UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Mar 17, 1921

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0124436.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0124436.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0124436-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0124436-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0124436-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0124436-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0124436-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0124436-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0124436-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0124436.ris

Full Text

 Issued Weekly by the Publications Board of the University of British Columbia
Volume III.
VANCOUVER, B.C., MARCH 17, 1921
Number 18
Sweet Lavender
Well Received
SPRING PLAY VERY
SUCCESSFUL
The Players' Club presented their sixth
annual performance, "Sweet Lavender,"
by Pinero, before a well-filled house on
Friday evening. The play met with a
cordial reception; in fact, those who
speak with authority on these things are
of the opinion that, in general evenness
and quality of production, "Sweet Lavender' is superior to any other performance of the club so far. The reluctance
of the curtain to descend upon so much
talent caused one or two trying moments,
but then the orchestra made a cheerful
noise and all was happiness.
As to the selection of the play, it is
gratifying that one critic at least takes
us seriously enough to complain that the
club does not show a sufficiently definite
system in its choice of plays. In answer
to this, it may be remarked that the
selection of a play by an amateur organization is, and must be, governed by a
hundred considerations, many of them
merely mechanical, such as those of
scenery and costume; and. that the
Avenue Theatre has its limitations. At
all events, "Sweet Lavender" represents,
in universality of appeal, at least, an advance upon last year's play. It is this
quality of universality that permits of its
being presented with more or less of the
present-day atmosphere, without any
considerable loss of effect. Whatever the
merit of the play, the generally adequate
performance of the players, the admirably level quality of the characterization,
and the consistency of the interpretation,
reflect great credit on the skill and
patience of the coach, Mr. F. G. C. Wood,
and bear witness to good and faithful
work on the part of the cast.
The ovation that greeted Mr. Arthur
Lord's first appearance on the second
night was a tribute no less to his performance of the night before than to his
previous record on the Vancouver stage.
His "Dick Phenyl" was admirable; only
a careful study and appreciation of that
sweet-natured, unstable character could
have produced so sympathetic an interpretation. This is, of course, the central
character; on the skill and truth of the
playing of this role depends the whole
effect of the play. Every credit, therefore, is due to Mr. Lord for his capable
handling of the part. At the same time
it is to the drawing of the happy-go-lucky
"Dick"   that  the  author  brings  his    best
(Continued on Page 6)
The New President
of the Alma Mater
Paul  N.  Whitley
Mr. Paul N. Whitley, editor-in-chief of
the Publications Board, has been chosen
as president of the Alma Mater Society
for next session. After a short campaign,
the electors have spoken, and Paul is
elected by a substantial majority.
The president-elect was formerly a
member of Science 18, of McGill. After
taking his first year Science, he left 'Varsity and went to Normal. From there he
enlisted with the 196th Universities Battalion, going overseas with that unit, and
transferring to the 46th Battalion. With
this battalion he served in France for
three years.
On his return, Paul resumed his studies
with Arts '22. He was chosen as associate editor of the Annual last year, and
this year has served with distinction as
editor-in-chief of the Publications Board.
His ability as an organizer and executive
head has been ably demonstrated in his
management of these positions, and the
student body may look forward to a most
successful year under his guidance.
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF APPOINTED
Mr. Bert Imlah, Arts '22, has been
appointed editor-in-chief of the Publications Board for next session, the appointment being made on Tuesday afternoon
at a special meeting of the Students'
Council. The new editor-in-chief is the
senior member of the Publications Board.
He served this year as an associate
editor and last session in a similar capacity, and has had, therefore, considerable experience in the work of the Publications Department.
7-6 Victory
Over Senators
U. B. C. WINS AMATEUR
CHAMPIONSHIP
Another championship came to 'Varsity
on Friday evening, when we were privileged to see our famous hockey team
waltz home with the Savage Cup, emblematic of the championship of British
Columbia. The first game of the series
for this cup was played at Victoria a week
ago Monday, the score being 3-2 against
us. The second game took place on Friday night, and, by winning 5-3, our squad
made the total 7-6 for us.
Our squad had clearly the best of the
play during the first period. They passed,
skated and checked in better form than
the Senators, although the visitors were
slightly heavier and more experienced
men. Lou Hunter scored the first counter within ten seconds of the face-off when
he soloed his way through the Victoria
defence and planted the rubber behind
the goalie, the 'Varsity rooters going
wild with joy. Lou added to this joy
seven minutes later when he fooled the
goalie on a neat pass from Pinkie Morrison. Every man played the game, and
all the passes were perfectly made and
perfectly received. Just at this point,
however, Shields and his check were banished from the ice for ten minutes.
The second period found the 'Varsity
squad a little tired, and consequently a
little more -inclined to let things slide.
The Senators undoubtedly had the edge
in the play, but the consistent back-
checking of the 'Varsity men held them
down, Pinkie Morrison being especially
adept at holding his check useless.
Shields drew out the enemy defence in a
wonderful manner, and somehow "oozed"
the puck into the net. It was pretty
work.
The third period saw the visitors working overtime to win. They played an excellent combination game, and more than
once threatened to overwhelm Broadfoot.
Dowd, of the Senators, scored early in
the period, and Smith made it 3-3 just
two minutes before the final whistle.
Then came the greatest exhibition of
hockey that it has been our privilege to
' witness this year. We gathered three
goals in two minutes, one of them being
disallowed by the referee.
