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The Ubyssey Sep 29, 1961

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 Engineers
confess
THE UBYSSEY
She wore
panties
Vof. XLIV.
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 1961
No. 7
Few students at
memorial services
MacKenzie, Birney, Lett
in eulogy to Grauer
Council seeks applicants
to chair special events
Student Council is seeking
applicants for ihe position of
Special Events Chairman.
Any person with experience
in programming and general
administrative chores is urged
to apply to the AMS secretary.
The job entails the presentation of various intellectual and
cultural activities on campus.
Successful applicants will be
interviewed by Council. Applications close 4:00 Monday.
By M0KE BLAIR
Only a handful of students turned out Thursday for the
end of an era.
They were conspicuous by their absence as about 1,000
faculty, staff and graduates gathered to pay tribute to Dr.
A. E. "Dal" Grauer, Past Chancellor and Chairman of the
Board of Governors of the University.
No sunshine found its way into
ROBED FACULTY MEMBER moves slowly down aisle at commemoration ceremony for the late university chancellor Dr.
A. E. "Dal" Grauer in War Memorial Gymnasium Thursday
afternoon. About 1,000 students, faculty, staff and graduates
heard Dr. Norman MacKenzie, Dr. Earle Birney and Chief
Justice Sherwood Lett pay tribute to Dr. Grauer.
AMS fee reduction
won by grad students
Now it's cheaper to be a grad. Student council has ratified
a motion by the Graduate Student Association to reduce mem-
-2css' Alma Mater Society fees.
WUSC books
for Geneva
The problem of the 7,000
books the Japanese don't want
is almost solved.
"The bed-pushing feat last
spring gave the book drive more
publicity than we thought," said
Robson. "People were also more
generous than we expected —
instead of 500 books, we got
7000".
All the books are useful somewhere, it is just a question of
where. Our lists show that we
pan meet some requests for universities other than the Japanese,
ahd for a secondary school in
Africa.
World University Service
chairman Stuart Robson said
Thursday, "We are sending a list
of the books we have — all catalogued and in alphabetical order
— to the WUSC secretariat at
Geneva. They have lists of the
books used in universities in
Africa and Asia," he said.
The books now sit in the Brock
basement.
Graduate students will now-
pay ;\ $24 AMS fee in their first
year of graduate work, and no
further fees in later years. Stu
dents previously paid $24 in first
year, and $16 in succeeding
years.
The reduction was made after
Grad students pointed out they
were being required to pay for
the maintainance of both Brock
Hall and the new Grad Student
Center.
INTEGRAL  PART
Said Graduate Student president, Bob McAndrew: "We do
not feel that we should have a
complete reduction in AMS fee's,
since in many ways, we are an
integral part of the student body,
but we should not have to pay
for facilities we have provided
for ourselves."
.-    "We do not feel compelled to
contribute, iror instance, to the
new Student Union Building,
since this is in effect, an undergraduate student center, and will
not be used by the Grads."
LESS   PARTICIPATION
"Furthermore," he said, "there
is a fine line between senior
Graduate students, and faculty,
and we are less liable to participate in undergrad affairs.
"The amount of time spent
pursuing a Masters or Doctors
degree will vary depending upon
the individual, and we feel that
it is unfair to tax a man according to his brains, or lack of
brains, so we are happy with the
new fee arrangement."
Grau i'ees now include a 24
dollar AMS levy in the student's
first year in the faculty, and a
$12 grad center fee each year he
is there.
the gym as Dr. Earle Birney, one |
of Dal Grauer's closest friends,
praised his calmness, courtesy
and wisdom in all circumstances.
He always had time to spend
with a friend even when he was
at the height of his power, Dr.
Birney said.
VISION
Dr. Grauer's foresight in building for the future was praised
by Chief Justice Sherwood Lett.
He told of ^the great projects
that had been undertaken by the
B.C. Electric Company since Dr.
Grauer became its chief officer
in the 1940's.
During the four and a Half
years that he was chancellor of
UBC the campus underwent its
greatest change and expansion.
With the strains of "Holy
Father, Cheer Our Way" still in
the air Dr. N. A. M. MacKenzie,
president and acting chancellor
of the University praised Dr.
Grauers' contribution to the university.
FULL LIFE
The    public    image    of    Dr.
Grauer was shown in his "imagi-'
nation,     sensitivity,      modesty,
dignity,  courtesy and courage,"
said Dr. McKenzie.
During his 55 years Dr. Grauer
was a Rhodes Scholar from UBC
and was captain of the uniyersity
basketball team.
. At Oxford he read law and he
received his Doctor of Philosophy
degree at the University of California. He went to the University of Toronto and by the age of
31 was a full professor and head
of the school of social work.
He became general secretary
of the B.C. Electric in 1939 when
he wanted to put his book learning into practice. He rose through
executive posts and by 1946 was
president of the company.
At the time of his death he was
chairman of the board of the B.C.
Electric's parent company, B.C.
Power Corporation.
In 1956 he was appointed to
the UBC board bf governors and
the t following year succeeded
Chief Justice Sherwood Lett as
Chancellor.
As the gowned faculty, senate,
and AMS council members filed
out with history the gym was
left in silence to brood over the
memory of a man.
Blood cheaper
than money
—chairman
Blood is the target of a week-
long charity drive that starts at
the University Monday.
"It's cheaper to give blood to
the Red Cross than it is to give
money to charity," said Peter
Woolgar, co-chairman of the
drive. "It's something most students can afford."
Faculties, Greek societies and
residences will be competing to
see which can reach the highest
Total objective for the drive is
percentage of its quota, he said.
1625 pints.
Thousands at Clubs Day
Bands, climbers thrill milling mob
By CHRIS FAHRNI
A guy had a hard time getting around at Club's Day.
: Jeez, the crowd is thick, the
guy thought as he pushed his
way through the gathering
crowds.
> The booster club had a band,
the Intellectual Stunt Committee had the Kon-Leaky, the
Philosophy club had girls, and
the Sports Car club had a
Daimler.
But the best display of all,
the guy said to himself as he
moved on, was at the Varsity
Outdoor Club. They showed
what a hanged man looked
like.
#      #      #
The 100 spectators laughed
when a climber scaled the
front wall of the Armory slipped and was left hanging by
his safety rope.
The guy moved inside, past
Cinema 16's monsters, ignoring the piercing Morse-code-
calling-up signal of Ham-soc,
and elbowed his way against
the tide to where the Dance
Club was rhumba-ing.
•!• ^P V
Once in a while he saw a
gymnast catapult out of the
crowd, propelled by an unseen
trampoline. Cassocked writers
wandered around in front of
their model workshop.
An arm grabbed him. "Join
the Liberals, Mac". Then the
Communists got him. Then the
Tories. He took refuge in the
comparative quiet of the Religious club area.
Somewhere, down by where
•thci B£s11s were sticking up»
Judo power-cries rose above
the combined screech of jazz,
waltz, pep music and morse
code.
A petition to keep Canada
free of nuclear weapons had
gathered 50 signatures by two
o'clock.
Flags decorated the UN and
International House displays,
while gay travel posters provided the set for the Carribean
student's booth.
•J* *V *I*
When a Social Crediter
called him a pinko, a New
Party man called him a government stooge, a fencer threatened to run him through, the
Alliance Francais swore at him
in French, he took his bruised
shoulders and eardrums and
escaped.
"Join anything?" someone
asked him.
"Naw, I'm not a joiner," he
said. Page 2
THE
UBYSSEY
Friday, September 29, 1961
THE  UBYSSEY
Authorized as second class mail by the Post Office Department,
\    Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash.
