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The Ubyssey Jan 8, 1960

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 THE UBYSSEY
VOL. LXVH
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, JANUARY 8, 1960
No. 33
UNDERSTAND  ASIA,   AFRICA
\\
Be Friendly/' Challenges Green
BY DIANE GREENAL (UBC STAFF)
The Right Honourable Howard
Green M.P. yesterday flung
down a challenge to UBC students to make friends of overseas students from Asia and
Africa.
Speaking to a capacity audience in the auditorium he demanded that we learn from them
all we can about the countries
from which they come.
It is important that we make
them "friends of Canada," he
said.
He paid tribute to the splendid leadership of UBC students
in spearheading the action which
resulted in the passage of a motion in the UN to investigate the
massacre  of  Hungarian  revolutionaries.
He stated that our information
as far'as it is available seemed
to be correct.
He developed "his talk on the
theme, "Canada's opportunities
for leadership in international
affairs."
With this criterion, he presented "pictures" of international
association such as the UN,
NATO and the Commonwealth
in which Canada can assume a
rate of even greater importance
in 1960.
Mr. Green could not overemphasize the importance of
Canada's further  cultivation  of
RT.' HON. HOWARD GREEN
Photo Ray Grigg
friendly international relations.
He also emphasized Canada's
major rate in maintaining close
friendships with the nations of
Latin America and the Commonwealth.
He further urges Canada to
take full advantage of the respect and frienship that Britain,
France and the U.S. have for
Canada.
He said that couragej vision,
and character would be required
to take advantage of the opportunity and challenge of the
1960's.
To provide the leadership for
Government :and people we depend on students, he said.
In answering questions, Gree*
said:
The Columbia—We will hav«
cheaper  electricity soon.
U.S.A. and our independence
—As far as possible in today's
world we are independent.
South Africa—We hope to influence her to change.
Red China — A "fish-hook"
question. No recognition now.
The Peace—"I only offer
opinions where I am responsible."
The Security Council seat-
Canada helped effect a compromise.
Canadian Nuclear Armament
by U.S.—This question is not
settled.
'tween classes
Socreds Give
Power Slides
SOCIAL CREDIT CLUB
Minister of Lands and Forests
Ray Williston will talk and present slides on Columbia River
power development at 12:30 p.m.
today in Bu. 100.
* *     *
LIBERAL CLUB
General meeting for all members will be held in Bu. 212,
Tuesday at 12:30 to outline the
program for the second term.
* * . *
FILMSOC
W. W. II films shown today at
noon in the Auditorium. Admission 15c or noon hour series pass.
* *     *
PHRATERES
•  Election    speeches    will    be
heard at all-phi meeting today at
noon in Arts 100.
,..,.. *     *     *
BOOSTER CLUB
' Pep Band players past or present willing to play at Mardi Gras
pep meet noon Jan. -14 leave
name and phone number in AMS
Box B8 or phone WA 2-7486.
_   *     *     *
RAMBLERS*
General meeting 12:30 today
in Bu. 204.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Dance tonight at 8:30. Admission  10c. >
* *     *
LIBRARY
, The Library and the English
Department will give a series of
one hour lectures on "How to
Use the Library" in rooms 852
and 859 of the Library; between
Jan. 11 and 15 at 9:30, 11:30,
1:30 and 3:30; and on Jan. 16 at
9:30 and 11:30.
* *     *
EAST ASIAN CLUB
Meeting today at noon in Bu.
223 to elect 1960 officers.
* *     *
VARSITY CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Prof. G. Parke-Taylor will
speak on "4esus Christ—~A New
Testament Roftrait" at noon today in Bu. 106.
* *    *
CAMERA CLUB
Illustrated lecture on making
'TWEEN CLASSES
continued on page 8
New Future For
Algerian Student
Best Dressed Girls
Win New York Trip
Two weeks in New York in June will be the prize awarded,
to the ten young women selected by Glamour magazine as 4fc#v1,
"10 Best Dressed College Girls in America". .     : •! *
The Ubyssey will selecte the^-
An unknown Algerian Student
who received - medieal training
in France is now an intern in a
Geneva hospital thanks to the
UBC organizations.
The AMS Council donated
$350 from last year's surplus,
and WUS contributed $150 towards a fund to relieve and assist
Algerian students in Europe.
This move was made at a time
when many Algerian students
were obliged to leave their country and were receiving attractive offers from East Germany.
The student receiving the
benefit of the UBC grant felt
obliged to leave France oh the
completion of his year and went
to Geneva with hopes of doing
his internship there.
A city clinic was willing to
accept him because of his academic record, but could not pro-
NEW FUTURE
continued on page 8
Attention   Staffers
Attention siaifers!
There will be a meeting of
the Ubyssey Editorial Board
on Friday al noon in the
renovated Pub Offices. All
Editors turn out.
AH reporters and anyone
else who has worked, is working, or wants to work on the
Ubyssey -show up in the Pub
a week Friday — on Friday,
January 15th — 12:30.
Please come.
the best dressed girl on our campus and enter her as a candidate
in this international competition.
The winners will be flown to
New York May 30th and will'
stay until June 10th as Glamour's guests.
The activities of those two
weeks are to be a surprise, but
will include luncheons, dinners,
interviews and television appearances.
The highlight of the first week
will be Glamour's annual College
Fashion Show.
The '59 show opened with a
larger-than-life photograph of
the "10 Best Dressed". The picture opened up and out stepped
the girls.
They modeled evening clothes,
and with their escorts — ten
young New York bachelors —
were danced off the runway for
an evening on the town.
The following criteria will be
taken   into   consideration:
1. Good figure, beautiful posture.
2. Clean, shining, well-kept
hair.
. Imagination in managing a
clothes budget.
4. Good grooming — not just
neat, but impeccable.
5. Appropriate campus look,
(in line with local customs.)
6. I clear understanding of her
fashion type.
7. Individuality in her use of
fashion color, accessories.
8. O workable wardrobe plan.
9. A neat way with make-up
(enough to look pretty, not overdone),
10. Appropriate—not rah rah
• look for off-campus occasions.
Details of contest will be puib*:.;,-"
lished in the Ubyssey nj^ct weej^r
*»*
Academic Symposium
Applications Available
Applications for students who
wish to attend the Academic
Symposium next month are now
available in the AMS office and
the Symposium office, Room 165
of Brock Hall.
Students are urged to watch
future editions of the Ubyssey for
further, information.
MR. BARNEY ROSS
i
Photo Ray Grigg -:
'Drug Clinics
No Way put
For Addicts'
"Drug clinics will allow an
addict to he an addict all his
life," Barney Ross said yesterday at the Hillel House.
