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The Ubyssey Jan 20, 1950

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 SUPPORT
HAMBER CUP SERIES
MON. & TUES.
The Ubyssey
SUPPORT
HAMBER CUP SERIES
MON. & TUES.
vol xxxn
<ii
VANCOUVER, B. C„ FRIDAY, JANUARY 20, 1050
No. St
Ubyssey Photo by Bruce Jaffary
McGoun Cup Debators
VERBAL WAR will be waged across Western Canada today, with these four students making up
the debating team of University of British Columbia. From left to right they are: Stan Medley
•fid Rod Young; who will defend UBC at the Univeristy of Alberta; Alistair Fraser and Don
Lanskail, who will take the affirmative side of " Communism Should Be Made a Criminal Offense
in Canada." The latter two will appear in Brock.Lounge tonight.
McGoun Cup Arbitrators
y''   	
Compete In Four Cities
Lanskail, Fraser Take Stand
For UBC in Brock Lounge Tonight
Four University of British Columbia debators are preparing
for their competition in Western Canada's famous McGoun Cup
contest, which will take place in four cities across Canada.
1 Donald Lanskail and Alastair Fraser
will defend University of British
they display their debating prowess
Columbia on home grounds when
on January 20, at 8 p.m. in Brxk Hall.
Holy War
SUBJECT
Subject  under   discussion  will
be
"What we need on this campus is a good beer and pretzels
election campaign," quoth Bob
Currie, council's Public Relations Officer, at their Monday
night meeting, and he spoke as
one who knew.
Carrie's stunning statement had instant effect, as gathered councillors
immediately schemed to raise campaign expenditures to a bountiful
thirty dollars.
PAST HISTORY
Inspired by Bob's idea, and no doubt
recalling eras of the past when eager
students were plied with beverages
of any and every sort, fertile minds
dreamed of great mugs of cold, foaming beer and trays of crisp, salty
pretzels.
"I like mine with salt in it," said
one slumbrous maid.  "Just think! 1
could dunk my pretzels."
PRECEDENT
"Maybe we could set an unbreakable precedent, and have every candidate contribute for one huge affair"
muttered another smoky-eyed dream
er.
Thoughts still whirling in their hot
little heads, council adjourned and
set out for the coffee bar.
CANDIDATE FACES
PROSECUTION AS
SIGNS MUST GO
AMS president candidate Charlie
Walker face prosecution unless he
removes a series of signs on University Boulevard, Provincial Police told The Ubyssey yesterday.
Police sny they warned Walker
several days ago to remove the
signs but police state lie has not
complied with their request.
"Communist Activity Should Be Made
A Criminal Offense in Canada.' This
unlve-.sity will take the affhmalive
side. In opposition to them will be
t-n vtisity of Alberta debating team,
which will take a negative stand on
the question.
At the same time on University of
Alberta campus, two Vancouver students will be waging a verbal war
in a contest' for the same McGoun
Cup. Rod Young and Stan Medley
will be representing UBC.
ACROSS CANADA
All over Western Canada, these
same debates will take place. Winnipeg, Edmonton, Saskatoon, and Vancouver are all included in the program.
McGoun Cup competitions first interested UBC in 1927. Since then, this
university has taken the cup twice
once in 1938 and then in 1942.
Fer 1930 competition, judges will be
Honorable Mr. Justice J. M. Coady,
Dean Cecil Swanson, and Alderman
Alex Fishor.
UN Club Sets Date
For Model Assembly
United Nations Club at University
of British Columbia have fci February 16 as date for next Model Assembly.
A meeiing of prospective delegates,
and all those interested in the Assem
bly. will be held in Arts 108 at 12:30
p.m. on January 25. Purpose of the
gathering will be !o elect an Assembly
president, choose a resolution, complete the lis: of delegates, and arrange
detail* of organization.
Resolutions should be presented for
consideration   at   this   tmie.
IAN MacKENZIE
. . . calls for holy wur
ne termed "the hoodlum-like tactics
of the Sciencemen, who on several
occasions this year have brough disgraces  to  the campus.
"It's time someone took a definite
.«tand," McKenzie stated. "Police protests have had no effect in curbing
the infantile tactics of this minority
group."
Election Candidates Must
Submit Plans For Approval
<?>
WHERE, OH WHERE HAVE
OUR FIRE HYDRANTS GONE?
Those boxen of (ugh!) manure that are dotted about
are lending a certain, unmistakeable air to the campus.
1 Superintendent of Grounds, Mr. hee, gave Ubyssey
reporters the offal news about the boxes yesterday, when
he explained that their purpose is not to beautify the
campus.
He said that, with the weather so cold, fire-hydrants
need a good healthy coat of manure to keep them from
freezing.
We'll take a muskrat coat, any old day.
Law Student Fourth
President Nominee
Fosttr Isherwood Announces Plant
To Join Presidential Running
Foster Isherwood, second year law student, is the fourth
nominee for Alma Mater Society president.
Arts   graduate   of   UBC   in   1M3„>
Isherwood received his MA from the
University of Saskatchewan in 1945.
After   teaching  Commerce  PubUc
Speaking at UBC tor two years, he
MacKenzie Defies
*
Hoodlum-like
Campaign Tactics
Charging the Engineers are
using "hoodlum-like tactics" in
their efforts to elect a candidate to president of the AMS,
Ian MacKenzie, campaign man-,
ager for candidate Peter de
Vooght called upon artsmen to
band together for a "holy war."
"A red scourge is threatening to engulf the campus," McKenzie, himself
a candidate for the AMS presidency
last year, told The Ubyssey. "De
Vooght has come forth to lead the
Artsmen's cause against the Engineers."