It would be impossible to mention each
of the Varsity men who distinguished
himself. Broadfoot was, as usual, invincible;  Pinkie was the hardest-working
(Continued on Page 3) THE   UBYSSEY
March 17, 1921
Clothes with
a "Rep"
for Style
and Pep
There's a certain unusual Class
in Semi-ready clothing that appeals
to the young men who strive for an
ultra-smart appearance.
THOMAS
& McBAIN
LIMITED
655 GRANVILLE ST.
The Palm Garden
LIGHT LUNCHES
Try onr Lobster Salad, our Sundaes and specials. You will find
they are  unsurpassed.
Corner Tenth and Heather.
Young Men's
Smart Shoes
Black and several shades of Brown
Calfskin, on the latest popular lasts
—perfect fitting—maximum service.
Price $10.00
Cluff Shoe Co.
Limited
649 HASTINGS STREET, W.
THE HOME OF GOOD SHOES
A TRIBUTE
Students of the University will hear
with deepest regret the announcement of
the death of Mr. Alexander Munro, Jr.,
former member of Arts '22, who was last
year elected to the position of treasurer
for this session. The death occurred on
Saturday morning at the family home,
1760 Parker Street.
"Sandy" Munro, as he was popularly
known around the University, was a
member of the Princess Pats.; enlisting
early in the war from Westminster Hall,
where he was studying for the ministry.
He was taken prisoner at Ypres, and for
two and a-fialf years was an inmate of
various German prisons. During this
confinement he contracted tuberculosis,
and it was from this cause that his death
occurred.
On his return from overseas, Alex, resumed his studies as a member of Arts
'22, and, as president of the Returned
Soldier Student Club, and an active participant in many other student activities,
he soon endeared himself to many about
the college. He was chosen as one of the
delegates to the DesMoines convention
last fall. In the spring of last year his
health began to suffer, and he was sent
to California. Two weeks ago he returned
to the city, and contracted pneumonia.
"Sandy" was well known, and was
loved and respected by all who knew him.
The deepest sympathy of the students is
extended to his parents, and to Bob and
Mary, his brother and sister, who are
members of Arts  22.
The funeral took place on Monday
afternoon, and was largely attended by
University students.
'THE STUDENT OUTLOOK"
Dr. A. B. MacCallum, professor of
physiological and biological chemistry at
McGill University, a scientist well known
in Canada, was the speaker at a general
meeting of the student body on Tuesday
last. President Klinck introduced Dr.
MacCallum, explaining that this eminent
scholar was on his holidays, and was
stopping in the city on his way to China,
where he will deliver a series of lectures
in the Pekin University.
Dr. MacCallum chose as his topic "The
Student Outlook," developing the various
prospects of the student of to-day. He
made an especial appeal to those who
were equipped with the scientific mind
to devote their attention to this sort of
work. He showed that the world, and
the progress of civilization, has become
greatly indebted to the scientist; and
that, though much has been done, there
is much more to do. He emphasized the
fact that research work on the part of
the student would involve in all likelihood many sacrifices, and rigid attention
to study for a long period. But the service to humanity would be well worth
the sacrifice. For those who are not so
inclined, Dr. MacCallum spoke of the
opportunities for service in other lines of
endeavor.
Any students wishing to procure copies
of last year's Annual may purchase them
from any member of the Publications
Board. The price is one dollar ($1.00),
one-half the cost.
IRELAND    &    ALLAN
BOOKSELLERS AND
STATIONERS
Depot for
FOUNTAIN  PENS
and
LOOSE-LEAF   NOTE   BOOKS
Phone, Seymour 602
649 GRANVILLE STREET
AFTER THE SHOW
Try the
JLJelrr\OT\tco Oajfe
704 ROBSON STREET
*w»«fa-rtow^m\w*~faw^fa~r»"fo"tti\«fat{hs
PHONE A/>on Day and Night
Seymour UDO£ SERVICE
BIG TAX I  SIX
Ask  for
V. YOUNG or FRED
Office:   725  Dunsmulr Street
Evans & Hastings
PRINTERS
-of—
"The Ubyssey"
for  1920-1921
WE MAKE A SPECIALTY OF
College Annuals
Magazines
Ball Programmes
Etc., etc.
578 SEYMOUR STREET
VANCOUVER,  B. C.
High-Grade Work and Quick
Service characterize our up-to-date
establishment. March 17, 1921
THE   UBYSSEY
BASKETBALL
Both 'Varsity intermediate basketball
teams were victorious over the Duke of
Connaught High School teams on Saturday evening last, when they travelled
oyer to New Westminster. The 'Varsity
girls won from the Senior High ladies
13-12. This is the first defeat in eleven
starts for the High School squad. Miss
Grace Smith and Miss N. Griffith were
the stars for the University team.
The team: Guards, Miss D. Lee and
Miss N. Griffith (7); center, Miss I. Russell; forwards, Miss I. McKinnon and
Miss  Grace  Smith  (6).
The intermediates, champions of the
City League, continued their winning
streak, coming out victors in a hard-
fought battle against the D. C. H. S.
Seniors. The final score was 38-33, after
ten minutes' overtime. At half-time the
score was 15-9 for the home team; but in
the last half the 'Varsity boys got going,
and at the end of time the score stood
27-27. Five minutes' overtime was played,
the score being 31-31. In the final five
minutes, however, the 'Varsity team
boosted it to 38 while the D.C.H.S. boys
were gathering two points.