Narcotic addiction - was of
main interests to questioners
among Ross' audience yesterday,
bringing deep disgust and bitterness in Barney's answers. Baj?r
ney described his four years of
drug addition as "the four mesi
horrible years of my life."   .„ .. .
In his speech, Ross said that
addicts should never be put in
jail. Instead of clinics, more
hospitals should be built to cure
addicts humanely.
Barney said that every addict
can be cured.
"It's all in his mind, but si
man must have strong determination."
An addict loses all contact 4$
affection for beloved people. *t
have seen brothers and husbanAr
prostitute their own sisters arid
wives," says Ross.
DRUG
continued on page 8 j PfcGE TWO
THS    UJBYSSEY
Friday, January 8,1960
THE
Authorized as second class mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa
MEMBER CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
Published three times a week throughout the University year iri Vancouver
by the Publications Board of the Alma Mater Society, University of B.C.
Editorial opinions expressed are those of the Editorial Board of The Ubyssey
and not necessarily those of the Alma Mater Society or the University of B.C.
Telephones: Editorial offices, AL,. 4404; Locals 12, 13 and 14;
Business offices, AL/4404; Local 15.
Editor-in-Chief: R. Kerry White
Associate Editor .. Elaine Bissett
}        Managing Editor Del Warren
^        News Editor ,. Bob Hendrickson
C.U.P. Editor Irene Frazer
1       Club's Editor Wendy Barr
Features Editor Sandra Scott
Head Photographer Colin Landie
*':       Photography Editor Roger McAfee
f SeniorEditor . Farida Sewell
( Reporters and Desk:
'       Derek Allen,  Vladimir Elias Romanchych,  Ed Lavalle,
Diane Greenall, Henry Johns
Co-editors: Ann Pickard, Ernie Harder
Staff: Alan Dafoe, Mike Hunter, Fred Fletcher
-EDITORIAL-   ~
- Marxist-Lenenist Communism, the only real export of the
Soviet Union, is due to come up for considerable discussion
and* consideration within the next decade, in the councils of the
world. Premier Khruschev's threat that the grand-children of
his .American contemporaries wouhi live under Socialist (Communist) rule, was no idle one — though he would have done
better to defer that date by a generation — but the promulgation of this Sociajist rule will come, if it does, not from the
oujside, but from with in, for it is toward the faint-hearted
nationals of our state that the Communist threat is first directed, and these pepple are numerous' enough to control any
£Otf£rnment, together with its legal and directpral processes.
The apparent desire of people in the faculties of other Cana-
dtan universities to hasten the fulfillment of Premier Khrus-
cifey*$ — and indeed, every Communismt's wishes, is evidenced
by, the mass signings of a petition Jo Mr. Diefenbaker which
ajj&S.that he. keep panada out of the nuclear-arms manufactory,
tjj^| he dees not permit Canada to co-operate in any nuclear-
ayrnarnent storage system, and that he uses the prestige enjoyed
by his government to prevent the .further testing of nuclear
w^apqns. If Mr. Piefenbaker is so foolish as to; listen to these
Pf^jjle, and to s^imleH«n.t' their petition by direct parliamen-
tajjgjr action, 'he and they will have materially advanced this
egpflT'til Soviet Russia th4t .>)$ *ke comniunisation of the entire
vmrfcl, tor, they will have ijmmistakably demonstrated to what
pomt tHe Jp^j^commiihist!moral attack should be directed.
Certainly we do not advocate that nuclear test explosions
tontinued.— the,j^viets have demonstrated that these are
^n^r a necessary adjjjin^t to the stock piling of nuclear
^siof -for^.^.nfe^|n^ti!on!of nuclear war: however, we do
^j^e, ,-a' sensiplpt ;p6^|cjf of readiness for surprise attack,
lip a for^ of ais$Ua^ive massive retaliation. Were we
k^ offer either o| tja$£ifj the Soviet Union would certainly
ernent ife present eeoncfjnic warfare by more direct means.
^"|ih^"Communists are like ourselves, and do not want
either hidden or overt warfare, betrays a lack Of understanding of tiMB.ba§ic tene:j; of the communist creed which is that the
sole aim of every declared Communist must be the communis-
ation of itjbe entir^ wor^d by; the surest means that offer themselves*. At the present'time, because of North American military readiness, economic warfare presents the best means to
thai end Ifowevgr, if we tre^a.x, our preparedness in any way,
we daln %e su^e that the Soviets wi}l turn to the more direct
method. Dictators have always preferred military victory to
. the economic submission of their victims. Khrushchev and his
predecessors have everywhere demonstrated their hasty
natures.
Should this petition reach the University of British Columbia, we would ask that faculty members do not be led
a*iray,ler the body of propoganda that has poured out of press
4m4.jedw'.jn thelast months, but that they be guided by the
evidence and accordingly refuse to commit their names to that
swap of paper. It is well enough to talk of high principles: it
is^njore sane, to take part in honest and determined action.
Xjften, honest men pan be very misguided by others who have,
prfa^te interests at stake.
The faculty must excuse this interference in what they
will no doubt consider to be their own affair. But it is they and
their fellows who are responsible for the present state of world
unrest. It is our generation who must live with .wharf; they have
lisfirus, and who must clean up after them. So help them, they
must not make our task more difficult than it is at present by
further foolish judgments.
—M. P. S.
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
RAVEU TAKES Off NtXT WEEK
FLY WITH IT.
TM-FIVE CENTS*
Jan. 5, 1960.
The Editor,
The Ubyssey.
Dear Sir:
• Mr. Ernest Wong today has
presented a favourable account
of higher education in Malaya.
However, he seemed to have
neglected a few important facts
that I have heard from reliable
sources. I would appreciate if
Mr. Wong would comment jon
the following points in the
.Ubyssey in the near future:
1. Government financial assistance to university students
is in the ratio of 4:1 for Malays
and , non-Malays, respectively.
That is, for every 4 students of
the Malay race there is only one
student of non-Malay origin to
receive* financial assistance, regardless of academic ■ standing.
The population distribution
among the 6.5 Malayans is
about 40% Malays, 35% Chinese, and the rest are mostly of
Indian origin. The majority, of
intellectuals and university students are of Chinese origin.
2. There seems to be a preference in the Civil- Services in
Malaya to employ graduates of
Malay origin irrespective of
qualifications.
3. The Minister of Education
in -the Federation of Malaya
was reported by the Straits
Times (a Singapore English
newspaper) to have made a
statement^of open Iracial segregation in higher education, for
example, setting up of racial
quotas.
4. There is some disharmony
between the Chinese - educated
Chinese population and_ the
English - educated Chinese in
Malaya.
Yours truly,
—An Observer.
