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UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Nov 8, 1951

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UNIVERSITY Ot ■
BOYISH COLUMMA';
NOV 1 3 1951
IHE LIBRARY
VOLUME XXXIV
AL FOTHERINGHAM
Campus
Chaff
Ladeez and gentlemen: An
nouncing a sensashunal offar.
At reduced rates you too can
see the magnificent scenery oi
Horseshoe Bay. f
A group of UBC students, no
doubt tniueneed by the BC Tour*
1st Association, are offering at
lantaatically low -prtoea a won.
derful tour of West Vancouver,
Horeeshoe Boy and surrounding
dtetHets.       "'■';
e
The enterprising young stu*
dent* «re Bill Iaglls, Al Hicks,
Frank Patterson and Pat Herman. They even tnported a sped'
lal driver, Norm Payne, trom
Vancouver Island, to do the haul.
These slap-happy lade are all
Coramunlstlcally clad In red hut
don't let Utat scare you away.
Hon A forty
This contest is open only to
artwnen. Rush your entries In today as this stupendous otter is
good only for 89 years*
All you have to do to enter 1>
to plan a blgtparty. Spend IB tor
tickets, 94 for a bottle of ginger
ale, ta^ce your girl and go to this
party.
We now inierrwpt this fommej*
ciai lor a jipsrani. #*w is ehr
ace eonw|eata*or Wiltel Wind*
'hag,   ■     '. .<.;.<
"Good evening people ot the
48 faculties and.all tha ships at
"1'"predlet-^-that in the next
two hours various artsmen Will
b«ome tunther acquainted with
»Ap»^^e^^|*p^|ife^^fT''*'V*:^**(V
A    ■ m.M ,£ _ A."   it A Jt'CeJ— A   ■
VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 1951
5 CENTS
NO. 20
i'i also predlot—that Allan
Potheringham's future moiling
address will be slightly southwest ot Albequerque, New Mexico.
*Now back to our sponsors."
.   As i was saying all you have to "
do to enter Is to arrive at your
party.   The   "See-Horseshoe-Bay-
Club" will do the rest.
Part of the service Is a beat-up
Romeo with a shaved head ealled
Ron Ducks—all who entertains
your girl while you are on the
tour by flapping his ears ahd
soomlng around the room a la
P-38.
im No Broint
It is alleged that he Is the
brains, behind tbe Terrible Five
but l think this is erroneous because several scientific tests
have proved beyond, a shadow
of a bout that he hae no brains.
Any artsmen who qualify tor
this* contest may apply at the engineering building (If you can
stand the smell?.
The line forms on the right,
artsmen.
PjS.—U also helps If you work
tor the Ubyssey.
Officials Plan
Interviews For
Postgrads
Officials of several large firms
will be on the ctumpus shortly to
Interview students in regard to
post-graduation employment.
On November 13 and 14, representatives of the* Imperial Oil Co.
and the Atomic Energy Commission will be here. The National Research Council will he looking for
future employees on November lti
and  17.
Mr. Homer, of the department
nf Employee Relations of Imperial
Oil Co. will give a talk to interested students on Tuesday, November
I'I,  In   Engineering 201.
These firms will be mostly concerned with Knglneeiing students,
but there will be sgme openings
for Commerce and Law studenta.
HOWS YOUR MULTIPLICATION? Does the integral of
tha log of tan times Him cube root of pi equal the rate
of thermal expansion in a Campbell's soup tin? Heres
something even a dumb bunny like me can understand. NO
more of the terrific 1952 TOTEMS will be sold after Nov. 16.
TOTEMS are how on sale at AMS office in the Brock.
Varsity  Loses Bracken Award
Sent To Rival Manitoban
.  WINNIPEG — (CUP) — University of Toronto pranksters
last week stole the Bracken trophy, emblematic of Canadian
university newspaper leadership.    *
 —  ■$*   And-that's not all.
siCMMiMf
Three plays will be produced
by   the  University     Players'
Club next week.
•
Student nights are Wednesday and Thursday and free tickets for these shows may be
obtained in the Quad today,
Friday and Tuesday.
First play to be presented is
"The Life and Death of Tom
Thumb'' a comedy farce by
Henry Fielding. Also on the
program ls Thornton Wllder's
"Happy Journey," which will
be played on a bare stage and
the "Second Shepherd's Play,"
a portrayal of the birth ot
Christ.
Directors are Peter Mainwaring, Jack Thome and
Doreen Odling. Plays start at
7:30 in the University Theatre.
Annual AMS
Auction Set
For Nov. 14
AMS will hold It annual auction
sale on  Nov.  14 in Brock lounge.
All articles In lost and found
not claimed by this Saturday will
be up for sale.
Included with these items will be
all extra copies of the 1917 and
1949 Totem, recordings of "Hall
UHC"   and   some  sheet   music.
Russia
Kian
'TWEEN CUSSES
They sent lt to the Manitoban.
The trophy is awarded each year
to.the pa*per publishing what the
Canadian University Press judges
consider  to be the nation's beat
jyLyl     WttjW'mV editorial page. This year, it is sup-
JVwff'l     PP-PaWf posed to be the property of The
Varalty, University of Toronto
daily, and was awarded It at the
CUP conference last Christmas.
Rut, Inspiried by the fact that
The Varsity has been reprinting an
unusually large number of articles
every number of Harold Buch
wald's column; unknown parties
In Toronto kidnapped the trophy
and expressed It tp "Canada's
Other Orea."
The special delivery letter was
received by Joe Gelman, Manitoban
editor, Tues day^ afternoon. He'-ap-
praised the letter as a hoax, and
had no Idea tht lt would actually
be followed by the trophy, he said.
But lt was.
Wednesday night, (Hallowe'en)
upon opening the Manltoban's office at the Winnipeg Saturday
Post, Gelmon was greeted by the
sight of a large corrugated container, marked "C.N. Express —
prepaid", "Handle With Care''
"Fragile," i,nd "This Sid* Up."
He opened the box and tightly
packed In crunched-up old Varsities Toronto Tele/trams and various Toronto faculty publications,
he found the coveted Bracken trophy.
Feeling that The Va.rslty might
be concerned about the trophy's
whereabouts, he telephoned Toronto. In the absence of Barbara
llrowue, The Varsity's editor, Marg
Welch, makeup editor, took the
call.