The team: Guards, Lewis and Elliot;
center, Johnson (10); forwards, Bickel
(14)  and Arkley  (14).
OUTDOORS CLUB
Last week the club held the first of its
series of Saturday afternoon hikes. Leaving on the 2 o'clock ferry, they crossed
to North Vancouver and hiked up Capilano Canyon, stopping for tea at the
hotel. The trip was voted an unqualified
success.
Next Saturday the club will go to Lynn
Valley. There being no hotel there to
come to our rescue, members are advised
to bring lunches.
HARRY    CARTER
Bicycles and Accessories
General  Repairs
Cab,   Buggy  and  Invalid  Chairs
Re-tired
■ Charges Moderate
C.C.M.
Agent for
"RAMBLER"  BICYCLES
632 Broadway, West
Phone,   Fairmont   1386
THE RELAY RACE
The biggest event of the season will
take place a week from yesterday. That
is to say, on Wednesday afternoon,
March 23, there will be big doings around
this little 'Varsity. For that is the date
which has been chosen for the second
annual inter-class relay from Point Grey.
Seven teams are entered for the race—
Arts '21, Arts '22, Arts '23, Arts '24, Science '23, Science '24, and Agriculture.
Arts '23, the enthusiastic Sophs., declare
that the date is an excellent omen.
Science '24 have a lot of money that says
they will win. Science '23 are quietly
training a fast team, and they will be on
hand. Agriculture, according to all reports, will also be there at the finish. As
to Arts '21,  22 and '24, little is known.
The race will start from the University
site at Point Grey at 3 p.m., and it should
finish on Twelfth Avenue about 3.45.
Those who have cars are invited to follow
the race, although they must be careful
to see that they do not interfere in any
way with the runners. Each class must
place one car at the disposal of the Track
Club. Running on the sidewalks, cutting
corners, or failing to follow the course
will disqualify the offender and his team.
The relay race was instituted last year
by Arts '20, who presented a large cup
as a trophy. Arts '23 captured the honors
last year, winning in spectacular fashion
in 37 min. 30 sec. The distance is 7.8
miles, and each team is composed of eight
men.
The course is as follows: From Uni-'
versity site, Point Grey, along Marine
Drive to Fourth Avenue; up Fourth
Avenue to Yew Street; up Yew Street to
Broadway; along Broadway to Granville;
up Granville to Twelfth, and along
Twelfth to the University.
St. Peter—How did you get up here?
Chorus  Girl—Flu.
—Puget Sound College Trail.
PREPARE
for the world of
BUSINESS
by taking a short course in the
Sprott-Shaw School
of Commerce and Telegraphy
Day and Evening  Classes
Phone, Seymour 1810
R.   J.   SPROTT,   B.A.,   Manager.
BASEBALL
TENNIS LACROSSE GOLF
FISHINO TACKLE
EVERYTHING  FOR ATHLETES,  SPORTSMEN  AND
OUTDOOR PEOPLE
TISDALLS   LIMITED
The Complete Sporting Goods Store
618 HASTINGS STREET, WEST Phone, Seymour 152
ELECTION NEWS
Monday, March 21—Election of secretary and treasurer of the Alma Mater.
For secretary, Miss Marjorie Agnew,
Arts '22, and Mr. A. F. Roberts, Arts '23,
For treasurer, Mr. W. O. Banfield, Science '22; Mr. William Ure, Science '23;
Mr. L. N. Cutler, Arts '22. Nominations
for president of Lit. and Scientific Dept.
Tuesday, March 22—Nominations for
presidents of Women's Undergrad., Arts
Men's Undergrad., Science Undergrad.
and Agriculture Undergrad.
Wednesday-, March 23—Nominations
for Men's and Women's Athletic presidents.
Thursday, March 24—Election of presidents of Arts Men's, Women, Science
and Agriculture Undergrads.
Monday, March 28—Election of presidents of Men's and Women's Athletic.
Election of president of Lit. and Scientific Dept.
Tuesday, March 29—Nominations for
marshal.
Thursday, March 31—Election of marshal.
Nominations to offices of the Literary
and Scientific Department are now in
order.
Honorary president, March 21st, ten
signatures; president, March 21st, ten;
vice-president, March 29th, five; secretary-treasurer, March 29th, five.
(Continued from Page 1)
man on the ice, and perhaps the most
effective; Ternan and Plummer held
down the defence position in admirable
style, although the steady work of Wolverton was missed at one or two points.
"Jap" is not as flashy, but he is a steadier
player than Ternan. Shields and Lou
Hunter and Jack Wilson on the forward
line all played bang-up hockey.
THE SPORTING
INSTINCT
If you men have any ideas on
sports, from fishing to football,
or if there are any points you
want to know, we're glad to
talk matters over any time.
Lisle Fraser
Sporting Goods Dealer
Cor.  Robson and Granville Street* THE   UBYSSEY
March 17, 1921
PURDY'S ARE
PURE
Mr. Purdy did not follow the
routine of candymakers' recipes
when he started making candy.
He broke new ground all the
way. That is why Purdy's are
so original in every way—and
they're absolutely pure.
Maker of Purdy's Chocolates
675       GRANVILLE       ST.
AVENUE THEATRE
FRI. AND   SAT.,  MARCH  25-26
The Victoria Dramatic and
Operatic Society
Presenting
"A Message From Mars'
Prices: $1.10, 85c, 55c.
NEW FRILLING
w
Of organdie, finely pleated and
finished with picot edge; widths 2
or 4 inches—75c and $1  a yard.
