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The Ubyssey Nov 25, 1938

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 METROPOLITAN
OPERA    -    SAT.
AUDITORIUM
Published Twice Weekly by The Publications Board of The University of British Columbia
FOURTEEN DAYS
TILL
• XMAS XAMS
Vol. XXI.
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 191.8
No. 18
COUNCILLORS
ASK REASONS
FOR REFUSALS
Since receiving- the refusal of
the Faculty Council to grant
longer noon-hours, the Student
Council has passed the following minute:
"THAT the Students' Council
feels very strongly that the Faculty Council has not acted in
the best interests of the University in refusing the request
of the Council for provision of
adequate noon-hours and Wednesday afternoon periods to
facilitate the program of extracurricular student activities,
AND THAT a letter be sent to
the Secretary of the Faculty
Council requesting reasons for
the refusal of these requests.''
The Students' Council feels
that since the situation is extremely delicate, they can offer
no further comment.
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VARSITY BAND
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Council Seeks
Profits of Caf
and Book Store
Students' Council decided Mondny
night to send a letter to the Board
of Governors proposing that the net
profits from the Cafeteria and Bookstore be turned over to the A.M.S.
Council discussed the matter on the
suggestion of a U.B.O. alumnus.
Actual wording of the motion Is:
"That   a  letter   be  written   to   the
Board of Oovernors requesting that
the management and the net prof-
Its of    the   Cafeteria    and   of the
Bookstore  be    given    to   the   Alma
Mater Society."
STUDENT   SUPPORT.
It was pointed out that these enterprises are supported entirely by
students and that therefore they
should be managed by students and
their net returns should be used for
student benefit.
It Is estimated that the annual
profit from the Caf and Bookstore
together Is In the neighbourhood
of 93,000.00.
The suggestion ls particularly pertinent on this campus where students have made expensive and permanent contributions ln the form of
a Oymnasium and a Stadium.
The band muy soon be plnying in full uniform with a drum-
major instead of up in the grandstand as they were when this
picture wns taken last Saturday. Council are looking for means
of raising money to buy band uniforms.
NOTIOE
There will be no Issue of the
"Ubyssey" next Tuesday.
Starting next week, and until
after the Christmas exams, the
"Ubyssey" will be published
only  once  a  week, on Fridays.
Backstage Bedlam Makes
Front Stage Atmosphere
By JACQUES METFORD
The last words are spoken, the
curtain comes down, and the audience settles down ln its seats to
wait for the next play, and perhaps
to fidget noisily If lt ls kept waiting
too long.
But we're standing, a privileged
observer,   Just   beside   the   switchboard,   back-stage,  and  do  we  see
things happen!
BUSTLE AND BEDLAM
As soon as the work lights flick
on, men ln overalls pop up from
everywhere, sliding down ropes and
ladders, tearing out of the electric
room, and from amidst props, -where
they may have been taking a moment's rest.
Out  they  aJI  dash,  and   Immediately  the stage, a moment ago so
orderly, becomes an apparent Bedlam of confusion:
Ropes,    light-cords,    scenery    flats,
and    Klleg    lights    are     pushed    and
pulled   around,   into   a   seemingly   inextricable   mess,   to   an    unparalleled
accompaniment of vituperation, cuss-
words  to you!
ORDERLY
Yet, all la in reality proceeding
according to a. set plan, and each
man has hia own job to do, and does
It.   If  someone   else   gets   in   his   way,
PRAIRIE  STUDENTS
WANT  DEMOCRACY
The forced resignation of Cleo Mowers, Editor of the Sheaf,
University of Saskatehewon bi-weekly, has aroused much comment, both in that University ond in others throughout Canada.
pWAR COMMERCIALISM SCORNED.
In the Issue of November 10, when
he made editorial comment concerning Remembrance Day, he Included
no praise for the dead, but only scorn
for the commercialism of war.
The Students' Couneil of the
University of Saskatchewan ordered either the Editor's resignation,
or a radical change In the policy
of the Sheaf. One Issue of the 8.
R. C. was "Waa the 8. R. C. to allow an employee to continue In
office, who had deliberately opposed their wishes."
The editor's statement in the current Issue of the Sheaf, makes reference to the fact that he had had no
official objection to his policy, and
therefore objects to the use of the
word "Deliberately."
ULTIMATUM CRITICIZED.
He criticizes the President's ultimatum a few minutes before the vote
of the Council was taken—that either
he or the editor must go.
That, Mowers says, was probably
the Issue on which the election was
conducted.
He apologises only for the wounds
he may have caused by his editorial
comment,  not  for anything  else.
DEMOCRACY   NOT   DEMOCRATIC.
Letters to the Editor ln the current
Issue   of   the   Sheaf   were   numerous,
containing   heated   criticisms   of   the
alleged ousting from "higher up."
They seem to be almost unanimous in their opinion—that it is not
the kind of democracy  for  a  University.
SATISFIES  OREED.
Says one writer: "The sooner we
realize that wars are fought to satisfy greed of the powerful ones and
that the dead actually laid down
their lives to the profit of the unseen
leaders, the better. That is why I
think the Remembrance day Issue of
the Sheaf was a contribution to peace
and fulfillment of the personal ideals
of the victims of the Oreat War."
Another: "It would be well to re-
U.B.C.   LOSES
TO LIBERALS
Upholding the negative of the resolution that "Vancouver should
adopt the city manager plan," McOlll and Braldwood of the Forum
lost by a split decision a debate
against the Liberals, Owen and
Fisher, last Monday night.
Owen claimed that adoption of
this plan would result ln better
co-operation among the civic departments and more continuity of
responsibility among the administrative heads. He showed the benefits American cities had derived
from the scheme.
MANAGER UNNECESSARY
McOill maintained that the American cities adopted the plan to
drive out politics from civic administration, and since there was not
yet politics In Vancouver civic circles
then the plan was unnecessary. Quoting extensively from Barrett-Leonard he showed that financial benefits
would be negligible.
Claiming that adoption of the
plan would eliminate unnecessary
duplication, patronage and 'passing the buck' Fisher elaborated upon and reaffirmed Owen's remarks.
MANAGER A DICTATOR?
Braldwood questioned the continuity of service, ability and policy from
one city manager to another. Concluding, he maintained that adoption
of the plan would lead to dictatorial
methods  ln  the administration.
SMALL CLUBS
ON CAMPUS
MAY^JNITE
Tentative plans for the amalgamation of some of the 42 campus clubs
and societies are being made by Struan Robertson.
Several clubs have a similarity of
purpose that would make their coordination convenient because It
would maf.e them easier for the
council to handle, larger, and with
wider Interests.
The unification of the Law Club
with the Parliamentary Forum and
the Political Discussion Club, the
8. C. M. with the V. C. U. and the
Historical Society with the I. R. C.
and the Social Problems Club are
some of the combinations suggested.
HUMOUR AND PSYCHOLOGY
IN   CHRISTMAS   DRAMAS
By Irene Body
Amid lulling properties and unstable bedroom wulls the cream
of the newcomers to the Player's Club stoically enacted their lines
ut the annual Christmas Plays Wednesday and Thursday evenings
in the auditorium. The plays will be presented again this evening
and Saturday.
For the flrst time in four years the new Thespians waited for
the audience to cease laughing before they continued with their
lines—and as a result, the audience was able to enjoy the humour
and not lose any part of the dialogue.