Besides being in the interests of the
Artsment, McKenzie said, de Vooght
is interested in protecting the reputation of the university against what
PJtoto by Tony Archer
FOSTER ISHERWOOD
entered 1st' year law here in the fall
of 1947.
While he was president of tiie
Parliamentary Forum in 1942 he organized the first Mock Parliament.
Other executive positions held by
Isherwood were: secretary and president of Law Undergraduate Society,
respectively.
Campaign manager for Isherwood
is Don Christie,
Twin Classes
EUS Film Shows
History of Metal
Film "No Man is and Island,"
sponsored by the Engineering
Undergraduate Society, will be
presented to students today at
12:30 p.m. in the Auditorium.
The reel, which Was produced by
the Canadian Mining and Smelting
Company, outlines the history behind
the metal industry in British Columbia.
BUS executive members have advised The Ubyssey to extend a special
welcome to all University students.
*r ^r *t*
FIRST LECTURE on the "Sources of
Marxism," topic of Mr. Elgin Ruddell,
Provincial secretary of the Labor-
ProgresFive Party, will be held Monday at 12:30 p.m. in Arts 103.
Student LPP has also announced
that further meetings will hear Mr.
Emil B'jarnason, a UBC graduate in
Economics, discuss "Marx as an Economist."
Second instalment of the lecture
series will be presented Friday, January 27.
* * *
UBC FILM SOCIETY will feature a
Comedy Film Revival at 12:30 p.m.
Tuesday, when they present W. C.
Fields and Laurel and Hardy in the
auditorium. Admission will be ten
cents.
Afternoon and, evening performance
is Song of My Heart, which will include the music of Tschaikowsky. A
twenty-five cent admission will be
charged at the three shows which
start al 3:30 p.m., 6 p.m., and 8 p.m.
Giant Pep Meet to
Boost Cup Series
In Armory Monday
Giant pep meet to boost
UBC Thunderbird - Alberta
Bears hockey game at Exhibition Forum Monday and Tues-
day at 8:30 p.m. will be staged
in the Armories Monday from
12:30to 1:30 p.m.
Meet is being sponsored by the
Thunderbird rally committee. Entertainment has been arranged by members of the committee.
Meet* will be sparked by the tall
girls Mardi Gras chorus line who
will stage two numbers. Officials of
ihe committee say a special platform
will be arranged for better vision.
/Master of Ceremonies for the show
will be Dick Ellis, third year law
itudent. Al McMillan's orchestra will
supply the music.
Majorettes and cheerleaders will be
on hand as well as members of the
Thunrall committee will be on hand
to entertain.
Thunrall officials state that help is
needed in staging the show, especially
from freshmen. Those willing to help
are asked to be at the Armory at
11:30 p.m.
High scorer and captain of the
visiting Alberta team will be interviewed by officials during the pep
meet, as well as UBC players. Coaeh
Frank Fredrickson will speak as well
as a prominent downtown sportswriter.
Three buses have been chartered
to take students to the game in eastern Vancouver. First bus will leave
Brock Hall at UBC at 7 p.m. Second
will leave Tenth and Alma at 7:15
p.m. and the third leaves 12th and
Cambie at 7:30 p.m.
Overflow of students will be accommodated by buses at these same
three point, if necessary. Bus fare
is 35 cents return.
Thunrall welcoming committee will
be on hand at 8:45 p.m. Sunday at the
CNR station to welcome the Alberta
team. Students wishing to donate cars
are asked to contact Don Knight in
Ole Bakken's office in the AMS.
Sought by Police
AH candidates for Student
Council must submit campaign
plans to the elections commit*
tee for approval by them, \%%y
McDonald, chairman of the
elections committee announ^d
today.
Candidates who fail to comply, to
the ruling to obtain approval. |br
their campaign devices will be decttlftd
ineligible to run, the stated. '' '
SUBMIT PLANS
Elections committee will be on heiid
each day from 12:30 to 1:30 p.rtii In
the Alma Mater Society off lea* t£ji|<
ceive campaign plans and approvi &r
disapprove them, she said. Cam|l1|ri
managers will be eligible to roifitt
plans.
Candidates themselves will be held
responsible for campaigning, an* dt»«
age to buildings or ground* "fill
make candidates liable. Ignorant* et
eleotion campaign rules will n^§*
accepted, th* election committerMtd
stated.
SEARCH
On* candidate was being aetrt)i*4
for by Provincial Folic*- yet
who wanted potters taken off
on th* approaches to UBO.
Charges of illegal campaigning by
other candidates were dropped wj|j|
elections committee yesterday i '''"''
an Engineer candidate. His cain
ing started before he filed nomUt
papers.
EXPENDITURES
"In the future," Mid Kay MoDect-
aid, "campaigning for offices other
than president must not b*fih until
8:30 a.m. and the day following tha
close of those nominations.'
Candidates for election may tsttet
spend W5 on their campaign it **•
also announced. Student Council Mptw
day ruled to abolish tha 115 maximum
in effect last year. Elections committ**
set the new figure.
"The elections committee only desires that this be a fair election,"
Jim Sutherland, president of the
AMS told the Ubyssey.
Local Disc-Jockey
That mad-cap diac-jockey is eontirig
to the campus. Jack Cull*n, m*n%
and moderator of the nightly CK^f
offering, Owl Prowl, will lb* at IMC
Wednesday, January 29.
First of a series of well-known VbJ^
couver raldo m*n to broadcast tttfp
the university, "Jackson" Ctalle^ tgffr
record his show on the campus for 'hits
evening broadcast.
Cullen will hold open house in.;tjhi
Brock Lounge from 12:30 to 2:3ft.fMJft.
that afternoon. Students will haVtft,,*
chance to see how disc Jockeys Operate as he demonstrates his skllkl to
the public. •
Following Cullen will be other radl*
artists, among them Wilf Ray, III*
Thompson, and Vic Waters.
