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The Ubyssey Nov 16, 1961

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 THE UBYSSEY
Vol. XLIV.
VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, NOVEMBER  16,  1961
No. 25
College officials
ask for federal aid
—Photo   by   Bai'ry   Joe
WORKING HIS WAY THROUGH COLLEGE in a slightly novel
way is the unidentified student above, who was caught in
the act of removing several gross of salable goods from
Brock Hall—and in broad daylight yet. Students have been
complaining of a wave of thefts of brief cases and umbrellas
this year. |
McGill prof suggests
aid to foreign colleges
OTTAWA (CUP) — Dr. Cyril
F. James of McGill University
has suggested a plan whereby
Canadian universities might
become the godparents of new
universities in developing countries.
The principal and vice-chancellor of McGill, addressing the
National Conference of Canadian Universities and Colleges,
suggested that Canadian universities might assume the
responsibility of taking under
their tutelage universities " in
foreign   countries   in   order   to
Bird Calls on sale
in Brock this week
Bird Calls, the Hustler's Handbook, will be on sale in Brock
Hall at noon only until Friday.
After Friday they m a y be
picked up from the AMS Office
between 10 pjn. and 4 p.m.
Advanced sales may be picked
up at the same time as others.
The price now is 75 cents.
ensure that their academic freedom is guarded.
"It is no idle boast to suggest that Canadian prestige is
very high among the new nations of Africa and Asia," Dr.
James said.
"We are not powerful enough
to arouse the fear that is often
excited by offers of assistance
from the U.S. or the USSR. We
have no taint of imperialist
heritage which sometimes
makes a newly independent
country reulctant to accept
tutelage from England, France
or Holland."
Dr. James charged that the
most important events of the
last few years "are not the explosion of atomic bombs, but
the kind of education that is
being made available to the
young men and women in
Africa, Asia and South America."
"It is in the minds of those
now in college that the ultimate battle of the cold war
will be won or lost," he said.
OTTAWA (CUP) —The three-
day National Conference of Canadian Universities and Colleges
ended Wednesday with a resolution calling for an increase in
university per capita grants and
aid for university projects.
NCCUC representatives said:
"Canadian Universities in a new
age consider it a serious obligation to warn the people of
Canada that the higher education crisis still continues and
deepens and that there is every
prospect that if will grow more
acute in the next decade".
UBC President Norman A. M.
McKenzie earlier called for
more federal aid for universities.
In seven resolutions conference delegates, r e p r e s enting
University administrations, asked for $1.50 to $2.50 increase in
per capita grants and a special
$500 grant from the federal government for students registered
Berlin crisis
fabricated
says Endicott
By KRISHNA SAHAY
The Berlin crisis is a fabrication of the NATO powers,
according to 1952 Stalin Peace
Prize winner, Dr. James Endicott.
It serves the purposes of the
West to keep the Berlin crisis
alive, he told a noon-hour meeting in  Bu.   203  Wednesday.
The Soviet Union signed an
agreement with the United
States Sept. 20, which called
for complete disarmament, he
said. "The Berlin crisis gives
the Americans an excuse to
disregard that solemn statement."
The Russo - American statement called "the Eight Point
Star of Peace" ensured total
disarmament within as short a
period as possible and was
signed by James McCloy for
the United States, Dr. Endicott
said.
He said economist Dr. Kenneth Boulding had told a
recent Sir George William's
University Conference on
"Causes of War" that disarmament, contrary to popular belief would not cripple the American  economy.
There is also a prevailing
belief that the causes of modern crises are largely ideological, he said. "But the real
cause is economic."
There is a growing war hysteria in the Western world and
the Canadian government is
doing nothing to check it, he
charged. "Operation Tocsin"
only served to aggravate the
situation, he added.
It is a part of a plan to make
Canadians accept the inevitability of nuclear conflict, especially over Berlin, he said.
in medical, dental, and graduate'
studies.
The resolutions also asked the
federal government to provide
$50 million for new building
construction.
This sum could be distributed
under a matching grants formula supervised by the National
Research Council.
Dr. Murray Ross of York University condemned the federal
government for not carrying "its
share of responsibility for scholarships or universities".
Dr. Ross also outlined plans
for a high school student trust
fund.
Students with first class honors "should have a $750 trust
account established in his
name." If the student maintain
ed his academic status he would
receive $750 each year until he
reached university.
Students who drop out or do
not attend university would lose
the trust fund. The money would
then revert to a pool to subsidize other students.
Students without a trust fund
or other financial resources
should have bursaries available
to them Dr. Ross said.
Dr. F. J. Leddy, academic
vice-president of the University
of Saskatchewan, moved a resolution calling for increased attention by Canada to the development of international studies
and to the language, history, and
philosophy of foreign countries,
particularly those outside the
Western European sphere.
FEE REDUCTION VOTE TOO A Y
Students go to the polls today to vote on the Graduate Student Fee Reduction referendum for the second
time.
"I expect no difficulty in obtaining a quorum this
time,' said AMS President Alan Cornwall.
All students are elegible to vote.
Polls will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at many campus locations and special voting booths will be set up at
the Teacup football game.
Commenting on the anticipated loss to the AMS of
$3,672 if the referendum is successful, Cornwall said' it
was more than the AMS had expected, but that the principle was most important.
Bob McAndrew, president of the Graduate Student
Society said, " I hope the majority of students will recognize and redress the injustice of the extra graduate student fee."
Council finally solves
term's "key" question
Student council has been
passing around a master key
for the Brock as if it were a
hot coin.
Oct. 30, councillors passed a
motion put forth by Science
president Bill Munro, taking
student president Alan Cornwall's Brock master key from
him. Council earlier passed a
motion giving a set of masters
to vice-president Eric Ricker.
Ricker said his duties as
discipline    chairman    made    it
UCC hit by Council
over Scott censure
Student Council has passed a
motion recording its "abhorrence" of the University Clubs
Committee executive charges
against Treasurer Malcolm
Scott and censuring UCC for
its irresponsibility in presenting the charges.
Council also passed a motion
expunging the UCC minutes
containing a charge of negligence against Scott from the
society's   records.
UCC had rescinded acceptance of the report charging
Scott and approved a new one,
deleting the charges against
the Treasurer.
necessary for him to be able to
get into all areas of the building  at any time.
Co - ordinator of activities,
Doug Stewart said he feared
with three masters out one
might get lost. Munro obligingly put forth his motion.
Cornwall, who was absent
from the meeting, protested
strongly at the next council
meeting. Munro moved to rescind his motion and Corn-wall
got the key back. He said he
considered the removal of the
key an infringement on the position  of  the  president.