START CAMPAIGN FOR
MATRIG SCHOLARSHIPS
The Canadian Student Assembly
has Initiated a campaign to secure a
federal grant for assistance to students not able to afford a university
education.
Since scholarships at present
available are quite Inadequate for
the provision of the majority of
•blest matriculating students, the
Federal Oovernment will be aaked
to assist a thousand university students.
ELIGIBILITY.
The amount required ls $500.000—
determining that the cost of one year
at oollege ls W00. Eligibility -gill be
determined by applicant's scholastic
record and Inability to finance a university career.
Tha campaign will Involve public
education  to  the  need  of  scholarships and endorsation by youth and
adult organizations.
OTTAWA  DELEGATION.
During   the   coming  session  a   student   delegation   will   visit  Ottawa   to
discuss  the  project  wilh  government
leaders  before  the  bill  to  be  submitted is discussed  in  the house. ,
A brief has been presented to the
Royal   Commission   on   Dominion-
Provincial   relations,   and   has   re-
• celved  favorable comment.
Dr. Orant Lathe, first secretary of
the association, ls at present on a
speaking tour of Canadian universities, organizing support for the
scholarship  campaign.
he merely curses him, and goes on,
"Trips!" is yelled, and with a snarl
of pulleys, a weight drops to the
floor, attached to three ropes: these
ere clipped to a backing—several
flats battened together, and whirled
out of the -way up to the grid,
BACKSTAGE MANIACS
A   giddy   maniac   dashed   past   us,
lightly   holding  a  massive  flat,   skids
lt  Into position  with  a  kick  or two,
and his mate braces lt in place;  this
is   happening   all   over   the   place.
Now    come    the    property    men,
with lamps, choirs, and everything
else needed.
"Electrics"  is  up  yonder,   balanced
precariously   on   a   ladder-top,   focussing his  lights  in  the proper places;
the stage manager Is here, there, and
everywhere,  giving a push to this, a
Jerk  to that,  getting all  ready.
ON WITH THE SHOW
"Curtain!" he yells, and we realize
with a start that the stage ls completely set again. The actors come
on, the lights are dimmed, and while
the curtain is drawn up, the stage
crew vanish temporarily until the
lime for the  next scene  arrives.
"Gosh!" sttys a frosh ln the audience to his girl-friend, "they sure
took a long time to do that!" We
snigger discreetly Into our hankie.
We  know!
(Continued on Page Three)
See   SHEAF
Steers Flee;
Aggies Weep
Between vanishing monkeys and
escaping steers the University has
its hands full from time to time.
On this particular occasion lt Is the
Faculty of Agriculture that ls doing
the chasing and giving the Science-
men a rest. Five days ago five elusive steers broke bounds and have
not been seen since.
No reason for the breakaway nas
been given by the Aggie professors.
For almost a week now the animals
have been chased hither and yon
through the bush along Marine
Drive, but to no avail. They still remain  at  large.
New York Opera
Direct to Varsity
The initial performance of the
Metropolitan Opera Association
will be rebroadcast from the
University stag e tomorrow
morning.
These operas are brought from
the stage of the Met. to the University by direct wire so that good
reception Is assured. They will
commence at 11 a.m. and continue
until 13.30 noon.
The doors of the Auditorium will
be open and students are free to
come and go at their convenience
but are requested to do so as quietly
as possible.
The opera to be given la Orfeo ed
Eurydlce    by    Chrlatoph    Wllllbald
Oluck.
LAW SOCIETY
DEBATE TUES.
"Resolved that appeals to the
Privy Council be abolished" is the
topic of the next debate of the Law
Society to be held Tuesday, 7.30 p.m.,
In  Arts 100.
Taking   the   affirmative   of   the
resolution   Is  Don  McGIU,   prominent  figure  In   the  mock  trial   held
last Tuesday night.
He   will   be  opposed   by  Bob   Smith
treasurer of the Alma Mater Society.
The  meeting will  be open to discussion. Everybody 1b welcome.
COUNCIL TO SUPPORT
SCHOLARSHIP CAMPAIGN
As a result of Dr. Orant Lathe's
talk of November 18, on the question
of the nation-wide campaign for National Scholarships, the Council has
appointed a committee to And ways
and means for raising $70 to support
the campaign.
Under the present system there are
only 12 scholarships of sufficient
amount to support the student financially.
VARSITY LIBRARIAN
ILL WITH INFLUENZA
Suffering from a relapse from an
attack of 'flu, John Ridington, librarian, has been absent from the
campus for a period of ten days.
He returned' home yesterday from
the hospital but Is not expected to
be baok at work for two weeks.
The Totem is a
Photographic Record
of University Life
$1 down buys your Totem
POPULAR CHOICE
It would be difficult to decide
which performance won acclaim of
all the students. Humour, as depleted
In the opening and closing plays,
"One Evening at Nero's" and "Oood
Night Please" delighted the audience, probably because these plays
were  in  the  nature  of relaxation.
"SOOth Performance" wm the
outstanding drama of the evening.
The acting of eaoh character wae
of an equal tenure. The dramatic
sequence waa well built up to a
climax with Ita unexpected ending.
ORIGINAL PLAY
The play Itself waa original, clever
and sophisticated and direction was
an added factor to the exoellent
performance.
Mental derangement and the psychological aspect of morbid plays on
the actors taking part is alwaya a
good vehicle for drama.
Aa a satire on the repetition of
Jealous episodes tbat enter Into
domestic relationships both on the
■tage and behind the acene* In
actual life le well portrayed.
OFFSTAGE  VIOLENCE
Following on the heels of "300th
Performance," the drama of emotions and ethics "Judge Lynch" appeared weak  in plot.
As  an  example  of  Grecian   offstage violence technique supported
by an intelligent cast, the presentation of this play waa Justified. The
ending left many In doubt as to ita
exact nature.
One   defect   which   can   be    easily
corrected  Is  the  feeble  "rhubarblng"
of the crowd.    It was apparent from
the    murmuring    that    only   a   few
people     were     contributing    to    the
sound.
SO MISERABLE
The 'so miserable' wife of Nero and
Agrippina were the two outstanding
characters in "One Evening at
Nero's". Witty repartee formed the
main part of the humour.
With the exception of the artificial
European gestures of Anicetus, the
direction  produced effective results.
PARDON MY YAWN
Cast and setting in "Oood Night,
Please" showed judicious selection.
Oestures and actions were natural
and expressive, a result of appropriate direction.
This   was  the   best  received   by
the student audience, probably due
to the kindred feeling of tired students with the stay-abed hero.
Between infectious  yawns the stu-
I dents laughed uproariously at the
antics of the bouncy bank president
as he struggled sleepily for possession of his mattress and pillows.
His advising - chastising butler
shushed, slsaed and yawned with the
family and domestics, in true butler-
Ish  attitudes.
MAKE-UP
Taking Chairman Gage's advice
we sat in the centre of the auditorium, but still noted make-up defects.
Seneca had the pallor of a sculpture illustration in a Latin 2 text:
Harry of 300 performances appeared
jaundiced and cook was too obviously a young coed simulating a domestic countenance; otherwise the costumes and facial decorations were
natural   and   convincing.
Stage manager and crew are to
bo complimented on their artistic
and well-balanced props. Variation
of colour and harmonizing furniture sets* showed the work of an
artist.
