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The Ubyssey Feb 6, 1919

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Full Text

 EXAMINATIONS NUMBER
Issued Weekly by the Publications Board of the University of British Columbia
Volume I.
VANCOUVER, B.C., FEBRUARY 6, 1919
Number 10
"WHAT   IS   BOLSHEVISM?"
Sit Bernard Pates' Address to The  Students  of The  University
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 30th, 1919
Sir Bernard Pares, a graduate of Cambridge, Professor of Russian
Literature, Language and History at the University of Liverpool, is well
known as the Editor of the "Russian Review." For the first two years
of the war he was the official correspondent of the British Government
with the Russian Forces. His most recent well-known works are: "Day
by Day With the Russian Army," published in 1915, and "Russia and
Reform," published in 1917.
'T'HAT the students of the University are interested in
public questions was shown by the large number assembled in the Auditorium on Wednesday afternoon, January
29th, to hear Sir Bernard Pares speak on the subject, "What
Ts Bolshevism?" The students have to thank Mr. Sutcliffe
for the opportunity of listening to such a prominent man of
the times, for it was at his invitation that Sir Bernard Pares
came to the University. Mr. Sutcliffe, who took the chair,
made a brief speech, welcoming the speaker on behalf of
the students and introducing him to the audience as the best
known authority on Russian  questions.
The speaker prefaced his remarks with a tribute to
co-education, and declared that the University should insist
on its right to help in the decision of great public questions.
"We must be careful," he said, entering his subject, "not
to confuse Socialism and Bolshevism." He told how the
terms Bolshevist and Memshevist originated, and gave a
short history of both parties, differentiating between them.
"Both parties," he said, "claim to be adherents of Karl Marx,
whom they have never read. They separated at first on a
question of means: both look to the elimination of the
capitalist .system—the Memshevist by evolution and education of the people, the Bolshevist by revolution. The whole
point rests on the question of class war.
"It is necessary that we have a knowledge of the parties
in Russia before the revolution. First were the Russian
reactionary party, supporters of the autocracy, composed
largely of people who were either German or had German
sympathies. Then came the Nationalist, a Conservative
party looking for a unified Russia. The Octoberists were
more liberal than the Nationalists, but accepted the manifesto of October 30th, 1905. They were represented by the
business men and the more honest among the officials. The
Cadets, or Constitutional Democrats (Liberals), consisted of
the professional class as a whole. This party held the majority in the first Government of free Russia. There could
be no organized Labor Party before the revolution, as labor
members were not countenanced by the Government.
"The Bolshevist talks of an Industrial Republic, but
Russia is mainly agricultural.    The only fair government to
settle Russian difficulties at the present time would be a
national assembly, representative of all classes, and elected
after careful study of the agricultural needs. .
"At the close of the Japanese war, two movements
appeared—one for reform, the other for revolution. The
influence of the reform party was first felt, and the Duma of
1905-1906 was formed; different from the ensuing Dumas,
because elected by universal suffrage and representing the
whole of Russia. The Government accused the Duma of
plotting against the autocracy, and on this ground dissolved
it and set to work to diminish the reforms gained. Labor
was struck out of the Duma entirely. On false charges
brought against the Cadets, the second Duma was dissolved;
but the third, subservient to the autocracy, lasted till the
revolution.
"Tn 1914, quite unprepared, Russia was thrown into war.
After ten months' fighting, the casualties of the Russian
forces were 3,800,000. Their total casualties in the war
amounted to 8.000,000 men. The Russians were disorganized;,
they attempted too much. What they lacked in munitions,
they paid in men; but their self-sacrifice was complete. Battalions, brigades, divisions were wiped out, and still they !
fought; without guns, without rifles, they held the line. Casualties were appalling, and an inefficient Red Cross distributed,
the wounded and maimed over the country before they had
received full medical attention. The Russian army was renewed seven times before it broke, and then it was from the
rear that it was broken.
"In February, 1916, the Russians received munitions, and
the war was won. The Germans knew it, for they changed'
their method of attack immediately and began the spreading!
of propaganda. The Allied staff have in their possession
telegrams, from the German staff to Lenine and his wife,
containing suggestions for the spreading of propaganda and
relating to money payments. Then came the revolution.
The soldiers were told that a new government was being
formed and that the land was being divided. In two months
there  were  2,000,000  deserters.
"The first Government was coalition and pro-Ally, led -
by Kcrensky. The Separist movement began in July, 1917,
and three attempts of the Bolshevist faction to assume power
failed. A strong hand was needed, but Kerensky was weak.
Tn their fourth attempt the Bolshevists were successful and
they became the ruling government, promising the people a
strong national government, peace, land and bread.
(Continued on following page) UBYSSEY
February ,6, 191if
Members of Arts'19
are requested to have their pictures.
takeri at " • .