Now three persons have
masters keys for the Brock —
Cornwall,  Stewart  and Ricker.
Teacup football game
noon today in Stadium
Defending Champion Home
Ec. home wreckers meet
Nursing Panhandlers at noon,
today in the Stadium for the
annual Teacup Football Finals.
At half-time The Ubyssey
All-Star Champion Chuga-
luggers will meet Engineers,
Foresters and Aggies in the
Annual Boat Race. There will
also be Chariot and cross-'
country races. Page 2
T<HE        UBYSSEY
Thursday,  November  16,   1961
§ijy*3p
Authorized as second class mail by the Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash.
MEMBER CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
Published tluee tiraes weekly throjighout the University year in
Vancouver by the Alma Matej- Society, Univejsity of B.C. Kditorial
opin:ons expiessed are those of the Editor of The Ubyssey and not
necessarily   those   of   the  Ahria   Matei'  Society  or   the   University   of   11.C.
TELEPHONES: CA 4-3242, locals 12 (news desk),
14 (Editor-in-Chief). 6. 15 (business offices).
i Editor-in-Chief: Roger McAfee
Managing   Editor     .    .
•rt.B5U<-iai.c    .EiUiiOr
News Editor ....    .
.City Editor     .    .    .    .
CUP Editor      ...
Photography Editor    .
Senior  Editor       .    .    .
Sports Editor      .    .    .
Photography   Manager
Critics Editor
Denis   Stanley
Ann   Pickard
. Fred  Fletcher
Keith Bradbury
Bob  Hendrickson
.    Don Hume
Sharon   Rodney
.    .    Mike Hunter
Byron   Hender
.    David Bromige
STAFF THIS ISSUE:
Layout: Bob McDonald
NEWS: Krishna S a h a y: Pat Horrobin, Mike Horsey,
Richard Simeon, Joy Holding, George Railton, Chris
Fahrni.
TECHNICAL: Pauline Fisher, Bert MacKinnon, Maureen
Covell, Fred Jones, Ted Ross.
Not polygamy!
Let's have three year marriage licences.
Why not? Many other societies even stranger have marriage customs. Like polygamy.
The three year marriage licence could probably be ar-  bs
ranged like a contract—three years with option for an addi-
tiqnal,three, years.
When the first option expired a second, for a longer per- j,
iod of 7 years, could be issued and upon completion of this
term a permanent arrangement would then be entered into.
On first thought this three year plan may seem a bit harsh
but let's examine it further. The first and perhaps most desirable feature is that it would do away with the need for divorce.
No longer would an incompatible couple be forced to drag
their case before the courts. They would merely have to wait
tiie unexpired time and then part. Still friends, perhaps.
7 "Needs vary throughout a person's life. During university
days, if a fellow's in arts, he'll be doing,a considerable amount
of typing, so ^faring this time he could marry a girl who could
type, say, 60 words per minute. If he is a forester he would
probably want a drinking companion, so he could marry a
girl who could drink 'beer. If 'he is and engineer he could
marry a girl who . . .
Students in the same lectures would undoubtedly marry.
Each would then have to attend only half the classes. Students
living away from home could marry girls who could cook, if
, they were lucky enough to find one. We're sure many more
such eonveniences could be found.
After graduation many people want to travel. So under
the three-year plan girls could marry "travellin' men." Later
in life, when most people get the urge to .settle down in a
more sedentary existence, the three-year plan would allow
them to marry someone with similar inclinations.
We constantly hear about the "new approach" to marriage and marriage problems. The marriage counsellor has
replaced the.marriage broker. Even social workers are getting
into the act. Such modern and enlightened approaches are
really skirting the issue.
Why should we westerners not . apply a little of, this
" "newism" to real core of- the problem. No, not women, mar-
. riaget, itself.
-■ With ;the advent of the three-year plan, many of the
younger- ".confused" members of society (juvenile delinquents), who seem to need only "security and the feeling of
belonging" according to other modern theorists, could get
married when in their confusion. They would not have to
worry about spending their whole lives with "that drip."
Just a few years. In marriage they could find that sense of
"security ^ind the feeling of belonging". True, incidents of
wife beating and attempted murders would probably increase,
but then most blessings are mixied.
"What about the kids."
Good point. Well, they could be . . . well society could
. . . well, we suppose . . . well every new revolutionary idea
has some irreconcilable flaws.
BY GAD CRUMLEY!! Isn't it ripping the way students support   campus elections.
Letters to the Editor —
€^it> * j&->,s-** *-X«m&&n W%£&> rtissV*   )^:*>'J*ULm^w-.
<V-.-fc$9BI
"Two oppose"
Editor,
The  Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
I wish to compliment you
on the volume of copy which
has appeared in the Ubyssey
on the Graduate Student Fee
Reduction referendum. However, I protest the insinuation
in a recent headline that
Council is "split" on the
issue.
Your .attention .is directed
to Minute 4 of the Student
Council meeting, Oct. 6, in
which council gives its "full"
endorsement and support to
the referendum. No opposition
was recorded at that time
although Mr. Gayton and Mr.
Hudak have recently seen fit
to speak against council's
decicion. It is indeed unfortunate that Mr. Gayton was
unable to attend that October
6 meeting.
I feel that your headline
implies indecision on the part
of the student-elected governing body. Since council has
23 voting members, a fairer
headline would have been
"Two Councillors Oppose Referendum."
Very truly yours,
BOB  McANDREW
G.S.A.  President
"Split—to separate into parts
or parties" Webster—Editor.
Another SUB idea
Editor,
The  Ubussey.
Dear  Sir:
After having read the two-
part article by Alan Cornwall
explaining the organization
and functions of the new Student Building, I feel that the
ideas expressed are superficially good but based on an
entirely mistaken premise.
You cannot bring together a
proposed student population
of 20,000 into "a general congregation area — for general
social intercourse and exchange of ideas — and philosophies" any more than you
can bring together the present
11;000 and a new building will
not change this.
The students sitting in the
Brock     Lounge     today     are
silent; conversation drowned
out by music over the Radio
Society loudspeakers. It is
important to note here that
the conversation died long before Jtadsoc .took over. Cornwall, goes on to say, "There is
a goodly number of students
who .do not wish to enter any
form or type:,of student activities but who would enjoy the ,
opportunity. to — dabble in
arts anjti crafts or —listen to
classical'music or jaz^," and
further, "only about ilO per
cent of the student population
takes an active part -in student
affairs."
