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The Ubyssey Nov 4, 1920

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 Issued Weekly by the Publications Board of the University of British Columbia
Volume III.
VANCOUVER, B. C, NOVEMBER 4, 1920
Number 4
ARTS '24 WINS TRACK MEET
CLASSES CHEER THEIR
REPRESENTATIVES ON
In spite of the rain and the mud, a
large proportion of the University gathered at Brockton Point to witness the
winning of the Faculty Cup by Arts 24.
The freshman class succeeded in collecting forty-four points, thirteen more than
their nearest rivals, Science '24. The
rooters of Arts '24 were out in force, and
their shrill trebles rang out joyously
whenever one of their men broke the
tape, which, unfortunately for the other
classes, was too often.
The individual championship was won
by Garret Livingstone, of Arts '24.
"Livy" is undoubtedly in a class by himself when it comes to speed, and he easily
won every event in which he took part,
scoring twenty points. Lou Hunter, of
Arts 22, contributed thirteen points to
his class, and Cliff Mathers, Science '23,
made eight points.
Johnny MacLeod, of Arts '22, won the
marathon in a most spectacular fashion.
He started off at a pace which would have
done credit to those running the mile,
and quickly left the other competitors far
behind. When he left the gate after the
first mile,- there were many conjectures
as to whether he would ever turn up
again; but all doubts were put at rest
when he returned, still in the lead, and
won the race by a very comfortable margin. Cassidy and Walker provided a
thrill when they staged a desperate struggle for last place.
Class totals: Arts '24, 44; Science '24,
31; Arts '22, 18; Agriculture, 11; Science
'23, 8; Arts '23, 7; Arts '21, 7.
The judges were: Dr. Davidson, Dean
R. W. Brock, Mr. Geo. E. Robinson, Dr.
McDonald, Dr. G. G. Sedgewick, Prof.
Harry Logan and Prof. Boving. The
timekeepers were Dr. T. H. Boggs and
Art Lord, Arts '21; while Sid Anderson,
Science '22, and J. R. Kingham, Science
'21, held the tape. James Mitchell, Arts
'21, was official announcer.
RESULTS
120 Yards Hurdles—Livingstone, Arts
'24; Hunter, Arts '22; Weir, Science 24.
Time, 18 seconds.
Shot-Put (12 lbs.)—Greggor, Arts '24;
Mathers, Sc. '23; Clarke, Agr. Distance,
37 ft. VA in.
100 Yards — Livingstone, Arts '24;
Weir, Sc. '24; Hunter, Arts '22. Time,
10 4/5 sees.
880 Yards—H. Arkley, Sc. '24; A. Rus-
(Continued on Page 8)
Garrett Livingstone, Champion
Outdoors Club
Erecting Cabin
Splendid progress has been made on
the cabin which is being erected by the
Outdoors Club on Grouse Mountain. On
Sunday morning over twenty husky 'Varsity men made the ascent of the mountain and put in a good day's work. George
Barnwell, president of the club, reports
that the work is well on the way, and
that all the heavy work is practically
completed.
However, those who have not yet assisted in this work have yet an opportunity to do so. Next Sunday the party
will climb the mountain again to continue
the work. All men are invited to go with
the party, which leaves on the 9 o'clock
ferry Sunday morning. A little work
next week will complete the walls of the
cabin, and then the work of building a
roof will be started.
'Varsity Seniors
Defeat Centrals
CLOSE PLAYING MARKS GAME
"Miss U. B. C, meet Saturday's heroes
—Mr. Hal Gwyther, Mr. Lou Hunter and
Mr.  Gee Ternan."
It was the superb kicking of these
three stars that won the 'Varsity-Central
Rugby game on Saturday and put U.B.C.
at the top of the league standing. Without scoring a try, our gallant fifteen
waltzed home with the honors, winning
from the cardinal squad  11-6.
From the first kick-off it was apparent
that an exciting contest would be served
up to the spectators. But no one guessed
that the play would be as sensational and
as full of surprises as it developed. During the first half the Centrals forced the
play, and a lot of excellent kicking was
seen on both sides. Al Buchanan distinguished himself at this pastime, gaining over 40 yards on a single kick.