BRIDGMAN'S STUDIO
413 GRANVILLE STREET
not later than Feb. 15
No photographs will be taken after that
date; and all are asked to go through
with the ordeal at once, even at the risk
of failing at the long-delayed and much-
lamented "Xmas" exams.
ENLARGEMENTS
Photographs copied equal to the
original. Duplicates, enlargements
Sr\d   miniatures   made   from   same.
Uancower Photo Co.
(Established 1911)
649 GRANVILLE STREET
(Down the Marble Stairs)
jfa&lf urn - (Craft
QUALITY CLOTHES
QUALITY    should   be   the   first
thing to look for, especially in
young men's clothes.
QUALITY     dominates     in    all
Fashion-Craft Clothes.
Prices moderate.
Value positive.
SHOP OF
FASHION-CRAFT
Eunttrti
514 GRANVILLE STREET
VANCOUVER, B.C.
WHAT IS BOLSHEVISM?
(Continued irom-.-Page  1)
"They promised »a natiohal. government; theh;'theyi.'tolj| us that they represented only.the'pnifclariet, ignoring all
other e-Iasses. In practice, however, they
seek neither' representative government
nor election by the people. 'The pro-
.letariet,' they say, 'don't know what they
want.' How, then,, do they differ from
the old autocracy? They look not for
a unified Russia, but for a class war.
. "As for peace, they gp.t a seven-.day
armistice that Qerhiapy, "promptly *brfeke
to enter Russia and seize army stores,
forcing the Russians to sue for peace.
You,.all * know of.-trie treaty of .Brest-;
Litovsk. Aside from other disgraceful
conditions, Germany stipulated that the
Bolshevists should formally resign all
right to conduct their propaganda in
Germany—a thing contrary to the principle they upheld and were lighting for.
This treaty, signed and confirmed in
Petrograd and Moscow, was the deathblow to Bolshevism. Honor cannot be
divided.
"Then they told us that land was to
be nationally owned and divided among
the people. Instead, it went to all who
were able to take it by force. As for
bread, we have but to look at the prices.
"Now we are told that Bolshevism
must extend over the world, that victory
in Russia is nothing without a world
victory. This Bolshevism is a war sickness; what we can't see in Russia is
there, and will come forth later. Bolshevism is what we see at the present
time, but it will disappear.
"Political education has begun and is
now proceeding rapidly. Let us remember that the Russians like the British
and hate the Germans. Even after the
Bolshevists came into power, the British
had a strong influence. Had we but had
five hundred capable men in Russia at
the critical ■moment, the country would
have been saved. We have been, in the
past, woefully ignorant of Russia: and
for every casualty we suffered after
1910, we have but ourselves to blame.
I do not ask that we should study Russian, but Russia, her literature, her
her language, and her economics. More
than that, wc should make a sympathetic study of the Russian people."
Dr. Sage moved a vote of thanks,
which was seconded by Mr. Scott and
enthusiastically carried by all present.
The best wishes and good-will of the
students go with Sir Bernard Pares on
his way to Russia, and all sincerely hope
that ours will be the good fortune to
hear him again.
Phone, Seymour 1391
Jl^Storry & Co.
Tatilbrs
650 Granville Street
Up Stairs
-    VANCOUVER, B.C.
Successr Business
College i
Limited
E;   SCOTT   BATON,
Principal
B.A.,
Cprner Main Street and Te
nth Avenue ■
VANCOUVER,   B.C.
Phone, Fairmont
2075 .
GIBSON STUDIO
Photographers
214-18   Blrks   Building
Phone,  Sey.  3430 Vancouver,   B.C.
HARRISON   &  CO.
R.  H.  SEABROOK,   Prop.
Drawing    Instruments    and    Materials
Architects',  Engineers'  and  Surveyors'
Supplies—Nautical   Instruments
and Charts
Telephone,  Seymour 5826
582 RICHARDS STREET
VANCOUVER, B.C.
MCDONALD'S
CHOCOLATES
For   Birthday  Gifts
Granville  Street Near  Robson
U.Morimoto&Co.
Direct Importers of
Japanese Fancy Goods
Ladies' Wear Made Special to
Order
Hemstitching  by  Measure
Manufacturers of
"Bamboo   Knitting  Needles"
Main Store:
673 GRANVILLE STREET
VANCOUVER, B.C.
Phone, Seymour 6410 February 6, 1919
UBYSSEY
E. C. KILBY
The Hosiery Specialist
628 Granville Street
VANCOUVER, B.C.
Wellington and Comox
COAL
The Best for  Kitchen and
Furnace   Use
Macdonald, Marpole Co. Ltd.
Sole Agents
1001 MAIN STREET
Phone, Seymour 210
HERE   ARE   TWO   BARGAINS
IN
Men's Wrist Watches
Sterling  Silver  Case,   7-jewel  nonmagnetic   movement,   with   radium
dial  and hands, leather  strap.