Considering there are Fine
Arts and. Music Clubs for, these
dabblers, one would think this
would relieve the apathy. He,
then says, "we must—-create
an atmosphere most condusive
to .whatever we are providing." This is true but what
are we providing for, more
apathy? more disinterest? The
major aim seems to be to get
a low-cost make-do building to
look after the social needs of
20,000 people.
UBC is no longer a "coL
lege" and thinking that all
students can be brought together in one structure is
thinking on a college level.
UBC is a university so huge
and complex now that this
idea no longer applies. Most
people who desire to exchange
ideas or just have fun seek
out a group of friends who
think in a similar manner.
These people find social contact in campus clubs, .fraternities and such organizations
and among the people taking
the same course of studies. To
attempt to have all these
people gather in a barn-like
structure for social contact is
inviting another big silence
filled with noise from Radsoc.
I propose some bold new
thinking be done by students
and council on the subject of
student building. I would
propose myself to:
(1) Have an architectural
competition to ensure the best
possible design for a main
structure which would be the
nominal centre for student
events of widespread interest.
The vital importance of getting the best architecture we
can afford, cannot be overestimated; the building will
be there for many generations
to come.
(2) Recognize the fact that
the university is too .large for
a union of ideals and promote
greater participation in clubs
and undergraduate societies,
supporting them with additional   finances   and  facilities.
(3) ^Encourage the administration, to jointly plan a campus-wide network of food
s e r v i c e s; buildings which
could include a restaurant or
coffee shop, lounge and washrooms. These .satellite = buildings, of the approximate size
of the Bus Stop Cafeteria,
could be the answer to the
important problem of bringing
the students  together.
They could be designed to
provide a different atmosphere, in each case, for lunch
and conversation so that the
student would be stimulated
to select something for himself  and  participate  in  it.
Yours truly,
ROGER H. FOORD
Arts IV
iiJ
'Misquoted"
Editor,
The  Ubyssey.
Dear Sir:
Professor Thomas has
pointed out to me that I misquoted him during a debate
on no nuclear arms for Canada last Tuesday. I apologize
for what was an unintentional
error, and I hope that the following correction will set the
record straight.
I misquoted Professor
Thomas in saying that ending
the human race would be justified if it was the only way
of saving it from subjugation
by a false ideology.
What he did say was that
he would be willing to end
the human race rather than
see it come under the subjugation of a false ideology,
whether or not it could be
justified.
Sincerely,
W. E. WILLMOTT Thursday,  November  16,   1961
THE       UBYSSEY
Page  3
By  BOB HENDRICKSON
Leftovers from last week: It seems I owe the Playboy
campus representative an apology. He informs me that his
magazine costs more than "The Bridge of Reason" (50c) on the
stand but less if you buy a subscription from him.
I'm glad people can pick  but the important points.
A letter of such serious import was received that1 itr requires'
reprinting.
Dear Mr. Hendrickson:
When walking in front of the library Tuesday I found a
fallout and, following your advice, picked it up.
I put it in my briefcase for future Use but now the briefcase has taken on a glow and, the hand I,used to pick up the
fallout has dropped off.
This is to advise you my lawyers will be in contact with
you to  ensure adequate settlement.
Your truly,
George E. Railton,
Com. Ill
Don't be surprized if you see an ad in The Ubyssey run-,
ning something like this:
HELP: Needed immediately; one lawyer to defend persecuted fallout advisor. Pis. contact Bob Hendrickson of The
Ubyssey.
*        *       *
There's no doubt about it, students are crazy."But Thei
Student Mirror reports that the French are doing something
about it.
Bureaux for  Psychological Assistance   have  been  established by the French Student Social Welfare Service in most
of the major university towns.
^ The Student Mirror reports most of the students asking
for treatment are in philosophy and unmarried. If any of your
friends fall into this category, now you know.
I don't know quite how to take this item from The Village
Voice but it quite affects me. What do you think?
5 EXPLANATIONS:
It was a way to meet actresses. Shakespeare
I was rejected by the committee. A. Hitler
I knew I could not keep my royalties. Solomon
I liked to watch animals mate. Wilhelm Reich
I felt sorry for us all. Jesus Christ
Scientist warns
Worldleaders ignorant
JOHNNY      THOMPSON'S
THUNDERBIRD    SERVICE^^
University District Chevron Service Station     rx^-^j
10th & Tolmie — CA 4-5313 ^v^X
PERSONALIZED   SERVICE   FOR  YOUR  CAR
for the man on campus
Ties-....   100
Dress Shirts  5.00
Crew Sox...._-_._._ ... 1.25
Sweaters, All Styles... 12.95-21,95
Blazers,
Blue,Black, Brown, Olive.... 39.50
Regular Umbrellas  3.65
Automatic Umbrellas .„,...._ 5.25
Brock Extension      11:30-2:30      Mon.-Fri
DR.   NORMAN   ALCOCK
. . : peace research
Modern students are more
, aware of the conseqiierices of nuclear conflict than the present
leaders of the world, said Canadian Peace Research institute
founder Dr. Norman Z. Alcock
Wednesday noon.
Dr. Alcock, speaking in Brock
Lounge, said students must try
to educate the leaders of the
country on the horrible results
of nuclear war.
The leading scientists of the
world have greatly misdirected
their energies, he said. They
have sought  only to better the
e escapes from
Buster '"*   clutches
Around Buster's" head quarters, Stu NOble must''be known
as the one that got away.
A month-:ago: Noble, a first
year forester; came out of the
Brock to find: Buster's hooking
up to his car. An RtfeP nfficer
had his ear%eys and' wouldn't'
give them back.
So Noble sat down in fhe driver's seat and wouldn't budge.
Neither would Buster's. The
towing company doesn't have
enough insurance to cover pass-,
engers when it tows.
Buster's, the RCMP and Dean
Walter Gage all pleaded with
the forester to give in. Cheered
by fifty onlookers, Noble sat
tight and the authorities gave
up.
The incident was referred to
Buildings and Grounds assistant Superintendent, Len Bayley,
who referred the case to faculty
council.
And faculty council, according to student discipline committee chairman Eric Ricker, deemed it wasn't worth a meeting.
Since it wasn't reported to him,
Ricker took the same stand.
Press conference
to use Spanish
LEIDEN, Netherlands (GUP-
COSEC)—In recognition of the'
growing importance of Latin
American countries, the Tenth
International Student Press
•Conference recommended this
summer that Spanish be made
one of the official conference
languages in the future. English
and French were the lah&uages
prior to' this years conference
resolution.
economic welfare of their own
people and to perfect methods
of warfare.