MEMBER CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
Published   three   times   weekly   throughout   the   University   year
j        in Vancouver by  the  Publications   Board  of the Alma Mater  Society,
University   of   B.C..   Editorial   opinions   expressed    are   those   of   the
Editorial   Board   of  The  Ubyssey   and   not   necessarily   those   of   the
Alma   Mater  Society  of  the  Univfersity  of   B.C.
j TELEPHONES: CA 4-3242, locals 12 (news desk),
| 14 (Editor-in-Chief), 6, 15 (business offices).
| Edilor-in-Chief: Roger McAfee
|        Associate   Editor        Ann   Pickard
I        News Editor Fred Fletcher
|        City Editor Keith Bradbury
|        CUP Editor       Bob  Hendrickson
i        Photography  Editor George  Fielder
i        Senior  Editor               Sharon   Rodney
I        Sports Editor     Mike Hunter
'        Photography   Manager      .    .    .    .    .       Byron  Hender
I       Critics Editor David Bromige
I STAFF THIS ISSUE:
j       NEWS: Denis Stanley, assistant city editor; Mike Grenby,
I Mike Blair, ehrjte Fahrni, Lloyd Drake, Sharon Mc-
'■' j Kinnon, Krishna Sahay, Ian Cameron, Janet Ramey,
Judy Richardson, Pat Hopkins, Ruth Tate, Joy Hold-
' ing, Eric Wilson, Paul Wilson.
SPORTS: Bill Willson, Ron Kydd.
TECHNICAL: Fred Jones, Don Hume, Pauline Fisher.	
Compromise?
Once again last year's package .deal referendum is drawing
fire. This time from the Law Undergraduate Society representative on council.
This lawyer-type says he is only a spokesman for a "group"
of students who f^el, as a matter of principle, the propriety of
the referendum should be challenged.
This group probably has at least a partly valid point. Per-
liaps the students should have had an opportunity to voice their
choice between the two buildings thtejy were being asked to give
their money for. Perhaps they should have been in on all the
negotiations with the administration on the financing of the
venture.
Since there was slim chance the present complainers could
do anything to change the course of the referendum they said
they would compromise and asked council to pass a motion
censuring the action of their predecessors.
There's only one, thing bothering us. We always thought
a matter of principle was one over which there was no com-
, promise.
We thought principle was the final standing point of a
man. A point past which he would compromise no further.
Yet we find this group compromising on what they themselves called a matter of principle. Seems strange.
Oh, well, lawyers will be lawyers.
Poor WUSC
Stuart Robson, a local World University Service chairman,
took seven inches Thursday to deal with things remotely connected to reporting of the "Books in Brock" fiasco.
His idea, we assume, was to go through a variation of the
age-old "We were misquoted" gimmick to divert attention away
from the disorganization of last spring's book drive, and imply
things aren't really as bad as The Ubyssey would like to make
out. '
We don't identify ourselves at meetings, Mr. Robson says.
The problem of getting rid of the books isn't new. The Ubyssey
didn't report all the good things that WUS did at its meeting.
And he went on.
What Mr. Robson is really upset about, though, is the fact
that the story got out.
Is he implying that if our reporter had identified himself,
he would have been asked to leave?
With regard to his second statement Mr. Robson ignores
the fact that there was no receiver for the books and that this
fact has not been made public before; therefore it is news. We
were told, you recall, the books would be sent to Japan and
Pakistan.
With regard to his third charge, there are a number of
organizations on campus which do good work which doesn't
get into the news columns. His wasn't the only club that worked
all summer!
WUS collected 7,000 books and got rid of 10 of them. The
rest are sitting in Brock basement.
WUS didn't know what books it had at the time of the
story. The list was lost.
The chairman of the committee apparently doesn't know
who his committee members are. When asked whom he thought
the extra person (our reporter) at the meeting was, Mr. Robson said:
"Oh, I thought he was a member of the committee."
—K.B.
Serendipity
Dont legalize abortions!
By  JACK  ORNSTEIN
Don't legalize abortions! For
more than one year. Abortions
are necessary, of course, only
when pregnancy occurs. So for
one year let those have abortions who need them. Then,
when all the females who so
desire are regularly taking
Enovids (birth control pills—
i.e.—ovulation control pills—
approx. cost $4.50 per month)
. . . there will be no NEED
for abortions. We can pacify
the theologians and other
sources of darkness by assuring them that we'll legalize
abortions for only one year.
If" the perfect contraceptive
is here, let's make it available
to all. This way we can eliminate the need for abortions.
Bachelors need no longer go
through the hell of waiting for
their girl friend's periodical
report. Single women who
have foolishly repressed their
natural  urges  need   do  so  no
longer. The essential point is
that they need no longer fear
the occurrence of pregnancy.
Healthier, happier and richer lives are available to all
through the advances of medical science. Nobody HAS to
take contraceptives and live
securely and happily. People
can still repress that most
disturbing of all drives (i.e.,
the one down to the drug
store), thus causing great psychological and physiological
strain, or they can have sexual
intercourse and go through
hell periodically.
I take little risk in being
contradicted when I state that
premarital intercourse is practised by 70-75 per cent of the
population—or perhaps 75-80
per cent would be closer. Isn't
it foolish for 75 per cent of
the people to take unnecessary
risks? Surely the best solution
to the problem of illegality of
abortions  is   to   eliminate   the
NEED  for them.  Naturally  it
would   be   better   to   legalize
abortions    AND    make    these
pills   readily   available  to   all.
But that will take a lot of timer
— and  doing.   I'm   sure  that
women  would  rather  take a
pill daily than risk undergoing
a perhaps psychologically dam-^
aging operation.
You should talk to all the
doctors and lawyers you know.
If we can't legalize abortions,
and even if we can, let's find
out all we can about these ovulation control pills. If thesfe
pills are as effective and as
safe as they are reported to be,
they should be as accessible as
the older, less effective an<J
less convenient contraceptives
are.
It's up to the medical and
law professions to carry the
ball from here — but they'll
need a shove or two—from you
and I. I hope you'll do your
share.
I'm sorry Dudley, but "gorsh I dunno" is hardly the answer I expected
Local boy
His Father having uttered the proper words in the
proper places;
The post-Varsity period ol yellow roadsters,
champagne and chorus girls
Having ended in one monster hangover too many;
The abortionist having been paid oft by the family
lawyer.
And the broken mis-engagement settled by proxy.
He could now take his place, aged twenty-nine.
As private secretary to the managing director.
With a suitable desk ot his own, as his father's heir.
Green light all the way; the pre-ordained marriage
assured
To the daughter of father's old friend,
(When the merger went through, of course—no point
in a public offering of shares.)
A year abroad, with the crest of the honeymoon in
Italy,
Unmarred by stray and ugly sprouts of neglected
wild oats.
Visits to the foreign branches, as a matter of routine,
("Good to get to know the people I'll have to rely on.)
Three children, a place in the country, voting stock
on the board.
With the chairmanship inevitable.
No one could doubt that a seat in the Senate awaited
him
When the distinguishing touch of the grey appeared
at the temples.
—VERNAL HOUSE Friday, September 29, 1961
THE
UBYSSEY
Page 3
CUP CAPERS
By BOB HENDRICKSON
Well here we go for another
year of plagiarism, philosophy,
and plain,phew,,
"^ First allow me to explain the
name of this column. CUP are
the initials of, Canadian Univer-
. sity Press. Bofn. in 1938, the
Brainchild of; several student
editors, it provides communication between Canadian. campuses
^nd trophies for the best Canadian student newspaper. The aim
of CUP was to raise the quality
of student ^publications and to
counteract the, tendency toward
self-centred regionalism.
They succeeded quite well in
^iese aims until subversion materialized last year in the shape
of this column.
And   now   we   come   to   the
^Capers   part of   the  title.   This
consists of the more inconsequen-
tal items of CUP copy (plagiarism),    the    Completely   Useless
Party  of   which  I'm   president
t(philosophy), and my own brand
of humor (phew).