APPENDIX
Best net of the evening was; missed
by tho majority of the audience. Professor W. Gage was conductor of
"Albert and the Lion" presented
by his Impromptu verse-speaking
choir  beiinid   the   footlights. Two
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, November 25, 1938
THE  UBYSSEY
Issued twice weekly by the Students' Publication Board of the Alma Mater
Society of the University of British Columbia.
Office: 206 Auditorium Building ... Phone Point Grey 206
Campus Subscriptions, $1.50 Mail Subscriptions, $2.00
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
Dorothy  Cummings
SENIOR EDITORS
Tuesday
Jack Mair
Friday
Robert King
ASSOCIATE   EDITORS
James Macfarlane • Irene Eedy
Ozzy Durkin
Van Perry
Van Perry
ASSISTANT EDITORS
Jack Mercer
Lester Pronger
C.  U.  P.  STAFF
Editor
James Macfarlane
Assistants
Ann Jeremy
Joyce Cooper
Rosemary Collins
Joyce Cooper
PUB. SECRETARY
Virginia Galloway
CIRCULATION  MGR.
Harry Campbell
REPORTORIAL  STAFF
Jack Margeson, Helen Hann, Pat Keatley, Joan Thompson, BUI Backman,
Joan Haslam, Ted Underhiil, Jacques Metford, Ruth Millar, Janet Walker,
Br Ita Vesterback, Bob Manson, Florence Hurndall, Bill Osborne, Ken Vernon,
Frank Spencer, Doreen Henderson.
SPORTS  STAFF
Editor: Orme Dier
Associates: Basil Robinson, Myrne Nevlson
Assistants:   Lionel  Salt,  Jim Harmer, Ormle  Hall,  Frank   Turner,   Austin
Frith, Byron Straight, Ted Pallas.
Advertising  Office
Standard Publishing Co.. 1037 Pender Street West, Vancouver, B.C.
Telephone:  SEYMOUR 4484
All advertising handled exclusively by Standard Publishing Co.
Editorials
SASKATCHEWAN STUDENTS' COUNOIL DICTATES
It is a revelation to read the two reasons given by the Students' Council of the University of Saskatchewan for forcing tlie
resignation of the Sheaf editor, Cleo Mowers. The first i.s that
"Mr. Mowers no longer held the confidence of the Student Council." Theoretically a university paper is tlie official organ of Ilie
.students and their representatives have every right to censure its
editor if it does not live up to this ideal.
But Mr. Mowers is censured for printing articles submitted liy
the students. Further it sems more than a coincidence that the
student notion was not taken until the President of the University
had warned the editor that he must "reform or resign".
The second reason sounds almost childish: "Was the Stu-
ilents' Council to allow an employee to continue in office who had
deliberately opposed their wishes" (italics ours). We cannot determine at the moment whether the editor of the Sheaf receives
financial remuneration or not but even if he does it would hardly
lie large enough to be considered a salary. The entire set-up ot
Saskatchewan must be extremely poor if the editor of the paper
is an employee of the Students' Council.
How can the students at Saskatchewan know what «oes on
in the conference room of their executives if the student papor
cannot tell what happens? The Students' Council could have unlimited power over the students and their money if the student
paper cannot "oppose their wishes." Many is the time a student
government has hod to make on explanation to students because
•their dubious actions were exposed by the campus newspaper.
Mr. Mowers may have deserved his demotion. One is so high
nn office should have a better sense of proportion, nnd should not
use his power to publicize his personal ideas (he is an active member of an anti-war society). But the reasons Riven by the Students' Council for ousting him are certainly not sufficient. Tf he
was to resign it should have been because he misrepresented student opinion on the subject ol* war and peace; because he was a
rabid  pacifist.
CORRESPONDENCE
The Editor,
Dear Madam:
The Musical Society would like to
make clear Its position ln regard to
the broadcasting of the Metropolitan
operas ln the Auditorium on Saturday mornings. Some students have
asked that the broadcasts be given in
their entirety, and not be discontinued at 12.30, but the Musical Society
has made objection on the following
grounds:
Our production ln the week of February 22nd, will see approximately
forty students on stage and an orchestra of some twenty-five pieces in
the pit. There are ln the neighbourhood- of twenty separate entrances
for chorus alone, ln addition to the
principal's work.
The only place on which the necessary   rehearsals   can   be   held   Is
the stage,  where  the production Is
to take place. Each noon hour during the week chorus routine is rehearsed   on   stage;   principals   are
given their dramatic Instruction In
the late afternoon and evening.
On Saturdays, a three to five hour
rehearsal is   held    to   put the music
and dramatic routine together. Without   this   rehearsal,   our   production
cannot go on.
Mr. Jarvls, president of the Film
Society, understands our position and
endorses our stand. We sincerely wish
that the full broadcast could be given
on the campus; lt was discussed a
year ago by our executive and dropped as not feasible, simply on account
of the difficulty of obtaining a suitable room. We are heartily in favor
of the Idea, and our opposition ls
only of necessity.
This  difficulty   proves  again   the
need of a recital room In the new
Student  Union  Building.
Yours sincerely.
FRANK PATCH,
Pres. Musical Society.
OFFER SCHOLARSHIPS
FOR OVERSEAS GRADS
Three scholarships, with a value of
t.275 ger annum, will be granted by
the Royal Commission for the Exhibition of 1851, to Canadian university  students.
These scholarships are to be given
for scientific research. Candidates are
required to be British subjects, and
must be under 26 years of age, except   ln   special   circumstances.
They  must  show  a high  promise
of capacity  for original  research.
POST GRADUATE.
The scholarships are "post-graduate", and are intended to enable
selected students of Overseas Universities who have already completed a full University course to
devote themselves for two years to
research work under conditions
most likely to equip them for practical service in the scientific life of
the Empire.
Further information may be obtained from the Registrar's office.
BRITISH STATESMEN
INSTITUTE SUBJECT
Dr. Ivor Jennings will deliver the
weekly address of the Vancouver Institute Saturday evening when he
speaks on "Men ln British Public
Life."
As usual the lecture will be given
ln Arts 100 at 8.15 Saturday evening.
Bus tservtce will be provided at the
end of the lecture.
DR, J. A. CRUMB IS A
RUGGED INDIVIDUALIST
Meet the most recent acquisition
of the Economics Department, a
business man and a college professor,  Dr, J. A. Crumb.
Professor Crumb comes to U.B.C.
from California. His Scottish ancestors were the original settlers of
Providence, R.I., but he was born
and bred on the western frontier,
and remains as he puts it, a "rugged
individual."
SERVED IN  FRANCE
It was not until 1019 that he took
up economics. During the war he
served with the A.E.F. In France,
nnd  It was In a soldier's uniform
thnt he first wore long trousers.
After    demobilization    he    studied
economics  and  foreign  trade  at  the
University of Washington  where  he
obtained    his    B.B.A.    From    Seattle
fellowships   took   him   to   California
for his Master's degree and a Ph.D.
In banking.
BANK SUPERINTENDENT
The world of business claimed him
In 1927 when he left university life
to become California State Superintendent of Banks at San Francisco.
Here he achieved a local reputation
as a banking and finance specialist.