Miss Welch expressed gratification that the trophy had been
found. She* reported that the kidnapping li rid most likely been set
off hy a recent Vnrsity editorial
Bill Sparling will be In charge' decrying the luck of activity on
of the sale. I the   Toronto   campus.
SouthiYi
Says Ban
Women
PARLIAMENTARY  Forum
debates the resolution "Resolved ihat Women be banned from
University" in Attn 100, at
12:30, Thursday with Mary
Southin leading the "Ayes",
Grant Campbell the "Nays."
Members are urged to turn out
and.take pgrt in the open
forum following the debate.
*r ™ V
THOtI .planning to attend the
Women's Residence danee on November 18th In Brock Hall are reminded to phone Isabel Mclnnis
hail ihis Wee*. „/
^^e ^ow ^P
THI USC symphony will hold a
practice In the.band hut, Thursday, Nov. 8, at 6:15. New players
are needed.
V *T flr -:*"
"THI RIAL Problem of Ufe" Is
the topic for today's address by
Dr, Robert Smith at noon in the
auditorium.
*> '/■n-"""<jf	
INDIA Students' Association will
meet today In ArU 208 nt 12:80
ehanp.
„.'*.    '9     **;
THI MINHTIA of Labor.Mr. J.
Oates, will address a meeting In
Arts 100, Friday at noon* ** W«
have any interest in British Columbia's Labor Laws and Code, now
is the time ,to clear up any questions that have arisen in your mind.
As a member of the cabinet, be
should be able to answer other
questions you may have concerning
government policy.
m     m     v
FOOTBALL DANCI will be held
Nov. 10th at 8:30 In Brock Lounge.
Admission Is 60c per person. All
types of dancing from fox trot to
square. Latin America Orchestra.
Fuh for all! Sponsored by Dance
Club.
fa* v *r
THI SOCIITY of Automotive
Bnglneers wtil present a film on
the Auro Jetliner and a film on the
Boeing 602 Jen Engine. On Tues.,
noon In Engineering 200.
m ■  m     v
v THI MUSICAL Society of UBC
ls holding its annual fail formal
In Brook Hall on Friday, Novem
ber 9. Queen of Hearts Ball Is tbe
•theme chosen for this, year's gala
occasion. Music will be provided by
John Emerson. Admission, at 12.00
per couple, is by program.
tt ^r Tr
FILM Society meets in Arts 208
at   12:30   Friday.   National   Film
Board's   experimental   film   "Dots
and Loops" will be shown.
tP        v        v *
LSE SPECIAL Events Organization meeting for Stravlnski's Les
Noces. All singers percussionists,
pianists come. Double committee
Room, Brock Hall, Friday, 12; 30.
T ^r m
iPROF.   BARN ITT   SAVIRY   of
the Philosophy Department will
speak on Friday In Engineering 200
on the topic, "What of Civil Liberties?" The meeting, to he held at
12:30, Is sponsored by the civil
Liberties Union.
V tt *r
MUSIC Appreciation Club presents "Sclielamony" by Bloch, a gavotte by Bach on Friday at 12:30 in
the Brook double committee room.
9p 9p 9p
IFC banquet will take place Tuesday, Nov. 13 at 6:30 ln the Commodore Ballroom. Admission is
*2.2R for actives and $2.75 for
alumni. Speaker will bo Mr. Ken-
drick.
Request  Full  Details
The Ubyssey's plan for exchange scholarships with the Russians has become page one news across Canada.
Wires have been pouring into The Ubyssey office for the
past week from college newspapers throughout the nation
requesting full details on the scheme.
Meanwhile editors are awaiting
a reply from Soviet Higher Education Minister S. V. Kaftonov.
They cabled the minister. 11 days
ago and prepaid a reply — but,
though Canadian Pacific Telegraphs assured them the -sable was
delivered the earne day it was sent,
no word has yet been received.
YUGOSLAV IXCHANQI
In the Interim Leon Davtcho, foreign editor or thi Belgrade government-party dally "Polltlka" told
editoMn-dilef tea Armour during
a visit to the campue that he was
certain his government would "give
very favorable consideration" to
any exchange plan with Yugoslavia,
Editors are studying the proposals and ay full report will be presented to students in neat week's
Uhyeeey.
The plan for Russia exchangee
proposed to send three UBC students to the Soviet and bring three
Russian* to UBC.
FAY ALL  COSTS
VBC wouild pay all costs of the
Russians and the Soviet government would provide transportation,
tuition, and room and hoard for
the Canadians.
President N. A. M. MaoKenaie,
student council, and International
Student Service bave expressed
full support of the scheme.
No detain We yet available, but
tt is believed that at least two eastern universities would consider
Joining the UiBC plan If the Russians agree.
CULTURAL TEAM
The Soviets proposed to send a
cultural team to tour Canada this
.all in exchange for a team of Canadian students—but National Federation of University Students turned
it down on th* grounds that lt
might be a "propoganda move."
* Informed sources say, however,
that the UiSSiR will likely be more
hesitant about scholarship echemes
since these would involve Integrating their students in Canadian
life.
They say it may be weeks before
The Ubyasey gets a reply.
UDC talent will lead tf>e parade of
entertainment,at the, pap meet to
be held Friday noon la the Arm*
ourlea.
UBC brhss band and UBC cheerleaders will try to stir ,up enthusiasm among Engineers and Arts-
men ft/like, and the audience will be
Invited to participate.
Also on the program will, be Bill
Davison, baritone and Impersonator now *np««nr at the Palomar
Supper Clubpand Betty  Philips,,
popular .CBaEad TUTS sinter.. \
Glen LaP will aot as M.C.
MBBBOn
Thesis Work
At Gallery
An exhibition of the thesis work
of last year's grhduates in the
School of Architecture is oi display ln the university art gallery,
located on the lower floor ot the
Library.
During their final year, students
In Architecture choose a topic for
their thesis design and spend the
latter half of the year preparing
the presentation drawings and models of their solutions.
All topics are of current interest
since this is a requirement of the
thesis project: for example, some
of the designs are:
New Public Library for Vancouver, Rebuilding of the Vancouver
Airpojt, Ski-Centre on Mount Seymour, Television Centre for Vancouver, New Administration Buildings and Convocation, Hall for the
University of British Columbia.
