elegant sex melodrama, chastely translated as
Hungry For Love.
The individual comes off rather badly: crushed by a Kafkaesque bureaucracy in the Argentinian Harvest, and by the anti-establishment
of the Amsterdam hippies in a Dutch film which
has undoubtedly the best title of the Festival:
The Less than Fortunate Return of Joszef Katus
to the Land of Rembrandt.
All showings are at the Bay theatre downtown, and full details of the program, and times
appear in the Sun and the Province.
PS: For those of you who can't get tickets
to The Chelsea Girls, it is worth noting that
the Varsity has a special free showing, on Sunday at 4:30, of Peter Watkins' film Privilege.
This extravagant and often brilliant satire on
government, religion, and the pop sOng business
is a film bursting with bright ideas; despite
obvious flaws, it could be one of the major films
of the year. This free showing is sponsored by
SCM, and it deserves a big turnout.
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
COMMERCE
MATHEMATICS
ECONOMICS
STATISTICS
RELATED DISCIPLINES
The Public Service of Canada
needs graduates for a development program  in
areas such as  Financial  Management
Management & Systems Analysis
Organization & Methods a
Personnel  Administration
Trade Agreements
General Administration
Examination to be held at 7 p.m.,
Tues., Oct. 17, 1967
in Room 106, Buchanan Bldg.,
Vancouver, B.C.
No applications needed.
For exam exemptions or more
details, get our booklet from your
university  placement office or
contact the appropriate office of
the Public Service Commission
of Canada.
■s>*
NOTE AESTHETIC shape of paint, as thrown by Jim Dale
in The Plank, British comedy showing at Festival.
Friday, October   13,   1967 V
w
FREAKING OUT against the wall, little Malcolm (Jace Vanderveen, left) and his friends, Elizabeth Murphy, Chas. Lawther, Nicholas Kendall, and Ellis Pryce-Jones, play in David Halli-
well's comedy,  "Little Malcolm  and  his  Struggle   against   the   Eunuchs"   at   Freddy   Wood.
ffigWTSi W QJJ
By STEVE  GARROD
Upon finding myself home
with friends named parents
eating a vegetarian meal
watching w. cronkite on the
cbs national:
October monday whispering
fall and the leaves calling
home the harvest — a Thanksgiving for this good life. A
time of peace and quiet joy
and wonder and of thanks to
god. A time when we can see
a fullness and a promise in
this our life.
But now before me speaking
the black and white canon of
death.
There is a war on, just
Another War. But a war is immoral as all wars. Flashing
pictures; a montage of death:
machineguns, pistols, flags,
ears, and mutilated bodies.
Seering the mind with barbaric
intensity,   the   bloody   knives
UNRULY HAIR?
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and the laughing white men
with the broken ears in their
hands. To mutilate with napalm is not enough, now the
need to desecrate the body for
remembrances of death is
strong. What has made these
men, blessed with the benefits of our great culture, into
inhuman killing machines?
Are these still human? Men
transformed into unthinking
and unfeeling instruments of
death, moved at will by the
leaders of the nation-state, the
grand strategists of death.
War of any kind and for any
reason is immoral, but so are
the causes of -war, the long
suffering of oppressed man.
War destroys man and his
world, but so does poverty.
Men cannot be legal killers,
instruments of death and destruction. Something must be
done.
The structure that we hoped
would guide us has failed, the
nation-state is taking us to a
world of war and hate instead
of a land of peace and love.
The nation-state stands condemned of crimes against
humanity. It is not an agent
of morality and creativity, but
rather of immorality and destruction. This state must be
replaced by a free environment where we can build a
good world. The arrival of this
blissful existence is now
timed to the third coming.
Men are not only instruments of death, who die a
little with every murder, until
there is no human left, only
a killing machine, the mad
dog of death; rather they are
people who could build and
grow, and those who die this
fierce death.
What we all must seek is
creation of a world of enlightened men, seeking truth and
beauty, imbued with knowledge and wisdom. Where every
man stands free. We must create a new Thanksgiving.
We wanted to ignore the
AMS this year, but it isn't
working out. In the month of
Sepember The Ubyssey mentioned Shaun Sullivan 15
times, Don Munton 10 times,
Dave Hoye nine times, CUS
ten times and UGEQ four.
Even Peter Uitdenbosch got
five plugs.
We redeemed ourselves by
writing about Stan Persky
eight times, which is around
the number of times he wrote
for us.
President Hare got just one
mention; acting president
Walter Gage got three, two of
which were references to Papa
Panda Gage.
Education's Guru Gumley
wishes to dissociate h imself
from the remarks he repeated
about Stan Persky. Artsmen
had told Guru they wished
Stan would spend less time
worrying about people and
more time worrying about
Homecoming.
Gumley himself thinks Stan
is the only arts president who's
done anything in years.
Did board of governors chairman Nathan Nemetz and acting pres. "Papa Panda" Gage
phone AMS pres. Sullivan and
inform him the Fugs were
hairy persona non grata at
UBC?
It doesn't really n_attei^gny-
way. The group told promoter
Roger Schiffer last week they
couldn't make their Homecoming engagement.
We'd rather go to a peace
march, said the Fugs.
Many years ago a British
newspaper had a contest to see
who could write the most sensational headline possible. Winner was: "Archduke Ferdinand alive, World War 1
fought by mistake." Last year
Maclean's had such a contest,
and among the winners were
"Canadian identity found —
hundreds of commentators jobless" and "Lunar expedition
returns — moon mere optical
illusion."
A contest is hereby called to
•write the most sensational
Ubyssey headline possible.
Get your entries in soon,
kiddies, contest closes when
we print the most sensational
of all.
We'd like to CLUB You . . .
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Friday, October  13,   1967 Prestige but no power
By BERT HILL
What is the relation between a democratic
university and student senators? None.
In next week's election, theoretically 18,359
UBC students will choose among nine candidates
for four student senators. The purpose of this
article is to examine the Senate to see what
these students are in for.
According to the University's Act, the Senate
is the academic arm and the board of governors
is the financial arm of UBC's government.
Until 1932 the Senate elected no members to
the board of governors.. Each acted virtually independent of the other except for a joint coordinating committee.
Unlike Wesbrook, the first president, president Klinck ran a loose ship. He let the various
faculties run much of their own affairs while he
concentrated on his own interest, the agriculture
faculty.