Police Pleased With
Student Driving
Police are very pleased with the
way in which students have been conducting themselves this year.
Except for one accident when a oar
hit a snowplow a week ago, tJt*re
have been no serious injuries or damages suffered so far.
Music Department Reveals
Barbara Pentland Program
Barbara Pentland, of UBC's music department, will present
a program of hor own compositions at 8:30 p.m. on January 23
in Brock Lounge.
Miss Pentland has recently arrived $>
at the Univeristy of British Columbia
after extensive music studies in Paris
and the United States. She has been
composing her own music since the
age of nine, and her Monday night
performance will be a collection of
these works.
Her   exhibition   schedule   will   be:
Siring   Quartette   —   1944   —   First
Canadian  Performance
Allegro moderato
Andante semplice
Allegro anlmato
—Steinberg Quartet
Studies in Line — 1941
Sonata Fantasy — 1947
—Barbara   Pentland
Song Cycle to poems by Anne Marriott
Wheat Forest Tracks
Mountain Cities
—Frances James accompanied by the
composer.
String Quartet — Repeat, Pig? 2
TOE UBYSSEY
Friday,    January    20,    1950.
The Ubyssey
„ Member Canadian University Press
Authorized as Second Class Mail, Post Office Dept., Citawa. Mall Subscriptlon*--f2.00 per y*ar.
Published throughout the university year by the Student Publications Board of th* Alma
Mater Society of the University of British Columbia.
Editorial opinions expressed herein are those of the editorial staff of Th* Ubyssey and not
necessarily those of the Alma Mater Society nor of the University.
Offices in Brock HaU. Phone ALma 1024 For display advertising phone ALma 3283
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF    J -••   «M   BANHAM
MANAGING EDITOR   CHUCK MARSHALL
GENERAL STAFF: CUP Editor, Jerry Mcdonald; News Editor, Art Welsh; Features Editor,
Vie Havi Sports Editor, Ray Frost; Women's Editor, Shirley Finch; Editorial Aast. Les Armour
City Editor This Issue: RON PINCHIN
Associate Editor: IRIS SANDERSON
GobbldeygooiT
Toward Better Education
Roy Knight, CCF MP for Saskatoon de-
serveJLthe support of every thinking Canadian, regardless of political opinion, in his
campaign for federal aid to education.
The difficulties caused by the unequal
\*r0alth of our provinces has made inevitable
piie standards of educations—with* only one
teiith as much per school child being spent
inirince Edward Island as in B.C. We cannot
afjpd to have any poorly educated Canadians,
fdi§?our future, manifestly, depends upon
education.
>'* Nor is there any reason why a Canadian
shduld receive an inferior education merely
because he is born in a poor province.
.-% Furthermore the cost of education is
steadily increasing and most of the sources
of revenue are now in the hands of the
federal government—a government which
professes to have no responsibility for education,
We need more and better schools, more
and better teachers, more and better universities and more and better professors if we
are to solve the problems besetting mankind.
Plato argued that the chief business of
government is education—and he had a prettjj
good case. It's about time Mr. St. Laurent
and his government took Plato down off the
shelf.
Maybe Mr. Knight and his party can wake
the government up.
By HeTTt im*nt
A New Twist In Affairs
-'•' A new twist is being added to this year's
Campaigns for AMS president.
| For the first time in the memory of
cajmpus observers the campaign race is developing into a straight inter-faculty war.
% Already, two candidates, Charlie Walker
alld Peter de Vooght, have set themselves
u^ as charttpions of their respective Science
ani Arts faculties and seem determined to
cofcduct their campaigns along strict party
lines.
■*■ Whether or not this new turn of affairs
lit desirable is a moot question but the die
has rtow been cast and there is Uttle that can
wyiboutit.
One warning, however, should be issued
at this time.
Students must arm themselves against
the inevitable party spiel which is bound to
follow and never lose sight of the purpose of
the election — to appoint a good man to run
campus affairs in the coming year.
AMS government has been fighting an
uphill battle for the last two years and is
just now getting back on its feet and given
one more term of sound administration, affairs will be back on an even keel once
again. »
Students owe It to the AMS and to themselves to see that the man they elect is big
enough for the job, regardless of his faculty.
In This Corner       byjim banham
Hn my twenties the critics said I was
Atal, in my thirties tHey said I was flippant,
in my forties they said I was cynical and
in my fifties they said I was competent, and
then in my sixties they said I was superficial."
With these words aging, wrinkled W.
Somerset Maugham introduces his book
"Quartet,'* a collection of four short stories,
to movie-goers. Just about all the qualities
he mentions in his introduction are wrapped
up in the film.
In the first, "The Facts of Life," he is
flippant. As a young tennis player leaving
for Monte Carlo young (19) Nicky Garnet
receives three pieces of advice from his
father. Don't gamble, don't lend money, and
have nothing to do with women.
Nicky disregards all three. He wins 100,-
000 francs at the gaming tables, lends 10,000
to a beautiful adventuress (Mai Zetterling)
and winds up the evening sleeping on her
sitting room couch.  During the night she
robs him of his winnings. He promptly retrieves it plus her savings from a flower pot
and doesn't discover it until he is winging
ihis way back to England. The story is told
' by the boy's father in his London club. The
' worried father is consoled by his friends who
tell him it never would have happened to a
cricketer.
!        In the second, Dirk Bokarde, as George
'Bland, heir to a huge English estate, blows
his brains out after being told by a pro-
■ fessional pianist that he will be nothing more
than a competent amateur. George has prom-
'• ised to give up his ambitions as a professional
piafjlil after two years study in Paris if he
knoilii he cannot make the grade.
Dirk Bogarde, as the sensitive young
artist who cannot go if his whole life is not
devoted to music, i.s one of the best things
in the picture. The story is called "The Alien
Corn."