The Editor,
Ubyssey.
Dear Sir:
Many students complain of
taxes, but few do anything
about them. I propose that a
petition be circulate^ on the
campus, and then be sent' to.'
the Federal Minister of Fin-
ance, the-Honorable Mr. Fleming, In this petition I suggest
that we ask that students in
full-time attendance at a Canadian University be allowed
to earn TWO THOUSAND
DOJyL^RSper year Tax Free.
All money earned over this
would be taxed at the; regular
rate. Failing this, I belleyethe
Federal Government should,
and must, allow students to deduct as tax-free earnings the
cost of fees, books, and supplies
needed to attend the University. In Canada we are looked
upon as the hope for tomorrow,
the future" leaders of the world.
We are told that we have been
given the essentials of good
citizenship, national pride, and
loyalty to *>ur Queen and our
country, and yet the government makes it extremely difficult, and sometimes impossible,
for some, if not all of us, to
receive the education necessary
to us and to the future of our
country.
A petition should also be sent
to the Minister of Finance for
British Columbia, Mr; Bennett,
demanding that students be
exempt from the 5 % Provincial
Sales Tax. In this way the student could buy books, supplies,
and clothes without having to
pay that extra 5%. Our AMS
cards could identify us as students to the shopkeeper,, who
would then make a note Of our
registration number, and refrain from charging us this'tax.
I believe that the Alma Mater Society of this University
should support, endorse, and
encourage these petitions, for
only through these means can
we hope to attract the government's attention to our needs.
Yours truly,
—Colin Walters.
Education I
Dear Sir:
I had a most embarrassing
experience yesterday. Tapping
a smart young student on the
shoulder, I was- amazed to be
confronted not with an acquaintance—but a stranger.
Needless to say my eyes were
opened to what is becoming
the sickest truism on this campus.
Fashion and fad magazines
must be making millions since
more than a sizeable percentage of the student foody dress,
act, and talk in'the manner
these magazines prescribe.
Through these and other
means the current- Americanisms south of the border gradually work their way into
Canadian life . . . and unfortunately . . . this campus. Have
we not the imagination to create entities ... or is it simpler to allow ourselves to be
imibued with diseases of this
type?
The clear-complexioned, shining haired campus cutie has at
last, I suggest, run her, gauntlet in the flurry of shaggy
sweater, pleated skirts, and
elfin-toes.
Curly-locked Canadian youth
is quickly reducing its mottH
er's pride and joy to a tufty
plane exhibiting the ingrained
scars of their robust boyhood..
Sauntering egotistically—khaki
top-coat dashingly exposing his
balljf^crew neck bulky-knit...
and ' fraternity pin shining
brightly on his Ivy League
lapel, the Canadian college
man, if we can call them that,
dabbles lightly in girls, football, and fraternity sing-songs
without achieving any measure
of success in any one of the
threje.
It is not hard to imagine the
union of these two prototypes
—supported by the romantic
love concept—into a marriage
that dissolves in the manner
it is created . . . quickly. Normal, happy, modern, stereotyped people living in a sparkling split-level, driving a
chromed creation of the latest
order . . . these are the pro-
creators of the generation to-
follow . . . omigod!!!
If this appeals to you, join
the crew. You are not alone.
Too bad, you should be. Canadian identity is the favourite,
topic of every national-minded
stalwart citizen—surely at the
university level one could find
more illustration of this principle that what exists on this
campus . . .
Identity withheld for
obvious reasons.
THE BARHSTOBMffiS
Present
fN.THE
An Authentic
Musical Melodrama
Starrins' a Versatile
Cast of Thesniaiis
It preserve the
moral tone of the
presentation, the audience  is  requested  to
afplajjd the hero
and hiss the'vtl-
LIAN.
.All food and vegetables
thrown en the. stage
.become the property of
j' the management and
will not be,returned.
Kindly
Phone MU 2-3677 for
table reservations.
1 tj Performances Nightly
at 9:80 plnj. * 1S;S8 ajn.
CAVE
SUPPER
(ArfikitectyreSS)
My blue-print for
success is a planned savings
programme at...
Bank of Montreal
&umkUC& *?£n4t Sa*t& fan StoccC&tto.
Your Campus Branch in the Administration Bldg.
, MERLE C. KIRBY, Manager
tTTsig step on the road to success Is an early banking connection Thursday, January 7,  1966
THE     UBYSSEY
PAGE THREE
Canadian lJ(nii)e?Aitif pnM Cenforence   +
STUDENT    PRESS    CHARTER
I.—WHEREAS the Canadian student press
believes in the following principles:
(1) That freedom of expression, and debate
by means of a free, and vigorous press is essential to the effectiveness of an educational com-
mnuity in a democratic society;
(2) a. That while the student press is a
function of the student government or of the
university administration this should in no way
be allowed to impair the freedom of the student
press;
b. That the student press should be free of
all  forms   of external  interference;
3 a. That it is essential to a free student
press that it be responsible fc*r the views, and
opinions it expresses and;
b. That the balic duties of such a free student press are to present the varied opinions of
the students it represents, to present news fairly,
and without bias, and to interpret local, national
and international events, and issues of interest,
and important to students to the best of its ability.
II.—AND WHEREAS freedom of the student press has been abridged in the following
ways:
(1) Confiscation of issues of student newspapers due to the publication material which
faculty or administrative authorities considered
detrimental to the repuation and the welfare of
the institution, or some department of the
institution;
(2) Suspension, expulsion, or threats of similar action against student editors, or suspension
of publications because of the publishing or the
proposed publishing of matters which faculty,
or administrative authorities considered detrimental to the reputation, and the welfare of the
institution, or some department of the insttution;
f' (3) Control of the content of a student newspaper through censorship by faculty, adminstra-
tive authorities, and the- student government so
that the student newspaper tended to become a
public relations organ of the institution or an
instrument, of the government;
(4) Financial pressure used to limit or retaliate
against editorial policy;
(5) By censorship of articles, and, or editorial
comment, by civil, and academic authorities, and;
(6) By inordinate, and excessive social pressure used to prevent publication of particular
issues  or  opinions.
CODE    OF    ETHICS
III.—THEREFORE, the Canadian student
press affirms its belief that it should be free from
all the abuses listed under Article II, and declares the following fundamental rights duties,
and responsibilities necessary for the effective
implementation of the principles; of Article I:
(1) That the Canadian student press* should
be free from pressure by student governments,
university authorities, or any external agencies:
(2) That within the restrictions of the laws
of libel, and within the scope of their responsibilities, and duties as outlined in Artcle I, the Canadian student press should be autonomous and;
.3) That the Canadian student press should
be free to develop so that it can continue to fulfill its role in the academic community.