Regular $10.50.
Sale  price,  only $7.95
Xickel-Silver Case, superior 15-
jewel movement, Breuuet hairspring, full radium dial and hands;
complete with leather strap. Regular  $12.75.     Sale  price	
..$7.95
DAVID   SPENCER
LIMITED
A POETESS  OF  BRITISH
COLUMBIA
ELSPETH "HONEYMAN
Miss Honeyman was born right here in B. C.
—in Ladner, to be exact. She attended the public
and high schools in this Province, and, during
the first two sessions of the University of British
Columbia, took as many lectures in English as
could be got into a workable timetable. It is
only some five or six years since she began writing poetry, but already she has had exceptional
success. Some of her verse has been published
in the London "Spectator" and the New York
"Times." Miss .Honeyman's literary career is
followed with great interest by her friends at the
University.
SEA MOODS
Dawn, and the white mist breaking,
Light on the sparkling sea;
Day, and  the  white-caps  racing,
Joyous and strong and free.
Eve, and the red sun sinking
Into a sea of dreams;
Dying in crimson  splendor,
The ghost of a vanished gleam.
Xight, and the white mist shrouding
The  shadowy  edge  of  the deep;
Xight, and a  pale  moon  shining;
Xight, and the  world  asleep.
NEW YEAR'S EVE
The long, long night is ending;
.    And, bought with blood and tears,
The   new   day   conies;   remembering,
We face the ransomed years.
1918-19.
EASILY MISSED
"They've put the price of beans up at
my  restaurant.     Have  they  at  yours?"
"X'o. but I notice lately that they
leave  off a  bean."—Queen's  Journal.
Leckie Shoes
are    made   for   the    man    who    is
particular
Remember;    "The Quality goes' in
before the Name goes on"
"That's  a Leckie"
University Students
Who have time to spare
could make no better use of their
time than in the
Study of
SHORTHAND
It will be of untold advantage
to you in taking lecture notes.
Most great speakers and many
great writers are good shorthand
writers.
What about YOU?
Don't you think it would be
valuable to you also?
Enter any time—Day and Evening Sessions.
R. J. SPROTT, B.A.,
Manager.
it
Phone, Seymour 1911
MIKADO"
Our   Specialties:
Silks,   Kimonas,  Ladles'  Wear
Made to Order
Opposite the Orpheum Theatre
766 Granville St. Vancouver,  B.C.
PATRONIZE YOUR
ADVERTISERS UBYSSEY
February 6, 1919
Clubb & Stewart
Limited
309 to 315  Hastings  Street, West
SPRING MODELS
in  Young Men's  Suits
"20th CENTURY  BRAND"
and other first-class makes
SPRING HATS
The very latest — the smartest
types we have ever shown. See
them before deciding where you
will buy.
Phone, Sey. 8380
The
Northern Life Assurance
Company of Canada
is a   good   Company  to Insure with
EDWIN J. GALLOWAY
' New and Old Book Shop
Specialists   in   University   Books
The Canadian Bank of
Commerce
Capital - - - $15,000,000
Reserve - - - $13,500,000
THRIFT AND  SECURITY
Open a Savings Account with The
Canadian Bank of Commerce. If more
convenient, accounts may be opened
and deposits made by mail.
Ten Branches in Vancouver District,
Including  the  following,  which  are  in
the vicinity of the University:
Falrvlew—Corner   Sixth   Avenue   and
Granville
Kltsllano—Corner Fourth  Avenue and
Yew Street
Mount   Pleasant—Corner   Eighth  Ave.
and Main Street
UBYSSEY
Issued     every     Thursday    by    the     Publications
Board  of the  University of British  Columbia.
Extra  mural   subscriptions,   $2.00   per   session.
For   advertising   rates,   apply   Advertising   Manager.
EDITORIAL STAFF:
Editor-in-Chief Ian.   A.   Shaw
Senior   Editor Alfred   Rive
( Margaret Browne
Editors I Patricia Smith
I Reginald E.  Cribb
Chief  Reporter T.   Preston   Peardon
DEPARTMENTS
Musical  Editor Leopold J.  Mahrer
Military  Editor Claude  P.   Leckie
Exchange  Editor Agnes  M.- Ure
BUSINESS STAFF:
Business   Manager W.   John   Allardyce
Advertising Manager John N. Weld
Circulation   Manager J.   Gordon   Fraser
Editor for the  Week Margaret Browne
AN EXPLANATION
As this issue of "The Ubyssey" differs
somewhat from the usual w-eekly publication, a slight explanation regarding
its nature is offered.
It would have been a matter of some
difficulty during examination week to
publish an issue containing the usual
quantity of news, for the simple reason
that, owing to lack of time, students
who usually discharge the onerous duty
of writing up College events have been
unable to do so.