He worked consistently and brilliantly
throughout the entire game.
Hug^hie Ross and Rex Cameron nearly
engineered a touch in the first half, but a
scrum was called on the five-yard line.
Bob Gourlay, of the Centrals, made the
first score of the game when he oozed
across the Varsity line after Blair Jar-
dine and Celle had been brought down.
The try was not converted.    Score, 3-0.
Hal Gwyther established himself as the
hero of the day a few minutes after the
start of the second half when he dropped
the pigskin over the bar for four points.
It was a lovely kick from thirty yards
out, and the 'Varsity supporters went
wild with joy. Score, 4-3. Gourlay took
the joy out of life, however, by charging
down one of Hal's kicks just twenty
yards in front of the 'Varsity goal. By a
quick follow-up and some neat dribbling
he scored the second try of the game.
Score 6-4.
Then Lou Hunter demonstrated the
proper way to make four points by dropping the ball between the posts from the
thirty-five-yard line. Score, 8-6. The
moments after Gourlay's score had been
anxious ones, and Lou's score sent the
U.B.C. mob wild again. Gee Ternan completed a good day's work by putting the
pigskin over the bar on a free kick just
before the final whistle.   Final score, 11-6.
Lou Hunter and the other members of
the three-quarter line were closely marked, and they•never had a chance to get
started. The few opportunities which
they had were spoiled by their delay in
passing the ball. THE   UBYSSEY
November 4, 1920
Clothes with
a "Rep"
for Style
and Pep
There's a certain unusual Class
in Semi-ready clothing that appeals
to the young men who strive for an
ultra-smart appearance.
THOMAS
& McBAIN
LIMITED
655 GRANVILLE ST.
The Palm Garden
Corner Tenth Ave. and Heather St.
Where you meet your College friends
at lunch or tea time
LUNCHES, TEAS, ICE CREAM
CANDY AND TOBACCO
MIDWAY  PHARMACY
Phone,   Fair. 840
Cor. Broadway and Heather Street
VANCOUVER,   B. C.
PRESCRIPTIONS A  SPECIALTY
We    carry   a    complete    stock   of
LOOSE-LEAF FOLDERS
LOOSE-LEAF REFILLS
EXERCISE BOOKS
WATERMAN PENS
We deliver anywhere, at any time.
AGRICULTURE DISCUSSION CLUB
The first meeting of the Agricultural
Discussion Club was held on Tuesday,
October 27th. Amendments to the constitution were discussed and passed, and
nominations for treasurer received.
Prof. King, the honorary president, in
the opening speech, declared that the
club was "one of the major institutions
of the University because of its past
record," and urged co-operation amongst
the members in order to obtain even
bigger results this year.
"The Freshman,' he said, "gets something from the club which enables him
to apply his class teaching and, socially,
leads to new inspirations. The practice
in platform speaking enables to more
vigorous, active thinking, and to speak
more concisely and clearly. It is often
difficult to express one's thoughts into
clear, concise form and to convince an
audience that you are familiar with the
work at hand. No institution will assist
more in this respect than the A.D.C.," he
declared.
Dean Clement, the second speaker,
said that one cannot help but obtain both
inspiration and information from the
club. "It gives one an opportunity to say
something publicly in your own way," he
said. Continuing, he outlined the requirements of a good speaker, and finished by
suggesting that the Hon. D. E. Barrow,
Minister of Agriculture, be invited to address the club some time in November.
This suggestion was immediately acted
upon, and it was decided to ask him to
speak on November 10th, the subject for
debate on that date being: "Resolved
that the present customs tariff is injurious to the Canadian farmer." Members of the staff and others interested will
be cordially invited to attend.
Y.M.C.A. REORGANIZES
Mr. Frank Studer, Arts '21, was elected
president of the Student Y. M. C. A. on
Monday when a general meeting of that
body was held. He succeeded Mr. Ted
Johnson, Arts '22, who was the president-elect, and who resigned because he
is leaving college. Mr. E. S. Grant, Arts
'23, was chosen vice-president to fill the
vacancy caused by the resignation of Mr.
James Mitchell, and Mr. L. E. Wells
Arts '22, was elected chairman of the
Bible  Study  Committee.