TO GIVE SPEECH
ibr. Ian McTaggart Cowen will
deliver a speech on "Biological
Science in the USSR" January
13 in BU 102.
Dr. Cowen, head of the UBC
zoology department recently returned from Russia where he
attended sessions at the Russian
Academy of Sciences.
Register NOW at the AMS. Office
F R A T E R N1T Y
SPRING
RUSHING
Registration Closes Tuesday
January 26th at 12:30 p.m.
Requirements:
12 Units - Senior Matriculation
Information Booklets available
A.M.S. office
No Cost or Obligation
To the Rushee
OUR DELEGATES' REPORT
Doug Parkinson was elected
by a tight 9-13 vote with one absentation over Arnold Amber of
the University of Ottawa.
Main election issue was the
desirability of having a president
in for two terms. Parkinson has
been on a trial basis for seven
months when the last CUP conference voted to see if a national
full-time president was advisable.
Winners — Le Quartier Latin
of Montreal University was
the big winner, winning one
trophy for the best French language newspaper and a second
trophy for the best editorial in a
university paper.
The Silhouette of McMaster
won the trophy for the best
weekly paper for the third time
in succession.
Western Gazette of the University of Montreal won the trophy for the best paper published
more than twice a week.
New Members — Represented for the first time at a
CUP conference were the Ryer-
sonian of Toronto and the Loyola
News of Loyola, Ontario.
Communications — The CUP
delegates decided to attempt a
Ham radio hook-up between the
western members of CUP after
clearance from the Department
of Transport. If the service is
successful, the network will be
extended east" as soon as those
universities set up the required
facilities-. *
A committee report on the
feasibility of having a telex service between CUP members. The
automatic teletype service offer
ed by Canadian Pacific and Canadian N at i o n a 1 Telegraphs
would enable members to transmit stories while still topical.
Delegates rejected the idea for
reasons.
Too much money would have
to be spent and CUP papers
would be serviced adequately by
existing methods.
Delegates were unanimous in
the desire to see more exchange
of news, features, sports, etc.
The Varsity of Toronto University was appointed to start a
CUP column. Writers from each
of the member papers are to submit items to this column. It was
felt such a project would help
the CUP together.
Finance Item — As the post
of permanent fully-paid CUP
president was endorsed by the
conference the establishment
of a permanent CUP national
office was mandatory.
Such an office was established
in Ottawa to be shared with
NFCUS.
To pay for this office and staff,
member papers were asked to
approach their student councils
with a proposed sliding scale of
CUP dues.
Under this sliding scale The
Ubyssey's dues would be approximately $275.
Ethics — After short deliberation, mostly to make small
word changes, the editorial committee returned a code of ethics
voicing the usual pallid terms
of freedom of the press.
The code was presented to the
general meeting.
As the delegates prepared to
pass the code, spokesman for LA
Rotonde took the floor and gave
an impassioned plea in French
for a code with teeth which
would underline CUP's position
of university paper's rights and
responsibilities.
The delegate said that if such
a charter was not drawn up the
Quebec university papers would
be lost.
His remarks were backed up
by the recent incident at Laval
University where the editor-in-*
chief and a reporter were expelled because of an article appearing in the paper.
Conference delegates were
deeply moved by the plea" and a
new committee, composed of
volunteers, was formed to "investigate the form of a new code.
The new committee worked
from 9 p.m. that evening until
5 a.m. in the morning.
The results of their labor is
shown in the centre of this page
with minor changes made when
the  general   meeting  passed   it.
Constitution — A motion was
presented to the general meeting to amend the CUP charter.
The amendment would have
prohibited the staffs of member
papers from holding positions of
any sort on student council.
The motion was defeated "by a
large majority.
Most delegates felt this matter
was outside.of CUP jurisdiction.
Nearly all* editors-in-chief of
papers represented held a position on their student council.
Author of the motion said such
a situation tended to make the
paper an organ of student council. PAGE FOUR
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, Jaaua
Poetry From University Presses
POETRY  FROM  UNIVERSITY PRESSES
James Wright's Saint Judas
is one of several books of poetry released this year by the
"Wesleyan University Press
(cloth, $3 each; paper, $1.65
each proclaiming its regular
publication in this field.
One effect of Mr. Wright's
■work seems to be to deny the
purpose of optimism that is a
necessary part of the modern
poet's equipment. Language and
experience must give a scent to
life at some level, must give a
qualified "yes" to life rather
than the unqualified "no."
Mr. Wright's words, "I do
not pity the dead, I pity the
dying," in "Ait the Executed
Murderers' Grave" give a clue
to his whole approach. Nevertheless, the sharp edge of the
imagery with which his poetry
is cut deserves our closest attention. He is working in stone,
from which vivid gleams of
light are continually escaping.
The most positive notes that he
strikes in his work ring out
sharply against the heaviness
of the mood he has.chosen, as
when he cries:
"Between his lips my delight
3n blowing wind* a bird song-
rose"
—and—
"His blue eyes lost their barrenness
and  bore   a   blossom  out  to
me ..."
(from "The Revelation").
•k      *      *
Of the first four poets Wesleyan offered, Hyam Plutzik in
Apples from Shinar gives the
least evidence of any "exploratory independence from all
traditions." In his narrative
poem "The Shepherd" he has
attempted to parallel a dramatic context as closely involved
as Shakespeare's "Hamlet." He
moves with surprising ease in
his command of blank verse,
disclosing a greater debt to the
master, than any of his three
contemporaries can claim. His
excursions into metaphysics,
however, do not quite come
off, and although he is more
obviously a poet of aesthetics
he lacks a certain sensitivity of
touch which may be attributed
to his predilection for shadows
and the role of the mystic
rather than the open light.
* *     *
Barbara Howes in Light and
Dark is in some ways nearest
to demonstrating the force of
the Anglo-Saxon word through
the syntactic structure of English poetry. Unobtrustively and
with a certain humility she
can insert a corollary at the
conclusion of a poem that will
offer surprising and meaningful complexity. Examples of
this can be found in "For a
Florentine Lady" and "The
Gallery." Her most successful
poems are "Triumph of Chastity," "The New Leda," "Nuns
assist at Childbirth" and "Undersea   Farmer."
* *     *
The Pittsburgh University
Press moves tentatively into
the field of poetry with Sara
Henderson Hay's The Stone
and the Shell ($3). This author's best poems are the least
feminine, "The Devil Shamed,"
•" . . . see what I mean?". "The
Close-grown* Grove," and "Observation." The one exception
to this qualification is "Beggar
Woman's Song" into which enters an unexpected warmth
and calm albeit one of resignation. She succeeds similarly in
her religious poem "The Silent," which far surpasses the
other examples here of her devotional writing.