By 1932 the provincial government because
of the depression had cut UBC's budget to half
of what it had been in 1929. When Klinck tried
to cut all the other faculties (arts and science,
engineering, forestry) and leave his own alone;
the faculty, students, alumni and Senate revolted.
CONTROL
The Senate passed a motion of want of confidence in Klinck. In the face of opposition of
the agriculture faculty (they wanted to keep their
lion-share) and the board of governors, the Senate
suggested that agriculture be reorganized as a
•   department of engineering.
In the midst of this unseemly hassle, a commission was set up by the provincial government. The commission suggested that the agriculture budget be cut on a proportional basis
and that the Senate be permitted to name three
of the nine members of the board of governors.
This looked like a great victory for the academic arm of UBC government especially when
the government appointed six all new members
to the board. But it wasn't really.
The senate couldn't appoint faculty and thus
the board didn't look that different: mostly different businessmen and lawyers from the businessmen and lawyers that had previously sat on
the board.
Thus the powerful members of the Senate
were other than faculty and could help the president as chairman control the Senate.
Later developments strengthened the hand of
the administration. As UBC added facilities on
its way to becoming a full-fledged multiversity it
added a dean for each new faculty. This tended
to strengthen administration control although
faculty total share of Senate increased from
about 20% in 1915 to about 44% now. The administration tends to control the Senate, in the
opinion of the Duff-Berdahl report on university,
government. Various faculty association briefs
in the past have recognized this state of affairs
and demanded numerical control of the Senate,
with administration and deans on an ex officio
position.
ALUMNI
Various "reforms" over the past few years
have increased the power of alumni on the
Senate at the expense of faculty. One reform put
three representatives of the alumni board of
management on the Senate. This avenue has been
used to put people on the Senate who were subsequently elected to the board of governors..
The major reason for this last reform disappeared when faculty were barred from election by convocation to the Senate. Previously
some faculty had been re-elected for over twenty-
five years to the 15 convocation seats.
Historically the Senate has maintained its
control over the type of people it elected to the
board of governors. The government appointed
two-thirds of board members from tow groups,
businessmen (38%) and lawyers (28%); the Senate has elected lawyers (25%) and businessmen
(less than 20%). The Senate election of businessmen is fairly recent. The first was John
- Buchanan in 1951 and the other two, Richard
Bibbs and Donovan Miller, presently sit on the
board. The other present Senate electee to the
board is Vancouver Sun publisher Stuart Keate.
The Senate has spread its electees to the board
evenly among academicians (usually research
directors for industry or from other universities),
civil servants, a farmer, a housewife, and a
medical doctor.
The only two labor representatives to sit on
the board were appointed by the government.
Attempting to assess the Senate as academic
policy making body is difficult for the senate,
like the board, meets in secrecy.
Before considering particular issues we can
presumably ask if the Senate is a suitable academic policy making board for the type of institution the multiversity is..
Few people claim the modern multiversity
serves the traditional interests of education: to
seek truth and prepare the student as a free independent individual for the society.
The multiversity is the creation of the complex society we live in. Society needs the skills
the multiversity provides for its survival. Thus
the high priest of this society, the businessman,
is the man who defines the academic policy of
the university.
It is no accident that B.C. with its dependence
on the forestry industry has five businessmen
who have ties with four forestry corporations on
the board of governors. And of course the UBC
forestry faculty's power is considerable.
In this light, we can only speculate why it
took so long to bring about a small scale experiment in academic reform like arts I, or why
UBC has no communications department but it
now has a department for those who want to look
up telescopes because the federal government
decided to do some expensive star-gazing near
Osoyoos.
FUNCTIONS
Setting aside the Senate as policy-making
body and ignoring suggestions by Claude Bissell,
president of the University of Toronto that it be
junked, with the board (faculty added) officially
taking over academic policy, we can define the
Senate as carrying out the following functions:
1. It provides a form of patronage to pay off
citizens who have worked hard for the university
but who lack the corporate ties to rate as governors.
2. It pays off the alumni association for its
award winning fund raising services to the university.
3. It provides postions for government appointees and for the various representatives of
the theological colleges connected to UBC.
4. It gives faculty a voice regardless of how
limited it may be, as we have observed already.
5. It gives students four senators: prestige
without power. Now they can talk about the
things students want but it is unlikely if anyone
will be listening, for the policy will be made
elsewhere.
pf Feveri
NOTICE TO '68 GRADS
Your FREE Grad Photos
Now Being Taken
Mobile Studio Locations
Oct. 2 to 13 Oct. 16 to 30
Education Bldg. Huts by Brock
Arts Students Anytime
Hours — 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Don't Delay — No Appointment Needed — No Cost
(This Service is Covered by Your GRAD FEE)
CAMPBELL STUDIO
10th & Burrard
736-0261
Africa Night
DANCE
TO THE MUSIC OF THE
TRINIDAD MOONLIGHTERS
STEEL BAND
Friday, October 13, 8:30 p.m.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Sponsored by The African Students Association*
M.C. - DANNY K. OTCHERE
Ladies 75c   —   Tickets at I.H. and at Door   —   Gents $1.00
EVERYONE     WELCOME
MAIDS 50c
MAKERS $2.00
Friday, Oct. 13        Saturday, Oct. 14
Seeds  of Time            French   Hand
Coastmen                     Laundry
Coastmen
LIGHT SHOW STROBE DANCE
RETI
1 CIRCUS r™
CHOOSE A
DIAMOND WITH CONFIDENCE
$150 up
Special 10% Discount to all
UBC Students on Diamond
Engagement Rings
FIRBANK'S JEWELLERS
Downtown
Seymour at
Dunsmuir
Brentwood
Shopping
Centre
Park
Royal
Friday, October  13,  1967 Che
These are the concluding
paragraphs of Che Guevara's
message to the Havana Tri-
continental Conference in April
of this year.
"It is the time   of the furnaces,
and it is only necessary to see the
glow."
(JOSE MARTI)
Vietnam teaches us this with
its permanent lesson in heroism, its tragic daily lesson in
struggle and death in order to
gain the final victory.
Over there, the imperialist
troops encounter the discomforts of those accustomed to
the standard of living which
the North American nation
boasts. They have to confront
a hostile land, the insecurity of
those who cannot move without feeling that they are walking on enemy territory; death
for those who go outside of
fortified redoubts; the permanent hostility of the entire
population.
IMPERIALISM
All this continues to provoke repercussions inside the
United States; it is going to
arouse a factor that was attenuated in the days of the full
vigor of imperialism — the
class struggle inside its own
territory.