The last two sequences of Maugham's
book are the best put on celluloid for ages.
George Cole as Herbert Sunbury has as his
only method of escape from the humdrum
life of catching the morning train to his
post office job in town, the flying of kites.
The Kite is obviously an escape mechanism
in which Herbert sees himself liberated from
his day-to-clay existence.
When George marries, his wife, Betty,
insists he give up hi.s hobby and when he
refuses she smashes his kite. He leaves her
and is thrown into jail for refusing to support
her or pay the installments on the furniture.
* A reconciliation is a fleeted in the end
by a prison visitor who persuades Herbert's
wife to take up kiting. The two standouts
in this sequence are George Cole as the
sensitive Cockney and his possessive mother,
played by Hermione Baddeley.
The final story, "The Colonel's Lady" is
probably the best. Col. George Peregrine, a
retired army officer turned country gentleman and hypocrite, is surprised when his
wive Evie, played by Nora Swinburne, becomes a celebrity after having a slim volume
of verse published.
The poetry concerns an older married
woman who has a love affair with a younger
man who asks her to leave her husband for
him. Eventually she agrees and just as she
is about to leave he is killed. The poetry
is explained to George by his Lofidon mistress whom he visits on business junkets to
town. Tortured because he thinks his wife
has been carrying on behind his back, George
finally confronts his wife and learns that
the young man in the book id actually himself when he was younger,
As a bumbling country colonel Cecil
Parker gives an admirable performance. Although she plays an almost minor role, his
wife weaves a thread of resigned calm througl
the picture far out of proportion to her actual
screen time.
The directors,of the picture have done
an admirable job of portraying English country life in the drawing room and on the
common. In "The Alien Corn," movie-goers
may discern a trifle too much restraint in the
family when they are told their son wants
to become a pianist.
Movie-goers who like good movie entertainment will find little wrong with this one.
V *T *t* x
I'll warn you now about the picture to
follow "Quartet" at the same theatre. It's
called "Beyond the Forest" and the advance
publicity states, "No one is as good as Bette
Davis when she's bad."
As the wife of a small town docfor, Rosa
Moline yearns for the glamor and glitter
of Chicago. She almost makes it as the wife
of a wealthy man with whom she carries on
an illegal love affair. For recognizing her
for what she is, Moose Lawson gets a bullet
through his brain.
Miss Davis snarls and thunders her way
through more than ninety minutes of the
most repulsive piece of celluloid to come out
of Hollywood in a long time.
At the beginning of the picture, Miss
Davis is labelled as "evil." Most discerning
movie-goers will probably walk out in the
middle. In fact, I'd advise you to skip this one.
hip to South Pacific Cheaper
7/»n Nmht et the Metd, 5
Several of my friends on the campus
supressed Mvhat I suspect was.inward glee
this week, when they found 1 do not Intend
to go to the tibm Gras.
But most of them politely managed to
seem sorry that my body win not be among
those found under any Commodore table (or,
worse still, uttder several Commodore tables)
early this or tmorrow mornings.
Personally, I do not feel half as sorry
for me at they do.
It Isn't that i cannot afford to go to the
Mardi Oras. It's just that an evening down
there would reduce my budget to the extent
that I would have to stop eating for the
following 73 days.
When it comes to eating regularly, I am
very conventional. Almost set in my ways,
you might say.
So (glutton that i am) I shall not attend.
You cannot tug at my heartstrings by
telling me thit Mardi Gras profits go to
charity. Charity begins at home, which ii
where I intend to begin being nice to me
(at no extra cost), both tonight and tomorrow
night.
You cannot impress me by pointing out
that the Mardi Oral coats only three dollars.
A friend of mine got fooled the same way
when somebody told him a marriage licence
costs only a couple ol bucks.
(Now, once a year, I take him and his
family a large Christmas hamper filled with
such necessities as canned goods and Underarm deodorant.)
If I could write poetry, I'd sum up my
viewpoint this'way:
9ft ep eft
Ode to the South Pacific
Or, Owed to the Mardi Gras
It may be great
—Or even terrific,
But it's not my dream
Of the South Paeific.
That's exactly why
I say fah-dee-dah
To a drunken night
At the Mardi Gras.
I can sleep my sleep
'Neath the Southern Cross
Without such a heavy
Financial loss.
Thafs exactly why
I give no hoots
*
For their formal dresses
Or monkey suits.
*r *r V
I can sit and watch
Some mermaid play
Without the smoke
Of a cabaret.
What better reason
To thumb my nose
At girls in formals
And nylon hose? <
e^e ej» e^
I can head for the land
Of the Kangaroo
Without the expense
Of a jug of brew.
That's another reason
(There's plenty more)
Why you won't find me
At the Commodore.
I can peer at natives
With flaxen hair
And pay no shot
For a taxi fare.
That's exactly why
I turn thumbs down
On an "ocean isle"
In the midst of town.       ..
* * a)
I don't object
To a social whirl,
But I got no dough
For the hat-check girl.
That's precisely why
I don't feel able
To part with cash .
For a nightclub table.
¥ ¥ *
I'll hang my hat
On a swaying palm
On Okinawa
Or even Guam.
But strike me dead
For this long recltery       '
If I ever enter **i!
Aforesaid nightery.
* ¥ ¥
You can call me stingy
Or can me cheap;
A two-bit heel
Or a no-good creep.
But again my reason
(Lest it be mistrusted):
Like a twelve-year-old girl,
I am quite flat-busted.
■i r\
-i   i
\,;t
y
■/ .yt
i .: i
---Ubyssey Classified
Notices
IF YOU PLAY SAXAPHONE, BASS
->r drums and would like to join the
UBC Swing Band, please phone Syd
Lawson, AL. 2023R.