The material for this week's "Ubyssey"
—which is chiefly of a literary and humorous nature—has been collected during the past two weeks, in order that
students might not be deprived of the
pleasure (or pain) of reading the University newspaper. Great credit is due
to those students who so very generously came to the aid of a miuch-harassed
editor by contributing material of a nature that required not a little time and
effort on their part—at a period, too,
when most students can be excused for
absolutely refusing to take upon themselves any extra work.
Our critics may ask why we have
lapsed so much into poetry, and if
this may be taken as a sign of madness.
Students of literature are well aware of
the fact that, in moments of great emotion, excitement, or srtain, there is a
tendency for our language to revert to
its earliest form—that of verse. Surely,
then, it would have been impossible for
our student contributors to have written
otherwise than in verse at this critical
period.
The two short poems written by Miss
Honeyman need no comment — their
charm and excellence are very evident.
The very fact that the young poetess is
a contributor to "The Spectator" and.
"The Times" is a proof of the high literary value of her work. We feel proud
to know that Miss Honeyman was for
a time a student  of this University.
In this rather unique issue we are
specially favored in being able to publish at least part of the splendid address
by Sir Bernard Pares.
As University students, we often have
the privilege of listening to outside lectures of value and interest; but the
scholarly address of the distinguished
Professor was noteworthy as being one
of the most excellent ever delivered in
our University. We feel intensely grateful for the rare delight we enjoyed; it is
our hope that the ideal of Sir Bernard
Pares may be realized, and that the
study of Russian literature and economics may one day become a reality in
this  Western  city.
CORRESPONDENCE
(The editors accept no responsibility for statements made in this column.
Letters must be brief. They should be written
on one side of the paper only and, if typewritten,
must be double spaced. The name and year of
the writer must be enclosed, but the letter may
be published over the initials or a pen-name if
so desired. No attention will be paid to letters
that do not comply with these rules.
The editors consider themselves under no obligation to publish any one letter. In the case of
two letters on the same subject, if both cannot be
printed, the briefer will be given the preference.)
Editor  "Ubyssey":
The modern views regarding co-education are
that the healthy association of men and women is
the natural and beneficial system. Indeed, the
person who still clings vainly to the old notions
of "higher education" for men only is as out of
place mentally as though he were materially
wearing the costumes of Queen Anne's time. The
day is now passed when a woman leads her life
in ignorance of everything but her home duties.
Women have just as much spirit as have men;
but the long centuries, during which "the weaker
sex" were supposed to be knitting by the fireside, have failed to develop certain qualities which
we find in men. But, though women are entering
fields of work formerly regarded as exclusively
masculine, they need not lose any of their fine
qualities. Furthermore, a high-minded woman is
above feeling even the slightest resentment when
it is stated that her intellectual standard is inferior  to  a man's.
L'OBSERVATEUR INTELLIGENT.
To the Editor of "The  Ubyssey":
Student criticism is always refreshing, if not
always valuable; and the recent editorial on the
work of the Players' Club is no exception. It is
only to be hoped that the students of the University of British Columbia properly appreciate
the noble purpose and thoughtful consideration
which prompted the Editor to warn them against
the "tawdry veneer of civilization" which he
considers to be portrayed in "The Importance of
Being Earnest/' and to call their attention to the February 6, 1919
UBYSSEY
The Art of Speaking
Debates, Speeches, Play-parts,
Recitations  Coached
Special   rate   on   single  lessons   to
U.B.C.  Students
HELEN BADGLEY
Suite 23, 709  Dunsmulr Street
Phone,  Sey. 6535Y
Mrs. A. L. Richardson,
L. R. A. M.
Pupil of Tobias Matthay
Formerly    Professor    of    Piano    and
Lecturer at McGill  University,  Montreal,  and  Midland Institute,   Birmingham,  England.
Studio,   709   Georgia   Street,   West
Phone, Seymour 8519L
VIOLONCELLO
MISS MAUDE SCRUBY
A.R.C.M.,  L.R.A.M.
Receives Pupils, Ensemble Classes,
Concerts, Recitals. Visits Vancouver weekly  (Tuesdays).
Studio: 709 Georgia Street
Telephone, Bay. 189
CUSIOK
SERVES   GOOD   EATS
692  BROADWAY,  WEST
VANCOUVER,  B.C.
EASTMAN KODAKS
Developing   and   Printing
Copying  and  Enlarging
CAMERA   AND   ARTS
610  GRANVILLE  STREET
R.  P.  DUNNE,  Mgr.
Next Time
TRY THE BUNGALOW
For   Light   Refreshments,
Ice   Cream   and   Candies
at
774 Granville Street
We Specialize in
GLOVES
DENTS       FOWNES
FERRINS
Ladies' and Men's
E. CHAPMAN
545 Granville Street
"unsuitable    situation    and    atmosphere"    in    the
Barrie play presented last year.