How close and bright would
the future appear if two, three,
many Vietnams flowered on
the face of the globe, with
their quota of death and immense tragedies, with their
daily heroism, with their repeated blows against imperialism, obliging it to disperse its
forces under the lash of the
growing hate of the peoples of
the world!
And if we were capable of
uniting so as to give our blows
greater solidity and certainty,
so that the effectiveness of aid
of all kinds to the people locked in combat were increased—
how great the future would be,
and how near!
.*
If we, on a small point on
the map of the world, fulfill
our duty and place at the disposition of the struggle whatever little we are able to give:
our lives, our sacrifice, it can
happen that one of these days
we will draw our last breath
FALL SPECIAL!!
BRING THIS AD AND GET
10% DISCOUNT
ON ALL TUNEUP WORK, PARTS AND LABOUR
UNIVERSITY SHELL SERVICE
4314 W. 10th 224-0828
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
Committee Appointments
Openings still exist on the following Student Administration Advisory Committees:
Traffic & Parking
Library
Housing
2 Students
2 Students
1 Student
Letters of application should be addressed to Kim
Campbell, 2nd Vice President, A. M.S., mailbox number
53. Appointments will be made at a meeting of Students'
Council, Tuesday, October 17 at 7:00 p.m. Applicants
should appear at this meeting.
"WHO ME DEAD?" says Che Guevara, Latin American
revolutionary at news of reported death in Bolivia this
week. Most people are waiting for official confirmation
from Cuba. Some people think Guevara is alive and writing press releases on his own death for the Pentagon but
this is only a rumour.
on a bit of earth not our own,
yet already ours, watered with
our blood. Let it be known
that we have measured the
scope of our acts and that we
consider ourselves no more
than elements in the great
army of the proletariat; but
we feel proud at having learned from the Cuban revolution
and its great main leader the
great lesson to be drawn from
Cuba's attitude in this part of
the world: "What difference,
when what is at stake is the
destiny of humanity?"
ENEMY
Our every action is a call
for war against imperialism
and a cry for the unity of the
peoples against the great enemy of the human species: the
United States of North America.
Wherever death may surprise us, let it be welcome if
our battle cry has reached
even one receptive ear and
another hand reaches out to
take up our arms, and other
men come forward to join in
our funeral dirge with the
chattering of machine guns
and new calls for battle and
for victory.
pf Sight
WC SHOE REPAIR
In The Village
Shoes resoled,  healed etc.
Handbags repaired.
Quality Workmanship.
Open Tuesday - Saturday
8:30 a.m. . 6:00 p.m.
^ now +
+ in the *
* spotlight*
*****
Give the KING a Ring . . .
681-4010 . . . and Swing
(Full Facilities For Your Enjoyment)
ling of Clubs
1275 Seymour St.
Appearing nightly in the
Copper Room of The Harrison Hotel is the vivacious
singing star of west coast
nightclubs, Marika Boyer.
A favorite of the supper
crowd at Alexis' Tangier in
San Francisco.
THE HARRISON Hotel
Harrison Hot Springs, B.C.
For reservations,
call toll-free 521-8888
CONTACT LENSES
Vent-Air lenses have no frames to slip or slide. They're virtually unbreakable while worn. They have four air vents for
better circulation of the eye's natural moisture and air so
necessary for proper wear. And best of all, they don't "hide"
your eyes.
NOW BY POPULAR DEMAND!-with every original pair of
Vent-Air contact lenses you will receive a spare pair at no
extra charge . . . tinted grey, blue, green, or brown as
desired. LOW MONTHLY PAYMENTS.
Vent-Air lenses are available only in our offices. Come in
for your no-obligation demonstration today . .. you may
see without glasses tomorrow.
AVAILABLE. O^LY  AT
KLEAR VISION CONTACT LENS CO.
HOURSi 9 A.M. to 6 P.M. daily incl. Sat.; Mon. & Thurs. to 8 P.M.
CALL
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FOR
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Suite 616, Burrard Bldg.
1030 W. Georgia Street
Vancouver, B.C. MU 3-7207
Please send me your free Illustrated booklet
and the cost ot invisible lens**.
Address-
0FFICES
«.*.«. Ma CUUM
Friday, October 13, 1967 Friday, October   13,   1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 13
TOMATOES,   TOO
Eggs greet NLF reps
MONTREAL (CUP) — Three
visiting Vietnamese students
got a mixed reaction Friday
from 1,500 students at the
University of Montreal.
Though warmly received by
the majority of students in the
hall, they were pelted with
eggs and tomatoes by some of
the 50 South Vietnamese
' studying at the university.
Jean Dore, student, association president at Montreal
University, said the demonstration   against   the   National
WUS meet moves,
St  Mark's  site
A World University Service
symposium at Loon Lake near
Haney has moved to St. Mark's
College for Saturday.
WUS officials said the reason for the change was lack of
finances.
The symposium will run all
day.
Topics* will include the
world as a global village, the
role of the student in an international society and the betterment of student-faculty relations.
Interested persons can obtain further information from
the WUS office, Brock 257.
Liberation Front spokesmen
may have been organized by
the Saigon government.
Gilles Delisle, president of
the polytechnical institute students at U of M said the South
Vienamese had the right to
demonstrate.
He criticized the NLF for
sending representatives who
could not handle this kind of
demonstration, or could not
answer questions directly.
The NLF representatives,
brought to Quebec by the
Union Generale des Etudiants
de Quebec, elecited similar
hostile responses from students at Sir George Williams
University two weeks ago.
FORMAL
AND
SEMI-FORMAL
rental and sates
Tuxedos, tails, white dinner   lackers,   morning
coats . . . complete size
rang*.
Wo   also   make   made-to-
measure suits.
(Sweaters by Hyde-Parte)
10%   U.B.C.  Discount.
McCUISH Pom^n*M
Mon.-Sat. 9:00 to 5:30
2046 W. 41st 263-3610
BROCK SNACK BAR
NEW     HOURS
SUNDAY 2 P.M. - 10 P.M.
MONDAY - FRIDAY 7:45 A.M. - 10 P.M.
SUPPER SERVED 5 P.M. - 6 P.M.
SATURDAY 9 A.M. - 2 P.M.
S.C.M. presents FREE ADMISSION
"PRIVILEGE"
-a Film by Peter Warkins of
"THE WAR GAME"
Vancouver Premiere
Varsity Theatre, Sun., Oct. 15, 4:30 p.m.