* •  *     *
Scribner's continues a useful
series with Poets of Today VI
($3.95). Gene Baro in his
"Northwind and Other Poems"
treats events as a primary
color displayed on the canvas
of his medium, into which he
works his comments on human
experience, drawing freely
from sense impressions -and
often using the palette knife.
There is experienced handling
of metaphor. In "The Way
Back Home" can be heard
echoes of Frost and even
Rilke, while the concluding
poems of his book on the
theme of death uncover a certain vein of bitterness in an
otherwise positively lyrical
poet.
*     *     *
The second poet in this volume, Donald.Finkel, is seeking
a synthesis of ideas in his "The
Clothing's New Emperor and
Other Poems." His analytical
mind has succeeded'in taking
apart rather than putting together. The reader suspects
that, for Mr. Finkel, a poem is
Bke an architect's plan for a
new building—something preconceived and meticulously designed. The noticeable diversity in his work is evidence of
an intellectual restlessness that
moves from "the flame between two mouths meeting / in
simple speech" ("The Clothing's New Emperor" to "the
hands of words are tender"
("Target Practice")—from the
Audenesque quality of "Give
Way"  to  the  uninhibited sim
plicity of "In Gratitude."
* * *
Finally, Walter Stone, at a
time when much modern poetry is so preoccupied with techniques, moves his language in
"Poems 1955-1958) with an
even cadence, and, like Mr.
Plutzik, is not independent of
tradition. His marriage poems
are striking for their relevant
detail, but we may ask ourselves whether poetry is not
more than the renewal of experience (such as this) even
when that experience is rare.
Mr. Stone is most successful
when he has fully identified
himself with his subject, as in
"Coral Reef."
At one level, through the
distinctness of their voices,
these poets show how far we
have come since the Georgian
gestures of the thirties in England. At another level, we may
learn through these works that
the greatest danger to contemporary writing may be a sense
of personal urgency that would
reduce the poet's art to a series
of technical procedures at the
expense of the truth.
—Godfrey John
CBC Writing Awards
CBC Prizes in Television and
Radio Writing. Two prizes of
$100 each donated by the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation,
are offered in competition to
winter or summer students in
any faculty, graduate or undergraduate, who are attending
the University, and are registered for a full programme of
studies leading to a degree. One
of these prizes, will be offered
for the best television play and
the other for the best radio
play. The plays must be designed to fill a half-hour programme or longer. The awards
will be made by the University
on the recommendation of a
committee consisting of representatives of the Corporation
and   of  the   University.     The
University and the Corporation
reserve the right to withhold
either of the awards if no entry of sufficient quality is received, or to divide the prize
if two entries are judged to be
of comparable merit. The winning of one of these awards
does not in any way obligate
either the recipient or Corporation with respect to performance or production of the play.
Students interested in the competition should get in touch
with the Chairman of the Creative Writing Committee, Department of English. All entries must be submitted to him
no later than August 31st;
For further information consult Mr. Zilber or Professor
Birney, Department of English.
More New Books
—Photo by Dave Bromide
The critic spent a very merry Christmas
The following is a brief description of a few of the many
good books which have been
published this summer that
are listed in "The Periodical",
published by the Oxford University Press.
THE MODERN GERMAN
NOVEL:  H.  M.   Waidson.     In
this book Dr. Waidson presents a survey of contemporary
German fiction. Thomas
Mann's "Felix Krull" is one of
those under discussion. Waidson describes Mann's book as
"the great German comic novel
of our time, human and humorous, balanced and urbane,
witty and uproarious, farcial
and intelligent, a work in
which scurrility is transformed
into artistic achievement, not
left as raw anger".
Mr. Waidson speaks of the
adventures of Felix as making
a vigorous, inventive and urbane novel which will contribute to maintaining Thomas
Mann's position as a foremost
literary figure, of European
and world-wide significance,
and describes his writing thus,
"Tiresome and irritating his
writing may be on occasions,
so that we are uncertain
whether he is a conjuror or a
magician, but he has commanded attention  for • sixty   years,.
both as teacher and entertainer, and his eminence as a leading novelist of the "twentieth
century is firmly established".
Also described in "The Periodical" are some outstanding
books by Canadian author*^.
Now it can be told. RAVEN
will take to the air next week,
IF the printer will print the
remainder of the material that
the editors sent to his shop.
For the interest of all you prurient purists, he refused to
print one story because it dealt
with five men who INTENDED
(they never got around to it)
to do things to a girl who was
under eighteen. Had she been
under nineteen, it would have
been legal. The fact that it
was a fin story had no bearing
whatsoever upon the case.
However, the printer WAS legally right, and perhaps he was
morally right, as well. Some
of you will think so. But then
you haven't read the story
have you. If the author will
give us permission, we will
print the story on these pages,
in serial form, so that you may
exercise your titillated disgust
at' leisure RAVEN will caw
with delight.   Next week.
I don't see why they bother.
How on earth can this quarter
of-an-hour* have advanced the
careers of either Mabel Mac
kenzie, Tony Friedson, or any
of the four poets concerned?
Moreover, the programme can
hardly claim honestly to have
"reviewed the work of these
four poets." Were I any one
of the unfortunate versifiers
concerned, I would object
strenuously to the idea of my
work being—presumably com
prehensively — dealt with in
15/4 minutes
All that remains are these
impressions: of Mabel Mackenzie's pleasingly ironic manner,
Tony Friedson's script-confined
attempts at special pleading
and four poems one would
have liked to have been able
to read so that one might per
haps have arrived - at some
more benevolent appraisal of
them—with the exception of A.
C. Annan's, which sounded
well enough.
If this is all the programmers
desired, one must deplore their
lack of ambition.
D. Mansfield
♦University Extension—
6/1/60. C.B.C.
I 1960
THE    UBYSSEY
PAGE FIVE
Widening Horizons
ixuriously produced, imag-
vely written first editions
ot the only ones that make
ren's libraries such a de-
Cheaper mass-produced
s of remarkably high qual-
re reaching the bookstores,
rtment stores and even su-
larkets.
r instance, Grosset & Dun-
usually   identified   with
inexpensive     reprints,
published  My First Pic-
Encyclopedia      ($2.95),
lated and adapted by Ma-
Ponsot from the    French
i   Encyclopedic   en   Col-
."   ts 67 pages are cram-
but  not  cluttered,  with
res, whose colors compen-
for some minor errors in
ninimal, informative text,
ly case its "lookers" may
outnumber its "readers."
s just that wealth of de-
hat appeals to those who
read for the first time to-
ow.
e Illustrated Book About
a.v written by Felix Sut-
introduction by Stuart
e, illustrated by H. B. Ves-
J3.95), is another Grosset
mlap "original." It is a
: survey, colorfully writ-
colorfully   illustrated,  of
Africa's tremendous variety.