Asked what prompted his coming
to U.B.C. Dr. Crumb pointed out his
friendships with Varsity graduates
he has met at California Universities, including Lome T. Morgan,
Alan Peebles, and L. Fournler. Professor Crumb Is married, and has
brought his wife and two children
here with him. Romantically enough,
his wife Is a former varsity student
of his.
WON'T DISCUSS OUR CO-EDS
Asked to comment on our campus
co-eds, Dr. Crumb wisely refused to
talk—"on grounds of domestic attachments." U.B.C. students ln general, though, he admires for their
individuality. The absence of "spoonfeeding" here ls In sharp contrast to
California, he said. But he is considerably surprised at the attitude
of the city of Vancouver to U.B.C.
It amazed him that a university city
should be so oblivious of its own
university.
Dr.  Crumb  Is  an  ardent  fisherman,  plays  the  piano  for  amusement,   and   hobbles   In   automech-
anlcs. His pet abomination is precocious people.
A genial and amusing speaker, his
lectures  aro  liberally  sprinkled  with
wittlclanis which slip by if you don't
keep   on   your   toes,   but   your   interviewer  must  watch  himself,  for  Dr.
Crumb's  major  aversion   (he  claims)
U   sycophancy   .flattery,   or   as   they
say   at   California   varsities;    "apple
polishing."
PASS   FOUND
A student pass was found. Will
owner apply to the Alma Mater
office.
LOST
In Applied Science 100 a Reynolds
Physic 3. Finder please leave at Mr.
Home's office.
TRANSPORTATION WANTED
Transportation   wanted   from   3rd
and McDonald. Phone Bay. 837-Y.
LOST
Lost: an Alpha Delta Pt pledge
pin. would finder please return to
Mr. Home's office.
THIS WEEK IS DOLLAR
WEEK. BRINO YOUR TOTEM
DOLLAR TOMORROW
The paretf ton*
In which tobacco
can bo wnoked."
SWEET CAPORAL
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BIRKS CHALLENGER WATCH
Majors in good time for every busy man
and woman.
Appearance   plus   performance   at   Prices
Hanging from  $25.00.
SILVERSMITHS
GOLDSMITHS
BIRKS
DIAMOND
MERCHANTS
VANCOUVER. B.C.
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UNIVERSITY BOOK STORE
Hrs.: 0 a.m. to 0 p.m.; Saturdays 9 a.m. to noon
LOOSE LEAF NOTE BOOKS, EXERCISE BOOKS AND
SCRIBBLERS
AT REDUCED PRICES
Graphic  Engineering  Paper,  Biology  Paper, XMAS CARDS
Loose Leaf Refills, Fountain Pens and Ink NOW  ON
and Drawing Instruments. SALE
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HOTEL
COFFEE SHOP     .(J
and
DINING ROOM
Fountain for       _____«
After Theatre     ^^?*5^fi»0^
GEORGIA
LUNCHEONS
DINNERS
TEAS
DANCES...
formal or informal.
SEY. 8743
CONVENIENT BANKING
for University people . . .
Students and members of the faculty of the
University of British Columbia will And the
West Point Orey Branch of the Bank of
Montreal convenient to the University, and
will find a friendly helpful service awaiting
them  here.
BANK OF MONTREAL
ESTABLISHED 1817
West   Point   Qrey   Branch:   SASAMAT   AND  TENTH
A.   B.   MOORE,   Manager
Dance at
Commodore Cabaret
873 Granville Street
Seymour 41 for Reservations
Diamonds, Watches, Personal Gifts
FIRBANK and LANGE
USE  OUR  CREDIT  PLAN
Seymour and Dunsmuir Opp.  the Bits Depot
Ambassadors  of  Good  Wool —
that's what a lot of people call us. To know our appealing, lustrous
woolens is to love them. They've got everything to make you happy
—they're good looking, they wear well and you're proud to be seen
in them. And here's a financial note: although you'd pay plenty
more for the same quality at a custom tailor's, we've pulled a lot
of strings to offer these fabrics to you at our usual thrifty price.
Visit our attach* ot your nearest Tip Top store.
$25-95
HAND-CUT   ANO   TAILORED   TO   YOUR    PERSONAL   MEASUREMENTS
109 W. Hastings
637 Oranville
II P   TOP
I AILORS
TTUF138
_/_V>*_W
1 Friday, November 25, 1938
THE    UBYSSEY
Three
ACKERY AT
FILM SUPPER
The Film Society will hold the flrst
of a series of three caf suppers
Thursday evening, December 1 at
6.30.
It  is expected  that Ivan  Ackery,
manager of the Orpheum Theatre,
will be the main speaker. The supper will be followed by a program
of shorts,  several of which will be
of a scientific nature.
There   will  be   a  charge   of   thirty
cents  for  the  supper.  All  those  who
WlU   attend   kindly   put   their   name
on   the   list  at   the   foot  of   the   caf
stairs.
The short program will start at
8 p.m. In the Auditorium, and will
be open to the entire University
free of charge.
SHEAF
(Continued from Page 1)
member that It is the official student newspaper and as such might
entangle the S. R. C. In a libel suit.
Undoubtedly there Is freedom of
speech In this country, but libel Is
still taboo."—(Probably referring to
one of Mowers' reeent editorials on
the appointment of an Arta President.)
PACIFIST  IDEALIST.
One who signs himself "pacifist"
. . . there are still those among us
who have the courage of their convictions and the energy to act upon
them" and also ... "I am glad to see
the Sheaf break away from tradition, ln publishing facts about war,
and opinions on peace and war, which
generally condemn war and agents of
war. at the same time substituting
for what they tear down a constructive attitude toward peace, our hopes
for  the future."
Another:    "the    article    on    'the
dead" was put—well a little strong
—but    to    the    point  ...  so   let's
worry about the living and not the
dead."
Another, who seemed to express the
consensus of opinion  on  the campus
says: "Do we or do we not want personal    liberty    ln    the    expression  of
opinion?     If  we  don't,   let  us  admit
that   we   are  ripe   for   dictatorship."
GHANG SUEY
in
Mary Ann
Land
OIL-GAS BILL
'Beer—5c; gas—17c' ls the slogan
of the Liberals under Bernard Reed
when they Introduce a bill for government control of capitalistic oil
and gas trusts, at today's meeting of
the P.D.C. ln Arts 100 at  12.30.
NOTICK
Films taken during the British
Columbia tour of the British Lumber Delegation will be shown today
in Applied Science 101 by Mr. Ferris
of the Department of Trades and
Commerce.
The Chemical Society will hold an
open meeting on Wednesday, Nov. 30,
in Science 300 at 12.30.
An open meeting of the Forest
Club will be held Tuesday, November 29, ln Applied Science 237 at
noon.
ELMER'S BREAKING
HEARTS NOW
He has confidence. Ve rsonnllty.
Pep. His clothes look like a
million. So does he. (His ears
nre still wrong, hut he can't
help that.) WE did this for
Klmer. Let lis do the s-une for
you.
BOND
CLOTHESSHOP
, 1^7 wetr    - * — "' '
OPP. PROVINCE BLDO.
CHAPTER EIGHT
THE OHOST AND THE KINO
"Oi tell you ol seen ut!" muttered
the moose on the north wall of Applied Science 100.
But this particular moose was not
of cockney extraction, and lt was
very, very dead. The voice was that
ot Joe the Janitor, who was perched
precariously behind the Oeorgle Jesse! of the animal kingdom.