Now if you will place
the apple on your
head ... But before
you do see the . . .
largest selection of
Paper Back Books in
Western Canada at
DUTHIE
BOOKS
THREE LOCATIONS:
4560 W.  10th Ave.
514 Hornby Street
Paperback Cellar
670 Seymour Street
Phone 224-7012
684-4496
681-8713
685-3627
Open Friday Till 9 p.m.
But students at McGill and
at classical colleges around
the province have listened to
what the speakers had to say.
The three NLF representatives drew large crowds at all
their meetings before leaving
Canada Wednesday.
"OLYMPIA"
PIZZA
SPAGHETTI
HOUSE
2599 W. Broadway
DINING ROOM
Take Out
Service
BUY 3 PIZZAS
GET 1 FREE
"tHC F»5v\?
YE«,Ttfe F,*„''
<o<
V.U.TH6RAr4 CArv^puS
CEmtre • U.6C- Smmoav
lo:©© €.«pa«-ir'\e*)T"*<-
V.i'n-.Ro-V,   ICirFo«MftL
V»rs*»p. weotjescAVs
At i © Pt-».
UVic starts pot thought
VICTORIA (CUP) — University of Victoria may become a centre for maijuana research.
Student council Sunday supported the structure of an
independent research body, preferably at U Vic, to study
the uses of marijuana.
MORELETTERS
Graham  commie?
Editor. The Ubyssey:
It has taken much self-control to be silent while reading
the words of Gabor Mate, but
his last article calling Billy
Graham a communist is the
last straw. I have never heard
a   more   ridiculous   statement.
Mr. Graham is a super-patriotic
super-Christian American who
is undoubtedly as anticommun-
ist as it is possible to be. As
such, of course, he is infinitely
more dangerous than any
North American communist
could ever hope to be. As for
the danger in Mr. Mate's mis-
truths, I can only speculate.
INDIGNANT
Have a Fling at the KING
(Full 'Facilities For Your Enjoyment)
King of Clubs
1275 Seymour St.
Sports Jackets and Slacks
The season's newest fabrics, patterns and colors will be found at
It Hilt It UN & FARISH LTD.
786 Granville
and
THE COLLEGE SHOP LTD.
802 Granville
FOR ALL YOUR CLOTHING NEEDS
Two Fine Stores Id Serve You "Tk
Page 14
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 13, 1967
COULD  CAPTURE...
...LEAGUE LEAD
Soccer Birds versus Villa
The UBC soccer Thunderbirds have a chance to move
out in front in the Pacific
Coast Soccer League when
they play Burnaby Villa at
2 p.m. on Saturday in the new
Thunderbird Stadium.
Because of the recent heavy
rainfall, all PCSL games except the one at UBC have been
called off.
Presently the Birds are tied
with Columbus, New Westminster Royals and Victoria.
Each team has one victory
worth two points.
With the other teams idle,
the Birds could take the league
lead with a win over Villa.
Soccer coach Joe Johnson
doesn't rftte Victoria as a
threat  since  they   have   only
won  one  game  in three,  all
home contests.
"With only
an 18-game season, V i c t o ria
doesn't stand
much of a
chance to win
the league,"
said Johnson.
It   was   the
Birds, in their
CARTER only   game  to
date, who handed Victoria their
first loss of this season.
Victoria has beaten Burnaby
Villa 3 -1.
Johnson is missing two of last
year's players in Russ Hillman
(a member of the Canadian
Olympic   and   Pan   American
OVERSEAS AUTO PARTS
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The Toyota Corolla has more horsepower than any
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But that's not all.
The $1798 includes all the "extras." Like the big
3-speed heater, tilt-back front seats, alternator, windshield washer, double-barrelled carburetor, padded
dash and sun visors, and 4-speed syncro-mesh. You
also get up to 40 miles per gallon and a car that never
needs greasing.
All that for $1798*. Including the 60 horsepower.
*F.O.B. Toronto, Montreal, Vancouver. Freight and delivery, provincial
and local taxes, and whitewall tires extra.
Toyota Corolla.
Main Dealer
CLARKE SIMPKINS
7th & BURRARD.
IMPORTS
RE 6-4282
squad) and Kirby Carter, who
is out with knee cartilage problems.
Carter had an operation on
his knee during the summer
and so far it has not healed
properly.
New additions to this year's
team include promising junior
Ken Elmer and brothers
Wayne and Gary Thompson.
Burnaby Villa will have five
Englishmen in its lineup on
Saturday.
The  five  were  brought
here by the Royal Canadians
soccer club and are playing
for Villa while waiting for the
Canadians' season to start in
the spring.
Harold Hansen, the Villa's
outside left and top goal
scorer, will also give Birds'
goalie Bruce Ballam headaches.
By getting an early jump on
the rest of the league, Johnson
is hoping to improve on the
Birds' fifth place finish of last
year.
PURE VIRGIN WOOL
Why have we added
shape to our
Soft Shoulder tailoring?
Because you asked for It
Men who wear soft shoulder tailoring are
generally more fashion conscious. They select
clothing with more variation of colour, pattern, and texture.
It is the same with styling. Even though soft
shoulder styles are traditional, our customers
like just a touch of change periodically . . .
to give each suit in their wardrobe a certain
individuality.
The trace of shape, the deep side vents, two-
button closure — these are styling details
currently emphasized by Cambridge stylists.
It's their job to know what customers want
and to create styling innovations which start
the trends.
If you like to be fashionably dressed, our new
soft shoulder "shape" is the touch you need.
The Woolmark on the Cambridge label assures
you it is a quality tested product made of the
world's best... Pure Virgin Wool.
Cambridge
traditionally fine clothes.
t4wt&8h>f>
2174 W. 41st in KERRISDALE
AM 1-2750
LTD
^       FOR A PERFECT FIT     ^
Ready-Made or
• Made-to-Measure   w
ASKIandCURLINGA
m PANTS m
• PANT SUITS    T
• LADIES' SLACKS & SKIRTS*
| 10%   Off  for  Students    f
iPantalones*
V 654 SEYMOUR  ST. V
^ TEL.: 681-Ml-. A
W     _ Open Friday 'till 9 p.m.        W
Do all girls have my problem?
Do they really? Of course they do!    '
That's one comforting factor. But
there's another one. It doesn't have
to be such a problem really. At
least if you're thinking about those
annoying days of the month. Every
girl goes through them. But every
girl doesn't necessarily suffer
through them. Not with Tampax
tampons. They're the easy way.