* * *
Doubleday & Co. are sending
out a line called Garden City
Book's. Added to their list- is
The Wonderful World of Communication, by Lancelot Hog-
ben, and The Wonderful World
of the Theater, by J. B. Priestley ($2.95 each). Both have
outstanding British authors
and an especially high standard
of illustrations— in reproduction, variety, and color.
Spiders from "Wolves" to
Sheet Weavers are described,
illustrated and discussed in
The Story of Spiders, toy Dorothy E. Shuttlesworth, illustrated by Su Zan N. Swain
($2.95),   another  Garden   City
book. There is enough technical detail to satisfy the 8-14-
year-old scientists and their
older-brothers and, if they exist, their spider-loving sisters.
Perhaps even a few shudderers
may be won over, for the delicate illustrations are as skillful
as they are informative.
So numerous and varied are
these books that inform, it is
easy to forget that old favorites
are still appearing in new editions. Joy Law has translated
Johanna Spyri's Heidi (Watts,
$2.95) in an edition that is a
joy to handle. It is hard to
believe that the reproductions
of Charles Mozley's unusually
good water colors are not the
originals.—Pamela Marsh.
WAR FILMS 15c
TODAY Or Pass
AUDITORIUM AT 12:30 NOON
Bird Calls-50c at the AMS Office
PACIFIC ARTISTS SERIES PRESENTS
"The Travellers"
Canadian Recording & TV Artists in a
CONCERT OF FOLK SONGS
Vancouver Art Gallery
JANUARY 25, 8.15 p.m.
Tickets    -    $1.75
Tickets available at UBC International House; Duthie's Book
Store, 901 Robson; People's Co-Operative Book Store, 308
West Pender; Castle Jewellers, Georgia, across from Kelly's.
U.B.C. PLAYERS' CLUB
tlllll 11IIU
Spring Play and Tour (May)
"Time Remembered"
By Jean Anouilh
Directed by Franklin Johnston
Saturday, January 9
10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.
in the
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
EVERYBODY WELCOME
A MAGAZINE OF
CONTEMPORARY WRITING
Now Available at the
B.C. BOOKSTORE PAGE SIX
THE    FBYISIY
Thursday, January;?, 198t
Auditor: Now,  let's see your
pink slips.
Filing Clerk (fern.): Sir!
"' Rh^s says, kissing a girl jtlst
because she expects yOu to is like
scratching a place that doesn't
itch.
Fisher: "I'd like to get a speedometer for my car.
Clayton: "Speedometer! What
you need is a calendar.
<
w*     -^^^Rm.
■   ■■III' ! ftfffllMff          S»      ^WBmm^mm\\\\\\m\\\\\\\\\m
l    **• ""a^^^^^p^^^^^B
<gXwh1rnnrD___                                                      ^AdAridH^H^^^^^^^^B
luuiiwinniifl^
Can >\e buj any worthwhile TV time         Finance and Sdlet> Management each year
for $109,000?" is the problem facing Don         as the company expands Tapidly  on  the
-E^adman  (U.   of Manitoba  '54),  Morley         streneth  of   manv    lone-established   nro-
Arnason (U.  of Saskatchewan   '56),  and         strength  at   many    long established   pro-
Gary Zivot (U.B.C. '59).                "                         ducts and dozens oi newer ones.
Members of the Advertising Department,             Graduating students are invited to meet
the three men shown here represent only         with Procter & Gamble representatives on
one   area   of   responsibility   available   to          Monday and Tuesday, January 11th and
graduates at Procter & Gamble. There are          12th.  Contact your Placement Office for
careers openings in Advertising, Buying,          details "and company literature.
3&S&
££.
IMPERIll OIL LIMITED
Has a Limited Number of Vacancies in
1960 in the Following Departments ...
MANUFACTURING
(Refining)
Students Graduating in:
I960
Chemical- Engineering
Mechanical Engineering
1961
Ghesmcal Engineering
Meehajiical Engineering
:       v: Commerce
RESEARCH
Students enrolled in postgraduate studies in Chemical Engineering or Chemistry who are interested in
either permanent or summer employment in the Research Department.
PRODUCING
(Production & Exploration)
Students Graduating in:
1960
Chemical Engineering
Mechanical Engineering
Engineering   Physics
Geological Engineering
Honours Geology
T961
Geological Engineering
Honours Geology
Engineering Physics
Honours Chemistry
Our Representative:
MR. R. G. INGS, will be on the Campus
on
JANUARY 11th
to make interviewing appointments for students enrolled
in the above courses who are interested in filling the
advertised vacancies
MR. INGS will be located in the Personnel and Placement
Office of the West Hall.
JWi
MMii
uiiJiiiaa^MiiMttiiMiBi
Time Te Register
For B. C Election
^Students may register for the
next B.C. Provincial Elections
at booths to be set up on campus
ail next week.
Below is a schedule of the alternating location of the three
booths to be set up daily from
10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. by the
UBC CCF Club.
Monday: North Brock, Education, Library.
Tuesday: North Brock, Buchanan, Library.
Wednesday:  Cafeteria,  Engin-
Thursday:   South   Brock,   Buchanan, Cafeteria.
Friday:   South   Brock,   Engineers, Education.
^onoeceioceoooopoeoooGOooe
CLASSIFIED
RIDERS WANTED—-8:30 lectures Mon. to Sat. West end
area. Phone MU 1-1677.
EXPERIENCED _ TUTOR   for
English 100-200. Don, RE 3-9950.
WANTED IMMEDIATELY —
Rides Mon. to Fri., 8:30. Phone
Linda, Am 1-2905 at 48th and
Marine, Carole, AM 1-4048, 62nd
and Marine and/or Ruth, AM
6-0701, Angus Drive at 57th.
AT  UNIVERSITY—For  Rent
2-bedroom   apt.   Ph.  AL. 0365-R.
WANTED: RIDE, urgently
along 4th Ave. from Macdonald
St. to UBC. Phone RE 1-1250.
University Hill Unittd
Church
Worshipping     in     Union     College
Chapel
5990 Chancellor  Blvd.
Minister   —   Rev.   W.    Buckingham
Services   11:00   a.m.   Sunday
SPECIAL STUDENT RATES
COMl*LETE OPTICAL, SERVICE
GLASSES FITTED
24-Hour Service OPTICAL Repairs
VANCbUVEft BLOCK
Main Floor
734 GRANVILLE ST.
Immediate Appointment
NEW WESTMINSTER - 675 COLUMBIA STREET
LA 6-8665
We'd like to admit right here and now that the
main reason we run advertisements like this is to
get you, dear reader, to drink Coca-Cola to the
virtual exclusion of all other beverages. The
sooner you start going along with us, the soone
we'll both begin to get more out of life.