(Both drawings and models are
now on display. The exhibition ls
open to the public from 10 n.m. to
5 p.m. every day except Monday,
until November 17th.
Hobo Hep Postponed
THE PHYSICAL Education Undergraduate Society announced
today that the "Hobo's Hop,'' originally planned for November 9,
has been po&poned because of the
long weekend. It will be held instead   on    November    15,    In    the
UBC TAUNT
ON DISPLAY
ATPEPMIET
Artsmen
May Take
Noon Swim
Assisted by a swift kick in
the pants by the EUS, fhe
Arte Undergraduate Society
has arisen from the .grave and*
flexed its muscles in preparation for today's swimming lessons.
James Oenis was given the honored position as president of the
new AUS. The Engineers Impressed upon OenlB that one ot his first
'duties will be to go swimming.
Complete slate of officers elected are as follows: vice president,
Miss N. Northrop; secretary, Les
Armour; treasurer, Miss M, A.
Smith; cultural representatives,
"Frank Patterson, Al Fotheringham; social representative, Miss
A. Karnar; public relations of!-
cer, Keith Hillman; and member-
aMarge* Bill Ferguson.
MILK PARTY %
Under the guidance of  Social
Rep Karnar the AUS will sponeor
a milk bottle party a*t some convenient  place,  either the  Boiler,
maer's Hall of the Yale Hotel/;
'  Frank   Patterson,   an Engineer,
commenting on the tact that he
must work with Al Fotheringhfcn**!,
said, "1 believe Al and I will ft-nt
along fine. You see, I met him ty^
Friday."    , _ *^'
Because" of the spirit (not spir-^
its) shown at -the meetitig it was
at the A*0A.^dopta rdus-
ty #>ng, *"»^\%>ng sug-
"i .^1»MBbV| Uke
peers'
^VlYlrig   the
ytMetety .'atams
wwr drive.
fijS -fl-rlve were
-ft;*
decitji
Ing
goat
Tea"
LILV*
The
though^
Arts Un
from  the
The wiM*M fl
entitled to'throw the loser's -execu
tive In the lily pond. Since the
artsmen lost and had no fxecutive
to christen with the Illy pond para-
moeclum the Engineers obliged by
forming an AUS.
The artsmen will receive their
reward at I o'clock today.
Dr. Smith
Continues
Lectures
Varsity Christian Fellowship has
brought to the campus for Us
1951 fall series, Dr. W. Robert
Smith,   head   of   the   Department
.*»i.'Sl
snjli
ymx
IIrIoii  atjfflie  University of   Dubuque,   Iowa.
During; this week Dr. Smith  hus
foyer or the new  sym. Dress  will  appeared and will continue  to
be   "hard   times"   and   tickets   are near twice a day In the auditorium
50c por hobo. | and   in   Brock  Hall. ■' "\
Page Two
THE UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 8, 1951
THE UBYSSEY
■MEMBER CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS > *
AutboriSfld as second class mail by the Post Office Dept. Ottawa. Student subscriptions
ILuo per year (included in AMS fees). Mail subscription $2.00 pr year. Single copies
five cents. Published throughout the University year by the Student Publications Board
of the Alma Ma/ter Society, University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions expressed
herein are those of the editorial staff of Uie Ubyssey. and not nacessarly those of the
Alma Mater Society or of We University,
Offices in Brock Hall, Phohe ALma 1624 For display advertising, phone ALma 3263
EDITORIN.
LES ARMOUR
4i
BJtEdlJTfVll #B»1^0R-A*LA*T (3CiyWMl#H MANAGING EDlTOR-©OUG mMi
News Editor, Don Brown City Editor, Harold Berson; CUP Editor, Sheila Roams;
Women's Editor, Florence McNeil j Fine Arts Bdltor, John Brockington; Copy Editor,
Jean Sm^th. *,,   y,,; ,e ■■".,, \
Change Or No Change
It was a great relief to everyone at the
last AMS meeting when Joe Nold, president
of the Parliamentary forum, moved that the
whole question of student council representation be referred te a referendum.
The meeting had almost petered out by
the sophomore member and junior member
solutions to dissatisfaction with tiie present
set-up had been heard.
It is the belief among some students that
this sophomore member, and junior member
should be eliminated, since it is felt that they
serve little useful purpose on the council
Then they take lot granted the validity of
this premise and go on to sajt that these
vacancies can be filled in a number of ways.
"First, there could be two members-at*.
to-aW members that represent no-one but
could carry on all the work ol Council that
none of the other members have time for.
', Second, there could be some representatives of the Undergraduate Societies, selected by the USC or from'the heads of their
groups.
Third, the vacancies could be filled by
eleven undergraduate society presidents.
The first plan listed above doesn't really
change anything but the title of the members.
Someone has to do certain of the committee
work': Right now it is the Vice-president,
because he has no specific assigned duties.
;The second plan merely introduces a
pressure block from the undergrad societies.
'   The third plan makes this pressure block
the dominating force in students council. The
undergrad societies with the best, organization become the power in tne student government.
There is a fourth plan that has received
very little publicity but seems to be the best
one of all. The status quo.
, This plan lis received the support from
the majority of the present members of students council. These members ought to be
in a position-to know.
At present they realize that any increase
in the size of the council will make it more
-unwieldy than it is now, and that if the size
is increased thi form of government will be
changed from a council to parliamentary
forum.
It seems to us that only a few well organised groups wM benefit from the changes.
The plan Whereby two-members at large
are instituted Sounds practical if .tie USC
changes its representation. This plan also calls
for the USC to consist of the Undergraduate
Society presidents.
At present only representatives with little
real power meet each Monday noon. If the
USC constitution provided that the presidents
must sift, then tha USC might again become
Uie important organization it was.
But to increase the size of council to give
Undergraduate Societies direct voice will not
be in the best interests of all the students.
Each stud&nt who is interested in his
Alma Mater should make the supreme sacrifice and vote as he sees fit.
'-rnawjjum
GF fras rnfito' ... ENGINEERS' STYLES
Most Agree With Mr. Gardner
Most students will agree with Mr. Gardner's address to the Student Peace Movement last Thursday.
Few realists will deny that armaments
races are a major cause of wars or that the
policy now being pursued by both the East
and the West is almost suicidal.