You might even call them a girl's
salvation. No matter what her age.
They're worn internally, which
means no belts, no pins, no pads,      —
no odor. Tampax tampons and
their container-applicators are
readily disposable. They save you
from all your previous worries
and embarrassment. Nothing can
show — no one can know. Tampax
tampons. Try them today and
cross one more problem off your
list! Available in 3 absorbency-
sizes—Regular, Super and Junior-
wherever such products are sold.
Just tuck them away in your
purse or desk.
DEVELOPED 8Y A DOCTOR
NOW USED .BY  MILLIONS OF WOMEN
TAMPAX TAMPONS ARE MADE ONLY BY
CANADIAN TAMPAX CORPORATION LTD..
BARRIE.  ONTARIO Friday, October  13,  1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 15
SFU versus UBC;
game of century
"If I had access to these
kids' minds," said UBC Thunderbird football coach Frank
Gnup, "then I sure as hell
wouldn't be worried."
Monday's football game
against Simon Fraser worries
Gnup just a little though.
"Sometimes it seems these
players are all up for a game,"
he continued, "but then they
let you down."
" Take last
week's game
for example
(the Birds
were beaten
20-0 by South-
e r n Oregon
College). It
was Just a
handful of
mistakes that
beat us."
Gnup will
insert Bob
Fitzpatrick, who has been out
with a knee injury, into the
lineup and bring up five Junior Varsity players to bolster
his roster.
GNUP
Gnup lost kicker Dick Stein
with a dislocated shoulder in
the SOC game. Fullback Dave
Corcoran is still limping from
a pulled hamstring muscle but
is expected to dress for the
big game.
Halfback Vic Iwata is suffering from a broken bone in
his left hand to add to Gnup's
problems.
"We'll put some new plays
in," said Gnup. "I don't know
if they'll work or not. Hell,
we're going for broke."
"If we win it'll be our defense that will do it. We'll
have to rush Wayne Holm and
Mike Martin (SFU's quarterbacks) all the time because
they're pretty good passers,"
wailed Gnup.
The Birds will scrimmage
tonight and have a light workout on Sunday in preparation
for the game.
According to Gnup, "Brother, it's going to be the game of
the century."
field hotkey Canadians pay off
"We're concentrating on
young Canadians," said Eric
Broom, UBC field hockey
coach, "and now it's paying
off."
Broom was talking about his
team which for the last three
years has won the first division title in Vancouver.
'^Usually, Australians and
Europeans would immigrate to
Canada and
play their
i)ield hockey
here. But now,
if you take a
look at our
team, you can
see that Cana-
d i a n s have
come a long
way."
consistently put
players on British Columbia
and Canadian international
teams. Three were on the B.C.
firsts that recently played New
Zealand.
The Birds have played one
game in the league so far,
beating Jokers 3-1.
Next games for the four divisions of field hockey will be
on Saturday when the Birds
play Pitt Meadows and the
Braves  play  North  Shore at
1:30 p.m. Tomahawks meet
their opponents at 3 p.m.
The Birds and the Tomahawks will play on the new
Spencer Field next to the John
Owen Pavilion while the
Braves play at Wolfson Field.
With the many players of
international calibre that the
Birds have, this year's team
will again provide tough competition and entertaining play.
BROOM
UBC   has
Yogurt!
PANGO-PANGO (UNS) —
"What a yogurt," chuckled a
neat-suited state department
official early today.
The official was commenting
on the unrectum — let alone
rubic — supposed reclipse of
famed jungle physician Ben
Chesey.
Authorities in this obscene
hole played cribbage.
The Moonlighters
PLAY AT THE
"AFRICA WEEK"
DANCE
Friday, Oct. 13
8:30 p.m.
International House
VOLKSWAGEN
DRIVERS . . .
LAST YEAR OUR FACTORY-TRAIN-
ED EXPERTS REPAIRED MANY OF
YOUR CARS . . .
Naturally we will quote on  any
repair   service   became   of   oar
guaranteed lew price*.
AU   WORK   GUARANTEED
Only At
AUTO-HENNEKEN
Specialized   Service
8914 Oak St. (at Marine)
phone Hans — 263-8121
The KING is a thing . . .
It's a happening
(Full Facilities For Your Enjoyment)
King of Cubs
1275 Seymour St.
Birds bolster Reps
Four UBC rugby teams will see action this weekend
but the biggest game will only include two Thunderbird
players.
When the B.C. Reps play the New Zealand All Blacks
at 8 p.m. Saturday in Empire Stadium, Birds' rugby stars
Stewart Scholefield and Tom Fraine will be on the B.C.
front line.
The Birds play Rowing Club I at 2:30 p.m. on Saturday
at Wolfson Field and UBC will miss their scrum half and
center.
Rowing Club will also be minus one player who has
been chosen to play for the Reps.
Tickets for the B.C.-New Zealand game can be purchased from any of UBC's rugby players for $1. At the
gate admission will be $2.
The Saturday meeting with the Rowing Club team will
be the league opener for the Birds.
The Rowers finished third in the Vancouver Rugby
Union first division last year.
In their next two games, the Birds will meet the first
and second place finishers in the league of last year, providing a stiff challenge to coach Donn Spence's squad.
In weekend rugby games on Wolfson Field on Saturday,
the Tomahawks play Brentwood College at 1:15 p.m., the
Totems meet Rowing Club II at 1:15 pjn., the Braves try
on the Richmond team at 2:30 p.m. and the Birds go against
Rowing Club I at 2:30 p.m.
The Braves were 11-0 winners over Western Washington recently, while the Totems lost out to Trojans IT by the
same score.
In a recent Junior Collegiate game, the B.C. Institute
of Technology beat the Tomahawks 3-0.
tabbiOM
of the two most important rings you will ever .wear!
Enchantingly entwined, one enhances the other to be
doubly effective on the finger. A beautiful variation
of an old and lovely theme, the rings lock together
for perfect position on the finger and to look as one.
Engagement ring $325 Wedding ring $ 170
Rings illustrated, are exclusive Grassie designs,
and must be handcrafted
BUDGET TERMS—10%  DOWN
Preferential Discount to UBC Students
Diamond Specialists Since 1886
566 Seymour 685-2271
Open 5 days a week — Fridays anttil 9 p.m. — Closed Wednesdeys.
Thunderettes travel
Three Thunderette teams are
travelling this week-end.