Now, as you must be interested
xin what kind of nut would write
such public drivel, allow me to
introduce myself.
■\   I am The Ubyssey's CUP Editor', a fellow of infinite crust.   I
like sex, money,  liquor,   jokes,
and   people who  provide these
items.
• I don't like cafeteria coffee
'(although I drink It, my last
year's exam results, and people
who say things like:
-'. "Oh, you're the Cup editor? I
guess that's a fancy title for the
fellow who brings the coffee
down for the reporters."
Remarks   like   those   hurt   a
, kind,  sensitive  soul  like   mine.
Well, that's it. The reporters are
asking for   something.    I  guess
.-they want me to help them with
their writing.
ANOTHER
LUCKY
NUMBER
5305602 |
if this is your
registration number,
you will win
absolutely free
one of the
NEW
FOR
FALL
TIES
they're slim, trim and
square end (but hip)
in all ihe traditional
colours to enhance
your dress or sports
ensemble. What's
more   they're   only
$2.00
at
the shirt
n tie bar
658   Seymour  St
"come in and tie one on"
Yes—says classics prof
exci
By  FRED   FLETCHER
Students would miss the
most exciting part of university if the administration
practised foresight, Mr. Malcolm McGregor said Wednesday.
He said students would
have missed:
• the fun of having lights
and water off in the Buchanan
building for two days.
• the enjoyment of standing
for hours in registration lineups. (If the administration had
foresight it would have 60
people instead of six okaying
Frosh programs, Dr. McGregor
said.)
• the   pleasure    of    existing
under the University parking
regulations. (If the parking
committee had foreseen the
abuse it was going to take it
would have outlawed parking
entirely, said Dr. McGregor,
a member of the committee).
Dr. McGregor, head of the
classics department was trying
to convince about 100 freshmen attending a debate at the
first annual Frosh Symposium
Vhat foresight is not better
than hindsight by a damn
sight.
He pointed out that most of
his colleagues watch the freshettes as they approach across
the Buchanan concourse. This,
he said, is foresight.
But, he watches them as
they go the other way. This,
he said, is hindsight — and
everyone knows that the rear
view is infinitely more aesthetic.
Dr. C. W. J. Eliot, who proposed the topic "resolved that
foresight is better than hindsight by a damsite, said, by
definition  of terms,  that  the
resolution actually read: "that
Vhe province of Bennett is
better than the site of Fulton
by the length of the Columbia
River."
By connecting the words
hind and simple, he deduced
that if one who is simple is a
simpleton then one who is
foolish is a fool ton.
This, he said, leads one to
the   conclusion   that   Fulton,
Bennett, damsite all go together.
Student Mike Matthews, for
the affirmative, said foresight
is better than hindsight because looking, back only makes
one wonder how he managed
to escape catastrophe yesterday.
"You can almost see the
big Busters truck in the sky
coming to get you," he said.
Photo by Lynne Nixon
SAGE ADVICE is what upperclassman Nick Omelusik is giving two freshettes at the first annual Frosh Symposium in
Brock Hall Wednesday night.
Cornwall to recommend
UBC —Soviet exchange
An exchange of UBC and Soviet students will be
proposed by student president Alan Cornwall at the National Federation of Canadian University Students Congress in Kingston, Ontario next week.
Cornwall said the proposed exchange would. send a
a UFC student to Russia for a year and a Russian student
would carry on his studies here on a World University
Service Scholarship.
New Location for
Textbook Sales
All text books are now on sale in the FIELD HOUSE,
immediately south of Brock Hall
This FAST SERVICE CENTER closes September 30
... avoid the rush, get your books today!
Operated by the
University Book Store
Don Robertson, for the negative, said that hindsight can be
disastrous because it can lead
a man into 'involvement' with
a woman.
Dr. Eliot ended the debate
by saying; "It is obvious, that-;
foresight is better than hindsight by a damnsight, for while .
I may spend therest of my life
contemplating my navel, Dr.
McGregor will spend his contemplating his rear."
The   debate   was   called   a.
draw.
week! YES NEXT
WEEK IS IT! WE'RE OPENING
NEXT   WEEK    (good    grief!!)
However let's not lose our
heads  over  the  thing,  after;
all we're still rational beings'
and we still have to try and,!
retain some sort of emotional
equilibrium about thi?" thing,
(lets snap our cap NEXT week)'
By the way — "this thing"
we refer to is our new  pizzeria opening right near campus; our first atempt to combine pizza and honky-tonk. It,'
should be a gassss!!! Why not!
drop around and join in the
fun.  Tonite,  eat our  famous
piza at our Davie St. joint.
1208 DAVIE MU 3-6015.
WE DELIVER
21
Anniversary
Sale
MEN'S
TOPCOATS
$39.00
reg. $59.50
Harris Tweeds
Imported Velours
New Shortie Style
in
Short, Reg., & Tails
REVERSIBLE RAINCOATS
MADE  BY  CROYDON
$18.95
United Tailors
British Woollens
549 Granville Page 4
Friday, September 29, 1961
THE
flesh, flask, stranded fish
FEDERICO   FELLINI'S   MA ST E R-
piece of movie art, La Dolce Vita, is currently in town, disclosing the degeneration and collapse of morals in twentieth
century society. This movie succeeds with
pure elegance and strange charm yet it
it not, until after the show, hours of reflection after, that the aura of awareness
enfolds one's mind with all the cinematographic beauty of the presentation.
FROM THE DEEP INSIGHT OF THE
writer is transmitted the dramatic theme
aided by the pointed imagery, but to receive his signal requires almost profound
thought, intelligent reflection and an
acquaintance with contemporary society.
FOR HIS PRODUCTION FELLIN4
makes excellent use of a reporter's life
as he winds his way through the sidewalk
cafes and night clubs of Rome. Marcello
Mastroianni is the man's name and his
passions lie in escapes — women and
drink preoccupy him — wealth mildly
fascinates him.
AT ONE POINT HE DRIVES MILES
to report on two children who claim to
have witnessed the Madonna. A multitude
gathers by nightfall to observe the spectacle (the return of the Madonna), the sick
and decrepit are hauled through the rain
to await healing. The. peasants are praying
as the movie cameras are churning and
TV spotlights burn the rain.
THEN THE BLESSED CHILDREN
arrive dressed in flowing attire; they
kneel and pray; sobs are heard and the
cameras churn on. Suddenly one child
starts to her feet; screams "The Madonna," and runs headlong into the rain followed by thousands. She runs left then
veers right pursuing the blessed Virgin;
all is chaos; then a close-up reveals the
giggling  child.
A Review of the movie La Dolce Vita
IT IS NOT DIFFICULT TO SEE WHY
Marcello tires of his career and consults
an old and trusted friend about his conflict. Steiner is a mature man of forty, his
face mapped with wrinkles of understanding and hollows dug by turbulence. Two
angelic children of three and five, a lovely wife and a comfortable warm home
are a refuge to Marcello and he asks if
he may come again. Steiner walks to his
bedroom, followed by Marcello, kisses
his children, and looks across the city
from his terrace. He sees no optimistic
future — no future for his children in an
age of A, H and N bombs.
STEINER SUGGESTS MARCELLO
take up serious writing and introduces
him to a publisher. In a Mediterranean
cafe Marcello, the writer, begins. It is
there he meets a fifteen.-year-old girl with
infinite charm and an angelic smile. In
her he sees the morals, the ambitions, the
contentment and the desire for purity
which he lacks. This is when he is nearest
to himself and self-fulfillment.
STEINER SHOOTS HIMSELF AND
his two children, and Marcello, the next
night, revels in a chaotic orgy surrounded
by unusual "niks" of every description.
Marcello, in a moment of drunken passion
tells them to stop, to leave their empty
existence, and when they laugh he resolutely and resignedly says, "This party
will go on forever." When the guests become bored with with a strip-tease they
wander toward a beach to see fisherfolk
drag a huge fish to shore. Marcello remarks, ironically, "Why is he staring at
us?"