; It ia, however, unfortunate that Mr.
Gardner laid the majority of the blame on
the shoulders of the West.
, It would take a daring man to say for
certain which side has done most to endanger
the .'peace of the world.
i Mr. Gardner's statements are doubly unfortunate because they lend support to the
unhappy feeling that peace movements are
backed largely by pro-Communists.
| The sober facts of the case—certainly as
regards the Student Peace Movement at UBC
—db not bear out the ugly slander which
would have us believe that those who openly
favor peace are Communist propogandists.
The Student Peace Movement was found*
4d by a group of students (only one of whom
was a Communist) who sincerely believed
that university students must take an active
part is fostering the cause of peace.
Their intention was to provide a forum in
which persons of every political hue could
get together and discuss ways and means of
keeping mankind from destroying itself.
Mr. Gardner's attacks on displaced persons are also extremely unfortunate.
It is true that many D.P.'s came from
countries now governed by Communists and
that they fled those 'countries in the early
hectic days of the regimes.
Since that time many of them Who have
no accurate conception of life in their native
lands.
They have devoted themselves to spreading malicious propoganda which has done
nothing but generate international distrust.
This, howevei*, does not apply to all or even
to a majority D.P.'s. Thousands of them are
intelligent hard-working new Canadians who
carefully refraih fronpt using their national
backgrounds to aid them in spreading international hate.
Up A Tree
By Chuck Coon
While visiting my aunt Tess in North-
umbria last week, I came across this case
history in the files of the Criminal Investigation Division of the Northumbrian Provincial Police. It is called "The Case of the
Yellow Nails."
SUBJECT: The sudden death on August
24, 1942 of Martin McFrump, artist.
HISTORY: McFrump spent most of his
life in the town of Puddle, Northumbria,
where his father was the local school teacher.
At the age of twenty, young McFrump
began to show signs of an unusual talent in
oil painting probably fostered by the summer
visits of a derelict artist named Jenson.
When Jenson died in 1936, McFrump
determined to become a real artist. Although
he took no formal lessons, he splashed paint
all over the house, forcing the McFrump
family to move to more spacious quarters—
a barn.
It was seven years before McFrump scraped up enough money to buy himself a canvas to work on. During this time, he lived
off the slender earnings of his father.
For 18 days, young Martin McFrump
worked on his first real painting, locked in
his  room.  Using only  the colors  blue and
yellow ("I dislike any other colors," he once
told a friend), the young artist of Puddle
produced a painting that rocked the whole
town. *
It was a portrait of a pair of blue hands
with long, pointed, yellow nails. He called
it simply, "Yellow Nails."
His father said it was the work of a genius. The mayor of Puddle called it a "real
work of art—divinely inspired." The editor of
the Puddle Weekly Times-Dispatch took one
look at it and urged McFrump to enter
"Yellow Nails" in the annual Northumbrian
Art Contest at Northumbia.
McFrump knew he was going to make
a clean sweep of the show. After all, everyone tolcl him it as the best painting they had
ever seen.
The great day came, and young Martin,
dressed in his Sunday best to receive the
first prize, betook himself to Northumbria.
That next evening his body was discovered by a French chamber maid in his hotel-
room. ,Beside him was a newspaper with the
contest results. "Yellow Nails" even failed
to rate honorable mention.
CONCLUSION: Suicide from extreme
despondence.
FOR SALS
FORD MODEL 'A' SKDAN. Phone
CB. 2587. After 6 p.m. 18-8
1087   AUSTIN    SALOON,    GOOD
body, tires, motor rebored, new pis
tons, rings, king pins and clutch
PA 4SBtfY. JS-4
MOTORCYCLE, TRIUMPH 50OCC
In excellent condition, complete
with saddle bags, etc. Low mileage.
Phone AL l-MIt* M—;8
$89 '81 CHRYSLER. PERFECT
condition. 4806 W 11th.* AL 1641R
LOST AND FOUND
w£p — H kM % mws Rules,
probably In Physics BWllding. Find-
er please contact H. Reese, Acadia Camp.
WILL KATHRYN SALTBR PLE-
atae call at AMS Lost end Found'
in regard to lost article.
NOTICIS
P. CARDBLL, WHO LOST HIS
briefcase, would like to contact
owner of oar with Leopard skin
dashboard, Acadia Camp, Room 3,
Hut   86.
NEWMAN CLUB GENERAL ME-
eting in the Clubhouse (Hut L6)
at 12:30 today. All Newmanites
must attend.
ATTENTION NEWMANITES!
Stag party this Sunday at 8 p.m.
at Bob Parl's. Full information at
clubhouse.
ROOM AND BOARD
TWO   STUDENTS,   TWIN   BEDS,
close   to   Varsity,   Available   AL.
3174-M. * i§.3
$80   PER   MONTH.   AVAILABLE
rOom Mid breakfast. 4612 W 11th.
AL 1641L.
TYPING
TYPING
IrtUL TYPE NOTES OP STU-
dents of Art Department, Handwriting must be legible. No shorthand. Terms to be arranged. CE
382.  Mrs. Moore. 16—8
TYPING .CAN BE DONE FOR YOU
accurately at reasonable rates. For
notes, essays, etc. Ph. FR 7026,
18—4
TYPING DONE AT HOME. REAS-
oriable and accurate. CE 9778.
Mrs. MacLeod, 2496 West 8th Ave.
16—10
TYPING, ESSAYS, Theses, manuscripts, card work, letters of application. Notes a specialty and
mimeographing. Eloise Street, Dalhousie Apts., University Area,
Campus rates. AL OQStiR.
"TYPING DONE BY EXPERIEN-
ced typist In English and German.
PA  1708  between  9  and  12  a.m.
17—6
TYPING OF ALL KINDS BY AN
experienced graduate. Accurate
and reasonable. Half block from
UBC hue terminal. 4638 W 8th. AL
AL 3242L. *
TRANSPORTATION
2 RIMJRS FOR 8:30'S (EXCEPT
Sat.) Leaving vicinity' 20th a*nd
Oak St. Returning daily 4:45 p.m.
approx. Contact Bob Couper, Law
Library any p.m. 17—3
ROOM AND BOARD
CLEAN,   COMFORTABLE   ROOM
In private home,  breakfast If desired. CH 4725. 2750 Alma* Rd.