DRINK
&»$&
SAY 'COKE' OR 'COCA-COW—BOTH TRADE-MARKS MEAN THE PRODUCT
OF COCA-COLA  LTD.—THE  WORLD'S  BEST-IOVED  SPARKUNaMINK. Friday, January 8, 1960
THE     U3BYSSEY
PAGE SEVEN ^
As Here For Crucial Tilt
Thunderettes Win;
In Totem Tourney
UBC Thunderettes started the  New Year  on a  good note
last nigh overpowering C-FUN 43-24  in a  Senior A contest.
Diane Beach led the UBC squad with 10 points. Diane is
now fourth in league scoring with 71 points in six games.
SCORERS
Fern Walker, with 9, and Barb
Whidden and Gail Leitner with 7
each, gave her able assistance.
Thunderettes now have a firm
grip on second place with four
victories in six starts.
Marilyn Peterson
. . .Thunderette Scorer
Varsity Sets Pate In
Grasshockey league
Recent grass hockey reports
show that Varsity has the top
goal average in Men's A Division
play. In action before the holidays, Varsity defeated UBC
Golds 9-3. A week later they
blanked West Coast Rangers 9-0
to take over sole possession of
first place on the basis of a better goals-for average.
In other A Division action before the holidays, UBC Blues
came up with a 6-3 triumph over
the Rangers.
In second round B Division
play last month, Pedagogues recorded a spirited 3-1 victory
over 'Spurs.
Undefeated Richmond tops the
loop with 7 wins.
Thunderettes next home game
is against 3rd place Hastings on
January   16   at   War   Memorial
Gym.
TOTEM JOURNEY
Thunderettes are aiming for
victories in the Totem Tournament (January), the WICAU in
(February), and the Senior A
League (March).
Norris Martin
. ready for big one.
Co-Editors: . Ann Pickard, Ernie Harder
Staff: Alan Dafoe, Mike Hunter, Fred Fletcher
Ex-Brits At Stadium
Ira Sat. Miller Cup Play
UBC's high-flying Thunderbirds   will  exhibit   their  talents
M UBC Stadium Saturday at 2:30 in Miller Cup rugby action.
They host Ex-Brits. /
The Birds carry a one and a half game bulge over 2nd-place
Kats into the second half of the season. They have yet to be
defeated. "
Under the determined prod-
xjing of Coach Max Howell the
Birds have welded themselves
into a cohesive unit.
TEAM WORK
According to veteran scrum
half Peter Bugg, who is sidelined
with an injury, teamwork has
been the key to the squad's phe-.
nomenal success so far this season.
This has enabled them to defeat Kats and Meralomas whom
many consider to have stronger
individual players.
LEAGUE GAMES
Elsewhere on he rugby scene,
Braves play Trojans at Douglas
Park East (same time).
At 1:15 Saturday, Frosh A
takes on West Van 2 at Aggie
Field; PE meets Wanderers, also
at Douglas Park, and Totems
take on Meralomas 2 at Connaught aPrk.
Totems squad made up entirely
of football players.
UBC SAILORS IN
WEEKEND REGATTA
UBC tars will be hard pressed
to hold their lead in intercollegiate sailing competition this
weekend at the first annual
UBC Invitational Regatta.
Sailors from the University of
Washington, Seattle U. and University of Puget Sound will try
to scuttle the UBC crews that
made an amazing sweep of the
first round last month in Seattle.
The score was seven firsts and
one second in an eight race
series.
The regatta will be held at
the Royal Vancouver Yacht
Club Jerichop station with races
commencing at 10:00 a.m. both
Saturday and Sunday. Boats to
be used are the new Penguin
Class dimjhies recently completed by members of the UBC
Sailing Club.
JANUARY CLEARANCE SALE
SUITS TOPCOATS
$49.95 - $59.95 - $69,95 $39.95 - $49.95
JACKETS SPORTSHIRTS
$24.95 - $29.95 - $39.95 $2.95-$4.95
SWEATERS  20%  OFF
MADE TO MEASURE — 20% DISCOUNT
ALL CLOTHING FROM REGULAR STOCK
BOB  LEE  LTD.
Natural Shoulder Clothing 623 W. HASTINGS
Big Crowd Saturday
Under the determined prodding of Coach Max Howell EST
Largest crowd of the season is expected to be on hand for
tomorrow night's crucial hoop encounter at the UBC gym.
Coach Jack Pomfret predicts victory for his Birds when
they tangle with Albemi's Kootnekoff-inspired Athletics, starting ot 8:30 p.m.
BIG GAME
Officials have tabbed tomorrow's contest as The game for
Thunderbirds, in their battle for
a play-off berth in the Inter-City
Basketball League.
A win for Thundebirds would
give them an important edge
over' Eilers in the race for fourth
and final playoff position.
The   powerful   Athletics   are
currently sharing the lead with
Dietrich-Collins  with   10 points
apiece.
WATCH JOHN
According to Pomfret, the
Birds will not be employing any
new startegy in tomorrow's
"must" fame, but they will be
keeping cldse^watch on set-shot
artist John Kootnekoff.
The former star of provincial
high school basketball circles is
averaging around 15 points per
<;ame, second only to veteran
Bob Pickell.
Another Pomfret plan for
hand-cuffing the A's: "Make
fewer mistaikes".
Member of last year's Thunder
bird crew, -Dave X>umaresg., has.
returned -*tb the Blue and Gold
strip, "His return will be a great
help" added Pomfret.
Inter-City League play offs
ar# expected to get underway
earjy next month. No dates have
yat been set.
In addition to city playoofs,
Thunderbirds are preparing for
action in the WCIAU basketball
schedule. Next weekend the
Birds wing their way to the University of Saskatchewan for two
contests.
While the Pomfret crew flies
the coop for a weekend, local
fans will be entertainied by the
world famous super stars of basketball, the Harlem Globstrot-
ters.
Rear Dr. Frood: The guy next to
me copy frum my paper. What
shood I do?
Dear    Trufhfil:
Quick!
Truthfil
Warm    him.
The clowning Trotters will be
here for two exhibition games,
January 15 and 16 at the War
Memorial Gymnasium.
SPORTS
SHORTS
SWIMMING:. Saturday the
UBC swim team begins a series
of contests with American
schools, with a dual meeting
against College of Puget Sound.
They take oh the Loggers in
Tacoma Saturday in the first of
11 meets leading to the WCIAU
championships in Edmonton in
March.