IT IS AT THIS MOMENT THE
climax occurs. Across a sandbar a lovely,
blonde girl waves to him. He crawls on
his knees a few feet toward her, failing
in his drunkenness to recognize her. He
is like a man grasping at his  ambition
which lies only a hundred yards away.
APPROACHING FROM THE REAR.
a slut grabs his hand and pulls him toward
the leaving crowd. One wave, one last
glance and Marcello turns and leaves. A
close-up reveals the blonde girl is smiling
kindly — that very angelic smile of the
girl at the Mediterranean cafe.
"THE SWEET LIFE' IS FILLED
with every conceivable failure. Marcello's
beautiful, rich but promiscuous girl
friend who tries to hide in Rome but cannot; the American actress who is simply
tired of her life but has not the self-
coercion necessary to change it — who
seeks refuge in love, walks in fountains
and lies in fornication.
IT IS NOT THE LACK OF REALIZ-
ation that prohibits the lost people from
finding their way. They know what they
are. One perfumed male says that soon
all the world will be homosexual. A degenerate woman of wealth classes herself
simply, "I'm a whore." Marcello tells his
friends he hates scandal writing. These
people are unreclaimable and this is what
makes them dangerous.
ORGIES. GHOST HUNTS, DRUNK-
enness, homosexuality, and infidelity
abound, emphasizing the theme which is
the lack of . . . Of what? Of everything
esteemed worthwhile.
THE PHOTOGRAPHIC IMAGERY OF
long empty halls, dust dunes and moldy
castles brings the theme through poignantly. Some critics find this picture repiti-
tious. The repitition, however, breeds
emphasis, not boredom.
THE FILM IS PASSIONATELY PRE-
sented, exquisitely engineered, purposefully photographed and exactingly acted.
SEE IT. IT SWINGS;
—gordon briggs.
-placebo-
by george bowering
AS THE SELECT FEW WHO
read what I had to say in this
space last week already appreciate, I have always concluded that the search for art
and artistic activity (alright,
Mom, artistic indulgence) on
this   fairgrounds  (Frosh:   read
2 DAYS ONLY
FRI. AND SAT.
JESSE FULLER
FOLKWAYS  RECORDING
STAR
the   legendary   blues   singer
who accompanies himself on
harmonics,  guitar,  bass,
drums and cymbals
ALL   seats   $2.00
Coffee Boii9e
726 Seymour St.
Open for Lunches
Vancouver, B.C.    MU 2-9135
campus) is a quest that would
challenge a Byronesque hero. I
refer by the last, of course, to
the editor of this page.
SO THAT BY IMPOSING
upon myself the rigors of my
own polemic integrity, I would
seem to have done myself out
of a job — that is, the weekly
secretion of a few hundred
words on the culture scene at
the old UB and C. Not so. The
realm of art is boundless, and
so is your disobedient servant.
Hence this week I propose to
view the baffling soul food of
the new Graduate Students'
Center.
LET US PROCEED FROM
the very good in whatever
direction leads us to the very
bad. Part way we find ourselves cramped on the land
scape gardening. Sandwiched
between an auspiciously private
irontyard and the unplayed
golfcourse of the faculty club
is the divot of turf accidentally
replaced in the yard allocated
to the grads. The barricade
that demarks the faculty club
belies the early resolution that
the new center would facilitate communal relations between faculty and grads.
THE MYSTERIOUS DIREC-
tors  were   smart  enough   and
SUNDAY AT 8:30
JAZZ IN CONCERT
DON CLARK QUARTET
tonight 8:30 to  1:30
fofksinging jazz
poetry to jozz
mamBzoion
Coffee Bouse
726 Seymour St.
Open for Lu tches
SPECIAL STUDENT RATES
COMPLETE OPTICAL SERVICE
Glasses Fitted
Contact Lenses
"'        24-Hour Service OPTICAL Repairs
VANCOUVER BLOCK       ll
MU 5-0928 — MU 3-2948 ~S
Main Floor f
734 GRANVILLE ST.
Immediate Appointment
NEW WESTMINSTER - 675 COLUMBIA STREET
LA 6-8665
gutsy enough and rich enough
to hang originals by British
Columbia painters on the various walls, rather than insulting
us with the usual bedraggled
prints that are supposed to represent the fin de siecle impressionists. There is a Binning,
small and sketchy to be sure,
and a Plaskett, and several
lesser triumphs that at least
serve to keep Mardi Gras poster
ads off the wallspace. Unfortunately the good effect is marred
by the nailing on the wall of
the Committee Room (whatever
that means) of an imitation
Kwakiutl lodge mask or whatever. It looks more like Mike
Matthews than any diety from
farther up the coast.
NOW TO THE VERY BAD.
For one thing, I like to eat at
an hour considered suppertime
by the civilized world (that's
situated amid the St. Lawrence
River, gang). Imagine my
chagrin one day last week when
I could procure food nowhere
on campus at 6:45 a.m. The
food at the GSG is tolei ably
edible (except for the instant
spuds), especially at those
prices, but I don't want to eat
my evening meal in the middle
of the afteernoon. Maybe l» an-
dard time will help.
TUUM YECHH.
DAME JUDITH ANDERSON
Advertised  as "our greatest ,
living actress, Judith Anderson   will   appear   in   scenes
from "MEDEA", "MACBETH",
and     "TOWER     BEYOND'
TRAGEDY"    at    the    Queen
Elizabeth    Theatre    Sat.,   at
8:30 p.m. Tickets are available for students at HBS or
at the Queen Elizabeth Theatre on the night of the performance   for   75c.   Regular
tickets   are   from    $1.75   to..
$4.00.
Raven
Ravenous for carrion
RAVEN, a literary magazine
financed by the A.M.S. is soon
to go to press for the tentfr
time, and any campus poet,
short story writer, essayist,
muck-rake or tish-stirrer who
has not yet sent his/her submission is urged to do so im»
mediately.
RAVEN recently in these
pages took a knuck on the rap-
pies from that administer ai
placebos, hoarse-doctor Bowering, for whose taste RAVEN
has been too conservative.
In an attempt to remedy this,
two of the editors of Tish, the.
Black Mountaineers' party-line
pamphlet soon to be reviewed
in this space, have been invite^
to act as RAVEN editors. They
are George Bowering and Jamie
Reid.
RAVEN TEN, to be designed
by Hugh Michaelson is expected
by late November of this year.'
Submissions should be left
either at the A.M.S. office or
the Ubyssey office, both of
which are in the Brock, and
should be marked c/o David
Bromige. — d.b.
The Permanent Question
Leader Beauty Salon
4447 W. 10th AVENUE CAstle 4-4744
Male and Female Stylists
OPEN FRIDAY NIGHTS 9'SE Y
Friday, September 29, 1961
Page 5
Entertainment:
th
e soon-seen scene
PIAYS
SUMMER OF THE SEVENTEENTH DOLL, reviewed on
this page, plays tonight and tomorrow at the Cambie Theatre,
635 West Broadway. Curtain 8:30, tickets $1.50-2.50:
Shaw's MAN & SUPERMAN, produced by the Vancouver
Little Theatre, opened at the York Theatre, Georgia & Commercial, last night, and runs until Saturday week.
Sean O'Casey's COCKADOODLE DANDY begins at the
Freddy Wood Theatre on campus on October 13th. This production is directed by Dorothy Somerset, and the cast includes
Harry Bailly (our Dave Hughes), and Ted Greenhalgh. Curtain 8:30, tickets $1.50-$2.00.
FILMS
Two INGMAR BERGMAN films may be seen this week:
at the Studio, ANSIKTET, the Face, miscalled THE MAGICIAN in North America. It will probably be dubbed, but if
you can endure this travesty, is worth seeing.