Fine Mesh Frilling, in cream;
comes 3l/2 ins. wide, with hemstitched border—$1.25 a yard.
Cream Net Lace Frilling, in 4 to 6-
inch widths; very attractive at
$1.75 and $2.50 a yard.
LIMITED
575 GRANVILLE STREET
(Member  Pacific  Inter-Collegiate Press
Association)
Issued every Thursday by the Publications Board
of the University of British  Columbia.
Extra  mural  subscriptions,  $2.00  per  session.
For advertising rates, apply Advertising Manager.
EDITORIAL STAFF:
Editor-in-Chief P.   N.   Whitley
Senior   Editor A.   A.   Webster
f A.  H. Imlah
Associate Editors ■ { S.  M. Scott
^ Miss  R.   E.   Verchere
Chief  Reporter A.   F.   Roberts
/"Miss  A.   Anderson
T. C.  Clyne
Reporters 1 Bert   Sweeting
Cliffe Mathers
' Miss  P.  Stewart
Exchange  Editor Miss   P.   I.   Mackay
Literary   Editor, | ^.   ^
BUSINESS STAFF:
business   Manager L.   T.   Fotirnier
Asft. fturiness   Manager..J.   E.   Matheson, Arts'23
Advertising  Manager H.   M.   Cassidy
( r>.   A.  Wallace
Assistants ,1 H.  G.   Scott
I M.   A.   Dyce
Circulation   Manager R.   C.   Palmer
Editor for the Week Miss R.  E.  Verchere
CONGRATULATIONS!
The members of the Publications
Board are determined that for once we
will resist the tyranny of an autocratic
editor-in-chief, and publish an editorial
agreeable to ourselves. Having assured
ourselves, then, that the chief has gone
for the night, we proceed to offer to Mr.
Whit1ey our heartiest congratulations on
his election to the presidency of the A'ma
Mater Society. We are convinced that
we voice the sentiments of every student
when we wish him all success and the
best of luck in the responsible tasks that
face him. We, who have been closely
associated with Mr. Whitley throughout
this and previous years, have particular
reason to be pleased with his election, and
to be confident that 'Varsity affairs next
session will not be less ably guided than
they have been this year. Our well-known
modesty prevents us from pointing to this
sheet as an example of what Mr. Whitley
can do when he gets started, but—well,
wait and see.
ATHLETICS
Last year it was confidently expected
that the University of British Columbia
would experience great success in all
branches of sport during this session.
Followers of athletics in the University
thought that the election to the presidency of the Alma Mater of a man whose
greatest interest was in sport, and who
was an outstanding athlete, was an excellent omen, and that the University was
coming to realize the part she should play
in the sporting world. 'Varsity teams
have always been looked up to in the
realm of sport, and these enthusiasts saw
the time coming when U.B.C. would take
her rightful place.
But even the most confirmed optimist
would hardly have dreamed that the
accomplishments which have marked the
passing of this session were possible. In
Rugby we have captured the city cham
pionship and the inter-collegiate series;
in basketball we have won two titles, and
were runners-up for another; in soccer
we have won a place as one of the best
teams in the second division; and now
in hockey we have won the city and provincial championships, as well as winning
the honors in the first inter-collegiate
series in the West.
To the various clubs the "Ubyssey"
wishes to express its heartiest congratulations, and in so doing we express the
feelings of the entire student body. To
them we add our thanks. For these
teams have kept the University name before the people; they have done great
good in educating the public to know
that there is a UNIVERSITY in British
Columbia. More than that—they have,
by sportsmanship and clean playing, convinced all true sportsmen that the University of British Columbia can and does
uphold the best British traditions of
sport. The game for the game's sake has
been the ideal of the 'Varsity athletes.
To the student body there is no small
measure of praise due, for the support
which these teams have received has been
very good, and they have been cheered
on to victory by the knowledge that the
whole University was behind them. There
can be no doubt that the B. C. spirit has
arrived. And it is here to stay. Though
we have done well this year, there are
greater fields of conquest before us, and,
while we play the game for the game's
sake, merge our individuality in combined
effort for the 'Varsity, and practice those
courtesies of sportsmanship which always
make the true gentleman, we are building
far better than we know.
THE MARSHAL
To-morrow at noon we are going to
discuss the question, "Do we, or do we
not, require a Marshal?' If we decide
that we do require a marshal, we are going to amend the constitution of the
Alma Mater Society to provide for such
an officer on our executive.
During the past session we have felt the
need of a leader where the efforts of the
student body as a whole were concerned.
The president of the Rooters' Club has
temporarily provided this leader, but' the
term "Rooters' Club" is misleading. It
would seem to imply a club whose sole
purpose was to provide "lung power' at
an athletic  event.
It is felt that there should be some
person responsible for the direction of
the efforts of the student body, where a
combination of all the Undergraduate
Societies is involved. The marshal, in
order to properly carry out his duties,
should be a member of the Students'
Council. In this position he could keep
in touch with all student activities
through the presidents of the Literary
and Scientific Department, the Men's
Athletics and the Women's Athletics,
and then in turn he could direct his
activities " through the medium of the
heads of the various Undergraduate Societies.
It is difficult to specifically define the
duties of a marshal. He must of necessity be a man in close touch with every
phase of student activity, and need not
necessarily be active in all or most of
these activities.