UBC ORCHESTRA REHEARSAL IN
he Orchestra Hut, Wednesday, January 25 at 6 p.m.
'HOTOGRAFHY COMPETITION :
Will those people who submitted
prints to 'this oompHltlion please
claim them at Room U in Arts building. Contest has been cancelled because of lack of support. **
CIVIL LIBERTIES UNION FRE-
sents Secretary of B.C. Teacher Federation "Should Teachers Hold Pubic Office?" Aggis 100, Friday, Janu-
iry 20 at 12:30 p.m.
PO Box 764 would appreciate any old
socket book, novels, magazines, fiction books, reading matter. Willing to
exchange books with other students.
SELF - CONTAINED BASEMENT
suite for rent or board. One large
bedroom, 3 single beds. Separate study
room and shower. Suitable for 3
girls or S boys. AL. 32S6M.
ROOM AND BOARD FOR ONE OR
two boys. Double room wilh single
beds, $55 per month with lunch made.
Apply 4118 West Uth, AL. 1658M.
Wohted
Lost
3LACK WALLET-PROBABLY IN
he Library. Please return to Lost and
Found.
LAB. COAT BY CHEM LAB 100,
lanuary 12. Reward for return. Terry,
CH. 0163.
WATERMAN'S GOLD CAP NAVY
blue barrel between Library and
South parking lot via science building, Reward. Phone George, CH. 7670
^OP OF STERLING SILVER CAN-
dlestlck. Lost last Thursday evening
in vicinity cf Brock Hall. Please return to Lost and Found,
PAIR HORN-RIMMED GLASSES-
Monday, January 16. Please turn In to
Lost and Found.
Room ond Board
TOOM AND BOARD, DUNBAR AT
15th, vacant January 3lst. Warm
single room. Breakfast and dinner,
3 meals Saturday and Sunday. Good
food, garage. AL. 2023R.
COMFORTABLE BED - SITTING
room with sigle beds for two students
sharing, with breakfast, $25 each per
month. Alse} room with double bed,
$31) with breakfast. AL. 3450L.
ROOM AND BOARD FOR TWO
male students. $50 per month. Close
to bu«. 4411 West 11th. AL. 3256M.
PAIR OF SKIS (6-foot) AND LADIES
ski boots (size 5 or 6). Phone Monica
at ce am.
RIDERS LEAVING MacDONALD
and 4th for 8:30's Monday to Friday
going home 5:30. Call BA. 1930 after
6 p.m.
IS THERE ANY INSTRUCTOR OR
student willing to five me a little
coaching in 2nd year Maths 202 (Calculus). Please phone West 33R to arrange times and fees.
WOULD LIKE TO JOIN OR FORM
car pool. General vicinity of 4th and
Alma for 6 days a, week. Atone AL.
2710R. (
For Sole
ZEISS  BINOCULARS,   3x60,  WITH
case. CH. 7623.
CAR    HEATER.    WORKS    GOOD,
doesn't leak, 112.00. O. Wallla, But 4,
Room 17, Fort Camp.
TUXEDO, SIZE 36. GOOD CONTtt-
tlon. Phone KE. S&5M.
TUXEDO,   SINGLE   -   BREASTED,
size 36, $20. Phone Dave, KE.
Found
FAITH IN CAMPtJS COFFEE AT
the Legion Canteen. Open eveniftgs
for your convenience, 7 to 10:16 p.tt.
Miscellaneous    .
TYPING: ENGLISH AND FORMOJJ
languages. Essays, theta*, Card Worf.
Campus rates. AL. 068AR.
TYPING     ACCURATELY     DONE.
Reasonable rates. PA. 2963
T"-
mmi
SALE _
2S% OFF ON MOST JEWELLRY
CASTLE JEWELERS
EXPERT WATCH AND JEWELLRY REPAIRS
(Special Discounts to Students)
4560 West 10th Ave.
ALfnaNft*
EUROPEAN
STUDENT TOUR
Sail May 27th on One Class ship in Canadian Service with run of
the ship privileges. London, Trossadis, Edinburgh; motor tour of
Scott Country, English Lakes, Shakespeare Country, Oxford, Holland, Belgium, Lucerne, Interlaken, Montreux, Geneva, Italian
Lakes, Venice, Rome, Hill Towns, Florence, French nod Italian
Rivieras, Paris. 67 days $1098 for complete tour or $878 without
Italy.
PHONE, CALL OR WRITE
UNIVERSITY TRAVEL CLUB
57   Bloor   St.,   West,   Toronto,   Kingsdale   6984
MANAGEMENT: J. F. aud G. II. LUCAS. Friday,    January    20,    1950
THE UBYSSEY
Page 3
shfrfey f inch'
Woman's Page
FirstJ Nighters See
King George Crowned\
A palm-decked Commodore, complete with sarong girl
murals, greeted first nighters as they stepped from snowy Vancouver into a South Pacific island paradise.
The Mardi Gras committee showed
a wonderful party for all their hard
work of the last month and a half.
Lonl Francis Und Bob Annable as co-
chairmen led their committee of Jan
McColl, secretary, Ralph Diamond,
treasurer, assistant, Gene MacDonald,
sponsorship, Doug Franklin, donations,
Mary Rlttloh, tickets, Rowan Cotton,
raffles, Shirley Abbott and John
Graham, programmes, John Panton,
Pulbllchy, Shirley Finch, assistants
Jackie Hartt and Hugh Cameron, Art,
Pete Burnett, Decorations, Jo Jean
Johnston, Costumes, Nial Scott, Act
IvltMa, Don Urquhart, models, Joan
Taylor and chorus, Diana Cox and
Mitel Swifter.