Mr. E. A. Johnson was present and
expressed his regrets at having to leave
U.B.C. He wished the "Y" every success in its efforts in the future. The executive of the Student "Y' is now as
follows: Honorary president, Dr. Todd;
president, Frank Studer; vice-president,
E. S. Grant; secretary-treasurer, H. W.
MacLean; chairman Bible Study, L. E.
Wells; chairman Mission Study, L. C.
Johnston; Executive Committee, A. H.
Imlah and A. A. Webster.
Prof. E. H. Russell spent Saturday at
the University. Although it was a very
short visit, he found time to call at the
Publications Board room and inquire
after his friends. He expressed himself
much pleased over the efforts of the
Musical Society, and inquired concerning progress on the song book. He was
one of the interested spectators at the
'Varsity-Central Rugby game on Saturday.
IRELAND    &    ALLAN
BOOKSELLERS AND
STATIONERS
Depot for
FOUNTAIN  PENS
and
LOOSE-LEAF   NOTE   BOOKS
Phone,  Seymour 602
649 GRANVILLE STREET
WHY GO TO
CHINATOWN?
WE   ARE   NOW   SERVING
CHINESE  DISHES  UPSTAIRS
6 to 3 A.M.
DELMONICO CAFE
704 ROBSON STREET
Phone,  Fairmont 722
THE REX CAFE
TEA ROOM BAKERY   ICE CREAM
Confectionery Tobacco and Cigars
692 BROADWAY, WEST
French
Velour Hats
for
CLASSY DRESSERS
To be had in all the new colors and
shapes.
You   know   what   I   am,   Mertel!
Ben Petch
LIMITED
898 Granville Street
Cor. Smythe and Granville November^, 1920
THE   UBYSSEY
'VARSITY SECONDS
WIN AGAIN
"Boy, page Mr. Meekison, bad man of
the Intermediate Rugby League!"
"Our Meek" established himself as the
hero of the curtain-raiser on Saturday,
when the 'Varsity II. defeated the Rowing Club II. 3-0. He scored the only try
of the game and distinguished himself as
a hard worker. He established himself
as the "bad man" of the intermediate
league by being ordered off the field for
a minor offence. However, the team and
the 'Varsity Rugby fans are all behind
Meek.    He played a bang-up game.
The popular element of "pep" seemed
to be lacking in the intermediate game.
The Rowing Club squad played an excellent game, and they kept our fellows
working all the time. During the first
half the play see-sawed up and down the
field, both sides having some narrow
escapes during this period. Hurst played
a steady game, but was hampered by a
sore knee. Wallace and Hatch played
a useful but not very brilliant game. Ed.
Solloway had hard luck for quite a while,
fumbling several good passes. The three-
quarter line failed to distinguish themselves, although Al Russell' and Purdy
played a very good game.
The only score of the game came in
the second half when Meekison broke
through the Rowing Club line for a touch.
It was a nice piece of work, Meek seizing
the only opportunity that presented itself.
He bucked the line in fine fashion. The
try for convert failed, and the play resumed its see-saw up and down the field.
Mr. Wm. Scott, Sc. '22, has been elected secretary of the Science Men's Undergraduate Society, in the vacancy caused
by the resignation of Mr. W. O. Banfield.
HARRY    CARTER
Bicycles and Accessories
General  Repairs
Cab,   Buggy  and  Invalid  Chairs
Re-tired
Charges Moderate
Agent for
C.C.M.   "RAMBLER"  BICYCLES
632 Broadway, West
Phone,   Fairmont  1386
BLUE AND GOLD 6
WEST VANCOUVER 1
In the first round of the Iroquois Cup
games, the University soccer team had
little difficulty in defeating West Vancouver 6-1. The game was played in West
Vancouver on a ground that was rolling,
stony and dotted with stumps. But the
College team had things practically their
own way during the greater part of the
game. R. F. Adams appeared on the forward line. He played on the left wing,
while MacLeod was shifted to right wing
to replace Rex Cameron, who was playing Rugby.
The game was rather loosely played.
Jock Lundie, at center forward, played a
hard-working and useful game. The
scorers were: Markel, MacLeod Mitchell,
Lundie, Rushbury. The other score was
made on a corner which MacLeod kicked.