The second film is the apocalyparesque SJUNDE IN-
SEGLET or THE; SEVENTH SEAL. These two films star Max
von Sydow and Gunnar Bjoernstrand.
This film can only be seen by possessors of an annual
membership, price $7.50 from Duthies, in the Classic Film
Society. Or is it the Vancouver Film Society? Blinkie of
Duthies will know. 8:30 Sunday at the Vogue.
UBC's CINEMA 16 shows THE MISTRESS sometime on
Monday evening. This is another of those membership deals.
Details from Duthies or the AMS or CINEMA 16, Brock Hall.
Or call CA 4-1455. The blurb calls this a film '"of considerable
THE CRITICS' PACE
EDITOR: DAVE BROMIGE
Layout: Jones
artistic power. T*l|bis film," it -continues, "mirrors the, conflict
between the traditional & modern outlook in Japan 50 years
ag?!V '"''.-. "-■■■ "■
FOUR FACES,. OF ASIA, a documentary, can be seen
under the auspices of World Adventure Tours at the 'Q.E.T.
next Thursday evening.
V *r ^£
CLUBS
AT THE CAVE: DOROTHY DANDRIDGE.
Admission excessive, price of drinks absurd.
AT THE INQUISITION, JESSE FULLER. Mr. Fuller,
it says here, "has sung in many of the major folk and blues
festivals. He is accepted as one of America's leading Blues
instrumentalists & singers." Jesse Fuller will do three sets
tonight and tomorrow night, sometime between 8:30 and 1:30.
Admission $2.00. No drinks, just coffee. MU 2-9135.
*}* *t« *f*
CBC, SEE
TOMORROW . . . 9:00 p.m. . . . THE BERKELEYS OF
BROADWAY. Astaire, Rogers, Oscar Levant.
SUNDAY . . . 11:15 p.m ALL THE KING'S MEN.
Brod Crawford, Mercedes McCambridge.
MONDAY . . . 1:45 p.m. . . . NORMAN YOUNG!! in The
Story Seat, with Lillian Carlson. Prod. Phil Keatley. Catch
it, Kiddies!
THURSDAY,;. 12:30 .p.m. . .. 5 AGAINST THE HOUSE.
Novak; 11:33 p.ni.        WENDELL COREY in harriet craig
CBC HEAR
TODAY . , . 10:15 p.m. . . . Poetry selected & introduced
by Kingsley Amis ... 10:30 p.m. . . . iRS.P. 11:00 pm Bob
Smith, jazz
TOMORROW   . . 8:00 p.m. ... The Movie Scene.
SUNDAY . . . 1:30 p.m. . . . Critically Speaking . . . 4:30
Resort on the Arts . . . 6:00 p.m. . . . Sargent Concert. 8:00
p.m. .     Iphigenia in Taurus
TUESDAY . . . 6:30 p.m. . . . CRITICS AT LARGE. Always catch this. It may be worthwhile.
WEDNESDAY ... of course, CBC Wednesday night. This
week: Aberhart of Alberta.
Don't say you weren't told. —d.b.
lolls in the doldrums at cambie
Review of the play "The
■mmer of the Seventeenth
Doll"
IIDDLE AGE IS A MOST
ortunate time at which to
thrown onto the grubby
>r of the real world. This
sm has been poignantly ex-
ssed in Ray Lawler's recent
/, "The Summer of the
eriteenth Doll".
«E ACTION CENTERS ON
igar cane cutter, Roo Web-
and his relationship with
Melbourne barmaid with
>m he habitually passes the
tif season. Important also is
i's partner, Barney Ibbot,
-styled Casanova, with a
iber of de facto wives and
cfren. Every lay-off season
the past sixteen years this
- have passed their time at
home of Olive Leech, Roo's
maid; previous to the action
° of the play Barney has
3yed the company of one
icy. Nancy, however, has
irjed of her uncertain re-
onship with Barney and
ted off tp the greener pas-
2s of marriage. Well in-
tioned Glive has invited a
:om widow, Pearl Cunning-
l, to live with her tempor-
y, thus facilitating a replace-
lt of Barney's loss.
HE PLAY BEGINS WITH
ikle of misleading optimism
Pearl's feigned indifference
s  to  disguise  her curiosity
and anticipation of Barney's
arrival, and Olive scurries to
the window at every blast of a
car horn. Gaiety erupts with
the arrival of Roo and Barney
and the cold beer flows freely.
THE MOOD IS SQUELCHED
when Roo exits temporarily,
giving Barney an opportunity
to tell Olive of Roo's quarrel
with Johnny Dowd, a young
American cane cutter, and
Roo's ensuing humiliation.
bout.
THE FIGHT AND HIS CON-
tinuing   grudge   suggest   that
Roo's main problem is unwill
ingness to admit his age. Roo
crawls off to seek employment
in a paint factory, psychologically unable to face the pride-
slashing competition of Johnny
Dowd's machete in the sugar
fields.
OLIVE, UNFORTUNATELY,
does not wish her unwilling
migrant to fold his wings and
settle into the nest. He has always been the Eagle who every
Jmating season beat his way
south in the summer to spend
five months in her solicitous
bosom. She has focused her
love on Roo's capabilities and
ignored the fact of his mortality.
LOWERED IN HER OWN
eyes to the status of a kept
woman, Olive can no longer
accept Roo's love. Neither can
Roo remodel himself to his former image nor Olive reconcile
her feelings with Roo's inevitable loss of youth.
ON THE WHOLE THE
Cambie Theatre production of
Lawler's play is competent
enough to warrant the capacity
crowd it entertained last Saturday night.
THE MOST OUTSTANDING
performance, if audience is a
valid guide, was that of Emma
by Barbara Tremaine. Her stage
movement, from the shuffling
gait to the dangle of her ever-
present cigarette left little to be
desired; her voice and gesture
were equally convincing, I
would very much like to see
her performance in a more
prominent role.
JOHN   STARK   PLAYED
John Dowd in the usual John
Stark manner — sufficiently
aggressive and shifting from
youthful swagger to boyish
bashfullness with enough facility to give a plausible performance.
WALLY MARSH'S POR-
trayal of Roo was competent
enough; Roo was in turn realistically rough, or obviously
grasping futily for articulate
expression, or genuinely gentle,
whichever or whenever the
script or director prescribed. I
offer only one criticism; his
accent could have been more
consistent.
OLIVE WAS PROJECTED
well,  although  Christine Best
cries more convincingly than
she laughs — perhaps because
according to one of her own
lines she is supposed to cry
very hard and she is living the
part.
DIRECTOR PETER STAT-
tner did fairly well, generally
speaking; stage movement was
well controlled, and continuity
and pace were quite acceptable.
He might have pressed for bet-
ence throughout the olay. There
ter accents and their perman-
is a possibility, I suppose, of
inability on the part of some
of the actors, in which case
Stattner cannot be blamed.
THERE IS ALSO A MITE
too much contrast between the
bright spots in the play and the
black — and here I believe it
reasonable to split responsibility Stattner and playwright
Lawler. In this particular lack
of mood control Lawler reminds me of Erich Remarque.
"THE   SUMMER   OX   THE
Seventeenth Doll" is running
at the Cambie 635 W. Broadway, tonight and tomorrow. It's
worth the $1.50.
—wayne lamb
JESS FULLER, well known folk
and blues singer is playing
at the Inquisition Coffee
House this weekend. See the
column, "The Soon - Seen
Scene."
ELVIRA'S
•Ima de Mallorca
9 W. 10th Ave. CA 4-0848
jjinal Imports from Spain
mcouver's Most Unique
Gift Shop
Point $teij^
4435 W. 10th Ave. CA 8-8718
25% Discount on all Purchases if you present your
AMS card.