The Hula Honeys and the Sarong
Sweethearts enchanted the audience
with their chorus numbers. The Hula
Honeys are: Joan Barton, Nancy Carter, Jaquellne Davies, Mary Denisiuk,
Shirley Hern, Lyla Butterworth, Susan Jamas, Sheila McGiverin, Jan
Olsen, Shirley Shields, Beverley Urquhart, and Chris Windebank. The
Sarong    Sweethearts    are:    Dorothy
Chave, Marilyn Grant, Bette Heard,
Ptel  Hodson,   Pauline  Lee,   Solneig
LeTVold,   Connie   Thompson,   Nonie
Marsden,   Gloria   Newell,   Jo   Ann
Strutt, Joan MacKeracher and Billie
Wadds.
Joan Taylor's models opened the
show modeling some of the beautiful
raffle prizes which will be drawn
for tonight. The models are: Barbara
Ann Brown, Nancy Wells, Kay MacDonald, Shirley Selman, Beth Mc-
Eaohen, Adele Goult, Marigold Mac
kenzie, Lonl Francis, and Joan Taylor.
The men's chorus opened the floor
show with "There's Nothing Like A
Dame." The sailor costumed singers
are: Doug Franklin, Dick Hubbard,
Dick Stevens, Jack Barnett, Leo Kel-
ekls, Bill Halcrow, Barry McHugh,
Bob Edwards, Al Goldsmith, Bruce
Arneson, Wally (Beck, Dave Sweet,
Cam Aird, Doug Reld and Pete Burnett.
George Jones of Phi Kappa Sigma
was crowned King of the Mardi Gras
as he went through a routine with
some of the beauteous chorus. King
George I sang a number that really
thrilled the audience. He has a cultured and practiced voice. i
The nine beauteous sorority candidates were Introduced to" the assemblage. One of the following will be
crowned tonight: Anita Henderson,
Diane Carr, Joanne King, Sandy Mac-
Carthy, Pat Henderson, Dodie O'Brien,
Jean Long, Arllss Toban and Sally
Heard.
Winning raffle tickets will be announced tonight after the queen is
crowned.
Those extending their patronage are:
Lieutenant Governor and Mrs. Banks,
Chancellor and Mrs. Hamber, President and Mrs. N. A. M. MacKenzie,
Dean and Mrs. S. N. F. Chant, Dean
and Mrs. Finlayson, Dean Clement,
Dean Dorothy Mawdsley, Dr. and
Mrs. Lawrence E. Ranta, Dean and
Mrs. Curtis, Mr. and Mrs. George
Cunningham, Dean and Mrs. Weaver,
Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Buchanan, Dean
and Mrs. B. A. Eagles, Dean and Mrs.
Woods.
Openings For Writers
In Women's Fields
By ANN LANGBE1N
Can you tell gingham from satin? A frill from a flounce?
Do you remember names, places and faces and constantly astound your friends with your flow of fashion chatter? Could
be you're the type that could make good as a journalist.
Not (heaven forbid!) as a hard-boil- t> * .^_^.	
NOTICE
"VARSITY DRAG' ON 28TH
FOR WUS ANNUAL COED
"RAH RAH" atmosphere, complete with Bunny Hugs
and the Charleston will be featured at the WUS annual
Co-Ed on January 28th in the Brock.
A group from the Arthur Murray dance studios will
be on hand to help with the Charlestoning and Bunny
Hugging. As a basketball game will be played that night,
coeds are urged to bring their dates over to the Brock for
the dance that promises even to outdo previous WUS efforts.
The WtJS committee directing the dance is Helen Robinson, Pam McCorkll, Beth Estey, and Mary Denisiuk. The
committee lifts asked Mr. and Mrs. J. Creighton, Mr. and
Mrs. S. Read, Mr. and Mrs. V. C. Brink and Mr. and Mrs.
Johnson to be patrons. Keith Watson will do the orchestral
honours.
Admission price is $1.25 a couple and tickets will be
on sale in the Cafeteria and in the AMS office on Thursday,
Friday and Saturday of next week and will also be available
at the door.
A COMPLETE PRINTING SERVICE ...
COMMERCIAL AND SOCIAL
OFFICE STATIONERY
Business Cords - Private Cords
Invitations - Programs - Etc.
College Printers Ltd
4436 VYc^t 10th Avenue ALma 3253
Printers of "The Ubyssey"
ed "city-side" reporter, but rather u a
smooth, smart faahion writer whose
own good grooming makes everything
she writes that much more effective.
Advantages are many for the enterprising social columnist and the job
is not without its small compensations
for long hours and sometimes gruelling
stories.
Nothing li more delightful to every
woman than to bo able to talk about
what happened at Mrs, Brown's last
week and what is going to take
place at Mrs. Green's next weak. Can
you imagine how much more satisfying it is to put it ln writing and
have others read it?
Free pastes and tickets are always
forthcoming, generally on the pretext of "covering the story" and it's
the newspaperwoman who meets and
interviews famous people from all
over the world.
Not to be neglected is the fact that
there is truly never a dull moment.
Fashion shows, teas, interviews, invitations to speak before women's and
girls' clubs, exciting cocktail parties
and formal cabarets — all are on
everyday part of the fashion writer's
life.
AH this needs training, however,
aad there is no place better fitted
for beginners than a school or coUege
newspaper. Everybody is new to their
jobs, and all aro willing to show
what little experience they have to
someone who is even greener.
ln this, the Ubyssey follows suit
and the women's page and its staff
welcome any girl, or boV, who wants
to give faahion work a try.
First Aid Courses under the direction
of the St. John Ambulance Corps,
will be given to students.
Sponsored by the Pre-Medical Society, the lectures will be held in
Hut B 2 Monday's and Wednesday's at
"!:30 p.m.
7
a
ween Classes
SUBJECT of this week's University
Radio Roundtable, heard Saturdays'
at 8:30 p.m. over CJOR, will be "What
is the Place of Advertising in Today's
Society?"