17—3
COACHING
TWO 4TH YEAR CHEMISTRY
students will coach or hold class-
es in Chem 100, 200, 300 for students who require help In these
H'u/bjects. Phone AL 1296L between 7 and 8 p.m.
17—5
HELP   WANTED
WE ARE ABLR TO OFFER A
most attractive proposition to University girls \v|1(> aro able to do
imrt-time selling, Phone TA 795U
for appointment. Hours 9-12 und
1-3 p.m. 17_3
6VM PLED6ES
AMS Would Like Money
The following students have been
asked   to  make  good  their  War
Memorial Gym Fund pledges.
.   D. L. Clark, James M. Clark, Michael  Clark,  Nigel  H.  Clark, W.
Nigel Clark. Miss D. A. ClwKe, Edith Clarke, Sheila Clarke. Graham
Clay, Richard Clayton'. Enid Clement, John Clarkson, Donald Clls-
ch,   M*ry   Clohoey,   Miss   C.   M.
Clngstei), Miss E. Clyne, Sandra.,
Cockburn, R. Cocking Saul Cohen,
J,   H.   Coleman,   Alfred Collette,
James Cllllcutt, Mies M. Colquhoun,
John Cannery, Mis P. Constabaris,
Miss M.  Constable Francis  Cook,
Robert Cook, Robert Cook, 'Thomas Cook, John Ooope' Jr., Gordon
Copland, T. Cosgrove Peter Cos-
tanso,    Michael    Cotton^    Henry
Court, John Covey, Gordon Cox,
William Cox, Wallace Craig, Gloria
Cranmer, N. Q.  Cranna,  Douglas
Crawtortf,   Joan* Crawford,   Joan
Crehan,   Patricia*   Crehan,   Denis
Creifhton, Mrs. Phyllis Crlbb, Glen
Cropsey, Reno Crosato Leslie Crosby Miss J. CrosB,  Stanley Cross,
Wm.  Qrossley,  Geo.  Crulcksbank,
Robt. Cubbon, David Cullen. Joseph Cyetokovich, Miss D. Cumming,
George Cumming,  D.  Cuuliffe,  S.
Cuthertson, Miss J&net Crafter, Robert   Cave,   William   Chin,   Peter
Cotton, David Campbell, B. G. Char-
leson,  Allan  Cobbln,  Alex  Cobbln,
Jack   Cobbln,   Raymond   Counsel^
Paul Dafoe, George Daln&rd, Jack
Dallyn  Paul  Daniels,  Bruce  Darling, Valerie Darling, Hugh Daub-
efty, Miss E. avey, Grant Davidson,
L.  Davidson,  James  Davies,  Miss
L Davies, James Davies, Miss L.
C.   Davies,   James   Davies   Ronald
Davies, Frederick Dawson John C.
Dawson Phyllis Dawson, Ernest G.
Day, William Day, Douglas Deeble,
Douglas   Deforest,   John   De  Long
Bernard De Jong, P. De La Giro-
day, Miss Etta Demerse, Miss M.
A. Denisiu, Norman Dent, G. Des
Hrisay, J. E. DeveireaUX, Betty De-
vine, J. fi. Devitt, John Devlin,
Peter Devooght, Reginald Dew**,
Rob Pickerson, Donald Dickie,' Joan
Dicie, Anne Dill, Vernoh Dillaba-
ugh, Harry DlsbroW, Morton frod*
ek, Sally Dodek, Florence Dodson,
Robert Doh&n, Arthur Dolg, Dolan'
Owen Dolan, Noreen Donaldson,
BUI Dong, Harold Downs, Elaine
Drage, C. Dricos, Robert Drldnan,
Shirley Driver, John Drossos, Allan Dnbeau, Miss A'. F. Dttckltt,
John Dudley, Leonard Dudlby, Patrick Duffy,' Neil Dunfleld, Roy Durante. Clarence Duncan, Richard
Duncan, Robert Dunlop, Ml«$ M.
Dupont, Norman Duthle, Harold
Dyck, John Dyck Jr., Beatrice Dynes, Hartley Dent, V. N. Desaulnlers, Miss G. F. Dobbin, Pamela
Dobbin/ Donald Duguid, R. A. Dies-
peter/Desmond Eaxlle, R. B. Earle,
Thurs., Fri., Sat.       Nov.
1.10
THE SECRET OF
CONVICT LAKE
Glenn Ford — Gene Tierney
Ethel Barrymore
—PlUSr-
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Complete with Sheets and Index
From |2.69
FOUNTAIN  PENS
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Co. Ltd.
STATIONERS   and   PRINTERS
550 Seymour St. Vancouver, B.C,
Portable Typewriter Headquarters
all makes       16 models to choose from
TYPEWRITER RENTALS
Special rates to students
Vancouver Brownlee Typewriters
611 West Pender
PA. 644S
UNIVERSITY BOOK STORE
Hrs.: I) a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturdays 9 a.m. to noon
Loose Leaf Note Books, Exercise  Books
And Scribblers
GRAPHIC ENGINEERING PAPER, BIOLOGY PAPER
LOOSE LEAF REFILLS, FOUNTAIN PENS AND INK
AND DRAWING INSTRUMENTS
Owned and Operated hy the Universlly of B.C. Thursday, November 8, 195i
THE UBYSSEY
Page Three
Raghbir Basi Only Canadian
At Portland IRC Convention
FINANCE EXPERTS BEAT
HIGH COST OF SMOKES
MONTREAL—(CUP)—Leave ft to finance experts
to find a way of beating the high cost of cigarettes.
A co-op composed of members of the staff and graduate
school of McGill's School of Commerce, manages to save
each member an estimated 25 cents on cigarettes.
Each chipped in a dollar for a sleek cigarette rolling
machine, and all have become experts by now.
UN Without Russia
Subject Of Debate
The topic "United Nations Without Russia" was hotly debated by two law students frbm Victoria, in Arts 100 Monday.
 . <j.    Speakers   in   the    UN-sponsored
discussion were Anna Wootten and
News 'Change
Discussed At
CUP Meet
WOLFVIIjLE, N.S. — -(CUP) —
A more extensive system of exchanging campus news between
Maritime universities, Including a
system of radio communication
sparked a good part of the discus
slon of the Canadian University
Press conference at Saint Francis
Xavier University last week.