Ik student who would lib to rise,
Ml use te savmg stmto^m
(lUteaikw^
Bank of Montreal
&m«tUu. '?<MCG<utAji>i Student*
A big step on fhe road to success
is an early banking connection
10 2 KIWOI CAMUUtS
rap Page 6
THE        UBYSSEY
Friday, September 29, 1961
New music facilities
will be needed by '64
By JOY HOLDING
The University's mushrooming Department of Music has
been contained —» at least Aor the time- being.
But, says Dr. G. Welton Marquis, professor apd head of the
-department,    a    promised    new
music  building will be  needed
within the next three years.
He said that in the two years
since UBC first offered degrees
in music the number of "degree"
students has jumped from 35 to
110.
Dr. Marquis said that the 14
available' practice rooms are
being used 2500 practise hours a
week.
"The present building has no
acoustical tiling and when four
to ten practise rooms are in use
simultaneously, the harmony is
sadly broken, in more ways than
one," he said.
He said UBC is the only western Canadian university offering a professional degree course.
Students who previously would
have had to attend either McGill,
the University of Toronto or
"United States universities now
come to UBC.
Dr. Marquis said that a serious
shortage of musical instruments
that the department faced last
year has now been alleviated.
"Actually we are in good
shape now," he said. "But we
will need the new building when
it comes."
Leadership conference
forms available now
Students interested in attending the Leadership Conference. Ocf. 6 to 8 can obtain
application forms at the J^MS
office. Cost is $4.Su per student.
The conference, held an-
nally ai Camp Elphinstone,
is a gathering of campus leaders to exchange ideas and discuss mutual problems.
Pharmacists dispense
headache aid for ball
Five thousand sample Bromo
Seltzer packages will be distributed on campus this week to
publicize the Pharmacy students'
annual Bromo Ball, to be held
Saturday night in Brock Hall.
What a
REFRESHING
NEW
FEELING
... what a special zing ... you get from
Coke! Sparkling as sunswept spray,
the lively lift and cold crisp taste of
ice-cold Coca-Cola.
Ask for "Coke" or "Coca-Cola"—both trade-marks mean the product
of Coca-Cola Ltd.—the world's best-loved sparkling drink.
New faculty
seeks voice
A new faculty of 19 students,
the School of Rehabilitation
Medicine, is asking for representation on Student Council.
They have asked council president Alan Cornwall for clarification on their chain of representation.
Spokesman Peter Edgelowhas
pointed out that there are two
avenues open to them. This is
through the Faculty of Medicine
representative or a voice ef their
own.
FOR
THAT
SMART
LOOK
IN
GLASSES
LOOK
TO
Ptesctiftien Ohtieal
gre>
We   use  genuine  CORECTAL   lenses
— clear from edge to edge —
"Ask Your Doctor"
Contact Lenses — Zenith  Hearing Aids
Special discounts to undergraduates
Est. 1924
frain for
a Career
With a Future
Here are four interesting and rewarding plans
for young men interested in a career as a
commissioned officer in the Canadian Army:
SUBSIDIZUION  FOR  PROFESSIONAL TRAINING - There
are. tn Service plans wherein university students in
medicine or dentistry can be subsidized during their
course and become commissioned Doctors or Dentists in
the Canadian Armed Forces.
THE REGULAR OFFICER TRAINING PLAN
-This is a tri-Service Plan wherein
high school graduates receive
advanced education and leadership
training at one of the Canadian Service
Colleges or a.university to become
officers in the #oyal Canadian Navy,
the Canadian Army or the Royal Canadian Air Force.
THE CANADIAN OFFICERS' TRAINING CORPS-University undergraduates may obtain a commission
tfy training during their spare time and summer holidays. The student who trains under this plan
it paid for his actual training time and is not obligated for full-time service after graduation.
You may obtain full information on any of these
plans from your University Army
Resident Stiff 8ft««r.
THE OFFICER CANDIDATE PROGRAMME-
.Selected high school graduates, not
wishing to undergo academic training
for a degree, may qualify as a short
service officer after a brief intensive
period of military training and later may
apply If become a regular officer.
CINEMA 16 PRESENTS "INTERNATIONAL CINEMA
A series of international prize1 winning films beginning Monday evenings in the Auditorium. All foreign films have
English sub-titles. With each feature will be shown outstanding experimental, avant garde, and award winning
shorts.
October 30th, ASHES AND DIAMONDS, (directed by A. Wajda.
Poland, 1958)
November 20th, THE OLYMPIAD
(conceived by Leni Riefenstahl,
Germany,  1936-38)
December 11th, ORPHEE (directed by
Jean Cocteau, France,  1949)
January 8th, LIGHTS OF VARIETY,
(directed by Federico Fellini, Italy,
1950)
January 29th. D5ARY OF A COUNTRY PRIEST (directed by Robert
Bresson, France, 1951)
February 26th, "AN EVENING OF
DAMNED FILMS."
March 19th, BRINK OF LIFE (directed   bv   Ingmar   Bergman,   Sweden,
1958)"
March 26th, WE ARE ALL MURDERERS   (directed   by   Andre   Cayette,
France, 1959)
ADMISSION B.y MEMBERSHIP PASS ONLY   '     PROGRAMME  DETAILS   AND  TICKETS  FROM
ADULTS, $5.00 STUDENTS, $4.00  " A.M.S., DUTHIE BOOKS AND CINEMA 16.
ENQUIRIES: CA 4-1455.  s
Monday, October 2nd
UBC Auditorium, 8 p.m.
THE MISTRESS   (JAPAN)
'In this film, which mirrors the
conflict between the traditional and
modern outlook in the Japan of 50
years ago, the dramatic incidents, the
sensitive performance of Hideko Taka-
mine, and the beauty of the photography, are combined to shape a film of
considerable artistic power that is the
equal of any film in the contemporary
Jaoanese cinema. Friday, September 29,  1961
T» 5
UBYSSEY
Pag* 7
Father knows best
for UBC hockey
lAJbljAMlf
SPORT
pI
PRACTISING FOR REAL THING, Thunderbird linemen George
Turpin (left) and Wayne Osborne check over pro football
contract, contrived by Ubyssey photographer Lynne Nixon.
Turpin and Osborne got letters from New York Giants asking
if they were interested  in  playing  professional.
Chiefs meet Royals
Whether, weather,
will affect Birds
UBC Thunderbirds rest their hopes for a victory Saturday
on whether and the weather
Rugby squad
ans U.K.
tour in '63
UBC's rugby team will probably tour Great Britain in
December of 1963, rugby coach
Albert Laithwaite said.
Laithwaite said he is waiting
for final approval from the English Rugby Union before he
finalizes the date.
'Birds will play in Belfast,
Edinburgh, the Midlands of England, and London. They will
finish the tour in Cardiff, Wales,
then fly homo.
The University administration
has agreed to help raise funds.
Money is also expected from
the national and provincial athletic unions.
During the tour, 'Birds hope
to play the famed teams from
Oxford and Cambridge.
Whether or not coach Frank
Gnup's prize quarterback Barry
Carkner will be in the lineup
when the 'Birds meet Alberta
Golden Bears in Edmonton is
at  the moment dubious.
Carkner has just recovered
from the sprained thumb that
plagued him last week and is
now down with a cold.
WEATHER  FACTOR
The weather is the other factor which could tilt the scales
in favor of Bears.
"We're like Florida ball
players, we like sunshine," said
Gnup Thursday. "The last two
years we've had snow in Edmonton. We need the good weather
for our passing game."
Bears, ' who are the Western
Canadian Intercollegiate Athletic Union defending champions,
will te pitting a powerful running attack against UBC's passing.
UBC lost both the games they
played against Alberta last
year. This year, having set their
sights on the WCIAU championship, they hope to reverse the
record.
INJURED  PLAYERS
Offensive end and defensive
backfielder Tom Andrews and
tackle Jim Beck will sit this
game out with pulled knee ligaments.