Speaker will be Allan Aindworth,
former AMS president and Rhodes
Scholar, now associated with O'Brien
Advertising; Bill MacBain, at present
taking his MA in Psychology; Mr. W.
Merritt, UBC Economics lecturer; and
Ross MacLean, radio producer. Moderator will be law student Ben McConnell.
9S> 9f> SSi
AXIS UNDERGRADUATE Society of University of British Colum
bia is sponsoring a series of lecturfes
by Arts and Science professors, who
will expound on research projects in
their departments.
For the most part, students do not
even know about these projects, which
are being undertaken at UBC. Lecturers will interpret the contribution
of these on the science of living,
tyt e^ ap
TOM GOODS, MP, for Buranby-
RichmoncT, will apeak to students in
Aggie 100 at 12:30 p.m. January S3.
He is being presented on the campus
by Student Liberal Club, wfto alto
hope to have on hand Dr. Jack Mc-
Dougall, MP for Burrard.
EATON'S Presents a Campus Favourite
... by NANCY... modelled by ELAINE BAILLE
A duo study in blue ... deft strokes of frosted
white accents a navy mood .. . fashion's favourite scheme for a post-winter reawakening.
Pick a dress .. .pick a hat to go well together.
Navy rayon crepe sculptured
into a sheath-of-a-dress . . .
lavish folds of nipped and
tucked fabric make the waist
and hips fractional . . . covered
buttons release fullness on toe
side. Size 12. 35.00
EATON'S—Dresses—Second   Floor
Straws in the wind . . . poke
bonnet of navy Milan straw
trimmed with veiling, a cabbage rose and spiced with
white straw fabric as facing.
26.95
EATON'S—Milllnery-Sccond Floor
I • eWlSH   COLUMBIA V*tIMI IT
 —]—MB
»*..,t..y.4» ■
**.*.> w**
Page 4
THE UBYSSEY
r; jr
Friday,    January -gtiO,    1950
Hockey Classic Goes On
P/ioto bv Doug Burnett
All fhe Reasons Why Hamber Cup Will Come Here
ONE OF THE FEW TIMES that UBC Thunderbird icemen have been caught standing still, the above array of stars will reverse
the procedure Monday night at 8:30 p.m. at the Forum when they show the visiting Alberta Bears what is meant by "hustle."
Top row, left to right, are coach Mac Porteous, Stu Bailey, John Dechene, Don McWhirter, manager Al Thiessen, Jack MacFarlane, Mai Hughes, Terry Nelford, Bob Lindsay, Bob Koch, Professor Hyslop (faculty adviser), Herm Frydenlund (associate
manager); Kneeling are Bruce Barnes, Wag Wagner, Fred Andrew, Ken Torrence, Merl MacDonald, Clare Drake. Absent from
the photo are Don Adams, goalie, who was injured at the time of the picture, Ken Hodgert, Bob Peebles, Greg Pesacrata and
Doug Hamilton.
Seventeen Thunderbird Icemen Assure
UBC That Hamber (Cup Will Not Go East
SPORTS EDITOR - RAY FROST
 Editor This Issue: DANNY GOLDSMITH ǤJ ^
Prep Meets Face Watermen
__.   y'
Before Conference Test
Five prep swim meets face Thunderbird flshmen before
they splash into the big Evergreen Conference test on March 11
at Bellingham.
Whe eagerly awaited Vancouver?
portion of the Hamber Cup intercollegiate hockey series resumes in
Vancouver on Monday night, January
23rd and Tuesday, January 24th at
8:30, with the UBC Thunderbirds hosting the University of Alberta "'Golden Bears."
The games, which will be played
at the Forum, are the third and fourth
of the four-game series for the Hamber Cup and the Western Canada
inter-collegiate championships.
'Birds are currently leading trie ser
ies two games to none. The margin
of victory was one goal in each game
and the locals were hard pressed to
turn in victories.
These games promise to be spirited
and hard fought as well as thrilling
from a fan standpoint of view. The
Bears are determined to turn the trick
here.
Bob Lindsay suffered a possible
fractured leg in the last game of the
series at Denver which was won by
the locals by a 12-4 margin. The extent of the injury is not yet known
but he won't be out for the Alberta
series.
Below is the impressive lineup for
the UBC Thunderbirds:
DON ADAMS-GOAL:
21. third year physical Education
Major from Regina—a rookie sensation
last season, Don is a Big Block winner and is a very capable netminder.
He is gifted with a good pair of hands
and is deadly on low shots. It is
known he has turned down several
"pro" offers.
BOB KOCH-RIGHT WING:
26, fourth year Pharmacy, from Calgary. Played senior hockey with that
city's Stampeders when he was only
17, and subsequently played with
RCAF Flyers and NW Royals. He was
high scorer in the squad last season.
Has won three Big Blocks for hockey.
Famous for his brilliant stick-handling
ability.
FRED ANDREW-CENTRE:
25, Teachcr.s Training, from Regina.
Played on RCAF championship squad
overseas, in his fourth year with the
local .squad, he has three Blocks for
hockey. Fred is a persistent forecheck-
er and precision passer.
HUGH RERRY-LEFT WING:
23, fourth year engineering, Hugh
played    last   season    with    Nanaimo
Clippers, B.C. senior "B" champs.
Played with Thunderbirds three previous seasons. Fast skater nnd has
a terrific 3hot. Two time big Block
winner. Has had several senior hockey
offers.
STV "GUNNER" BAILEY-
RIGHT WING:
20, third year Arts, from Camrose,
Alberta. A beautiful skater and a
tremendous back checker and opportunist. Scored several goals during the
recent tour. ,
CLARE DRAKE-CENTRE:
21, third year Physcial Education
Major, from Regina. Played junior
hockey with Regina Pats and Medicine
Hal Tigers. A Big J31oek winner as a
rookie, hi< is a very cagey performer
with tremendous natural ability.