"Oi tell you ol seen ut the last
two nights running, and ol do mean
running!" whispered Joe nervously.
Patrolman W. Appleyard and Horace Q. Fizzle, huddled behind nearby
deer, shook their heads doubtfully,
but peered nevertheless through the
darkness at the doors.
HEADLESS HEDOEQUICK.
Suddenly, a mischievous giggle
came from behind a faded map, and
the body of the Ohost of Hedgequlck
ambled out minus the head.
"This ls where ol colme mi" yelled
Joe the J., and, applying Theorem 22
ln the blue books, viz.—that a straight
line ls the shortest distance between
here    and    there—left    his    assorted
company with a tinkling of glass.
Appleyard   and   Flssle   contented
themselves   with   trembling   like   a
couple of the six delicious flavours.
The   Ohost   assembled   head   and
body, weaved unsteadily to the front
of the room, and sat down ln a chair
that wasn't there. It took out a pair
of    Imaginary    spectacles,    carefully
polished   them   with   an   imaginary
handkerchief,   and   put   them   on   lt-
nose. Then  lt chuckled  merrily,  and
took  a  pull  out of a  bottle of elixir
that was not imaginary.
It rose, and checkered over to
the same moose as had until recently been furnished with one
Janitor. Patting the beast's schnos-
sola affectionately, the Ohost sobbed:
"Alas,   poor   Vorlc,   I   knew   him
well."
So  lt   took   another   pull   of   elixir,
and  threw Itself  Into  a soliloquy.
WATERED   BEER.
"Curse Chang Suey!" said the
Qhost. "He crazed me by putting
rubber legs on all my favorite chairs,
and he murdered me by putting
water ln my beer. Now the Prince of
Norway can march unchallenged
through my country, with his battalions  of  dates!"
At this moment, the night bell
rang, and, taking one last pull of
elixir, the Ohost of Hedgequlck
dropped the bottle, and vanished
under the lecture platform.
MAKE  WAV  FOR  THE  KINO.
But   before   Appleyard   and   Fizzle
could   come   out,   King   John,   King
John's  court,  and  King  John's  long,
white  beard marched into the room.
Little pages from the Castle sprinkled    crumpled    call-slips   before    the
King,   and  a   brace  of   tame  Freshmen, with little bells jangling about
their     necks,     gambolled     playfully
around his feet, barking and adroitly
catching  ln    their   mouths   the  flsh
that the courtiers threw to them.
The whole    troop   stopped while
King    John    fondled    his    fungus
thoughtfully. He was just going to
remark    on    the    wonderful    quiet,
when    there   came   the   sound   of
muffled rummaging.
It   was   the   Ohost   of   Hedgequlck
defying Article 16 in the Ohost League   Covenant   by   returning   to   look
for the bottle of elixir. In a moment
lt  swayed   up  ln  front  of  the  King,
with the recovered glassware clutched  in its  fist,  and  looking  as happy
as a Freshman that has gotten away
with   putting    on    the    lights  in   the
Library.
"Tallyho,    Jackie!"    chuckled    the
Ghost.  "Did  I  ever  tell you   the  one
about    the    scienceman    who    drank
himself under a log table?"
POOR   FRESHMAN.
King John nodded the royal crown
vigorously. travelled non-stop to
seats 33, 87, and 130, and lateralled
himself out of the window with the
chin moss streaming out prettily behind him.
The court left in a body, leaving
the  Freshmen  in   the  form   of   two
pots of jellied meat.
The   Ghost   gave   a   horrible   laugh,
UNIVERSITY
CAF VIEWED
BY   UBYSSEY
There ls only one thing that can
be compared to the football stadium
during a thriller and that Is the caf
any time during the day from 11,30
to 1.30.
REPORTER STARTS
HIS JOURNEY
One   fine   day   last   week    I   was
hungry, my stomach craved nourishment.   I   wanted   a   drink—of   milk.
(Pubsters   are   noted   for   their   Insanity  and  ananlty;   therefore   they
cannot safely Imbibe anything stronger   than   the  mildest  of  beverages).
So I headed for the caf, down a long
flight  of  stairs.  I  sneaked  my  way
through a  dense  cloud  of  smoke. I
looked tn the caf. I wiggled my eyes.
I peered over   the   rim of my specs.
Seeing ia believing. There, positively, wae a Jam. I tried to barge
through.  I  oould  not do  It.  I  retreated. I put my Inferiority complex   ln   my   pocket,   squared   my
shoulders,   tightened  my   lips  nnd
started  in   again.  The  flrst  chore
waa to mow my way through one
solid phalanx of rugby players who
had pre-empted the aisle In front
of  the  door.  By  this  time   I  was
ready for steak and onions.
SEEING IS BELIEVING
Aha! Half way there. Dimly
through the clouds of cigarette
smoke; dimly over the heads of
lanky students I could see the counter. But, being blind in one eye, I
did not see some long lanky lounge
lizard's size thirteen hoof reclining
ln the aisle. I tripped. I swore. I
cursed. I got up. I started In again.
A pop bottle that some thoughtful
student tossed on the floor carried
me another fifteen feet. I lost my
superlorlorlty complex; I stopped to
look for It, I found It. I continued.
JOURNEY CONTINUED
I observed on my travels: athletic
youngsters forcing caf girls to detour, to journey three times as far
as was necessary; accumulations of
pop bottles, milk bottles, trays, bags,
papers on the tables that the students were too lazy to dispose of
themselves. Obviously they do not
read—maybe they are Incapable of
reading—the signs which are posted
on the walls. Also did I see students
doing homework and ogling some
beautiful coed or handsome Adonis
during the rush hour when some
fetarvlng undergrad wanted a place
to eat. Just to eat. Not to discuss
cumpus activities, not to date up the
one and only, not to go to sleep Indefinitely but JUST TO  EAT.
I continued my trip to the' counter. No more mishaps except that I
slipped on an apple core that some
charming coed deliberately threw on
the floor. I got there. I bought my
milk.
Out of the corner of my eye I
observed a student with either the
wrong environment or wrong heredity filching a chocolate bar. I sat
down to a table to drink my drink.
The reward of the patient. Then I
made the return trip. Slowly but
surely, carefully and cautiously I
sneaked my way down and out—mis-
hapless.
REPORTER'S   NOTE:   Does  this
apply to VOU, "Joe and Josephine?"
PIN LOST
Alpha Delta Pi Sorority pin. Jewelled, pearls and rubles. Finder, please
return to Mr. Home's office or to
Mary Craig.
llllll,llllll,IIIMIIMIIIIIIIIII,IMII,llllllllllllll,l,,Mlllllllllllllli
. 1
H.   JESSIE   HOW,   B.A. I
I Public Stenographer |
| 4481  -West lOtli Ave. 1
I Diiayi and Tli-sas Typed :
|-"|||IIIIIIIMIIIHIIIMIHIIIMIMIIIIIIMIHIMIMIHIIIIMII Illllll*
and Jumped into the sink.
Appleyard and Fizzle climbed down
wearily from their perches, mopped
their brows and went out into the
fresh air.
But suddenly Horace clutched the
long  arm    of    the    law,  pointed  a
quivering   finger   at   a   dark   figure
that  was  padding  across the  walk
ahead.