The goal of scientists should
be to enhance the social scale of
people all over the World* rather
than to a d v a nee physical
sciences, he said.
It is in order to advance the
social science that the Canadian
Peace Research Institute is being
founded, he said. Scientists will
do research on means to end war
and to bring about disarmament.
Disarmament, according to
Alcock, is not a simple problem.
Whereas unilateral disarmament
is feasible for Canada or even
Britain it is not for the United
States.
The two giants must disarm
bilaterally.
The prevalent fear that disarmament will throw the Amer-
can economy off balance is unfounded, he said, as cost of arm.-,
ed forces is only 10 percent of
the economy. -
If the 10 percent previously
spent on armaments were channelled into foreign aid there
would be no perceptible effect
on the economy, he added.
The peace institute, while researching on martial problems
will be only a fact finding group,
Dr. Alcock said. It will not attempt to put its findings or conclusions into practice.
He said the Institute would be
located' on a university campus.
Vic Homecoming
Victoria College will hold its
Homecoming Dance Saturday
at the Gordon Head campus.
All   alumni   are   invited.
ths MILDEST BEST-TASTING ogarette Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
KIINIEO
By PETER MORRIS
•    BALLAD OF A SOLDIER   *
(director Grigori Chukrai, Russia 1960)
^.BALLAD OF A, SOLDIER is one of those films that, on. the
surface, one might class with so many other films we have seen
from post-war Russia and which might be typified as ersatz social
realism. Its theme of the effect of war on innocent Russian people
is one that is dear to the hearts of Soviet film producers, and,
as with its predecessors, its aim is overtly humanistic and its style
deliberately emotional. Yet the recognisable structure and style of
BALLAD OF A SOLDIER distinguish it from so many other films
of its type and allow discussion of it as cinema rather than as a
piece of pamphleteering.
The intentionally episodic dramatic structure tells the story of
a young Russian soldier who, after destroying two enemy tanks
single handed, is awarded a week's leave by an indulgent Soviet
Blimp. On the long journey to his home village a number of adventures befall him and he arrives home only in time to make the
return journey. Most of the action takes place on board a train
and the camera effectively conveys a bleak, sad sense of distance
covered: the railroad sidings and the desolate stations; the forests
reflecting in train windows and the flat countryside sliding and
jolting past.
TOO NOBLE AND PATRIOTIC
The screenplay, which is written by Valentin Yoshov and the
director Grigori Chukrai, leans a little too heavily on the side of
duty and patriotism and presents characters that are a shade too
noble and refined to be believeable. (The only characters we are
supposed to dislike are a venal guard on the train and a woman
Who has taken a lover while her husband is at the front). This inevitably leads one to the conclusion that the Russians are just
about the nicest people in the world, enduring the horrors of war
without bitterness but with good humour and a ready consideration
for others. Possibly very good public relations but-^very unconvincing filmically.
However, the basic emotional theme of youth and love thwarted
by a war they cannot understand is very successfully conveyed by
the elegaic style of director Chukrai. The camera, which focusses
almost entirely on the boy and the shy young girl he meets on the
train, is less concerned with the objective events on two human
beings. The style is contrived only to make the primary characters
emotionally compelling, and to evolve from a simple story some
of the awareness of the tragedy involved when human encounters
cannot be fully experienced because of war.
EFFECTIVE OPENING SEQUENCE     -
The opening sequence, although replete with some obvious
camera trickery, is surprisingly effective in eliminating tlie incredibility of the boy's achievement in destroying two enemy tanks
singlehand'ed, and in imparting a real sense of visual excitement.
The swiftly moving camera following the boy in the bizarra chase
t>y a tank, the rapid cutting from the boy to the juggernaut rearing omnisciently above the field, the relentless jarring imagery,
all unite to give some sense of the fear and futility in the episode
itself and the boy's own wild confusion.
The growing love of the boy for the shy apprehensive young
virgin is magnificenty described by a camera that rapidly involves
one emotionally as well as visually. The first stirrings of innocent
sensuous love, mirrored in the faces of the young pair, are counterbalanced by camera glances at the passing sky—by steel-sharp
etchings of railroad bridges framed with billows of smoke curling
against silhouetted iron railings—or by a tenement building where
a little boy blows soap bubbles down a stairway.
WAR AND LIFE
Their mutual bewitchment and the mingling of their desires
as the time approaches for their parting is artfully described by a
series of close-ups of. their faces, softly dissolving in and out, that
is a triumph of, camera narration. It is at this point that we perceive the irrevocability of what is to follow: their young love
cannot be fulfilled for the most terrible consequence of war is that
life and love are held in abeyance. Time and destiny will allow of
no other conclusion for their meeting than tragedy.
I would have appreciated a little more imaginative use of
sound. The use of natural sounds is limited to those absolutely
necessary, and no attempt is made to use the sound track creatively
for emotional effect. The music falls back onto the old stand-by of
using a distinct theme to signaL changes in the emotional tempo,
but the theme recurrs with such insistent inevitability that its usefulness is destroyed.
Some people may find BALLAD OF A SOLDIER too sentimental for their tastes. Yet, despite its obvious faults, the film
has a sense of poetry and pictorial excitement that makes it a
veryCpowerful and moving experience.
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GEZA AN DA the Hungarian born pianist appeared with the
Vancouver Symphony last Sunday afternoon at the Queen
Elizabeth Theatre. This comparatively young virtuoso performed the Brahms Piano Concerto in B flat major.
Orchestra  San   P/e/ro
Musica di Napoli
Last Thursday a Queen
Elizabeth Theatre audience
was fortunate to witness some
of the finest string orchestra
playing heard in Vancouver
during recent years. The occasion formed part of the first
American tour of the ORCHESTRA' SAN PIETRO OF
NAPLES, a distinguished
product of the Italian chamber
orchestra tradition which has
given the musical world such
ensembles as I Musici and the
Virtuosi di Roma. Nineteen
players, mostly strings plus
contrabassoOn, two oboes and
horns, combined with such
unity of conception and technical precision that ore cou'd
almost forget the music -was
being performed by more than
one man.
Seldom heard works of the
sixteenth to eighteenth centuries filled out Thursday's program. A sinfonia by Cimarosa
and a Concertino by Pergolesi
gave from the outset an impression of cohesive, well disciplined ensemble. The string
tone sounded consistently full
and warm—without the raspi-
ness too often heard here on
alternate Sundays.