It might be suggested that he take
charge  of initiations  after  they  have  re- March 17, 1921
THE   UBYSSEY
ceived the approval of the Students'
Council. He should keep in close touch
with student affairs, and prevent the
holding of two events on the same date,
if these events in any way detract from
one another. He might direct the sale
of tickets for all student social functions,
and insure that students alone receive
these tickets in preference to people outside the University. He might, directly
or indirectly, conduct all student meetings, other than the regular or special
meetings, of the Alma Mater Society and
the meetings of the subsidiary societies;
that is, he might be responsible at song
•practices, yell practices, election campaign meetings, meetings to be addressed
by invited speakers before the arrival of
the president of the University or the
appointed chairman of the meeting, and
other student gatherings where spontaneous demonstrations would make for
greater college spirit. He should be in
charge of theatre night, and should direct
the activities of the yell leaders, insuring
that at least one leader be present at
events where organized rooting is essential.
At once it is quite clear that the marshal may make this experiment either a
success or a failure, in accordance with
the importance which he attaches to his
position. In order to avoid failure, it is
necessary that we clearly state his duties
if we are going to benefit by having a
marshal elected to the Council.
ABSENCE   OF   PRECEDENT
In this issue of the "Ubyssey" we publish an account of the performances of
the Players' Club, in spite of the fact
that the "Ubyssey' was not honored with
complimentary tickets for the reporters.
We believe that this neglect was due to
a misunderstanding, in which the "Ubyssey" is prepared to take its share of the
responsibility. We have reason to believe that the Executive of the Players'
Club will recommend to next year's Executive that such tickets be granted to
the "Ubyssey."
©
orresp
OT\det>
ce
Editor "Ubyssey."
Dear Sir: May I bring to your attention
a matter which for some time I have been
forced to notice—that is the silence (?) prevalent in the reading-room? To those who
live near the college and spend their periods
between classes studying at home, this will
not apply. But for those who live at some
distance and find it convenient to spend
their free hours in the library, as well as for
those who are using reference books—is it
fair that we are to be constantly interrupted
bv an eloquent flow of language between
those who are supposed to be studying?
I do not refer to a slight disturbance
caused at any time by those entering or
leaving the room, nor to an occasional remark, necessary or otherwise. But I do refer to the childish actions of some who consider the reading-room as their nursery,
Where, in exuberance of spirits, they enjoy
delightful gossip during a period of from five
minutes to one hour. May I remind these
that there are common rooms where this
demeanor would be more in keeping.
WITZEND.
Editor "Ubyssey."
Dear Sir: Within the last few weeks resolutions have been adopted by the Students'
Council and the Executive of the Literary
and Scientific Department regarding the
granting of badges of honor to athletes and
debaters. In each of these resolutions,
however, a clause was inserted to the effect
that neither letters nor pins would be
granted to students who had not registered
for their  Sophomore year's work.
This discrimination against the Freshmen
appears, on the face of it, unwarranted. A
student, if he excels In any of the activities
de&erving of recognition, ought, I think, to
be given a letter or pin, as the case may
be, regardless of his year. It is quite possible that a student may, upon completing
his Freshman year, find it impossible, owing
to pecuniary or other causes, to continue his
studies. If, during this first year, he has
done anything praiseworthy, why should he
not have the tangible proof of his University's appreciation?
There may. of course, be legitimate reasons for refusing these honors to Freshmen.
Put, if so, they might at least be stated
clearly. As it is, the Freshmen must feel
that they are being unfairly treated. A full
explanation of the causes of the aforementioned discriminatory clauses would, I feel
sure,   be welcomed  by all Freshmen.
G.  S.  C,   '22.
"Keep Fit" week at the University of
Washington, the programme of which
includes an hour's exercise a day, has
produced some queer results. Co-eds
purposely start for classes late, so that
they may run without appearing "perfectly idiotic." Another requirement is
to get to bed by 10.15 p.m. It seems that
some do, but they are not students!
Frosh—I want to get ahead.
Soph—Heaven knows, you need one!
ARROW
SHIRTS and COLLARS
Follow the
ARROW
and  you  follow
the Style
E. SCOTT EATON, B.A.,
Principal
Success Business
College, Ltd.
The School of Certainties
Phone, Fairmont 2075
ON MAIN AT TENTH
VANCOUVER, B. C.
©RPHEUM
Week Commencing
Monday,  March 21, 1921
FRANKLYN  ARDELL
In
KING SOLOMON, JR.
A Farcical Comedy of 1950
With   RUTH   WARREN.   HELEN
GOODHUE   and   GRACE   WHITE
Presented by Daniel Kusell
The Famous International Clown
BERT MELROSE
Featuring his original Melrose Fall
EDITH CLIFFORD
Comedienne
Pleasing   to   the   Eye   and   Ear
ROY INGRAHAM at the Piano
TOM SMITH
ALL FUN
EVANGELINE—      —KATHLEEN
MURRAY SISTERS
SONGS  AND  DANCES
DELMAR & KOLB
Present
"ONE  SUMMER   DAY"
A Novelty in Pantomime
The Famous Comedian
JAMES C. MORTON
Assisted by
MAMIE EDNA & ALFRED MORTON
In a Comedy Travesty
British  Weekly
Concert  Orchestra
EDUCATIONAL
STATIONERY
STUDENTS WILL FIND IT
INTERESTING TO VISIT
OUR UP-TO-DATE STORE.
WE ARE HEADQUARTERS
FOR EDUCATIONAL STATIONERY — CHAPMAN'S
LOOSE-LEAF   BOOKS,   Etc.