Thunderette golfers and tennis players go to Edmonton for
matches with the University of
Alberta girls.
Here at home, the Thunderettes participate in a dual
track meet with the Vancouver Olympic Club at 11 a.m.
on Saturday at UBC's track.
Housewives!
PANGO-PANGO (UNS) —
Housewives in this island pigpen actually fooled around
quite a bit early today.
In fact they hardly, said
authorities, saw fit not to.
BETTER BUY BOOKS
UNIVERSITY
TEXT BOOKS
NON-FICTION
PAPERBACKS
Specializing in
Review Notes
and Study Guides
224-4144
4393 W. 10th Ave.
We iought for
yoii — and won!
sun-kissed
days in
GRAND
CAYMAN
550.
- at the only LUXURY
hotel on this unspoiled
West Indies island.
Grand Cayman offers you
seven miles o_ clean, pink
sand, corals, tropical fishing, parrots, wild orchids,
and iguanas . . . This
island is so unspoiled it
has just one luxury hotel
— the air-conditioned La-
Fonlainc—right on all that
beach!
We have reserved a lot of
rooms at the La-Fontaine
for Vancouver people who
want to cheer up with a
real travel bargain. Our
first flight is on November
10 — stopping overnight in
New Orleans. No passports necessary.
Call for your Grand Cayman travel kit—or reserve
now.
INTKRNATIONAL
8 Branches
5700 University Blvd.
224-4391 Page 16
THE     U BYSSEY
Friday, October 13, 1967
TIVEEN CLASSES
ETC., ETC., ETC
Peepers probed by Webster, Rankin
The Peeping Dick, panel discussion with Jack Webster,
Harry Rankin and members
of the Civil Liberties Association, Monday, noon, Brock
lounge.
SPECIAL EVENTS
'   Ali   Akbar   Khan,    tonight
7:30,   auditorium.   Tickets   at
AMS   or   at   door.    Students
$1.50. Non-students, $2.50.
UN CLUB
Discussion   of   the   Middle
East question with Gabor Mate,
Monday noon, IH.
IH
Coffee hour  today,  3  p.m.,
upper lounge.  Everyone  welcome.
PARLIAMENTARY COUNCIL
General meeting, today, noon,
parliamentary council office,
brock extension. One representative required from each
political party. Others welcome.
ARCHEOLOY CLUB
Field    trip    Sunday.    Bring
boots, warm clothes and lunch.
Meet at 9 a.m. at archeology
lab, behind auditorium.
ALPHA OMEGA
Meeting Monday, noon, Bu.
223. Election of new PRO.
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
Come and speak French today, noon, IH. Membership
cards now available. New
members welcome. Coffee
served.
CIRCLE K
Meeting Monday, noon, Bu.
2205. New members welcome.
VCF
Hayride    tonight.   Meet   at
Brock at 6:15 p.m.
CONSERVATIVE  CLUB
Tory Inn party, Saturday, 8
p.m., 1132 Howe.
KOERNER LECTURE
Dr.   Rachel   Giese   discusses
the Greeks in Venice, 1453 to
1799,   Monday,  noon,   Freddy
Wood theatre.
STUDENTS WIVES
Those interested in playing
bridge and who have not already signed, phone D. Ennik,
731-6920.
MUSSOC
Technical    party   scheduled
for Oct. 15, 1 p.m. Postponed
until early November.
VARSITY DEMOLAY CLUB
Organizational meeting and
elections will be held today,
noon, Bu. 232. All demolays
and senior demolays welcome.
VCF
Cal Chambers speaks on
Forgiveness, today, noon, Ang.
110.
BADMINTON TEAM
Badminton team organizational meeting at Vancouver
Lawn Tennis Badminton Club,
Fifteenth and Fir, at 7 p.m.,
Monday.
PHRATERES
Retreat   this   weekend,   for
pledges, actives and associates.
Bus leaves Brock,  1:30 p.m.,
Saturday.
EDUCATION US
Dean's   forum,   Monday,
noon,   ed.    1006.   Come   and
gripe.
DEBATING UNION
Forum  debate  today,  noon,
Bu. 217. Topic: That socialism
is   the   scourge   of   the   20th
century.
WOMEN'S INTRAMURALS
Managers meeting Monday,
noon, women's gym.
BLOCK   CLUB
BOOSTER CLUB
Dance to the Organization on
Saturday, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m., and
help   promote   the   SFU-UBC
football game. Admission $1.
CONTEMPORARY
ARTS COMMITTEE
Meeting   today,   noon,   Bu.
2205.
YOUNG ALUMNI CLUB
University government panel
discussion, Brock lounge, noon
Friday. Participants: Prof. C.
Bourne, faculty of law; Sholto
Hebenton, lawyer, alumni;
Stan Persky, arts US and
Shaun Sullivan, AMS president.
UBC VIETNAM COMMITTEE
General   meeting,   Tuesday,
noon, Bu. 216. All welcome.
LIBERAL CLUB
Jean  Chritien,  MP,  former
cabinet minister from Quebec,
speaks in Brock lounge, Tuesday, noon.
AFRICAN STUDENTS
Dance tonight at IH, 8:30 to
the   Moonlighters   steel  band.
Ladies  75  cents, men $1. All
welcome.
WOMEN'S CURLING
Practices will be held Saturday,   12:45  p.m.  to   2:45,  and
Wednesday, 8:30 to 10:30 p.m.,
at Thunderbird arena.
SPECIAL EVENTS
Those interested in publicity
please   come   to   the   special
events  office,  Monday,  noon,
for an important meeting.
CIASP
Information: Brock Ext. 354.
General meeting for all applicants Wednesday, noon, Bu.
1221.
Swing like a KING
(Full Facilities For Your Enjoyment)
King of Clubs
1275 Seymour St.
UNIVERSITY CHURCH
ON THE BOULEVARD
UNIVERSITY HILL UNITED
11:00 a.m. "The Human Side"
Story of what the church
is doing.
Guests: Myrtle  MacGregor
Lillian Loeppky
WELCOME TO U.B.C
HAROLD MacKAY
ST.  ANSELM'S  ANGLICAN
8:00 a.m. Holy Communion
10:00 a.m.  Holy Communion
& Sermon
Preacher. Jim McKibbon
JIM McKIBBON
SCM
Free showing of the film
Privilege, Sunday, 4:30 p.m.,
Varsity theatre.
CLUB CANADIEN
Daniel Latouche discusses
Why I Am a Separatist, today,
noon, Bu. 102.