One of the high points of the
concert came when Franco
Gulli appeared as soloist in
Mozart's concerto K 216 for
violin and orchestra. Gulli's
pliant, singing tone admirably
suited this work. The muted
triplets and pizzicato bass of
the   orchestral accompaniment
LITERARY   STUDENTS
ATTENTION
Agfe and sickness compels sale
of retired author's professionally
completed manuscripts, including
all copyrights. Ideal for man or
woman.   TS   6-6362,
in the Adagio blended especially well with the violinist's
flowing melodic line. Gulli's
technique was. always secure
and his phrasing was so
wrought as to capture many of
the concerto's subtleties. Fortunately, the conductor agreed
with the soloist's approach and
maintained an appropriately
brisk tempo.
The   highest    attainment for
the orchestra probably came in
Gabrieli's Sonata No. 19 for
strings. Ironically, we know
Gabrieli today mainly as a
pioneer experimenior with
brass choirs, yet his writing
for strings, as this sonata illustrates, combined rhythmic sensitivity with melodic inventiveness. San Pietro's conductor,
Renato Ructolo, showed a particular affinity for this work
and consequently urged his
men to an even greater intensity than usual.
Haydn's Trauer (mourning)
symphony, No. 44, concluded
the written program. The
orchestra seemed to realize
that this symphony marked
the achievement of a perfection of form the composer had
long sought. An evenness of
craftsmanship in its writing
was paralleled by an evenness
of performance by the musicians. This in fact points up
again one of the most characteristic features of the
ORCHESTRA SAN PIETRO.
A submission of each musician's individuality to produce a cohesive, uniform ensemble has resulted in the creation of an orchestra which can
play as one instrument, fully
responsive to the conductor's
will.
—-william littler
T
The conservatively slruciu
Breugnon Overture" by Kabal:
ed last Sunday afternoon's
Concert. With its quick surpris
and individualistic o r c h e sti
work provided an excellent liv<
to a concert which was to n
force throughout. Featured o
gramme was the Hungarian b
Geza Anda.
A n d a performed the Bra
Concerto No. 2 in B flat majoi
certo so large in scope and stat
"a tiny, tiny pianoforte conce
tiny, tiny wisp of a Scherzo" i
poser, is in four movements ins
usual three, a second movemt
tjeing interpolated.      C
Melodies were clear, singir.
iantly in the upper registers in
The strength of the perform*
rapidity with which he was at
ify it was shown in passages
tones ranged from fierce to de
in the same musical sentence;
was always controlled and ran
terse strongly attacked stacca
melodic passages stealthy
through dextrous delicate tril
ing liquid runs.
It is hard to express adec
control which Anda exhil
strength of his hands and wris
gers produced full rich fortes t
not harshly banged, yet nim
and relaxed hands produced pi
were delicate but never fragile
were always crisp and legati
rang out clearly over well co
companiments. Throughout, thi
unfaltering driving attack whi
the performance from beginni
Never, however, -did the work
performer always the virtuoso
trolled command.
To further enhance  this p<
GAIL HILL IMPLORES BARNE
DINNER WITH THE FAMILY,
day at 8:30 p.m. in the UBC A ty,  November  16,   1961
THE      UBYSSEY
Page  5
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:pen-
lony
ding
this
ning
l  its
pro-
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'iano
con-
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th a
com-
f the
lerzo
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the
mod-
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ivith-
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sm a
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The
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• the
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CRITICS' PAGE
EDITOR: DAVE BROMIGE
Layout: Jones
i a
nd
a piano
the orchestra seemed caught up in its dynamic force. Ernst Friedlander combined
with Anda to impart to the third movement, Andante, a moving depth of feeling. The strings worked well for the most
part giving much support to the excellence of the soloist. The one weak element
of the performance was the woods. However, this was insufficient to override the
general high quality.
Also included in Sunday's program
was the Berlioz, Romeo and Juliet Symphony. This work a radical innovation in
the day of Berlioz is described as a Dramatic Symphony. It heralded the birth of
what we know today-.as program music:
music of the emotions to tonally portray
what the poet can say in words and the
artist in oils. Divorced from the rigid
Classical form, this program music was
the new medium of the Romanticists of
the early 1800's. It is thought that this
particular  symphony  had  a  great  influ-
Poet  and  Dramatics
Birney to read poetry
EARLE BIRNEY, poet and professor,
gives readings from his own poetry
at noon today (Thursday) in Buchanan
104.
2ft rft 3£
UBC dramatists honored
MAXINE GADD, 4th Year Arts, is
the winner of the first Canadian Inter-
Varsity Drama League Play Competition. Her play, A Visit to the Pit, written for Eng. 407 (Dr. Friedson's play-
writing course), won the first prize of
$125. Miss Gadd also won second prize
in  the  N.F.C.U.S.  poetry contest.
An honorable mention in the Drama
League Competition was won by KEN
HODKINSON, UBC grad, for his play
Tick-Tock.
ence on Wagner and Lizst, giants of this
Romantic age.
The Romeo and Juliet Symphony
sprang from Berlioz' ardent love and feverish courtship of an English actress, Henrietta Smithson; whom he had seen performing in Paris in 1827. The first movement, "Love Music", is an adaption of the
balcony scene. It is an intense and impassioned duet with Romeo presented by the
strings and Juliet by the woods. It opened
with full rich tones which were strong
but not hard. The cellos exhibited a lyric
beauty, dramatic and moving, which was
answered by the flutes and oboes with a
haunting melodic line.
The second movement, "Queen Mab
Scherzo", is a gossamerlike interpretation
of Mercutio's fair queen. The work is dia-
phonous and limpid in its orchestral texture and mercurial in its motion.-This was
presented very well and showed good
work from the string section. The. flute,
where it entered through the ethereal crying effect of the violins was too clearly
defined, too tangible to support the misty
strings. The overall impression was however excellent.
The third movement "Romeo alone-
festivities at the Capulets" provided a fitting finale to the symphony and to the
afternoon's program. Here was exhibited
BerliOz' grandiose orchestration and his
love of a full sound. Brass and tympani
played an important role.
Crescendoing to high peaks the work
dropped back to tranquil wood and string
passages, only to rise percussively to another peak. These hills and valleys finally
culminating in a crashing climax involving ever instrument on stage tremihating
on short crisp notes by each orchestral
section in turn. Rhythmically this was
good and it provided an excelleint finale
to a generally excellent program.
—bob mcdonald
RAVEN AND
ENGLISH  TOO
Almost 100 copies of last
year's RAVEN NiNE are still
available at UBC's bookstore.
The book contains reviews of
the following English 100 novels: THE GREAT GATSBY,
FAREWELL TO ARMS, SONS
AND LOVERS, PASSAGE TO
INDIA, HOWARDS END,
POINT COUNTER POINT and
OLD WIVES' TALES.