As a result of the meetings, it 16
planned thut editorials and feature
stories of interest to all the papers
will be freely exchanged so tha*t
each campus will be well Informed
of the activities and interests taking  place  at  other  universities.
To speed up the movement of
news between campi a system of
radio communication was discussed. The possibility of a maritime
network met the approval of delegates, who deckled to investigate
further the requirements for coordinating exchange of news.
Dan  Levy.
Upholding the positive side, Levy
said Russia and her satellites hud
fallen down on the fundamental
principle of UN. lie claimed Russia
not only did not participate but
also attempted to split the unity of
the organlatlon.
He said the North Atlantic Pact
was necessitated by Russia's behavior. "Russia is attempting to
Inject disunity into nations which
would unify if left to themselves."
He felt that non-political groups
like UNESCO could also be more
effective   if  Russia   was   excluded.
Miss Wootten felt all nations
must be a part of UN If it Is to
carry out its intended international
policy.
She believed the organization is
hum/pered at present by the lack
of a military force.
If Russia was excluded only a
selective group of nations catering
to tiie US wotlld be left to carry
out the job.
Meet Feels
U.S. Arming
Too  Fast   .
Only Canadian delegate to
North West International Relation Cluos Conference held
last Friday and Saturday al
Portland, Ore. was Raghbir
Singh Basi  of UBC.
Over 70 delegates from universities in Montana, Idaho, Oregon,
Washington and British Columbia
mot for live round-table discussions based on the theme "Whither Now?" '
According to Basl, the general
feeling of the mfcet was that "the
U.S. government Is spending too
much In armaments" although delegates also felt that "perhaps this
hi essential due to the apparent
communist menace.'
RAI8E STANDARDS
"We believe the U.S. Government should expand Its program to
help underprivileged countries ln
a constructive way in order tlfat
they help themselves to mtse their
standard,'' said Has I.
Regarding thc Far East and
South East Asia, :t was the opinion ot the group that the United
Stales should follow a definite Far
Eastern foreign policy mainly siding with tie raising nationalistic
movements* In   those   countries.
The expansion of economic aid
through the UN in. building the
national economies of these countries was also felt to be vital.
STOP COMMUNISM
The conference suggested that
by helping underprivileged countries to raise their standard of Jiving the U.S. would prevent the
spread of Communism and thus pr*
serve and strengthen Its own way
of life.
Raghbir Basl stressed the need,
In   a   letter   to   the   Ubyssey,   for;
more  delegates   from  UBC, to future conferences. I
MERIELLE  FINDS THEM
9
Beware! Men At Large
Miss   Dorothea   Auerbach,
The   Ubyssey,
Dear Dot,
I have finally found thc answer to your question "where
do UBC's big, brawny men
hide themselves.' '
After weeks of scouting
around the Library, -Fort, and
•Acadia Camps, the Caf and
finding none of these handsome creatures, I too, was beginning to lose faith in the
Administration's statement that
tliere were three males to
every fenu.le.
I was sc disheartened I was
even planning to go to the Library  and  do some  French.
But I didn't have to resort
to that horrible a fa-te because
I   finally   found  THEM.
"Where,   where?"  you   ask.
In an old dark shack Ik hind
Hie   Hrock.
"And what do they do in
this old dark hut," you want to
know?
Finding the answer to that
question took me a* little longer then I expected. For weeks,
I'd watch them coming to this
place, each with a diabolical
gleam in his watch and carrying  a   mysterious  suitcase.
Last week I collected my
nerve (I'd pawned it In order
to buy a Biology text) and
went   into   the   hut.
Tho noises stopped! All eyes ,
turned  to  me!
Someone asked me what \
played. Puzzled over this question but determined to make a*
good Impression on these long-
sought-after men I replied, with
my nicest smile, "Oh    bridge,
canasta  and
"No, wc mean what, instrument?"
It was then that 1 realized
that all these gorgeous specimens of manhood formed what
is knenvn as the Varsity Ba>nd.
But 1 wasn't to be allowed to
keep all this to myself. Arthur
Delamont, the conductor, likes
football so the Band plays at
all the games and the Pep
Meets. Oh, well, I guess I really don't mind sharing my new
found friends with the outside,
world. It really was a shame
Ihat the Band didn't go to Tacoma* last week-end for the
football game. Can you Imagine that bus trip?
Well, I can dream-but first
there's my trombone to practice.
MERIELLE   LEVEY.
<S££MY&.
f A,HIONrD
100% Pure Botany Wool
The finest  Botany   wool   sweater
made   in   Canada,   in   exquisite
colours! By the-makers of die
famous Glenayr Cashmere. At
all good stores.
Cardigan $8.95
Long Sleeve Pullover $7.95
Short Sleeve Pullover $6.95
B.
m
1
8TUPIO
suggests a
Christmas ond
Graduation
Portrait
^ Wc have Cap,
4538 W. 10th Ave.
(Opp. Safeways, 10th and Sasamat)
Clown  &  Hood
ALma 2404
HAROLD WINCH
Winch Hits
e _ e
r
Speaking t6 the CcV Club on
campus yesterday at noon, Harold
Winch, leader of the opposition
party In Victoria, rapped the B.C.
Coalition.
Winch claimed that the difference betwoen the CCF und the Coalition party was their approaches.
He felt that we need more co-operation between individuals, communities, provinces and nations.
•
Continuing, Winch claimed that
we are Insecure and need to be
handled by a co-operative approach. Nothing accomplished Is
the result of Individual  endeavor.
GtENAYR-KNIT    UMITED   TORONTO
>
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The 'Daks' label is your assurance of a
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HOC   Mfin's  Casual  Shop,  Main   Floor
UNIVERSITY SOX
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^-.-■\.y Page 4
THE UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 8, 1951
Wots
WATT
By CHARLIE WATT
CHARLIE SWANSTON
succeeded in eliminating Phil Hume via a
closely fought semi - final
match which ended in a one
up victory for said Charlie.
Details of tfiat little epic are
'fzheduled to appear elsewhere on this page, so I shall
say no more.
Max Swanston, the other
half of his brother act, is due
to meet George McKinnon
this weekend in the other
semi-final. If Max defeats
Georgia the final will have a
strong Swanstonion flavor.