In intermediate grid action,
the New Westminster Royals
collide with winless UBC Chiefs
at Queen's Park at 8 p.m. tonight.
Royals are tops in the league
with a 4-0 record, including an
3-7 decision over Chiefs in the
season opener.
League-leading   UBC   Braves
eet   Chilliwack   at   UBC   Sta-
:ium at 2 Sunday in the Fraser
'TzVey Junior Football League.
Hockey, football
stars to be chosen
Western Canadian Intercollegiate Athletic Union all-star
teams will be chosen this year in
hockey, football, and basketball.
In the past, only basketball
had an all-star team.
The method of choosing the
teams is still under consideration, but probably each coach
will choose an "all-opponent"
team.
The all-star players will then
be chosen on the basis of the
number of votes they receive
from opposing, coaches.
Only UBC, Alberta and Saskatchewan players will be
eligible for the teams. Manitoba
dropped out of the league this
pring.
RUSSIAN GYMNASTS
COULD SHOW HERE
Students might get a look at
some of the world's best gymnasts early next year.
A Ukrainian team with several Olympic stars among its
members may tour Canada in
1962 UBC gymnastics coach
Dr. Doug Whittle said.
If the team agrees to the
financial guarantee it will hold
an exhibition meet at UBC, he
said.
By MIKE HUNTER
The man who  coached the best  junior hockey  team
Canada in 1960 will join the UBC coaching staff this year.
Rev. David Bauer, C.S.B., who
led the St. Michael's (Toronto)
College Majors to victory in the
Memorial Cup final last year.
has been transferred to St.
Mark's College, UBC.
Father Bauer will help UBC
coach Al Stuart this winter, and
will probably take over full-time
coaching duties in 1962, Athletic
Director Bus Phillips said.
COACHED ST. MIKES
Father Bauer has been associated with the St. Michael's team
of the Ontario Hockey Association junior league for the past
seven years, six of them as manager. Last year, he became head
coach, and led St. Mikes to tbe
most successful season in years.
Father Bauer is the brother of
Bobby Bauer, a member of the
Boston Bruins' famed Kraut line
of the late '30s and early '40s.
St. Mikes climaxed an 84-game
schedule with a convincing triumph over Edmonton in the
Memorial Cup.
MEETING TONIGHT
Meanwhile, coach Stuart is
holding a meeting for all prospective players tonight at 4:30
in Memorial Gym 216. First
practices start Monday at 10 p.m.
at Kerrisdale Arena.
Stuart has many of last year's
forwards back, but has lost
flashy centre John Utendale,
goalie Ron Molina, and defense-
man Roy Hammond.
Hammond will help Stuart
with the coaching duties this
year.
Stuart hopes he can get Ken
Walters, a goalie who has played
professional hockey for the Mont
-eal Canadien chain, to replace
Molina.
;n
CROSS - COUNTRY season
opens Saturday for coach
Peter Mullins and his runners.
Birds' meet Vancouver Olympic Club at 11 a.m. at Brockton Oval.
SHORTS
SWIMMING
Trials for the intramural
swimming meet will be held at
Empire pool Oct. 2-10. Finals
will be held at noon Thursday,
Oct. 12.
TENNIS
Women's tennis practice Monday evening. Check the WAA
notice board in- the east entrance to the Women's Gym on
Monday for details. All women
interested please turn out.
BASKETBALL
Thunderette basketball team
will practice Monday evening
at 7:30 in the Women's jgym.
Over 35 hopefuls turned out for
the first practice but newcomers are still welcome.
The Sutton /!Wfr Tffie
Students!
For a new dining pleasure
try our daily special.
DEANS
4544 VV. 10th
Open 'till 11:30
The ranks of this legion are a far flung fraternity of men whose badge is the button-
down collar. Even fanatics on the subject
consider a goodly number of button-downs
are, of course, a social must. (How nonconformist can you get even at u.b.c?
In our shop for young men* we have carefully
assembled a collection of these shirts for both
dress and sportswear. In fact, the most complete selection available. Like all our young
men's shirts, they are 4aper-tailored with the
new trim waisted look. ARE YOU A BUTTON*-
DOWN GUY?
$5.95 te $7.95
/*
Fashion Tips for Fall
How about a slim tapered slack in cords and
wool worsted?
$8.95 to $19.95
Jack Cbch £t<(.
545 Granville St.
SHOP       DOWNTOWN
T 1 L
MUtuall-9831
ON        FRIDAY Page 8
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, September 29, 1961
TWEEN CLASSES
Our  policy . .
NEWS EDITOR'S NOTE:
The Ubyssey is not a notice
board for Clubs.
The Ubyssey will not take over
the job required of club executives — that is, to inform mem-
' 'hers of regular meetings.
'Tween classes should be a
place where events of general
interest are advertised. Outstanding events of more limited
interest will be included where
possible.
All notices must be in English
or they will not be published.
PRO's must print notices clearly. If writing on notices cannot
De read easily, they will automatically be dropped.       ";
We will make sure important
notices get into the paper at
least once but we will not guarantee more than that. The edition which is closest to the event
will carry the notice.
Clubs wanting notices to appear more than once should
make out a separate notice for
each edition.
All 'tween class notices must
be in the publication office by
1 p.m. the day beiore publication
or they will not be printed.
— News Editor
*■  *   *
JAZZSOC
Contemporary Jazz in Concert
with the Jim Kilburn Quartet.
TSJoon today in the Auditorium.
Members free. Non-members:
25c.     ~
*   *   *
VCF
"Christian Faith and Higher
Education" will be the topic of
J. I. Richardson of Carey Hall
noon today in Bu. 106.'
GLOBETROTTERS CLUB
Globetrotters meeting Tuesday at 7 p.m. in Brock stage
room.
* *   *
LUTHERAN  STUDENTS
Lutheran Student Association
will hold a get acquainted retreat
at Camp Luther, Lake Hatzic
this weekend.
Buses will leave Brock Hall at
1 p.m. Saturday. For information call RE 1-5594.
* *   *
Nisei Varsity Club will hold a
Frosh Reception dance tonight
at 8 in Brock Extension.
Cost is 50 cents and everyone
is welcome. ,\
* *   *
LETTERS CLUB
The Letters Club has openings
for two new members. If interested telephone Peter Jensen,
TR 9-2032 this evening.
* *   *
WUSC
Committee members meet at
noon today in the Conference
Room. Important business to be
discussed.
* *   *
ARTS US
Important meeting of Arts US
Executive Friday noon in Arts
Office Bu. 115.
* *   *
ROD AND GUN
Interested people meeting in
Bu. 217 at noon Thurs., Oct. 5.
* *   *
GEOGRAPHY CLUB
First meeting Monday, Oct. 2
at noon in FG 101.
* *   *
PHRATERES
Noon today in Arts 100. All
new members welcome.
UBC CLASSIFIED
RIDERS WANTED for ear pool
in vicinity of Dunbar and 20th;
must be able to drive one day
per week. CA 4-9710 or CA
4-0883 evenings.
RIDERS WANTED from North
Van to UBC Mon .through Sat.
Call Ian, YU 7-0473.
WANTED: Ride vicinity Oak and
12th, 9:30 to 3:30. Call RE.
6-0989 after 6 p.m.
WANTED: Good used portable
typewriter, cheap. Phone Margaret, AM 6-6408.
LOST: Would the person who
found a light brown UBC jacket containing 1 pair glasses
near Mary Bollert Hall last
Saturday please contact H.
Kidston at Hut 9 Fort Camp
or pnohe CA 4-90691
LOST: The person who picked
Up a biege and blue raincoat
(woman's) in the biological
sciences building Mon., Sept
25 please contact B. Cavallin,
CY 8-4634 or return it to the
zoology dept.