RAVEN NINE, selling for a
mere 50 cents, also contains
other literary efforts.
IER, who seems nothing loth, in a scene from Anouilh's
nted by UBC's Players' Club tonight, Friday and Satur-
•ium.
Shoot the Pianist
Tirez sur le Pianiste
France  1960
A brilliant film with flashes
of bizarre humor and fliahts
of fancy.
A GANGSTER THEME
Directed by
FRANCOIS   TRAUFFAUT
of "400 Blows" fame
VARSITY
i
Wtbat TMMUE CA 4-9730
-placebo-
by george bowering
- LeRoi Jones v.s. Censorship -
ALL OVER THESE GREAT
nations of the North American
bombsite there has been a significant rise of the old fun
game, ring around the rosy,
only nowadays the farmer is
no longer in the dell. He is now
holding office in the bureaus
of literary censorship. One of
his latest posy flingings from
that bottomless pocket has
been his incarceration of LeRoi
Jones. Only Mr. Jones is not
going to fall down with a
"hush-a."
For anyone who does not
know who LeRoi Jones is, and
what his problem is, a short
description will follow. Those
who don't care can leave the
room and rush to their Stephen
Spender seminar.
LeROI   JONES    IS   THE
editor of the advantegarde mag,
Yugen, and of the valuable
poetry newsletter, The Floating Bear. Some of the poems
he has published in those mags
have been obscene. But in FB
PREFACE TO A TWENTY
VOLUME SUICIDE NOTE;
poems    by   LeRoi   Jones,
Totem Press, 77 pp, paper
$1.25.
number nine, he published a
piece by William Burroughs
(see Naked Lunch) in which the
governmental processes of the
USA are lampooned. The peripatetic postoffice dept. of the
U.S. was given the prod from
someone, and one night Jones
and his family were routed out
of bed and Jones spent the
night in jail. The charge? Circulating obscenity through the
mails.
JONES AND HIS CO-
editor Diane DiPrima are now
raising money to fight the case.
The post office and the establishment are getting ready to
avenge the crime against
humankind  of  the  Chatterley
and Cancer cases. Probably
Sen. Goldwater is hoping both
sides lose.
Totem Press, who have not
as yet finked out in the fashion
set by the formerly-great Evergreen Review, have recently
published Jones' first book,
Preface To A Twenty Volume
Suicide Note. If you want your
copy before the gendarmes
pounce on it with lead calipers,
send to City Lights today.
THE POEMS COVER THE
period between 1957 and 1961,
and are set in chronological
order. It is pleasant to see
that the ones in the back of
the book are the best. The
early ones lean heavily on their
ascribed influences — mainly
the Black Mountain school and
the Beat hockey. "In Memory
of Radio" sounds like an early
Corso chant:
"Am I a sage or something?
Mandrake's hypnotic gesture
of the week?"
But later, when there is a
McClure-like inquiry into basic
actuality, and especially when
there is an attempt to put the
reality of the problem of being
a Negro into free verse, there
is a definite sense of Jones the
man/the poet singing through
the lines. Sound and sense
work together, the way some
early English poet said they
should. And the line becomes
what it must be—a written re-
enactment of the verbal word
group.
"What are
influences?
A green truck
wet and glowing, seance
of ourselves"
UNFORTUNATELY THERE
is too much of the early Jones
and too little of the later Jones
in this first collection. As part
of a collection of the real
poetry in America, it is an
irreplaceable volume. Organically, it droops a little.
THE CANADIAN OPERA COMPANY
presents
OFFENBACH'S
Satirical Comedy Opera in English
rr
Orpheus in the Underworld''
with JAN RUBES
an all-professional Canadian cast and opera orchestra
Saturday, December 2 and Friday, December 8 at 8:30 p.m.
QUEEN ELIZABETH THEATRE
Tickets NOW al theatre box office, $4.50, $4.00, $3.50, $2.50,
and $1.50.
Tour Management: Overture Concerts
Special Savings to OVERTURE Subscribers
UBC PLAYER'S CLUB
presents
''Dinner With The Family'
by  JEAN ANOUILH
directed by ROY BRINSON
Tickets:  $1.50,   $1.25,   50c  for students
at AMS or MODERN MUSIC
536 Seymour Street
NOVEMBER 15, 16,  17 and 18
IN UBC AUDITORIUM
Curtain Time 8:30 Page  6
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday,  November  16,   1961
*» rat*
Students starve
to prove points
WILLIAM  BURNETT
. . . revamp aims
Burnett hits
city schools
Humanities and technical
programs in Vancouver second-
•ary schools are 'inadequate,
school board chairman William
IBurnetr told a noon-hour meeting Wednesday.
The arts have a great worth
in the educational system and
they should not be relegated
behind the sciences, he said.
Burnett said he disagrees-
with the Provincial government's plans for separate vocational and secondary schools.
Burnett said that he would
rather,see the vocational schools,
combined with the high schools,
but as, annexes.
"We feel that students should
be  kept together," he said*
Burnett suggested several
educational goals:
# Educate youth as fully
and as far as possible.
9  Up-grade   educational^
standards.
'-#■■ Institute immediately a
system of vocational training in
the High Schools.
9 Re-education of these who
are not skilled enough to find
employment in the machine
age.    ,
FOR SALE CHEAP
Han's white dinnei- jacket, size
oS; man's tweed spoi'ts jacket,
size 3S. Botli like new. Pliojie
BE   8-S065  after  5:30  p.m.
KINGSTON (CUP) — Three
ij teen's University s t u d ents
v;nt    on   a   thfee^day hunger
rike to put" dramatic mean-
"■?' into'phrases about hungry
,« ople.
The    money   normally  spent
■ i food will be donated to the
W or Id   University     Student
>• ganization to help relieve the
I irvation of millions.
The fasters  issued  a  general
challenge  to  other  students to
duplicate the feat.
*   *   *
DETROIT, Michigan (CUP-
UPS) — A Wayne State University co-ed who said she was
"appalled and disgusted" by
hunger strikes, has gone "on a
hunger strike.
Susan Swan, a sophomore
and a member of the Young
Republican Club and the Young
Americans for Freedom, plans
to drink nothing but-water until
German lecturer
to visit university
Mrs. Liselotte Dieckmann,
visiting lecturer from Washington University in St. Louis,
Missouri, will- speak at noon
Monday, in Bu. 102 under
sponsorship of the German department.