The ball hit one of the West Vancouver-
ites and bounced into the net. Rushbury
aided the movement by bunting the suburbanite.
The team: Henderson, Crute and Wolverton, Mitchell, Jackson, Cant, Adams,
Rushbury, Lundie, Markel and MacLeod.
INTER-CLASS BASKETBALL
Arts '21, Arts '23, Science '23 and
Science '24 basketball teams got away to
a good start in the Inter-Class League on
Thursday and Friday. The play in the
opening games was rather ragged, and,
though it is too early to pick winners,
Arts '21, Science '23 and Science '24
would seem to be the strongest contenders. The Arts seniors had no difficulty
in winning from Arts '22. The final score
was 22-7.
The Arts sophomores won from the
freshies in the second game on Thursday,
20-8. The two Hunters, Upstall, Wallace and Saunders played for the sophs.,
PITMAN BUSINESS
COLLEGE
Established 1898
Oldest  and  most reliable  Business
College in B. C.
AUTUMN  TERM  NOW   OPEN
As the method of instruction is individual, students may commence
at any time.
422 RICHARDS STREET
Cor. Hastings Phone, Sey. 9135
FOOTBALL
Rugby and Soccer men, we are here to take care of your requirements:
Footballs,   each      $3.00 to $11.00
Boots,  per pair   $8.50 to $12.50
Jerseys,   each     $2.50 to   $7.50
Pants,  per pair    $1.50 to    $3.50
You will find our stock of Football equipment the largest and best assorted in B.  C.
TISDALLS   LIMITED
The Complete Sporting Goods Store
618 HASTINGS STREET, WEST
Phone, Seymour 152
RUGBY NEWS
A reply has been received from H.
Wilfred Maloney, of Stanford University,
concerning our proposal to send a team
to California this season. While approving of the idea of an annual series, owing
to the limited time available to make
publicity and financial arrangements, he
advises that we should postpone the
event until 1921, at the same time expressing willingness, if we so wish, to put
the matter before the California Rugby
Union and proceed with the necessary
preliminary arrangements for 1921.
The following criticism of Saturday's
game was obtained from two well-known
Rugby enthusiasts:
While individual play was good there
was too much of it, and a noticeable lack
of concerted action in the back field. The
insides, especially Ternan, were not satisfied with making openings, but'attempt-
ed too often to go through single-handed,
as a rule working away from, instead of
towards, the rest of the backs.
Ross slipped up an easy try by failing
to pass to Hunter just in front of the
Centrals' goal.
The overhead basketball pass was condemned as entailing considerable waste
of time and a clear indication of the trend
of play to the opposing team.
The number of forward passes could
be easily lessened if the wing men would
lie farther back, thus ensuring the pass
being taken at top speed, with no slowing
up on the part of the wing to avoid a
forward pass.
but they appeared to be entirely out of
practice. Arts 24 put up a weak team
for their first game, and, as a result of
their loss, will probably field a stronger
team next week.
Science '23 have a strong team lined
up. They had no difficulty in defeating
Science '22 on Friday, 23-11. Science '24
won easily from Agriculture in the second game, 26-11.
Athletic
Service
If there is anything in the way
of information on sports or
sporting goods that is of interest to the men of U.B.C, such
information is always available
at Lisle Fraser's.
Lisle Fraser
Sporting Goods Dealer
Cor.  Robson and Granville Streets THE   UBYSSEY
November 4, 1920
WHEN YOTJ GIVE
A LADY CANDY
When a young man's fancy,
etc., etc., his thoughts turn to
candy and other things.
When he gives chocolates, they
should be Purdy's.
purby's
Maker of Purdy's Chocolates
675 GRANVILLE STREET
STUDENTS
SHOULD HELP
HOME INDUSTRY
In Vancouver there is now a
completely equipped factory for
the manufacture of school supplies.
It is the patriotic duty of students throughout the educational
system of British Columbia to demand school supplies made within
the province.
Smith, Davidson & Wright
LIMITED
Manufacturers and Wholesale
Paper Dealers
VANCOUVER   AND   VICTORIA,   B.C.