Of course, the Editor did not intend to insinuate that the judgment of our College students
against taking a farce seriously! Nor did he
mean to suggest, we hope, that the three members of the Faculty who were responsible for the
selection of Oscar Wilde's play, as well as for
"Alice-Sit-by-the-Fire," were likewise incapable of
judging the merits of a modern drama. Advice
on such a subject, to gentlemen who have seen
the best dramatic productions of three capitals,
is superfluous, to say the least, coming, as it
does,  from an undergraduate.
CHARTER MEMBER.
Dear Editor:
I enclose a suggestion for a yell:
Uni-varsity jazz,  jazz,
Uni-varsity has,  has,
Has the game,
Has the name,
Has the fame,
To beat 'em up,
All the same,
Oh, yazz, yazz.
L.  CUTLER.
VARSITY PROFESSOR'S
DISTINGUISHED   SERVICE
News has been received that H. T.
Logan, who went overseas as a lieutenant and was later promoted to captain, has now been gazetted major.
After the signing of the armistice, Capt.
Logan was made educational director
for his battalion, and later the scope of
his work was extended to include the
whole division. He is now employed in
recording the work of the machine-gun
sections of the Canadian Army in
France.
Major Logan was formerly instructor
in classics in McGill University College,
and has kept constantly in touch with
U.B.C. ever since.
TERMINAL   CITY   CLUB
MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP
"As a memorial for those members
who lost their lives in the Great War,"
the Terminal City Club has decided to
establish a scholarship in the University
of British Columbia. According to the
wording of the resolution, the amount
is fixed at $100.00 per annum, "to commence with." It will probably be increased in a short time. As yet no
definite decision has been made as to
the conditions of awarding the, honor,
but the matter is to be arranged very
shortly. It has long been recognized
that there should be more scholarships,
but this is the first action taken to fill
this need. The Terminal City Club is
to be congratulated upon having thus
aided the University.
Read the ads. on the next page.
FOR CLASSY SWEETS
AND   DAINTY   EATS
Give
THE ARBOR
the  "Once  Over"
779 GRANVILLE STREET
T^EEP   the   happy   memories   of
College days for all time.
Bridgman s Studio
will    help   you   with    pictures    of
established reputation
At the  same address:
413 GRANVILLE STREET
The
Clarke & Stuart Co.
Limited
Commercial  Stationers   and   Printers
Students'  Loose-Leaf  Binders
Educational Stationery
School  Equipment
Drawing   Instruments   and   Materials
320  SEYMOUR  STREET
(Opposite  C.P.R.   Depot)
Vancouver,  B.C.
Fresh  Cut Flowers
Funeral   Work  a   Specialty
Brown Bros. & Co. Ltd.
Florists, Nurserymen
and Seedsmen
TWO STORES
Head   Office:
48   HASTINGS   STREET,  EAST
VANCOUVER,   B.C.
Phone, Sey. 988 and 672
728   GRANVILLE  STREET
Phone,  Sey. 9513 UBYSSEY
February 6, 191?)
IRELAND
&
ALLAN
"-' '■'•■"■         "xtbe JBoofe
lovers*
Iffetreat"
i'«  i   A  »:       v  : V: . »-. .          - ■■': >:
BOOKSELLERS   AND   STATIONERS
648  GRANVILLE  STREET
Phone, Seymour 602
VANCOUVER, B.C.
thes£i/s And 'edinya
(Chaucer to Date);
Whylom as .ojrle Moriee t$I|en, ns;.;, ,
Ther was a man that highte Theseus,
Of English he was lord and governoui-
A nd  of   Philosophye  eek  a   Doctour.
And  grett'er was ther  noon  under the  sonne,
For muche honour and" laude hadde he wonne.
Who   coude   ryme   in   English  proprely
■Hisi-gentilesseB     For sothe it am nat I.
^At  Harvard and  Dalhousie hadde he be     - -
jNo other rtiarl so oft of his degree"
-This ilke man let olde thinges  pace,
And held? after th* newe world the sjpace.   i .-
;But,ior Ia f^tyn^yow ojhiij® air«3E;   * - - .   , V,
jHis'i&lJUUjeJ|^*W feftft* *4?>W gay? ■"■
jFul semely his nektye pinched  was
His nose tretys;  his tytxi gieye as glas;
ypon his cheekes was ther nought of reed;
But sikerly he hadde a fair forheed;
It was almost a spanne brood I trowe,
por hardily he nas not undergrowe.
JFul fetis were his shoon,  as  I  was war
Of silver brighte aboot his arm he bar
A wriste-watch with houres shewn ful clere;
He loked oft #i hope the belle to here,
His eyen twinkled  in  his heed aright
!As doon the sterres  on a frosty night.