Golf as a university sp6rt,
seems to be on the wane, hast
year for some ,unknown reason,
Evergreen conference officials
kindly cancelled the annual golf
meet pel*manently. From a UBC
point of view, this was nothing
■short of disastrous. After so
•jnany humiliating football defeats, we were rapidly becoming
a mite neurotic regarding the
question or sports. We had Just
won the conference meet three
years runnltig. Now they take our
only claim to fame away from
us!  Sad. Isn't It?
¥      *      *
Pomfret Worried
"Wt WANT more high-handicap golfers In the club," Max
(vlce-prexy) asserts. "If anyone
• wants to learn the game, we can
teach 'em. We plan to hold winter training sessions ln the Armouries." »
Inexperienced golfers would
certainly benefit by tournament
play come the Spring.
On the basketball front, Coach
Jack Pomfret will be watching
the Christmas exam results* with
lnterest.*and possibly, apprehension. These wise old 'Birds had
better a-pply their collective
noses to the grindstone. Maury
Mulhern, Ron Stewart, and Ron
Blteet, are currently lnellgble.
#       *       *
Wtfey Stmt HMy
BI88ET has hit the big-time
(for two weeks at least).
Last Saturday night Ron
player for the Ellen, and will
stay with them until Injured Nev.
Munro returns. It is rumoured
that Ron could develop Into a
permanent member of the squad.
A stern edict has apparently
been Issued in the Pbnvfret household. Cloverleaf coach Ron Webber Is up against opposition trom
Cloverleaf wives. Cloverleaf
wives have Intimidated hubbies
into retirement. Hutabies are remaining In retirement. After all,
order  is orders!
Don'l   Worry  Jack,  coaching's
more   fun   anyway!
*r *r *n
FOOTBALL: This weekend the
awesome spectre of the powerful
Oregon State College looms over
the virtually defenseless 'Birds.
With eight players out of action,
the situation looks practically
hopeless. Included among the
eight injured players Is Bobby
Hlndmerch, our brilliant end. According to tradition, the Individuals on this continent favor, and
pull for the underdog. The 'Birds
are definitely in the Doghouse this
time.
THE   UBYSSEY   SPORTS
ALEX MacGILLIVRAY, Sports Editor
Assistant Editors—Barry Drinkwater and Vic Edwards
Birds Look Good In
Edging Pilsener 5-4
Rookie Line Figure In
Three Well Earned Goals
By BRIAN PRENTICE
The UBC Thunderbird hockey team became a hockey team
last tonight at the Forum. They played sixty minutes of hockey
and even though the final score stood, at 5-4 it could easily have
been won by a much larger scgre.
The rookie line of Marcel  Pre
GUNNAR BAILEY
... in action
GOLF
eS wan son
Advances
To Finals
CHARLIE 8WANS0N, of
the Trail-Rossland Club, advanced >o the finds of the
UBC golf championship this
week when he squeezed by
Phil Hume of Marine Drive
/■Club with a one up victory.
This is the third consecutive
year thr.t Swanson lias reached the finals of fhe tournament. He will meet either brother Max Swanson or George
McKinnon in the '?fi hole filial,
to be played over the University Oolf Course.
The S<vanson - Hume match
was tight all the way. with the
lead continually changing
hands. Hume grabbed an early
2 up lead with birdies on the,
first and third but he soon
lost his advantage when he
pushed his drive in the fifth
and when his opponent blrdled
in  the 'ith.
Another birdie in eight and
par in nine givve Swanson a
two up lead. The frosty ground
played tricks on Swanson in
the tenth and eleventh., whereupon Hume jumped in with
both feet to (ie up the match.
The lead then see-sawed up
to the 18th. when Hume sesre-
ly bunkered himself in lose the
hole and the match.
Cross-Country
Entries  Wanted
All those planning to take part
! In the fourth annual Pacific Northwest Cross-country championships,
November 2!!. are asked to attend
a moetiiiK In the Memorial Oym
this  Saturdi.v at   ll::i().
fontalne, Rudy Richer and Steve
Orygehuk stole the whole show. Besides figuring ln three of UBC's
goals they back-checked the Pll-
soner team right Into the boards.
And they dld,lt by good clean body
checks, and persistent drive
throughout the game.
Without a doubt the Birds, had
more than three-quarters of the
play and it Is a. wonder to all the
fans present how they scored only
five goals. And Incidentally the
usual   crowd   of   avid   UBC   fans
were present. That Is about fifteen
tonight. It's iv good th I iik the play-
ers  have  friends.
Birds struck In the first few
jninutes of the first period for
'their first goal. Al Hood wer.ved
Around three Pilsener players after
receiving a perfect pass from Mass
Young and picked the upper corner of the goal. A very few minutes later Pilsener tied the score on
a ricochet shot that left goalie Don
Anderson lu the wrong side id' the
goal.
Passing  Plays Gain Two Goals
For the next four minutes the
Birds showed tbe predominantly
Pilsener crowd that they are a real
hockey team by whipping in twe
more goals In as many minutes as
you could count the UBC fans.
The rookie line really gave an
exhibition of stlckhandllng and
passing culminating In a well-
earned goal by Marcel Prefontalne
with an assist going to Steve Grys-
chuk. Steve, Incidentally played
heads up hockey on every play.
He grabbed the puck cway from a
Pilsener forward at the ten minute
mark and after shifting and weaving around half the Pllseer team
he rifled the puck Into .the upper
right hand corner. The goal-tender
didn't even know It was in. It was
truly a picture goal and Steve received a leal hand roin the Pilsener crowd,
The first period ended u 3-1 for
the Thunderbirds and In the first
few .minutes of the second Pilsener began to put on the steam.
Fast Clean  Pace  Pays Off
It has not been definitely proven
that their sponsors gave each player a lift via their product. But they
fought back hard and by way of
another ricochet and a well-earned
passing play they rapped ln twt
more  goals.
lone defenceman Jim M< Mahon
and after two passes by their
three forwards the puck rested in
the goal.