It   was   an   old,   old   woman,   with
key-holes  painted  on her dark  spectacles, two hatchets at her waist, and
rubber    sneakers    on    her  feet.    She
seemed to be carrying a shovel.
"What's  that?" whispered Fizzle.
MARY ANN'S AGENTS.
"That old bat? Why she's well-
known to us," replied Appleyard.
"She's one of the agents of Mary
Ann. Several of them wander around
the campus every night, but we don't
know where they go ln the day. Some
say they live in an underground cavern called Mary Annland, which Is
ruled by Mary Ann. Let's trail her!"
The two pursuers faded Into the
night, and all was still but for the
.shuttling back and forth of the Ghost
in close pursuit of three Alpha Gams
in   the  moonlit quad.
Is  there  a  Mary   Annland?   Will
the  Ohost  meet  Chang  Suey?
, There was a resounding rap at the
door, a ripple of ingenuous feminine
laughter,  and  then
PURSUIT OF        a   bewildering  time
HAPPINESS. of   utter   confusion.
The door had been
opened by our stalwart footman, and
without further ado the gay party of
desperadoes had bound him gag and
foot and thrown him out onto the
porch.
But this was not all. They next
accosted our timid Chinese domestic,
and wrung from his quivering extremity his slgnature-^-in true Cantonese Chinese characters. By this
time we had become aware that the
house, my- own little nest, was being
raided and despoiled by a collection
of beautiful students, hailing, we are
told, from the University of British
Columbia.
We next betook ourselves unto them
and engaged them ln a mite of pleasant conversation, only to find that
they were conspiring to wrest from
us our very own 'uppers'—yes our
genuine false teeth. But we had deceived them, for our teeth really are
real!
Quite unabashed they demanded
next a photograph of a Movie Satellite garbed ln a bathing costume.
Well we searched the house high and
low, but no . . . there wasn't one! I
could show them any number of American debutantes, French princesses,
Hungarian Counts, and native Mata-
bele women, all apparently decked
out ln scanty attire which at least
would have served as a bathing suit
—but they would have none of tt, and
up they went on their pretty little
heels  to  take   their  departure.
They were going to measure the
length of a street car; capture a live
insect; pull up a railway tie; gather
some scum from the bottom of the
Crystal Pool; purloin dozens of varied hotel accoutrements; remove a
horse's tall en masse; and last but
not least, to make off with six grey
human hairs. The last they suddenly
spied upon my rapidly silvering
head, so they scalped me on the spot,
and left!
Nice people these co-eds. They
were on a scavenger hunt.
And   now   a   slug   for   the   Player's
Club.  A  truly  excellent  performance,
with no room for crl-
TONIOHT        tlclsm, unless we were
AT 8.15. In  a  very  vituperative
mood;      which     we're
not.
The choice of plays was such an
Improvement over that of last year
that we hardly realized that tt was
a Player's Club show. The leading
actors and actresses ln each piece
were well selected and obviously deserved the heavier roles. We predict,
in our humble way, great things to
come for the club and many of its
members.
We should like to give one big plug
for the stage manager for a superlative Job. Best we've seen this side of
the Indian Ocean.
We  have  often   tried  to  point  out
in   this   column   the   fact   that   the
students  of  today   are
DRUG going to the dogs ln a
FACTORY.       very    extensive    manner. The other day we
took a stroll into the sanctum sanctorum of the Caf.
Quite a spot, lt ls. We found that
the Caf makes enough money ln a
fiscal year to supply itself with new
equipment every so often, and, of
course, to meet running expenses
adequately. They have new automatic
French fry machines that cook those
crisp, crunchy, starchy things, etc..
an electric sllcer, mincer, masher and
strangle!-, a spacious automatic toaster, a complicated automatic dish
washer and sterilizer, and a complete
refrigeration plant.
Next  we  decided  to  Investigate  the
dissipating Index of this Campus. We,
the    students    and    the
DRUG Faculty,    demolish     be-
TRAFFIC. tween 80 and 90 cases
(24 bottles ln each) of
Coca-Cola per week, sometimes rising
to 100 cases a week—2,400 bottles" for
those that are lazy!
We also smoke about $130.00 worth
of cigarettes and tobacco a week—
the equivalent of 13,000 cigarettes a
week. If one considers that each
student only buys about 50 per cent,
of their smoking materials at the
Caf and the other half elsewhere, one
realizes that we are definitely a
smoking campus.
Together with  these two  items, we.
A Man's Christmas
From 16 to 60
Look at If you had jutt stepped out ot ' ESQUIRE'
__*^h*-___
Paysley   ties  are   a  mark  of
distinction. All the shades and
Patterns you could ask for.
'ou can make some man
happy with one of these
beautiful cruvuts.
Scarves make the Ideal gift
for a man at Christmas time.
A smart all-wool, or a glistening white silk evening scarf
are suggestions for your shopping list.
There is an art in dressing. Some clothes give, the
air of commonplace, others stamp a man with
distinction. Our stock has been chosen with the
view of making our customers stand out among
others. An added touch of smartness makes the
well dressed man, and 'Co-eds' a gift for the
boy friend from the "Esquire" will make him
very  happy.
ESQUIRE
2(i<i4 (iKANVIiJ.K
men's apparel
BAYVIEW 9680
Art shots in
color will appear
in big 1939 Totem
$1 down buys your Totem
'NITE AT THE FORUM'
FOR BUILDING FUND
Just after the laat exams, December 19, everyone will be going down
to the Forum for A.D. Pi Nite at
the  Forum.
Not only will there be one of Lester Patrick's famous hockey tussels,
but Alpha Delta PI has arranged for
refreshments to follow and from
then on the rink is free for all to
waltz and glide (or otherwise)
around   the  ice.
The Brock Memorial Building will
benefit directly from attendance as
It Is ln aid of this project that the
Nlte at the Forum has been conceived.
TRINITY NEWS
A fourth year Trinity man brings
back this anecdote from the mining
district of Northern Ontario. It
seems that a certain youth looking
for employment near Klrkland Lake,
and bitterly cursing his lack of qualifications, adopted the bold plan of
going up to a mine and announcing
to the boss  that he was a student.
"A student from where?" asked
the boss. "From Varaity," he replied. "What course?" followed up
the boss. The youth was not quite
prepared for this nasty turn of affairs, and the only university course
that he could think of was Theology,
"Well," said the boss, "if you give
the boys a little sermon every week
in the bunkhouse, I have o job for
you right now." With amu.lng
equanimity, the "student" bought an
old Bible and a batch of ready-made
sermons. He was still pleaching
when  our Trinity  man  left.
-   Toronto  Varsity.
the students and Faculty, demolish
60 to 70 pounds of coffee a week. We
i us) cannot find the assay figures for
caffeine ln a pound of coffee, but we
hazard the guess that we, the students and Faculty, drink far too
much coffee!
Every now and again we must get
stabs of conscience for we deal just
as stringently with 5 gallons of cream
and 10 to 11 gallons of milk a day.
and our ice cream bill is $227.00 a
mon Ui. Ah. us, what it i.s to be a
student,  or   a   professor!
HOME GAS
Homo fins nnd Home
Eastern Motor Oil are
second to none—-Your
loyal support of these
B. C. products main-
tains "work and
wages" for mnny fellow citizens.
HOME OIL
DISTRIBUTORS LTD.