Professor of German and
chairman oi the university committee on general and comparative- literature; Mrs. Diecik-
man will speak on "Symbols of
isolation in -same late lUth century German and French
authors."
the hunger strikers realize "how
ridiculous they are and what
a whole farce this is."
Miss5 Swan's hunger strike is
aimed specifically against one
called by other students at the
University. Miss Swan is upset
by the impurity of -their strike.
She explained:, "It has been
my understanding that a hunger strike entailed abstention
from all forms of nourishment.
These noble ascetics however,
have limited themselves to a
liquid diet, which could include
almost any type of food such
as malts, juices; Metrecal, and
anything else that can be processed in a blender."
Grad photo proofs
must be returned
Graduate students should return their graduate picture
proofs to Campbell Studios by
Nov. 24. Graduates who have
not yet picked up the proofs
should do so immediately,
Totem officials said.
Students in the graduating
class who have not had their
graduate photo taken should
make an appointment with the
Campbell Studios at 2580 Burrard. The appointments must be
made before Deceniber 1 on
any Tuesday, Thursday or Friday. Cost of the service is being covered by the graduation
elass fee.
STUDENTS!
Studying Too Hard?
1
KEEP ASPIRIN WITH YOU
AT ALL TIMES
ASMS!
UNIVERSITY     PHARMACY      LTD.
5754 University  Boulevard CA. 4-3202
UNDERGRADS
ATTENDING
FIRST YEAR ARTS & SCIENCE
FIRST YEAR COMMERCE & UP
A CAREER IN ACCOUNTING
You may start your career next May and obtain a Bachelor
of Commerce, degree while qualifying for a CA. in the
Institute of Chartered Accountants of B.C.
For more information on this combined B.Com./C.A program, come to the
MEETING—WEDNESDAY, NOV. 22
12:35 p.m. in Buchanan 212
The  Institute  of  Chartered  Accountants
of British Columbia - MU 1-3264
»Bodusive«
THE AUTHENTIC STORY
OF PRESIDENT KENNEDY'S
WARTIME ADVENTURES
This week The Saturday Evening Post publishes the
first authentic account of Lieutenant Kennedy at
war. To get this story, writer Robert Donovan
traveled halfway around the world. He got eyewitness reports from every "survivor of the Kennedy
crew. He even interviewed the Japanese commander whose destroyer sank Kennedy's PT boat.
This is a story of heroism, humor and heartbreak.
You will follow John Kennedy's adventures from
the moment his ship went down — right up to his
dramatic rescue from a desert island. Read "PT
109: The Adventure That Made a President."
The Smtmrdmit Bremlmg
Perfectly-matching sweaters and
slim slacks. Girfs with the right fashion
answers choose this beautiful jumbo-knit"
Shetlantex cardigan with its colourful
Jacquard front panel. New Wevenit slim
slacks dyed-to-match. Stunning Fall colours.
Cardigan, 36-42 . . . $14.98, slim slacks, 8-20
. . . $14.98. At good shops everywhere.
AJXt&ii- Jv& | il is not a Senuine Kitten. Thursday,  November  16,   1961
THE      UBYSSEY
Page  7
Court considers
what to consider
Photo by Les Pal
PHYSICS PROFESSOR Dr. G. M. Griffiths takes reading on physics department radiation-
counter to determine concentration of radioactive fallout in Tuesday's rainfall. Dr. Griffith
will speak at the first of three public seminars on "The nuclear problem" Friday and
Saturday in  Forestry  and  Geology 202.
Mixed  lot marches
against nuclear arms
By PAT HORROBIN
Ever wonder what kind of
people demonstrate against
nuclear  arms?
Saturday's Armistice Day
marchers   were   a   polyglot  lot.
An off-duty downtown newspaper reporter, in scruffy
sweater and flannels, jostled a
lady in a plum colored cloche
bat and well-cut suit who
teetered along the asphalt in
four-inch heels. In her turn she
clipped a sparsely bearded engineer on the other side with
her fat handbag.
One bus driver came out the
door with the whole family. Another, Burnaby councillor Russ
Hicks, admitted he had a bus
waiting   fpr   him   over   at   city
hall and muttered that he might
just as well walk over to get it.
Point Grey Junior High
teacher Moe Gordon was glad
after a few miles he was wearing hush-puppies. He split someone else's lunch because he had
been on his way out to the golf
course.
A man pushing a baby carriage across the Cambie bridge
was a policeman on his day
off.- A blond three-year-old,
buttoned into his blond father's
overcoat, opened one eye when
his dad was asked why he was
marching. "See this little guy?"
asked B.C. Labor Council executive Vic Cathers. "That's the
reason. I want him to go into
a bit better world."
Campus Barber
Shop
Monday - Friday 8:30 - 5:00
Saturday   8:30   -   12:00
LOCATED IN
BROCK EXTENSION
TWO GREAT LIMELITER'S ALBUMS AVAILABLE NOW!
MONO - STEREO
ll^JllJWHt-
Alexander and Axelson
Appliances Ltd.
4508 W. 10th Avenue
Vancouver 8, B.C.
Varsity Fabrics
4437 W. 10th Ave CA 4-0842
Yard Goods, McCall Patterns
Sewing Supplies
Open Friday 'til 9
The student court is deciding
who   can refer  questions to  it.
Treasurer Malcolm Scott and
first vice-president Eric Ricker,
appearing Monday noon on behalf of student council said they
feel that constitutional questions should be approved by
council before going before the
court.
In its Oct. 23 meeting council
had protested the methods by
which the student court was
asked to rule on the legality
of a previous council minute
involving The Ubyssey's editorial autonomy. President Alan
Cornwall was not, council decided, entitled to contact the
court as he did without council's approval.
Cornwall, appearing in hig
own behalf, said he appealed
to the court as president, and
said he felt that any individual
should be able to petition court.
Chief - justice Lance Finch
said the whole question, in the
court's eyes, was who can refer
questions to it.
Alternate chief justice, Laurie
Peers, said that the question
was essentially: does an individual student have the right
to go to student court or does
he have to go through council
and run the risk of getting a
refusal.
The court adjourned until
Nov. 20, when it will give a
decision.
903   ROBSON   STREET,
Vancouver,   B.C.
MU   1-0612
South Seas Gift Shop
Christmas Gifts
HAND CARVED WOODS
from Africa, India, Philippine
Islands, 'Bali, China, Fiji
Islands,  etc.
MARINE  CURIOS
Exotic   Sea   Shells,   Corals,
Sea   Fans,  Giant  Clams
Peruvian Clay, Carved Horn,
Soapstone   Figures,
Woven   Bamboo
CAFE DAN DINE & DANCE
important Announcement to All Students
CAFE DAN welcomes back all our guests
and friends from UBC.