WRESTLING: An All-comers
Meet is cheduled for Saturday
afternoon at the Memorial Gym.
TENNIS: Applications for
Women's Tennis manager are
now being received. Apply in
writing to Marg McLachlan at
t&V Women's GyhC Deadline for
applications is Wednesday.  :   ..
SO*CCER MATCHES: Sunday,
2 p.m. •'"-..
Second Division—North Shore
United vs Varsity at Kinsmen
Park, North Van.
Third Division—UBC vs Fera
Sheet Metal  at Mclnnes Field.
BIG BLOCK
There will be an important
meeting of the Women's Big
Block Club today at 12:30 in the
Women's Gym,
WOMEN'S BASKETBALL
Anyone interested in playing
guard on the Senior 'B' Women's
Basketball team please attend
practice 7:30 Monday at the
Women's Gym.
see the
great new
^mfttStin,
A-55
FOR
1960
AT
GORDON
BROS.
10th and Alma PAGE EIGHT
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, January 8, I960,
'TWEEN CLASSES
(conltinued from page  1)
salon quality prints. Remember
the Ben Hill-Tout salon in Feb.
* *     *
L.S.A.
Lutheran Students will hold a
party this Saturday night at
8:00. If interested phone Jack
at FA 5-6115.
* *     *
GEOGRAPHY CLUB
Dr. Warren will speak on future power development in B.C.
in F. and G. 208 at noon Monday.
* *     *
ALPA OMEGA SOCIETY
Today's regular meeting postponed until next Friday. Ukranian dancing practice Tuesday
noo nin Education 2.
CCF CLUB
The first CCF meeting of the
year wiU be held today at 12:30
in Bu. 218. It is particularly important that all attend those
Who offered to help operate the
booths for election registration.
* *     *
NEWMAN CLUB
Annual Women's retreat will
be held at the Cenacle Jan. 29-
31. If interested call Maria
Alesio, AL 9819.
* *     *
ARCHITECTURAL U.S.
Dr. Oberlander will speak in
Bu. 106 at 12:45 Monday on his
recent trip to Ghana.
wn'iiipi
**:__•
cmmm Iff
BARNEY  ROSS
(conltinued  from  page  1)
The threatened divorce of his
wife made Barney give himself
up to treatment after repeatedly
trying to quit by himself during
his four years of hell.
"No one can cure himself,."
says Ross, who after four
months of treatment was a
healthy man.
' "The greatest fear of an addict is being discovered," said
Barney after relating some of his
own personal experiences of his
four years torment.
Ross, who is now promoting
the sale of State of Israel Bonds
said, "I am not a paid solicitor.
It is just part of my life and
heart to help our good people of
Israel. I am glad to see it return
again to the 'land of milk and
honey'."
Barney, former lightweight
and welterweight boxing champion of the world, was the first
double champion in boxing history.
ALGERIAN STUDENT
(conltinued from page 1)
vide him with any stipend for
the current academic year.
As a result the student was
having a hard time making ends
meet and was seriously Considering giving it all up when he visited the Geneva Secretariat of the
World University Services.
Because of the UBC grant they
were able to make a scholarship
available to the student.
And next year he will receive
an intern's salary because UBC
got him through this year.
Borcherdt Speaks
Professor Hans-Heinrich Borcherdt will speak, in German,
on "Schiller as a Poet."
Professor Borcherdt will speak
January 14 at noon in Bu. 217
to mark the bicentenary of
Schiller's death.
The profesor is former head
of the Department of German
Literature and of the Theatre
Institute of the University of
Munich.
The California
Standard Company
CALGARY, ALBERTA
offering careers in.
PETROLEUM EXPLORATION AND
V". PRODUCTION
will conduct campus interviews on
January 13, 14 and 15
FOR POST GRADUATES, GRADUATES
AND UNDERGRADUATES IN:
Mining Engineering Permanent positions only
Mechanical Engineering ...... Permanent positions only
Geological Engineering  Permanent, and summer
Honours Geology   Permanent and summer
Physics and Geology  Permanent and summer
ARRANGEMENTS FOR PERSONAL INTERVIEWS
MAY BE MADE THROUGH THE UNIVERSITY'S
NATIONAL EMPLOYMENT OFFICE.
When asked what was his
toughest fight," Ross answered
that Jimmy McLarnin, a Vancouver boxer, was his most difficult opponent. T oday the two
are the best of friends.
Ross fought McLarnin three
times, defeating him in 1934 to
win the championship, losing it
to McLarnin that same year,
then winning it back again in
1935.
Barney Ross, as a result of his
many    and   varied   experiences
during his life, has reached the
opinion    that    "nothing    comes t
easy; you have to fight for it."
MEN
TWO BARBER SHOPS
TO SERVE YOU
inside  the  gates
• Brock Hall Extension
• 5734 University Boulevard
STUDENTS!
LEARN THE FUNCTIONS OF PROVINCIAL
GOVERNMENT DEPARTMENTS BY GETTING YOUR
FREE SUBSCRIPTION
to the
"BRITISH COLUMBIA GOVERNMENT NEWS"
WRITE TO:
B.C. TRAVEL BUREAU
Parliament Buildings,
Victoria, B.C.
SAMPLES ARE ON FILE WITH YOUR
UNDERGRADUATE SOCIETY*
JANUARY
CLEARANCI
MEN'S
TOPCOATS
Regular $59.50. - $69.58
SALE PRICE
$38<>o
United Tailors
British Woolens
549 Granville
\
r
mf
Fortune Magazine calls us . . .
"the most
hellishly modern
old-fashioned company
in the world"
... and they're right!
We believe in the old fashioned virtues that pioneered
a sprawling trading empire across Canada. Virutes such.
as dependability . . . determination . . . integrity . , .
and the spirit of adventure
We are looking for aggressive young men . . .
willing to accept a challenge . . . men who mjpjkt
into a progressive management team. .■'■<".:. ^fet.
If YOU are willing to accept a challenge, then join a
modern company as a Junior Executive in Retail
Merchandising. ^.'^
You'll find we're modern in giving you:
• a good starting salary.
• continuous and rapid advancement opportunities
• interesting and challenging work
• formal management training
Come and discuss the many fields open to Graduates
this year. YOU can have a brilliant future with the
Hudson's Bay Company!
Make Your Appointment Today
Representatives of the company w.ill  be  conducting
interviews  on  the campus, January  27th and   28th.
Call Your Personnel Office on the Campus
INCORPORATED   2??   MAY   1670.
BIRD CALLS
50c
A.M.S. OFFICE
TM4*}}o '}uauivrB<Iaa sotfJO Jsod -£<l IfBta sts-bio paoaes re pecpoiBtiY

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