The  Independent   100%
fl. C. Company
OET VALUJ2
IN PRINTING
for the activities
of your—
SORORITIES
FRATERNITIES
SOOIAL
and
OLUB  FUNCTIONS
THE
CLARKE & STUART
OO. LIMITED
Stationers and  Printers
5.10   SEYMOUR   STREET
VANCOUVER. B.C. CO-ED    CAGE7TES    CRASH    WIN    COLUMN
Four
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, November 25,   If):58
VICTORIA INVASION REVERSED ON SATURDAY
Crimson Rugger Tide
Plays Varsity Champs
Varsity-North Shore
Clash for Third Time
'Birds Free of  Further  Injuries  After  11-0
Mid-Week Win Over Young
Meraloma Squad
A block and white mailed fist on a blue and gold background
will provide the charming motif for tomorrow's classic grid-iron
game when the still unbeaten, untied Varsity men meet their
bitterest rivals from across the inlet, the North Shore Lions.
Varsity's record with the Lions so far this season is one victory,
one protested game, and ten uppereuts. Incidentally the game
tomorrow, played at Athletic Park at 2.30, will be staged for tho
Lipton Cup symbolic of Big Four supremacy.
OLD RELIABLES AID
Varsity  cleared   the   way   for   the
championship game by downing the
moaning Meralomas 11-0 on Wednesday night  in  a  game  played  under
the   lights   and  a   blanket   of  soupy
Vancouver   mist.   The   'Birds   threw
most of their second string men into
the fray with the idea of giving the
first-stringers a well-needed rest but
found   that   the   old   reliables   were
needed to supply the scoring punch.
Graham Finlay put the Students
In tbe lead when he  skirted  left
end   from   the   two   yard   line   to
plunge over near the corner flag.
Aub Gray's convert missed. In the
third quarter the seconds added a
point when Junior Lamb hoisted a
forty-yard punt behind the ■Lomas
line   where   the   safety   man   waa
rouged by a swarm of tackier*. Aub
Gray added another touchdown In
tbe last stansa plunging over from
the six yard line.
TEAMS UNCHANGED
The victory leaves the way clear
to what will be the season's third
natural ln as many Varsity-North
Shore encounters. Varsity will go in
tomorrow the favorites for the first
time. With Oarnie Smith and Oordie
Kobson still on the sick list the
Lions  will   trot  out   about  the   same
team  that  lost  to the  Varsity   boys
last Saturday.
Varaity, rid of the Injury-Jinx
that bit them earlier in the season
will use the same well-balanced
team tbey used against the Lions
last week. Johnny Farina will not
start at quarterback again this
week and signal duties will fall on
ap Roberta. "Hunk" Henderson's
apot at end hae been filled ably by
Normle Burnett. Burnett Is faster
than Hunk and tackles harder.
TEMPTED TOMMY
Junior Lamb may earn a few minutes showing tomorrow by dint of
bis great work Wednesday night.
Junior outkicked the regular booter
Johnny Pearson and played a great
game at end.
ap Roberts played the full alxty
minutes on Wednesday and proved
himself a -worthy successor to Farina's signal calling spot. Tommy Williams divided his attention between
swivel-hipping through the 'Lomas
and refusing temptation in the guise
of a frowsy individual in the stands
wtth a bottle.
The game -will commence on the
dot of 2.30, student passes acceptable.
A large cheering section will be welcomed by the Pep Club, so turn out.
Pucksters on Senior Loop
Merry-go-round; Play Soon
H00PERESS
mm
J
Ruth Wilson It Is, the versatile
Varsity all-rounder wbo led her teammates to a thrilling >8-Jta over Cunninghams laat Monday night.
V.V.HOOPERS
PLAY STACEYS
MEN    OF   MAURY   OUT
FOR   THIRD   WIN
By JIM HARMER
It has been stated at various times
and by supposedly reputable persons
that Varsity's entry Into the Senior
city league had been accepted. Very
good, say all the enthusiastic wielders
of hickory on the campus, very good,
but so what? For over two weeks now
members of the Varsity Hockey Club
have been kicking their collective
heels along the side-lines while the
other two clubs of the alleged league
have already jlayed two games. Now
Varsity teams are noted for their
Spartan manners but gosh, It's been
extra cold outside for the past while
and even ye hockey club have a limit
to their powers of endurance.
FOUR-TEAM LEAGUE.
So with the purpose of throwing
more heat than light on the subject
a daring member of the above fraternity was despatched to invade the
dens of high hockey moguls, namely
the Vancouver Ice Hockey Association.
Said    member    emerged    in    due
time with the startling Information
that there were not three, mind
you, but four teams comprising the
league, and that these elubs would
be playing double headers twice a
week.
SO WHAT?!
This bit of Info rather upsets student plans for the valiant wielders
of the crooked stick ln the cause of
Alma Mammy still like to think that
they attend this noble institution for
the purposes of enlightenment. Two
games a week, you therefore gather
Is a rather heavy schedule, and one
to which the much bandled-about U.
pucksters refuse to tolerate without
much ado about plenty.
So there we are where? A team and
no league, no games, then a league,
too many games, so no team, oh nerts
you  figure  lt out.  .  .  .
GLOVES LOST
A pair of men's gloves, yellow pigskin, ln the Caf Wednesday morning.
Please return to Pat Keatley. care
of Ubyssey, Players' Club or Pep
Club.
THIS WEEK IS DOLLAR
WEEK. BRINO YOUR TOTEM
DOLLAR TOMORROW
R. H. Marlow, society photographer, for fine portraits, phone Trin.
2157.
The   Hotel   Vancouver
presents
MART KENNY
at  the   Spanish   Grill
Exclusive Camera PORTRAITS
At  Popular  Prices
WHERE YOU  OAN OET
TOTEM ORDERS
Cafeteria
Pub Offloe
From Your Fraternity
Musioal Society
Phrateres
Players Olub
REPEAT SHOWING
AT CAMBIE STREET
Varsity soccermr n will have a
chance to stage it repeat of their
recent victory over the league-leading South Vancouver XI. Saturday
when they meet their bitter rivals
in the feature attraction of the week
at Cambie St.
The collegians will be at full
strength except for the loss of lnslde-
right Rod McMillan -who is still out
on account of two broken ribs sustained   In  the   last  game.
lllll«l<<,IIIMIIIHII,llll,llll,l,l,IIIIHIIIIIIIlllllllt,ltllllll|ll,l
VARSITY  SERVICE
STATION
"AT   THK   GATES"
"OUR   aKliVlCE   MEANS
HAPPV  MOTORING"
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And so It eame to pass that there
was  great  gnashing  of  teeth,  and
them what as had no teeth went to
see the feature baaketball game of
the  season   between  the  Blue   and
Gold   Thunderbirds  and  the  Stacy
Shoemen on Saturday night of November  28  in   the  year  of  not-too-
much grace of 1938.
And  even  some  what  as  had   teeth
took   time    out    to    watch   the   epic
struggle that the prophets claimed in
advance   would   be   nothing   more   or
less   than   super   super.   The   Men   of
Maury   were  just  itching  to  hit  the
hardwood after a week's lay-off, and
were   out    gunning    for    their   third
straight   win  ln   the   local  Inter-City
loop.
LINE-UP CHANGES.