PRE SOCIAL WORK
Speaker from North Shore
neighborhood house Monday,
noon, Bu. 203.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Students, Faculty 8c Clubs—3 lines, 1 day 75*. 3 days $2.00.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.00, 3 days $2.50.
Rates for larger ads on request.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone.
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in advance.
Publications Office, BROCK HALL, UNIV. OF B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
AFRICA NIGHT — TONIGHT!
Ever danced to the Music of the
Sensational Trinidad Moonlighters
Steel Band? Then try them tonight,
8:30 at I.H. Ladies 75c, Gents $1.00.
Everybody Welcome!
UNDERGROUND ROCK BANDS ARE
where it's at. For your next dance
Phone  Magic  Theatre.   685-1711.
KISS THE SKY AND DANCE TO
the Apollos, also the Young Generation, Sat., Oct. 14, Clinton Hall,
2605 E.  Pender.
4-BIT  BROADS
and   Guys  —   two  bucks,   this   week-
and    at    the    Retinal    Circus,    1024
Davie.  Light show,  Strobe Dance.
COUNTRY   JOE   IS   BACK
at the. Retinal Circus with the Painted   Ship and  Papa   Bear's   Medicine
Show, October 20 - 21, $2.50.
DANCE TONIGHT TO MOONLIGHT -
ers Steel Band. 8:30 p.m. I. House.
■75c   and   $1.00.	
Greetings
12
Lost 8c Found
13
LOST OPHTHALMOSCOPE HANDLE
in front of Woodward Library. Fin-
der  please   phone   224-6649.   Reward
REWARD. BI-FOCAL GLASSES IN
brown pigskin case. Lost Registration week on Campus. Gratitude.
Don,   2741523
LOST—SILVER RING WITH BLUE
stone in men's washroom, main
Lib. or Bu., inscription Templeton.
Finder  please   phone   Glen   2543845.
WOULD THE PERSON WHO TOOK
my dark brown suede jacket at the
Arts dance, please return same at
Publications  Office.
COUNTRY JOE HAS BEEN FOUND!
Retinal Circus has Joe, the Painted
Ship and Papa Bear's Medicine
Show,  October 20 -  21, $2.50.
LOST — "HEMMI" SLIDERULE
last Wednesday, Oct. 4. Finder
please phone Al. at 261-7195. Reward.
FOUND IN BU. WASHROOM ONE
black kid glove. Call Rae at 263-
9323.
ONE UBC ARTS JACKET FROM
rack at Brock Arts Dance last Fri.
Would finder return to the Ubyssey.
FOUND LADIES WRIST WATCH
on West Mall Oct. 4. Phone June,
261-4702.
Rides 8c Car Pools
14
GIRL WANTS RIDE TO 19th & OAK
M, W, F or all nights after 7:15
Phone 874-0645.
RIDE REQUIRED FROM CENTRAL
West Van. Can drive one day a
week if necessary. Phone Dave,
926-2377.
YOUNG BRIDES OR BRIDES TO
be: For quick, easy, and interesting
cooking ideas, come to "THE
BRIDES' KITCHEN" on Monday
evenings from 8:00-10:00 starting
Oct. 16 for more information call
224-4775  or 733-1677.
WE'LL     TAKE     CARE     OF     YOUR
Hair.   While   you're   in   the
Complete   this   rhyme   and   win   a
free  comb.   Campus Barber   Shop.
153  Brock
Travel Opportunities
 16
TORONTO CHRISTMAS CHARTER
Limited capacity on modern Turbojet at inexpensive Student Rate.
Information 224-9841 or 731-5429, 4-
6 p.m.
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
WANTED: USED HAMMOND OR-
drawbars and double keyboard,
gan M. or L. Series. Preferably with
Phone   Harry   733-8694^	
WANTED—Nikor Developing Tank—
Phone John after 6:00 p.m. RE 3-
5928. 	
AUTOMOTIVE 8c MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
1965 TR 4-A RED, TOP CONDITION.
Never raced. $1900.00 or *>est offer.
Phone after 6 p.m.  263-8227,  Frank.
1959 PORSCHE 1600, SILVER COUPE
healthy condition, 2250 Wesbrook,
224-9662.
1962    AUSTIN    850.    GOOD    VALUE.
Sports Car feel.  Phone 263-9141,
'62 FALCON 2 DOOR 45,000 MILES
new valve job & battery, radio
excellent tires.  1800.  — 738-0292.
'55 METEOR. EXCEL.  COND.  MUST
sell $295 or offers.	
Typing
40
EXPERIENCED   TYPIST   —   ELEC-
tric.   Phone  228-8384  or  224-6129;	
WILL TYPE  TERM ESSAYS
RE  1-2664 --MRS. SHARP	
TYPING AT HOME VIC. PNE. 25c
per page. Supply own paper. No
phone calls if "sufficient time is not
given to complete. Phone 255-8863.
Ask for Rosie.
EXPERT   ELECTRIC TYPIST
Experienced essay and thesis typist
Reasonable Rates TR. 4-9253
"GOOD    EXPERIENCED   TYPIST"
available   for   home   typing.
Please call 277-5640.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted—Female
SI
Help Wanted—Male
52
Male
or Female
53
MATHEMATICS      AND      SCIENCE
tutors   required.    Fourth   year   or
graduate,    736-6923,    4:30-6:80   p.m.,
except Tuesday.
INSTRUCTION
Music
82
MUSIC THEORY, COMPOSITION,
piano and guitar lessons for beginners   and   advanced   students.   Tel.
681-2762,   West End.	
GUITAR
Teachers who care — all styles —
Bill Lewis Music, 3645 W. Broadway,   738-0033.     	
1963 CHEV. BISCAYNE 2 - DOOR
std. Excellent body, top condition.
$1200.   224-5552.	
'56    DODGE.    EXCELLENT    RUN-
ning condition. Call Brian 261-1979.
1960     RAMBLER     CLASSIC     4     DR.
Auto. 6 cyl. radio, excel, cond. Best
offer.   731-2995   Sunday.   	
STAFF MEMBER WANTS TO BUY
small imported car 3-5 years old.
Immed. cash for suitable item. Mrs.
Fisher,  736-5841,  after 6 and  wknd.
Motorcycles 26
HONDA-FIAT
Motorcycles  - Cars
Generators  -  Utility Units
New  and Used
SPORT CARS
N        Motors        T
O S
R E
T      W
145 Robson H 688-1284
1966 DUCATI 250 5 SPD. 30 H.P.
Excellent condition. Reworked engine. Chrome accessories. Dirt
cheap.   522-313J>.	