Special Rate of $1.00 per person (Fri. only)
came in effect September 22, 1961 and
continues throughout the season.
(AMS or Library card required)
For  reservations  see  owner  in   Buchanan   2239  (Slavonic
Studies) every M. W. F. at 12:30 or phone:
TR 4-6883, or MU 4-4034 352 WATER ST.
"COME AND SEE US"
Friday, 12:30 noonf Room 2
A LECTURE OF EXTREME IMPORTANCE
•    ■ it
"Saint and Scientist
BY
Sri Swami Premananda
Of Agra, India
Hear this dynamic, erudite, profound ex-professor who
is considered to be the most respected and influential
you rig swami in India today.
East-West Indian Students Association
East-West Culture Institute
Yoga Jivana (Yoga Life Foundation)
FREE   LITERATURE   ON   YOGA   IS   AVAILABLE   BY   CALLING   TR   4-9532 Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday,  November  16,   1961
IVffEN CUSSES:
Propaganda films today
NEW DEMOCRATS
New Democrats present banned Second World War propaganda films: "Battle of Britain"
noon today in Bu. 106, Admission 25c.
* *   *
PLAYERS' CLUB
Auditions for a reading of
"The Importance of Being Earnest" noon today in the Auditorium.
* *   *
CIRCLE K CLUB
Mr. Matthews from Dunn and
Bradstreet on "The Importance
of Credit", Friday noon in Bu.
2218.
* *   *
SAILING CLUB
Lecture on Principles of Sailing,  noon today in  Bu.  203.
* *   *
POETRY CENTRE
Earle Birney reads- his own
poetry in Bu.  104  noon today.
* *   *
JUNIOR CHEM. CLUB
Film, "The Powell River
Story," Friday noon in Chem.
250.
AMS  retakes
Friday  noon
Retakes of AMS card photos
will be done in the stage room
in Brock Hall, on Friday from
8:30 a.m. .to 4:30 p.m. and Nov.
23 from-11:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Students eligible for retakes
are late registrants, and people
who got no picture or the wrong
picture in the brown envelope.
Please bring wrong pictures to
the retake room.
The two days are available
to give education students
practice teaching a chance for
retakes.
AMS cards are available
from the undergraduate societies.
Rental Service
TUXEDOS
Black Suits, Formals,
Costumes, Make-up
Special Student Rates
New York
Costume Solon
4397 W.  10th      CA 4-0034
Near UBC Gates
POINT GREY
JEWELLERS
25% REDUCTION
On all Merchandise For
UBC Students
(Show Student Card)
4435 W.lOthAve. CA 8-8718
UPPER
TENTH
BARBERS
4574 W. 10th AVE.
One Block Past the Gates
Featuring European Trained
Barbers
V.C.F.
Dr. John Ross will give a
lecture entitled "The Christian
Divorce" in Bu. 106 Friday
noon.
* *   *
FOLKSONG SOC.
Session in guitar instruction
Friday noon in Bu. 2239. Members   only.   Bring   intsruments.
* *   *
HAM  SOC.
Advanced code and theory
classes will be held at noon today in Bu. 317. Everyone welcome.
■k    -k    ~k
INDIAN   STUDENTS   ASSN.
Dr. Harnetty will speak on
"India's Foreign Policy" Thursday noon in Bu. 100. All welcome.
* *   *
CARIBBEAN STUDENTS
Two films "Treasures of the
Reef" and "Safari on Wheels"
noon today in Bu. 102. Free
admission.
UN  CLUB  XND
INTERNATIONAL   HOUSE
Current affairs discission
gifiotip everf Monday noon in
the IH board room. All interested ; welcojne..
'.■'"'■*."■ ■'•"   '   '■■•■[*•: *-*''
SstelttiMVTIONAL HPUSE
; Turkish evening Friday, "8
p.m. in the International House
Upper Lounge. Film and speakers,  followed by  dance.
Ski at Bajnff after Christmas
with IH. 4tay at tne Banff
School of Fine Arts. All classes
of skiers. Mfeeting Friday, 17th,
12:30 at IH.
*   *   *
NEWMAN CENTRE
Nominations meeting for PRO
Thursday,  12:45 in the lounge.
Charlton & Morgan blue blazer, tall 4i $12. CA 4-7205
(after 6 p.m.).
196 2    GRADUATES
GAHADA'S LARGEST EMPLOYER
- FEDERAL CIVIL SERVICE -
requires .
CIVIL - ELECTRICAL - MECHANICAL
ENGINEERS
An interesting and rewarding career may await you in the
Federal Civil Service if you are graduating in Civil, Electrical or Mechanical Engineering in 1962. New graduates in
these fields will be employed at various Canadian centres
on vital and challenging projects involving design, development, construction, research application and contracts engineering.
STARTING SALARY APPROXIMATELY $5200—Allowances will be made for those completing relevant postgraduate training.
CANDIDATES MUST WRITE A GENERAL OBJECTIVE
TEST AT 8:30 a.m. ON SATURDAY. DECEMBER 2, 1961.
Details regarding the examination, application forms and the
booklet "Opportunities for Graduates in Engineering" are
available from
UNIVERSITY PLACEMENT OFFICE
OR
CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION,
OTTAWA
INCO DEVELOPS WORLD MARKETS FOR NICKEL
Coinage provides world markets for nickel
Nickel and nickel alloys make excellent coinage
because they withstand corrosion and hard wear;
can be blanked and coined readily; have a bright
metallic lustre that makes them easy to recognize.
' According to the latest information, 47 countries
of the world use nickel or nickel alloys in 118
coins. On the average, more than 5 million pound's
of nickel are used annually in the coinage systems
of the world. That's about 10 per cent of the total
tonnage of all metals used in coinage each year.
Think what this i&eans for Canada.
Canada is the world's largest producer of nickel.
And Inco, through sales, research and market development operations, maintains a continuing program for the expansion of international markets
for Inco nickel.
More Inco nickel than ever before will be exported to expanding world markets... helping to
build trade balances, stimulate Canada's economic
growth and create more jobs for Canadians.
MONEY MINTERS, a 16 mm. 15 minute film in colour produced in cooperation with the Royal Canadian Mint is available on loan
for group showings. NICKEL IN COINAGE, a free booklet telling the story of nickel coinage through the ages will be sent on request.
THE
INTERNATIONAL NICKEL
COMPANY OF CANADA, LIMITED VNCQ
55 YONGE STREET. TORONTO /        .     \

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