Some distinct changes ln the lineup are ln order for this game, with
the possibility of Doug Oross taking
over reserve guard duty along with
Miller. These two will take the back
positions when regulars By Straight
and Rann Matthison come off.
Out of a superfluity of forwards,
Coach Van Vllet will probably pick
Alec Lucas, Don Livingstone and
Frank Turner to start the game.
Johnson, Brud Matheson and Alexander will all be ln there fighting for
the same spot at right forward and
all will probably get ln the game.
The latest gag of the basketeers ls
a little track work - to get ln shape,
and If exercise and confidence mean
GIRLS   WIN
TWO GAMES
SENIOR'S  TRIUMPH   26-22
JUNIOR'S WIN   16-14
By MYRNE NEVISON
After two years of losing basketball, the Senior A co-eds confounded
the downtown critics Monday night
by coming from behind in a last
minute rally to down the faat stepping Cunningham crew 20-22. Then
as if that wasn't shock enough to
last quite a while, the Senior B's
came through with their first win in
many moons by stopping Normals
16-14 on Wednesday.
STRONG RALLY
The Cunningham battle was a
great victory for the collegians.
Leading at the breather 12-11, they
were down 17-18 at three quarter
time. Steadied by the brilliant defence work of Ruth Wilson and Fay
Burnham the co-eds rallied to take
the game in a fighting finish. Two
free shots by Fay gave the studenta
the lead and baskets by Jean Thomson and Alice KJos cinched the game.
A deciding factor in the battle was
the way ln whloh Lola McEwen held
Cunningham's ace scorer, Jean Shirley, to one lone baaket. Last week
Shirley tallied 18 points. Better passing and the ability to get under the
basket helped to give the collegians
the winning edge.
High   scorers   for   Varaity   were
Jean  Thomaon  and  Ruth   Wllaon
with 11 and 7 points to their oredit.
JUNIOR'S COMING THRU
By grabbing an early lead, the
Senior B's managed to keep ahead of
Normals in a slow game. Margaret
Weldon, Betty Cole and Mae McQueen led the scoring with 0. 4, and
4 points.
Side-liners—The biggest attraction
at the Senior A game was the show
put on by the Varsity subs. When
their teammates pulled ahead, there
was no holding the co-eds. . . . After
the whistle, pandemonium broke
loose—much to the delight of the
spectators. . . . Jean Thomson went
to town on her long shots sinking
one trom the centre of the floor. . . .
No more ice cream cones . . . the
girls are getting too good for any
safe wagers.
By Basil Robinson
Coach A. B. Carey's twice-defeated Thunderbirds run up
against some moro stiff opposition Saturday when they clash with
the invading Crimson Tide of Victoria at the Stadium in the
second McKechnie Cup gome of the season.
Tommy Williams, Canadian football star, will not be among those
present Saturday, according to Maury
Van Vllet.
it appears that he has not been
conforming to training regulatlona.
LOST
Black and red Waterman fountain
pen, less top, somewhere between
Arts and Science Buildings. Finder
plerse  return to  A.M.S. office.
RAINCOAT  LOST
A white raincoat taken from the
Publications Office. Will person who
took same by mistake please return
lt to the Pub immediately.
anything, maybe the boys have something there when they say: "Just
watch us take Stacy's for a ride."
—DIER.
llfllllllflllM
Smooth butierif toffee
in delicious milJc
chocolate I
na
a treat
to eat—
try it today /
THE    BEST   CHOCOLATE    MADE
the U.B.C. for a few games, will replace - Basil Robinson behind the
Thunderbird pack.
Harry Lumsden and Strat Leggatt,
who gave such brilliant exhibitions
of defensive play in the recent anti-
Rowing Club epic, will be back again
to patrol the wings, while the reliable speedsters Howie and Ted McPhee are set to help turn the Tide
back
LINEUP
The Blue and Oold lineup Is as
follows: Forwards: Harrison, Jenkins and Wallace; MoCammon and
Billings; Robson, Mattu and Harmer.
Scrum Half: Sandy Lang; Fly Half:
Ted McPhee; Three-quarters: Leggatt (capt.), McPhee H„ Tremblay
and Lumsden; Fullback: Bird.
It takes only a gentle hint to remind the general public that the
U.B.C. aggregation lost the first Cup
battle of the current year to the Vancouver Reps on Armistice Day by a
14-5 score, and in view of this minor
calamity, the Careymen will have to
come through with a win to keep in
the   race  for Intercity  honors.
REDMEN   8TBON-
The Islanders heve not yet shown
in McKechnie Cup competition, but
according to reports from the Capital City they have been undergoing
a long and rigorous training schedule in preparation for their first encounter with the collegians.
The Blue and Gold side of the picture doesn't look any more attractive
than it did the week prior to the
first Cup tilt. Vie Moore, strapping,
ex-Vlctorla hook Is still "hors de
combat" because of what he describes as a "auper-eharley-horse,"
and another freshman discovery, Al
Gardiner, is definitely out until next
term. Further, Oerry Mason, chunky,
186-pound package of sorum dynamite, will be missing from the second row owing to a broken finger
sustained last week against Rowing
Club.
BILLINGS LN
The loss of Mason will leave room
for Fred Billings to step up from the
U.B.C. ranks where he haa recently
been making a grand job of leading
the Oas House Gang's pack. The
team list of the forwards also reveals
the inclusion of Alan Wallace who
will replace Ernie Teagle in the
acrum.
Only one change will be made in
the backfleld which played brilliantly
on defense but lacked scoring punch
on -the offense against Rowing Club
last Saturday. Nippy Sandy Lang,
who started the season with the Varsity team and then dropped down to
»»• ****** •■•■■•*ll«(*ll**)*t)i*)M((llt(l(llll(lltll(l(llll(lll II   I ItllHIIIIIIIItlHIIIIIIII Illlllllll, I
Pioneer Laundry & Dry Cleaners
Seymour 8334
A complete Laundry and Dry Cleaning Service
Licensed Sanitone Dry Cleaner
• lltlHIimiMIIMIIMIM-ll-IMtMIIMIHMmMIIMMMMHimillMMHHHtMlttlllHtMMIIIMIIIIilHlltl I,I||||||||||||||||||||,||||,„,|M
PEARSON REPLACES
McPHEE ON CAMPUS
SPORT DIRECTORATE
Howie McPhee, Oampus Varsity
rugger and track star, has announced
his resignation from the Athletic Directorate because of the pressure of
business.
Johnny Pearson, long-puntlng star
of the undefeated Thunderbird gridiron team, has been elected to fill the
poaltlon on the board, and will now
work with Rann Matthison, Maury
Van Vllet and the boys in shaping
the destiny of the Blue and Oold in
the field of athletic endeavour.
Speedster Howie found that he
could not attend meetings regularly,
and offered to retire ln order that
the Directorate could be kept at its
maximum efficiency.
Money found Tuesday afternoon.
Owner please apply 407 Science
Building and prove property.
BE COLI-EGIATE—Smoke a Pipe . . .
Peterson's Reg. $8.00—SPECIAL 81.70
WORLD WIDE NEWS    <*£«.
Across from the Commodore
1/fyttt $***** onihe. Ai**, !
&.C*SUci*n*Lc >yu^tyijplu*ivvu
«-v*t^ OftcrueUu*. «vsiu«ia at
7 P.M.
ov*t, &c*tti*o ^ttxfaovt
C B R
±

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