He was not pale as is a for-pyned goost;
UntO his ordre he was a noble post. r
But greet harm was it,  as-, it thoughte me,
That on his shinnes spftttefc hadde he tweye.
For poe$y that taughte.he with the beste.- ,
In a^f"th|ng9jhteafc«*f^as bfiji M*tjp) t _ '    J
Although  him  relckede  muche  of  gentilesse.
Of forty yeer of ajje.he was, I  gesse.
Now comth the poynt';  bifel that on a daye
A  companye  of ladyes tweye and tweye,
Gan td Arid^ fro »Hd rennen up and down
To seken eek a habitacioun.
And oon of hem was clept Edinya;
And  eek  another oon  Ipolita.
And right anon of composicioun
Cam Theseus and lad hem al adown.
To his office and  ther bigonnen he
To teche thise ladyes poesse.
And right anon, hem rubbede of his heed;
And seyde that he wolde have the ladyes reed.
He caste his ye upon Edinya;
And ther-with-al  she bleynte and  cryde  "A."
Ful sore afered of hir deeth was she.
For eek a man of ire and wrath was he.
And  ther-with-aj  on knees down she  fel
And  seyde* "Theseus, if it be thy wil
Have  on  a wreeched  womman  some  mercy
Ne make pie rer^ QC elles I moot dye."
*'Nov£;t£e^elj,f* fcyfe  be* ."c Effort js ;ther;>oon
Thou  sittest  there  as doumb  as  is  a  stoon."
For ireffae jtgyaek; be wojde no longer byde;
He gan to thrbwen bokes fer and wyde.'
feut on their jkrtp#e» baredlen,-<lpwn
The ladyes al with lamentacioun.
Grete teres fillen on their robes  blake;
And swich a cry and swich a wo they make
That in this world nis creature livings
!That herde  swich  another weryroentlnge
And passeth otriere  of weping'Edmye
The rewfuJleatfr of al that companye.
fTho  Theseus hadde  compassioun
Of wommen,  for they wepen ever in ooh
And softe unto himself he seyde,   "Fy
Upe* a man that wol han no mwcy."
(For pitee renneth sone in gentil herts.)
And with  a cry he from his  sete upsterte.
He  seyde  to  hem,   "No  longer  seyth   'Alias.'
I  yow foryeve al hoolly this trespas.
And in his armes he hem al up hente
And  right anon they of their teres stente.
The  belle  souneth  loude  and   eek  adown
The ladyes seke other habitacioun.
And  then ful  wisely seyde  Ipolita,
"This world nis but a thurghfare ful of wo.
Then is it wisdom as it thinketh me
To  maken  vertu  of  necessitea.
Fortune,   that  yerveth  us  this   adversitee
(I  mene Theseus)  wol han  no pitee.
We most endure him, this is short and pleyn;
I hope he wol not bokes throwe ageyn."
(And    here    endeth   the   tale   of   Theseus   and
Edinya.) R.   G.
Y. M. C. A.
At the regular meeting of the Y. M.
C. A. held at the noon-hour, Thursday,
the members listened to an address by
Dr. Sedgewick on the subject, "Principles of Loyalty." In the present day,
said the speaker, loyalty means devotion to the law of human conduct—the
moral law. It is true the moral code
changes from age to age, but there are
certain fundamental standards which do
not change. The spirit of loyalty does
not demand permanent attachment to
any one institution; but as the outlook
is broadened, so should the spirit of
allegiance broaden. The final definition
of loyalty, said Dr. Sedgewick, is "the
will to believe in the Eternal, and the
ability to make  it practical."
The meeting closed with the usual
vote of thanks to the speaker.
What's  the use
Of worrying?
Of examinations?
Of the furnace?
Of the ban on dancing?
Of "College night" at the rink?
—Exchange.
THE     YAMATO
Direct   Importers  of
Japanese Silk and Fancy Goods
460 GRANVILLE STREET
VANCOUVER,  B.C.
Phone, Seymour 2288
TO ARTS '18
NOTE:—The following class poem, written by
Miss Wilband for the graduation exercises of Arts
'18, is published in "The Ubyssey" because of its
popularity and the demand for copies:
In nineteen-iourteen, year of fate; .;. ■ :
'Neath surging war-clouds dark and grim,
When our great nation's .Song of Peace
Had swelled into a Battle Hymn,
We entered at these open gates*—-
For  Knowledge's quest; must never pau^e,—
To learn in this great time of need ;
How best to serve our Country's cause.
And there we learned that every one
In  Life's great task must do his share,
That these small parts, united, form
A mighty work of beauty rare.
Our eager hands were taught to use
The tools that form great destinies,
That from hard rock can carve the forms
Cf  Freedom and   Democracy.
So, with our young hearts lifted up,
We took our work with earnest will,
And learned to love the tasks that we
First found to do in old McGill.