BOB LINDSAY-LEFT WING:
20, third year Physical Ed Major,
from Medicine Hat. Great backcheck-
er and sparkplug. His injury will deprive the squad of a first rate hustler.
WAG WAGNER-CENTRE:
28, fourth year student in food
technology, from Edmonton. Played
on North West Air Command team
in 1945 and 1946. Having his best
season to date. Three Big Blocks for
hockey. Smart skater and fancy stick-
handler, terrific shot.
JOHN "CORKY" DECHENE-
RIGHT WING:
20, second year Arts, from Manitoba.
Newcomer to 1he squad this season
and is a welcome addition. Colorful
performer, powerful skater. Delights
in heavy going and he knows how
to take care of himself.
BRUCE BARNES-RIGHT WING:
21, second y?ar Arts, from Edmonton.
Accomplished skater and a potential
star. Needs work to develop but has
shown good form to date. Could be a
high scorer.
DOUG HAMILTON-LEFT WING:
Fourth year Physical Education Major from Edmonton, formerly played
with University of Alberta Golden
Eaars. First year with Thunderbirds.
Has terrific hustle and spirit.
TERRY NEI.FORD-LEFT DEFENCE:
25, Teacher's Training, from Prince
Albert. Has three letters for hockey,
plays a heady game on defence, a dependable performer and a strong
skater. Plenty of hustle both ways and
lie can throw a terrific check.
JACK MACFARLANE-
RIGHT DEFENCE:
20, second year Physical Education
Major, from Regina, played last season with Medicine Hat Tigers of tiJe
tough prairie* junior loop. A stylish
skater, he is an outstanding newcomer
to the squad.
KEN HODGERT-LEFT DEFENCE:
21, third year Physical Education
Major, from Regina. Played with Winnipeg Monarchs as a junior. He is a
spirited performer and has tremendous hustle.
BOB PEEBLES—RIGHT DEFENCE:
20, third year Arts, from Trail,
where he played junior with the
city's Smoke Eaters. Played with Jay-
vees and a few games with the Thunderbirds last season. Terrific hustle
and drive, and a team player all the
time. f j.JJn
GREG PESECRATA-
LEFT DEFENCE:
20, third year Arts, also from Trail.
Injuries Keep Bell From
'Bird Weekend Road Trip
Big Bill Bell, lanky forward
eiu' 'Birds drop both of their games.
fit'It only managed to hobble about
■ n the Whitforth game, and the old
knee would hardly support him after
:  little time in  (lie Eastern contest.
on the Thunderbird basketball
team, will not make the trip
south this weekend with his
team-mates.
News eanu' ;is a blow to 'lairds when
it was announced that ei knee injur\
incurred in the Pacifie I.u.herein gann
and aggraveiled .since then will keep
Bell nut if active jiiay |',,r al leasl
two weeks, | ing  ace  with   the Chiefs,  worked  out
On the mat!  trip last   vwvkmd    i|,.,i ' uith   the  'Rii.Is yeslordav.
In a frantic last minute attempt to
plug the gap in the team left by
Be'il's absence,  E'dl   Rapes,  high  scor-
ONLY
AUSTIN
Gives Such
• SPARKLING
PERFORMANCE
• AMAZING
ECONOMY
• REMARKABLE
RIDING
COMFORT
A40 Devon Sedan
SI 445.00
CALL CE. 8105
FOR DEMONSTRATION
Gordon
Bros.
AUSTIN DEALERS
10th and Alma
Teams with Bob Peebles on defence.
A former Smoke Eater and Jayvee,
he is a hard worker.
MAL HUGHES-DEFENCE:
22, third year Commerce, from Edmonton, formerly twith Thunderbird*
A hard worker and sound skater.
With this array of talent, UBC is
assured that the Hamber Cup will
rest for the first year at this university.
Calibre of the prelims range all the ■
way from a "soft push" to a battle
which will take everything that' the
UBC team has got.
When Thunderbirds hit the waves
against Eastern Washington "Savages" and University of Idaho this
Saturday at Cheney, Washington, the
Blue and Gold should emerge wel
but victorious.
Next Saturday UBC aqua boys will
be back in town to swap strokes
with Gray Harbour College at the
YMCA pool. Though the Harbour
school has a reputation for turning
out top-notch swim squads, Varsity
hould take this one too.
February 3 'Birds go south for a
Bellingham match with Western
Washington. Return engagement goes
February 25 at the Crystal Pool.
Toughest of the prep meets will fo
at Seattle on the eleventh when UBC
meet the University of Washington
frosh team, rated as one of the fastest
cq the coast. A real powerhouse
squad,.the freshmen have been rated
above their own Varsity team.
However, all these encounters us
just the build-up for the Evergreen
Conference Swimming Meet on March
4 at Bellingham. The Evergreen matt
is the biggest thing to^ happen to
Varsity swimmers during tha whole
sports year.
With a few breaks 'Bl^ might ba
able to pull this contest away from
Western Washington, Eastern, Puget
Sound, and the rest of tha Evergreen
Conference colleges that will take
part ||ft'
VILVIT
PENCHS ARE
YOU'LL BE GLAD T0M0RR0W-
Y0U SMOKED
PHIUP MORRIS *&«
6*Uje>t PHIUP MORRIS
This means that
the lead is actually
bonded to the wood.
You can't buy better
school pencils!
m \*.
Have A Coke...
Play Refreshed
VENUS P8NCH. CO„ LTD.. TORONTO
Ask for it either tt*s>... hoth
trademarks mean tht tern thing.
COCA COLA — VANCOUVER
■•,#.#■.%•

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