SFIjp
(HUvktSc Stuart (Ha.
LIMITED
Wholesale and Commercial
Stationers
550 SEYMOUR STREET
VANCOUVER,  B. C.
Tel. Ex., Seymour 3 THE    UBYSSEY
March 17, 1921
Buy Your Notepaper
by the Pound
ENGLISH LINEN NOTE PAPER--A
good quality linen finish note paper,
put up in packets of 60 sheets (2T^
quires),  at    30c
ENVELOPES TO MATCH — Are put
up in boxes of 60, for 30=
SCOTCH LINEN NOTE PAPER — A
very good grade of medium weight
linen finished writing paper, put up
in 1-lb. packets containing about 120
sheets   (5   quires) 35c
ENVELOPES TO MATCH—Put up in
boxes of 75, at, per box 35c
SILK   VELVET   NOTE   PAPER—Good
quality pad finish note paper, put up
in packets of 60 sheets,
at,  per  packet 40c
ENVELOPES TO MATCH—Put up in
boxes of 60, at, per box 40c
ENGLISH FABRIC  NOTE  PAPER—A
high-grade linen finish writing paper
in   a   plaid' effect,   put   up   in   pound
packets of about 100 sheets,
at,   per  lb 75c
ENVELOPES  TO  MATCH—
Per packet of 25 20c
—Stationery Dept.,  Main Floor,
New Wing
DAVID    SPENCER
LIMITED
Phone,  Fairmont 722
THE REX CAFE
TEA  ROOM   BAKERY        ICE CREAM
Confectionery Tobacco and  Cigars
692  BROADWAY,  WEST
SAPP WANTS
A NEW NAME
I really don't like my name.
To be frank, it doesn't express
what a candy shop should be.
I am thinking seriously of
changing the name of the store
—and want some suggestions.
I'll let you know if I decide
definitely.
Robt. Sapp, Ltd.
Candymaker
814   ROBSON   STREET
SWEET  LAVENDER   (Continued)
work; in some respects, therefore, the
role of Phenyl is less exacting than some
of the more sketchy parts. For instance.
Pinero leaves Mrs. Rolt, Lavender's
mother, unrelieved by any shifting of the
view. Miss Marjorie Agnew's interpretation of a monotonous drawing is, therefore, to be the more commended. It is a
particularly trying part for a young amateur to play convincingly, and if some of
the passages were a little out of key the
fault lies almost entirely with the lines.
Miss Agnew played throughout with a
laudable restraint and an obvious sincerity.
Miss Muriel Evans, who, as the delicate "Lavender,' looked the picture of
health in the first act, played her part
with an appealing charm, and was
especially effective in the last two acts.
The contrast between the shy grace of
Lavender and the florist's assistant that
Miss Evans played to such perfection at
Christmas is sufficient indication of her
versatility, and promises well for her future career in the Players' Club. Mr.
Garrett Livingstone's "Clement Hale"
was uniformly pleasing, and a very creditable performance for so young an actor.
Time will no doubt give greater firmness
and vigor to the texture of his playing.
Of Miss Dorothy Adams, what is there
to say, except that she was perfect? It
is given to few amateurs to attain that
cool ease of manner, that complete mastery of the situation that Miss Adams
showed as "Minnie Gilfillian,' no less
than as "Celia" last year. Her role this
year gave free play to the piquant charm,
humor and vivacity that distinguished her
in "Green Stockings." In short, Miss
Adams is an amateur in nothing but the
name.
Mr. Bruce Fraser was surely born to
play "Horace Bream." That priceless
young American blows in and out
through the play, at first with rather the
chilling effect of a draught, but later,
when the thaw sets in, refreshing as a
trans-Atlantic breeze. Snubs fall harmless upon that cheerful and determined
pachyderm. Miss Kirsteen Leveson's
"Mrs. Gilfillian" was a pure joy. A really
beautiful performance. Miss Leveson
has, if possible, enhanced the excellent
reputation she won last year. Mr. J. O.
C. Kirby, as the amiable Dr. Delaney,
seemed a trifle conscious; perhaps he also
was haunted with misgivings as to
whether even Irish doctors are really
quite as shaggy as all that. However, he
conveyed the benevolent and meddelsome
physician, and we took what we could
get of the  Irish  flavor.
Pinero and Mr. Lacey Fisher together
made an utterly delightful figure of Mr.
Bulger of the constant heart. But I think
much of the delicate absurdity of the
sketch was lost upon an audience for the
most part unfamiliar with the Bulger
background. Not that the house was
unappreciative, but Mr. Fisher's excellent
rendering would have found its appropriate response from an English audience. For a perfection of finish that
was almost professional, Miss Leveson
and Mr. Fisher had not their superiors,
perhaps not their equals, in the cast.
Mr. Jack Clyne did good work as Mr.
Maw, the solicitor, his dapper energy
contrasting effectively with  the  down-at-
(Continued on Page 7.)
The
Students' Cafeteria
Do not forget when down town
to lunch at The Old Country Tea
Rooms,
641  Granville Street
Upstairs
Hall   to   rent   evenings,   accommodating 60  couples.
Banquets, dance suppers and refreshments of all kinds served anywhere in the city. Enquire the
Tally-Ho.