The    Birds    played    &•   heads-tip
game   of   hockey   last   night   and
UBC's   goal   -   tender   was   once I certainly deserved  to  win.  Special
more at a loss to stop the shot that j mention should go to tho UHC tie-1
bounced   off  a   player's   stick   just | fence for a  well  played game.  He- j
us lie reached for a pass. But Pll-1 sides figuring in assists the whole j
sener's third and tying goal was u ; four   players   played   bang-up   hoc-
well-earned effort. They came In on   key. '
„„... „ _. ...... ....      .._   .                  ....                                  .....     '
Tonight's The Night
For Girls To Howl
Tonight is the when Intramural teams can pick up a few
extra points toward the intramural cup. It's the Athletic Night.
:«> In the Women's
URGENT CALL ISSUED FOR
STUDENT TEAM MANAGERS
Men's Althletic Directorate prexy Bill Sparling has announced that student managers are urgently required for
the following team:
English rugger  three managers
Soccen*   One junior manager
Rowing Club 4  one manager
Badminton     one  manager*
Cricket   one manager
Basketball      two managers
All interested in applying for any of the above positions
should apply at the athletic offices in live new gym.
INTRAMURALS
J. Brummett Snaps
Cross Country Mark
A new record was set for the
Varsity cross-country run jester-
day noon when Pre-Med student,
.luck Brummel finished in a time
of 1 l:l.'i, clipping •'.-. seconds off Ihe
former mark.
Max Bertram, last year's winner
actually crossed the finishing line
fit st but because he Is a member
of the track leant he was officially
Ineligible lo compete. Bertram's
time  was  14:13'/2.
Other members of the Pre-Med
team followed the example of their
fellow student, Ron Birch coming
in second, Barrlcau and Hawkins
were fourth and fifth respectively,
to lead the medical students to
victory,
The first ten runners to complete the course were as follows:
Brummct. Birch. Bl.igg. (VOC);
Barrieau. Ilaskins, Lougstafl' (lJE)
McCormlck (Newman ('lulu; MacFarlane (!'!'"); Drummond (Zebes);  Stephens (Lunula Chi).
In the team results Pre-Med
collared the majority of the points
followed by PE. VO.C, Fijis and
North   Burnubv  and   ATO  tied* for
fifth  place.
With reference to the new record it should be noted that the
course was shortened by one tenth
of  a   mile   from   last  year's.
FOOTBAU DUCATS
STILL   AVAILABLE
Tickets nre still available
for this Saturday's football
game.
They can be obtained at the
New Memorial (iym at noon
hours.
Varsity Thunderbirds play
host to the powerful Oregon
College eleven, lt promises to
be an interesting contest, In
spite of the fact that UBC is
hampered by Injuries.
If you don't wish to Incur
the wratn of jolly Sta*n Clark,
we advise you to get your ducats early. After all, the little
woman won't want to stand,
especially if It's raining.
Competition is going to be keen *;
in the floor hockey and blow ball! November 8 at
game. Kym*
i     DON'T forget that running shoes
NEWMAN   Club   is  fighting   ror .. „
are   necessary   on   the   gym   floor
Athletic Night championship, but
they'll have a hard time getting
past Arts 1 grey and PE II.
9ft ^ft 9fi
ADDED features are the Ping
Pong finals to be played off at. the
Athletic Night and Square Dancing. After all this "hard work"
coke and donuts will be on hand
to revive the girls.
LET'S see everyone at the Intramural   Athletic   N'lglrt,*. Thursday,
GRASS HOCKEY
e
UBC Girls Classy Bunch
and that admission is free
WOMEN'S   INTRAMURALS
Friday,   Nov.   9
Medicals   v   TT.
Arts  I (irey v  Pharmacy.
Arts   II   v   Residence   I.
Tuesday, Nov. 13.
Aggie v Arts III Orange.
VOC   v  Medicals.
Wednesday,  Nov.  14
Arts I grey v Home Ec.
Arts III blue y TT.
Thursday,  Nov.  15
12:Hit-—Arts EV gold v Pre-meds.
Hillel v Arts I red
1:15—-Medical v Arts I yellow.
DS
ACCOS
moke
PHILIP MORRIS
the most pleatinq
cigarette yeu can
tmeke!
PM-31
. .. SMOOTH . .. SATISFYING!
By JAN CRAFTER
WASHINGTON STATE OOLLECE, Pullman.
Nov. 8—Four University and College teams and
one Independent club from two nations came
through three rounds of play without, a defeat In
a two-day women's field hockey tournament at.
Washington State College that , ended Sunday,
Nov. 4.
No championships are awarded In the Pacific
Northwest Hockey conference and standings are
informal, hut these found the following unbeaten
with three wins in three starts: University of
British Columbia. Vancouver: College of Puget
Sound. Tacoma: Western Washington College of
Education, liellinghnm: College of Idaho, Caldwell.
rft *»*j*» 9fi
IN ADDITION Hie oilier team not lo lose a
stall was the strong Independent Vancouver I II.C.I
Maple Leafs. The Maple Leafs were lied twice,
however, in their first two -star!-* against Mr.*
University  of Oregon   Evergi eens  ami  against   Ihe
Oregon icate college Skyliaers. Buildiug up power
as ihey went along the girls with only nine players
when some of their players had to leave the tournament early they beat the WUS Kamlaks 2-1.
There were eighteen tennis entered representing eleven campuses in three slates and one
Canadian province ,and also two Independent
teams.
No entering school or teaim failed to win at
least one game. The tourney which was started
Saturday in rain would up iu sunshine Sunday.
Next year's tournament will lie played at the University of Oregon,  Eugene,
*r fv n*
THE UBC TOTEMS won all their throe games
with the first game against Washington State
ending up at ."i-o for VW. Doreen Armour scored
three goals and Sheila .Moore scored two in the
Second (lame against University of Oregon.
Elizabeth AHercromhie scored the winning
goal, final score l-u for U.BC. Doreen Armour
scored two goals in the third game against Oregon
State and the Oregon Stale Kullhnck scored a
glial I'or Cite in Ihe last .halt* making tht.' -jcoro
for that one three to 0 for UBC.
Save Wisely TODAY..
for TOMORROW
Consult any of tlio following Sun Life Representatives who have had wide experience in budgeting
your income to meet essential insurance needs;
FRED MeCOLL
JACK PEARSON
JOHN TF.NER
LARRY WRIGHT
J. J. CAPOZZI
J. R. BRANDON
ROYAL HANK BUM.., VANCOUVER
PACific r,:i2i
SUN UFE OF-CANADA

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