WISH TO SHARE DRIVING, PRE-
ferably for 9:30's. Live in vicinity
of Central Park.  Phone 434-0422.
HELP! I STILL NEED A CARPOOL
from Caulfeild, West Vancouver.
Soon!  Phone Pete  926-1581.
FANTASTIC BRITISH PROPERTIES
carpool will allow one more driver.
Phone Don 922-3087.
GOIN' MY WAY? NEED RIDE FROM
vie. 25th and Cambie. M-F. 8:30's.
Phone 879-7083, Henry (6:00-10:00
P.m.).	
GOING TO EUROPE — 1967 YAMA-
ha 60 cc, almost new, perfect
shape. Phone 738-4504.
1967 SUZUKI 250 cc. HUSTLER. 2000
miles, only six weeks old. A-l condition.   Carrier.   Phone   266-8031.
Miscellaneous
RIDE NEEDED FROM 70th AVE.
between Oak and Granville Monday-
Friday. Please phone Marlene 261-
4893.',
URGENT!
Three Blondes need ride from Chilco
and Pacific for 8:30's. Phone Roz 731-
9561.
Special Notices
15
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSUR-
ance rates? If you are over 20 and
have a good driving history you
qualify for our good driving rates.
Phone  Ted  Elliott,   298-5966.
GARY: WILL YOU PLEASE NOT
shoot flaming arrows In my door?
Arlene.
WATCH FOR THE BIG 3 FROM
Film Soc. November Is Movie
Month.
VARSITY DEMOLAY CLUB FIRST
meeting, 12:30 Friday, October 13th,
in Buchanan 232.
GSA WILL HOLD ITS GENERAL
meeting for fall on Thursday, October 26, 1967, at 12:45 p.m., in the
Lower Lounge of the Graduate Student Centre. Plans for Centre expansion and consequent fee increase
will be discussed.
COUNTRY JOE RETURNS
to the Retinal Circus with the Painted   Ship  and  Papa  Bear's  Medicine
Show,   October  20   -   21,  $2.50.
S.C.M. presents free showing of
PRIVILEGE
new film by Peter Watklns
Sunday,  Oct.   15 — 4:30  p.m.
Varsity Theatre
 32
WHOLESALE PRICES TO ALL UBC
students on trans, radios, tape recorders, record players, watches,
jewelery, etc., at THE DISCOUNT
HOUSE, 3235 West Broadway, Tel,
732-6811.
Special Classes
Tutoring
63
64
Maths. Tutors, 4th year or graduates,
GRADES  7  to  13
736-6923 —  4:30   -  7:30  P.M.
HELP! MATH 120 AND CHEM. 110
Tutor desperately needed. Phone
Bob   277-3346  after  6:00 p.m.
FOR   TUTORING   IN    1st   AND   2ndJ
year   Chemistry,   Math.   &  Physics,
also  Logarithms and Sliderule.  Call
263-4005.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
THE FINEST MEN'S HAIRSTYUNG
at the Upper Tenth Barber. 4674 W.
10th   Avenue.   1   block  from   gates.
LOOKING
For clean, used, guaranteed appliances.
Also   complete   repair   service  for all
makes and models.
Mc"    ER Appliances Ltd.
3215   .7 Broadway—738-7181 i
15-SPEED BICYCLE, '67 MODEL.
Call Bruce, 224-9864, Room 564, after  6:00 p.m.
STATIONERY - ART SUPPLIES -
Gift & Party Shop. See Walter's
Stationery, 2910 W. Broadway. Ph.
733-4516.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Scandals
 " 37
TOM, I LOVE YOU. MEET ME IN
Aud., Nov. 9. Please say yes Hr.
Jones!	
WANTED — WILLING HELPERS
male or female, to work on Treasure   Van.   Phone   Bev.,   261-5491.
DEAR CAT, I'M BALLOU WITH-
out you. Meet me in Aud., Oct. 26.
Signed,  Lee Marvin.	
BIRDS   50c
Birdwatchers,  $2.00.  This weekend at
the Retinal  Circus,   1024  Davie.
THE SCANDALOUS COUNTRY JOE
returns to the Retinal Circus with
the Painted Ship and Papa Bear's
Medicine Show, October 20 - 21,
$2.50.	
T.G.I.F. YOUNG ALUMNI CLUB
features "Helicopter Canada" film.
Friday afternoon 3:30-8:00 p.m.
Cecil Green Park.
B. ARE YOU STILL A VIRGIN? I'M
worried—Manfred.
39
Typewriter Repairs	
ANDERSON  TYPEWRITER
SERVICE
TYPEWRITERS
ADDING  MACHINES
NEW    AND    RECONDITIONED
REPAIRS TO ALL MAKES
Free  Estimates        Reasonable  Rates
ALL WORK GUARANTEED
185  West   Broadway 879-781S
Across from Zephyr Motors
Service  Centre
BIRD CALLS
Your student telephone directory is
available at end of month. Buy pre-
sale tickets now for 75 cents from
Bookstore or Publications Office. After  publication  price  will  be  $1.00.
UBC TEXTS BOUGHT AND SOLD.
Busy B Books, 146 W. Hastings.
681-4931.
RENTALS 8c REAL ESTATE
Rooms
•1
GRAD STUDENT WANTS GIRL TO
share furnished apartment near
4th and Alma. Transportation available. Contact Anne, 228-3856 or
922-1085.
ROOMS ON CAMPUS CLOSE TO
meal services, 2260 Wesbrook Cres.,
224-9662.
MALE STUDENT, SINGLE ROOM,
kit. priv., use frig, bath. Main
floor.   Non-smoker,   $40.   733-8778.
'NEWLY DECORATED RECREA-
tion room," 10' x 24'. Private bathroom, kitchenette and entrance.
Phone  228-8096.
Room 8c Board
82
ROOM AND BOARD ON CAMPUS,
5745 Agronomy Road, Ph. 224-9667
after six.
DELTA KAPPA EPSILON FRA-.
ternity is now inviting inquiries for
accommodation in their new $155,-
000 36-man house on Agronomy
Road. The house will be officially
opened Jan. 1, 1968, but room and
possibly board will be offered in
early November. The house will feature the best living facilities at
UBC for residence rates. For further information and opening dates
please write: H. Harrison, No. 6,
3851 West 4th Ave.

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