What one of us will e'er forget
That first bright year that there we passed,
And  our merry frolics,  'ere we laid
Our childish toys aside at last?
And so Time turned another page,—
That  here on earth we' «aH  a year,—
And old  McGill was left among
The ether memories we-hold dear.      . ' ; '
For there was born, beside the shore,
Where   beats   the   ocean   surges   free.
Beneath the pine-clad mountains tall
That  brave young leader,   U.B.C
Like  Pallas from the head of Jovv,
Armed all in splendor, forth she'sprang^ ■
And in her own,  our hands she took,
While   "Follow  me!"   her   summons  rang.
So once again, with our new gpide.
We turned us to our tasks anewj" *'*-.-
And her we followed through the years;..
With her to fuller knowledge grew.
But through our  College's peaceful halls
We heard War's far-off echoes roll;
We heard an enemy's Hymn of Hate,
As 'they tried to tVamplt* Belgium's sool. :   /
And by our gates unceasingly
Sounded the tramp of marching men;
And some among us dropped their books,
Never to take them up again.
For, on the blood-soaked fields of France,
They gave the best they had to give;
They gave their clean young manhood up,
That  Freedom  might forever live
They graduated, noble souls,
From this great 'Varsity of Life
With honors, while w* lesser ones
Continue y« to face the stfJfe.   ,   j ;     t
And others have heard the unceasing call
And left, ufi for'a while, to go-,   ?   ;
Across the seas, and "Over There"
The spirit of Arts'-'i8'to show..
Our numbers dwindled  every year,
But to our work we still held fast;
And now the race is run, and we
Have reached -the shining goal at last.
A moment ftn the threshold yer     ■'
We linger,  just to bid farewell
To our Am^a Mater, 'ere we .leave;
Dear U.B.C, we loved you well.
HAZEL WILBAND,   'iS, February 6, 1919
UBYSSEY
SHIRTS
FOR EVERY PURPOSE
FOR EVERY PERSONALITY
FOR EVERY PURSE
New weaves"'
. .   ..  . And colors
$1.50 to $12
Potts vS Small
LIMITED
Cor. 6ranuille and Pender
SEY. 1643
i R.£.Purdy, Etd.
!; ' and
Home-Made Candies
'   Afternoon Teas and Light Lunches
Ice Cream and Drinks of all kinds
':     2
ftlP dRkNVILLE   STRteEJT
;;        exclusive
,.. c.qstumiere.s     ;
\'-   For,'.Women, JMisses and-Children
LIMITED
575 GRANVILLE STREET
CANADA'S GREAT
MUSICIANS
I.    DR. TORRLNGTON
Only a few of Canada's great musicians
are Canadian by birth; but so many
prominent figures in the world of music
have made our country their permanent
home, that it would be extremely unjust
not to include them under the term
"Canadian."
The place of honor must go, of course,
to Dr. Torrington, who was the founder
of music in Canada. Born in Worcestershire, England, in 1837, he exhibited
pronounced musical talent at a very
early age, and eventually developed into
a pianist, organist, choirmaster and orchestral conductor. In 1856 he went to
Montreal, where he remained for twelve
years; and then went to Boston, where
lie remained until 1872. In 1875 he became the organist and choirmaster of
the Metropolitan Church, Toronto. In
Toronto, Dr. Torrington devoted himself to the development of every available musical resource.; and it was
through his efforts that the first performance in Canada of Mendelssohn's
oratorio, "Elijah," took place, with
chorus, orchestra and organ. His musical activity may be estimated by the
statement that, under his direction, the
Philharmonic Society and Festival
Chorus and Orchestra performed the
oratorios of Handel, Haydn, Mendelssohn, Costa, Spohr, Gounod, Mackenzie and Massenet; the cantatas of
Sullivan, Dvorak, Max Brucli and Cowan, and the symphonies of Haydn, Mozart,  Beethoven and  Saint-Saens.
In 1888 Dr. Torrington founded the
Toronto College of Music, and was the
first to establish periodical musical examinations throughout the Dominion. If
he had done .nothing else, he deserves
first place for this alone, because the
"Local Centre" examinations are now
one of the most powerful factors that
are influencing the national musical
standards.
When a life of crowded musical
activity was ended in November, 1917,
Dr. Torrington left the ineffaceable
memory of a dominant personality with
unbounded musical enthusiasm, tempered by a lavish generosity and kindliness towards all who were treading the
path  of  sincere  musicianship.
AT "CUSICK'S"
P-d-n:  "How much?"
Waitress:   "Thirty-five   cents."
P-d-n:  "Beg pardon?"
Waitress:  "Forty-five."
P-d-rt:   "Sorry,   I   guess   I   heard   you
the  first time."
exclusive Styles
— in —
for
Young men and
Mtii$ NEW'STYLE'fe IN^'fALL
AND WINTER FOOTWEAR
are certainly handsome.