A.   WALTER,   Prop.   Phone   Sey.   2045
NEXT TIME
TRY THE BUNGALOW
For     Light    Refreshments
Ice  Cream  and Candies at
774 GRANVILLE STREET
MIDWAY  PHARMACY
Phone,   Fair.  840
Cor.  Broadway and Heather Street
VANCOUVER,  B. C.
WATERMAN'S PENS
EVERSHARP PENCILS
LOOSELEAF COVERS
AND REFILLS
NOTE BOOKS,  Etc.
We deliver anywhere, at any  time.
BARRON
' HOTEL
Restaurant
Two  Blocks from  Vancouver  Hotel
When you compare Quality, service
and price, and consider the high
standard of the food we serve, you
will realize wherein it is to your advantage to come here.
A welcome awaits you.
BARRON
Corner Granville and  Nelson
Phone,  Seymour 2011
Operated by W.  D. Wood Limited
MAURICE  PERRIN,   Manager March 17, 1921
THE   UBYSSEY
SOCIETY BRAND
CLOTHES SHOP
Rogers Bldg., 450 Granville  Street
CLOTHES  FOR YOUNG MEN
Glad   to   show   the   new   models.
They are entirely different.
FIT-REFORM
WARDROBE
345 Hastings Street, West
J. W. Fofter
Limited
WE SELL CLOTHES FOR YOUNG
MEN AND MEN WHO STAT YOUNG
ANGELL ENGRAVING CO
CUTS
For
Newspapers, Magazines, Catalogues
and  General  Advertising  Purposes
DESIGNING
Original and Distinctive
518 HASTINGS STREET, WEST
THE GREAT-WEST
LIFE ASSURANCE CO.
Head   Office,   Winnipeg,   Manitoba
Result of a 20-year endowment
which   matured   October   1st,   1920.
Name, Gilbert Inkster, Lady-
smith. Premium, $102.30. Amount,
$2,000.
In 20 years he paid $2,004.60.
The cash value of his policy was
$3,070, being the face of the policy
$2,000 and a dividend of $1,070.
640 HASTINGS STREET, WEST
Vancouver Branch  Office
A  SAVINGS  ACCOUNT
By carrying money around
in your pocket you will
never learn the habit of
THRIFT. Deposit your
spare funds with this Bank
in a Savings account; interest will be paid, and you
can withdraw both principal and interest at any
time.
We welcome small accounts.
The Canadian
Bank of Commerce
MADE IN B. C.
SCHOOL SUPPLIES
Keystone Loose Leaf Books are
the simplest and best to use — at
least many students have said so.
Taking straight through the S. I).
& W. line of "Made In B. C."
School Supplies, we believe you
will find their use is logical from
the standpoint of both quality and
, price.
Smith, Davidson & Wright
LIMITED
Manufacturers of School Supplies
VANCOUVER   AND   VICTORIA,   B.C.
HAGAR
SHOES
FOR
MEN
AND
WOMEN
As surely as there is a sun in the heavens, we can
satisfy any man or woman's Footwear desires in
"Hagar" Shoes.
We specialize in this brand and stand back of
every pair.
FOR QUALITY
FOR FIT
FOR STYLE
FOR VALUE
we earnestly commend the "Hagar" line.
INGLEDEW SHOE CO.
"Vancouver's Smartest Shoe Store"
666 GRANVILLE STREET
here! and there
Twenty-six of the six hundred women
of Boston University College have
pledged themselves to give up candy,
high heels, short skirts, eating between
meals, late dances and theatre .parties for
the sake of wearing a chevron on the
sleeve of their gym. middies. Incidentally, there is a hygienic and moral end in
view.
Queen s Dramatic Club presented last
week a bill of three one-act plays in Little
Theatre, Convocation Hall. It is interesting to see that the first of these was
one of our Christmas plays, "Trifles," by
Susan Glaspell. The programme was
fairly varied—one was tragedy, one a
fantasy, and one just "plain" drama.
The medical course at Toronto University includes a course devoted to
Public Speaking. The Faculty of Engineering has recently inaugurated such
a course as a regular subject. It is
strange that Arts should be so behindhand in realizing the value of a course,
which  it, more  naturally,  should include.
In the current number of the "Atlantic
Monthly" there is an article entitled,
"What Do College Students Know?"
It is not a long article.
Bobbed—Oh,  dear,   I've   lost  my   little
pink bow.
Braided—How perfectly  awful!    What
did he look like?
—Jester.
Some are born crazy, some achieve
craziness, and some have final exams,
thrust upon them.
(Continued from Page 6)
heel "Dick." Peculiar honor, I think, is
due to Mr. A. E. Richards, whose playing of the double role of Hale's adopted
father and Ruth Rolt's betrayer showed
a sense of balance and a sureness of
touch that saved the situation more than
once from slipping into "bathos." Indeed, the whole cast and their coach are
to be congratulated on their treatment of
a play which even thirty years ago was
regarded as sentimental, and which
nothing but deft handling could prevent
from seeming a trifle cloying to a present-day audience.
K.  M. P.
TURN YOUR IDEAS
INTO DOLLARS
LEARN   HOW   TO   WRITE
SHORT STORIES
Short-Story Writing
Illustrating
Bookkeeping
Journalism
Cartooning
Accounting
Write for particulars
Shaw Correspondence
School
1401   Standard   Bank   Building
VANCOUVER,  B. C. THE   UBYSSEY
March 17, 1921
ANNUAL CONCERT OF MUSICAL
SOCIETY
After the dust and the smoke and the
excitement of the relay is over, there will
be a big event for University students.