FOUND; I have red coat taken
by mistake at Brock Hall
Dance Sept. 15. Please phone
AL 3-1978.
LOST: $20 for the return of the
overcoat and suit taken from
the M.G. in Lot "C" on Friday.
No questions asked. FA 1-8077.
i#?
Does your
Savings Account keep
GOING   DOWN?
Here's a new and simple
way to keepyour savings buoyant. For paying bills, open
a Royal Personal Chequing
Account. Keep your Savings
Account strictly for saving.
Ask about this new Royal
Two-Account Plan.
THE ROYAL BANK OF CANADA
CAMPUS BRANCH
TOTH AT SASAMAT
Matz & Wozny
548 Howe St. MU 3-4715
Custom Tailored Suits
for Ladies and Gentlemen
Gowns and  Hoods
Uniforms
We   specialize
in
Ivy League
Clothes
Special Student Rates
I a «<
nsA-
li Al
[ $ave"monTy~1
I      WITH   THESE   LOW   COLLEGE   RATES!      ■
1    QPIAYBOY   II  yr res $61    $5.00 B
ID PLAYBOY  U yrs reg $111 9.00 ■
■*3TIME 11 yr reg $71 v.   3.87 _
*3 TIME  12 yrs I       7.001
DUS Newian<l WR 139 wksl   j 3.S7 I
I*C5 NEWSWEEK 11 yr reg, ii>       3.0C ■
*□ NEWSWEEK   134 weeks!   ...   ...   2.50
*Q LIFE  II  yr reg $5.951   .   .......   4.00
*nLIFE  12 yrs) 7.00
I *n Sports III. II yr reg $6.75) .... 4.00
*J SPORTS ILLUSTRATED 12 yrsl .. 7.50
D Harper's Monthly H yr reg $61 . 3.0C
LJ Saturday Review II yr reg $71 .. 4.00
"1 SATURDAY REVIEW 12 years) .. 7.00
JNEW YORKER (8 mos reg $51 . 3.00
U ATLANTIC   MONTHLY   18   mosl   3.00
I*J Archit Forum 11 yr reg $6.50) .. 3.25
L*j Christian Sci Mon 16 mos) . ... 5.50
D ESQUIRE (8 mos reg $41   2.00
Q Ladies Home Jour < 23 mos reg $51 2.85
ID Sat. Eve. Post 139 wks reg $4.50) 2.99
□ LOOK 1 1 yr reg $4)   2.00
Q MADEMOISELLE II yr reg $5) .. 2.50
Q Good Housekeeping  12 yrs reg $6) 3.50
I    Q READER'S DIGEST  (8 mos)       2.00
Q SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN   II  yrl   .   6.00
Q The Reporter 11 yr reg $6)   ...   .   4.501
0 New Republic  II  yr reg $8)       5.00 I
ID THE NATION 11 yr reg $81       6.00
Q Manchester Guardian   II  yr AIR)    8.001
DKEALITEi (1  yr reg $15)         10.001
QGRAPHIS 11 yr reg $15)    11.251
-]NY TIMES  ISunday only 1 yri   .   2SX0
]NY TIMES (Book Review 1 yrl   ..   6.501
] AMERICAN HOME   125 mos)   ...   3.251
_J Amer Jour of Medicine  (1 yr)   ..10.00 I
~~l Amer Jour of Surgery  U  yr)   ...13.00
"J Art Direction  11  yr reg $61   ....   5.00 I
3 Art News  11 yr reg $11.50      8.99 I
Q Arts b Archit  11 yr reg $5)       3.00 1
IP) Better Homes tr Gardens (1 yr) . 3.00,
[1 Car Cr Driver (1 yr reg $51 .. . 3.00 !
Q Changing Times  11 yr)       6.CO I
ID Downbeat 11 yr reg $71   5.60 "
Q Electronic World  11 yr reg $51 3.00.
O FLYING   11  yr reg $5)    3.00 I
D FORBES  (1  yr reg $7.50)       5.001
I #n FORTUNE  II  yr reg $101     ....   7.50
Q GLAMOUR  (1  yr reg $5)       3.00 |
D Harper's Bazaar  II  yr reg $5! 3.00 I
H Hi-Fidelity  115 mos reg $7) 3.75 1
I    0 Hi-Fi Stereo Review  (1 yr reg $S)   2.50
I    PI HOLIDAY  115 mos reg $7.50)   ..
I    n House Beautiful   12  yrs  reg SI 01
IO HOUSE (, GARDEN II yr reg $6)
•n HOUSfO HOME 11 yr reg $61,. .
''_, ' ivlng 4 Young Hmkrs 11 yr) , .
[71 Modem Bride II yr reg $31 .. . . _
IT MeCALL'S (1 year)  ■ 3;<So-S
G Modorn Photography II yr reg $4) 2.00 _
H Popular Boating (1 yr reg $5) .. 3.001
D^opular Electronics 11 yr reg $41 2.00 1
ID Popular M«ti 120 mos reg 5.80) 2.9S■
n Popular Photography II yr reg $5) 2.50-
nREDBOOK   (1  yr)            3.001
a ROAD Cr TRACK 11  yr reg $5)   . .   4.00 1
13 SCIENCE DIGEST II yrl  3.50 ■
O The Second Coming 115 issues) 4.00 m
nShow Business III   II  year)        7.001
DSINGOUT  (1 yr reg $3,601       2.5o|
ID SKI MAGAZINE  (2 yrs reg $5)   .   3.00
D SKIING NEWS 12 yrs reg $51   ...   3.001
QSUNSET  (2 yrs reg $5)       3.001
I    □ Theatre Arts  19 mos rog.$5.651   .   5.00 1
Q Town tr Ctry  (22 mos reg 13.751   8.50
□ TV Guide 144 wkl reg 4.40)    3.33 I
a VOGUE   11 yr 20 issues)       5.00 1
I BORDER NOW, publisher will bill you later!
STUDENT SUBSCRIPTION  SERVICE -
1743 N. K.nmore, Los AngefM 27, Calif.      I
3.751
6.00 I
3.50 |
4.50
2«01
2.00 I
Inclosed $_
.Send I
iteration to: I
I address  
city   tone ..   state..
E"«St.   ....    class of ' "
"•wG»lll from I      I
LOST: Would the person who
picked up ray slide rule in Bu.
3201 on Friday, Sept. 22,
please pnone CA 4-9901 and
ask for Brian.
LOST: Will the girl who picked
up the wrong biege and brown
raincoat from the chemistry
lab Friday morning, please
phone Janet, FA 7-4388.
WRITER'S SERVICE
Let us sell your story, article,
book, TV, songs and poems.
Violet   Sacchwell,
6125 Ewart St..
South  Burnaby
HE 3-31TO
Open Evenings
'59 RENAULT, one owner, 16,-
000 miles, white walls.
YU 7-5171
2 Scooters for Sale
106 miles to gallon
1956-$90.00
1958 -$150.00
PHONE MARGARET
CA 8-8884
Double Breasted Suits
Converted  into
Single Breasted
Alterations — Repairs
United Tailors
BRITISH WOOLLENS
549 Granville
^u^on^T^atj (lumpen^
INCORPORATED   2*°    MAY   1670.
Georgia at Granville . . . Shop daily 9-5:30. Fridays 9-9
Phone MU 1-6211
Now... the "natural" look in
an all wool sports coat . .at
The Bay's
CAREER & CAMPUS SHOP
It's that slim, trim look that keeps you well
dressed on or off campus. Comfortable, natural
fit, with high three-button front, centre back vent.
In a multitude of olive, heather, lovat, brown and
grey tones. Short, regular and tall fittings 36-44.
Each 39.50
USE YOUR PBA . . . REMEMBER, YOU CAN SHOP
'TIL 9 TONIGHT, ALL DAY SATURDAY at the Bay
CAREER and CAMPUS SHOP, second floor.

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