■For the young woman, the new
military heel boot, with cloth or
buck tops, 'in colors of .brown;
grey, or black.
For the young man,. the new
shades of tan, with leather or
Neolin soles; also smart styles in
black.
We have an Expert Fitting
Service.
e
Shoe Co.
666 Granville Street
"Vancouver's   Smartest   Shoe.
Store" UBYSSEY
February 6, 1919
Shoes for
Young Men
OMART and SNAPPY STYLES
—the latest in Shoes as now
being worn in the large Eastern
centres.
In   all   leathers—in   Black,   Tan,
Brown—all  the  popular  shades.
The   largest   and   best   stock   of
Men's Shoes in Vancouver.
Your   Money's   Worth
or  Your  Money  Back
WILLIAM DICK
Limited
33-49 Hastings, East
Vancouver, B. C.
RENNIE'S  SEEDS
They Always  Grow
Send for Catalogue To-day
WM. RENNIE CO., LTD.
1138 HOMER STREET
872 GRANVILLE STREET
Phone, Sey. 530
YOUR COMPLAINTS
regarding the service of this Company are an invaluable aid in
improving the service,
■al We solicit your complaints and
constructive suggestions, and invite you to let us know irregularities in the street car system,
mistakes in your light and power
bills, and any instance of inattention or lack of courtesy by our
employees.
<I Our aim is courtesy, safety and
efficient  service.
B.C. Electric
THE  FEMALE  STUDENT,
OR VIRTUE UNREWARDED
Come!  listen all,  both great and small;
Come!  listen to my tale.
'Twill fill your hearts with grief and feai
And turn your red cheeks pale.
A man there was whose learning great
Did awe the student mind;
His  brain  was  filled  with  thoughts  and  thoughts
That were both cruel and kind.
It chanced one day,  as old books say.
He  hastened  up  and down,
Foot after foot, foot after foot,
And frowned a dreadful frown.
The  children  dear,  with  looks  of fear.
Sat still and gazed aghast;
Their hearts were filled with direful dread,
Their pulses galloped fast.
At last he ceased his hurried walk,
His  feet  both  stood   quite  still;
He looked at them, and looked and looked,
Till he had looked his fill.
"Take  heed!    Take  heed!"   cried  he  in  wrath;
"This is no  time to joke.
The female student is no good,
Because she does not smoke."
"Hence!   Hence!   Avoid my sight!" he cried;
"Ye females,  so unripe,
Return not to this pleasant class
Till ye can smoke a pipe."
The  maidens  wept.     Tear after  tear
Splashed on the  classroom floor;
And   when  they  finished   weeping  those,
They went and wept some more.
"O teacher, dear!" they shrieked in fear;
"Why,  teacher?     Tell us why?"
And sobbed  as though  their  hearts would  break,
While  he thus  made  reply:
f'A pipe," quoth he,  "within the mouth
Is fraught with peace and joy;
A  gentle temper sways the wight
Who owns this happy toy."
"Alack!" they moaned and choked their sobs,
And then they cried: "Alas!
Why does not Teacher smoke a pipe
While we  are  having class?"
KARSHISH.
Telephone  Eccentricities
What do you do with your free hand
when telephoning? Some people make
use of the pencil often found near the
telephone to draw on the wall the most
weird and intricate diagrams. If you
are a student of geometry, this is probably your diversion. Others, again,
gesticulate with the free hand—it is indeed on record that one absent-minded
gentleman dropped the receiver in his
anxiety to add special emphasis to his
remarks!
Dr. Clark: "Wilby, will you translate,   'This   room   is   twenty   feet   high.' '*
Wilby:    "Cette  chambre  a "
Dr. Clark: "But 'chambre' means a
sleeping-room."
Wilby:     "Well "    (Interrupted   by
rude laughter from the class.)
The Great-West Life
Assurance Co.
HEAD    OFFICE:    WINNIPEG,    MAN.
Assets, December 31st,  1917,
Over 24  Millions
As soon as possible every young
man should create an estate by purchasing a life insurance policy.
Investigate the merits of The Great-
West Life, and it will not be necessary to seek  information elsewhere.
Inquire at
640 HASTINGS STREET, WEST
Branch  Office for  B.C.
Remodelling Skins Tanned
FURS
A   SEALSKIN   COAT   or   a   fur
piece made up by us is a thing
of beauty.
H.  E.  TAYLOR
Repairs
508   DUNSMUIR   STREET
Phone, Sey. 4891
WELL-PRINTED
STATIONERY
Means Everything
to Your
Business Success
Get   Your   Next   Supply
from the Pioneer
Printing House
EVANS & HASTINGS
PRINTING   COMPANY
578 SEYMOUR STREET
Phone, Sey. 189     Vancouver, B.C.
None  but  Union   Mechanic*   Employed

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