In the evening of Wednesday, March 23,
the Musical Society of the University will
present their fifth annual concert in the
ballroom of the Hotel Vancouver. Those
who have attended any of the previous
concerts need no urging; they will be
present. But for those who have never
heard the Musical Society in action, we
wish to say that it's a treat not to be
missed.
This year the concert will be under the
direction ot Lieut. J. D. Parkin, who succeeded Professor Russell as conductor.
The men's and the women's glee clubs
and the orchestra have been practising
steadily, and a good programme is promised.
The chief item of the programme will
be the rendition of the oratorio, "The
Ruins of Athens." The solo, work in this
will be taken by students, the club having
decided to use no outside talent. Miss
Kathleen Grant will take the soprano solo
part, and Mr. Barr the bass. In addition
to this cantata there will be a number of
glees and selections from the men's
quartette. The orchestra is to play the
musical score of the cantata, and will also
render a number of selections.
Tickets can be secured from members
of the club, and will be exchanged at
Walter F. Evans on Friday and Saturday
of this week.
THE SONG OF THE PUCK
(To the 'Varsity Sextette)
DR. DAVIDSON INTERVIEWED
Among those who were interviewed
last week by the "Ubyssey' was Dr. J.
G. Davidson, honorary president of the
Rugby Club and several other athletic
societies. Unfortunately, owing to lack
of space, his interview was not published.
It is with great pleasure that we now
present his ideas to the student body. He
said, in part: . .
"Are conditions well with college spirit?
Public Speaking? Athletics? Social
functions? My answer is an emphatic
'Yes' and an equally emphatic 'No' in
each case. We are learning how to focus
on one point the combined energies of a
group or of the whole University. When
the team is composed of players and
rooters, it inevitably follows that the
game is played with a desperate energy
beyond the ability of the players alone,
and in a clean and enthusiastic sportsmanlike manner. We have developed this
spirit in athletics. It is a priceless asset
to the University as a whole, and to us
as individuals. We are just beginning to
see it in inter-collegiate debates; but it is
not yet our habitual attitude toward the
University in all its activities. It is altogether too little in evidence in the classroom, and, after all, we must be primarily
an educational institution. Too many
students do not 'play the game' with their
studies. The Freshman class, particularly, is taking too long to find itself this
year. ,
Every student should play some athletic game, take part in some literary
activity -find a place in some organized
social affairs—and do a little real study.
We depend altogether too much on a few
brilliant, all-round athletes, speakers and
Into  the  light,  where  ice  gleams  bright,
I flash, on wings unseen,
And hear the shout that quick rings out
The whistle shrill and keen.
We're off with a rush and a swing, my
lads,
The  beat of the  skates'  sharp  ring,  my
lads;
Hockey! the game for a king, my lads,
The song of the puck I sing.
I dart away the longed for prey
Of twelve good men and true,
Quick  comes  the  beat  of  speeding  feet,
A gleam of gold and blue.
Then  off down  the  ice  with  a  will,  my
lads,
While  the  breathless  crowd  is   still,  my
lads,
Sticks clash—a turn—and a spill, my lads,
And the shouts the building fill.
Where   eyes  and   heart  each   play   their
part
With hands and feet and brain,
And all life's whirl means just to hurl
That small black speck again.
With   just   one   more   try   when   you're
stuck,  my  lads,
A cheer for your grit and your pluck, my
lads,
Here's to the sextette—from the puck.
S. M.
DO YOU WANT A JOB FOR THE
SUMMER?
The exams, will soon be here and
gone, and next comes the vital question
of work for the summer. The newly-
formed Engineering Discussion Club is
taking up that problem at its first general  meeting   next   Monday,   noon.
Now is the time to start looking for
work. Don t leave it until too late. Get
your information at this meeting, and get
started'. A special invitation is extended
to the men of Arts '24, many of whom
will doubtless be entering Science next
year.
Don't forget—Monday, the 21st, at
noon, in Room 24, second floor, Science
Building.    Be there.
Gilbert Murray's translation of the
"Alcestis" of Euripides was produced last
month by the Hart House Players, of
Toronto University.
Western University, of London, Ont.,
has inaugurated a course in Journalism,
the first to be given in Canada.
dancers, while probably the majority of
the students remain out of it completely.
"A few members of Faculty are doing
good work, as advisors in various lines
of student activities, but a great many
more are able and anxious to participate.
Students do not realize the benefits that
might be derived from such co-operation
or the existence of the spirit itself, while
most Faculty members lack the true assurance that some possess in making the
approach. I would suggest that each
group in all lines of student activity
should look about for a permanent honorary president, and take him into their inmost councils. The benefits would be
more than worth while on both sides."
"THE LATEST
PHOTOGRAPHY
-• THE TIME
GRAIV
When Wanting Nice
Things to Eat
CUSICK
CAN   SUPPLY   YOUR  WANTS
From the very finest Chocolates,
Home-made Candy, Ice Cream and
Soft Drinks, Pastries, and such like,
to the daintiest little Dinner and
Light Lunch you ever ate.
Make sure you go to Cuslck.
Cor. Heather and Broadway, West
SPECIAL
$25.00
Rough Blue
Serge
Norfolk Suits
REGULAR
$45.00
THE SHOP OF
3 aafrtan - (firaft
Thos. Foster
& Co., Ltd.
ONE STORE ONLY
514 GRANVILLE ST.

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0124436/manifest

Comment

Related Items