THE GREAT-WEST
LIFE ASSURANCE CO.
Head   Office,   Winnipeg,   Manitoba
Result of a 20-year endowment
which  matured   October   1st,   1920.
Name, Gilbert Inkster, Lady-
smith. Premium, $102.30. Amount,
$2,000.
In 20 years he paid $2,004.60.
The cash value of his policy was
$3,070, being the face of the policy
$2,000 and a dividend of $1,070.
640 HASTINGS STREET, WEST
Vancouver Branch Office
AVENUE THEATRE
Week Commencing   Monday,   Nov. 8th
Mats. Wednesday and Saturday
EDWARD LBWERS, supported by an
All-English    Cast,    in   Cyril    Maude's
Greatest Comedy Success
"GRUMPY"
Even'g, $1.65 to 55c; Mats., $1.10 to 55c
Issued every Thursday by the Publications Board
of the University of British Columbia.
Extra mural  subscriptions,  $2.00 per  session.
For advertising rates, apply Advertising Manager.
EDITORIAL STAFF:
Editor-in-Chief P.   N.   Whitley
Senior   Editor A.   A.   Webster
/A.  H. Imlah    '
Associate Editors   { S.  M. Scott
I Miss R.  E.  Verchere
Chief Reporter -A.   F.   Roberts
/'Miss A.   Anderson
J. C.  Clyne
Reporters -< Bert  Sweeting
Cliffe  Mathers
vMiss P. Stewart
Exchange  Editor Miss  K.   M.   Portsmouth
t •*.             T^j-t S A.   L.  Stevenson
Literary  Editors ^ G   G   Coope
BUSINESS STAFF:
Business   Manager L.   T.   Fournier
Advertising  Manager H.   M.   Cassidy
/D. A.  Wallace
.... I VVm. McKee
Asslstants IP. V. McLane
I H. G. Scott
Circulation   Manager R.   C.   Palmer
Editor   for   the   Week A.   H.   Imlah
MAKE IT A SUCCESS
In undertaking to publish an avowedly
"literary supplement." the "Ubyssey' is
not merely seeking to refute certain criticism which has been levelled against it
as a periodical, in the first two years of
its existence. Rather, the reputation of
all the students is at stake, for the effort
is to prove them capable of producing
literary material which merits publication.
It is to be the crucial test to discover the
quality of talent in the University. Obviously, then, when the first supplement
appears, before Christmas, it absolutely
MUST be a success, or the critics will
be justified in their severest strictures.
So the responsibility rests on every student to lend his aid toward upholding
the honor of his Alma Mater.
If everyone who can produce anything
interesting or amusing were conscientiously to do so for this occasion, there
is no doubt that the supplement would be
inadequate to contain all the contributions of merit. And everyone would certainly give his or her help if a personal
appeal could be made. Therefore let this
be read in the light of a personal appeal
to YOU, the reader, to support the credit
of the whole. University. You know what
you are capable of, better than anybody
else knows; so write down what you
think is your best achievement, in prose
or verse, serious or with levity, and submit it as soon as possible. Or, at least,
let the editors know the bulk and nature
of your intended offering, so that the
resources at hand may be surveyed. Help
to swell the literary supplement and you
help to establish a valuable tradition for
U. B. C.
JUST A MINUTE
The members of class and club executives may well feel proud of the
successful social functions which are held
throughout each College session. In our
elation, however, we are apt to be unmindful    of    a    consideration,    regarding
which we are tempted to express an
opinion. It is quite noticeable that each
succeeding year there is a tendency for
our parties and dances to become more
and more expensive and elaborate. We
do not wish to be harsh in our criticism;
but might we not suggest that an attempt
be made to exercise at least moderate
economy in planning future social affairs?
When a society finds it necessary to
charge two dollars a couple for a dance
in the Auditorium, surely the limit has
been reached. Even if we leave out of
consideration entirely the large majority
of men who are paying their own way
through College, it is far from wise for
young people, attending University, to
cultivate such habits of unreasonable extravagance. We have in mind not only
music, refreshments and other incidental
requirements, but also the evening gowns
of many of the young ladies.
It is true that the success of a dance
may be measured, almost entirely, by the
quality of the music. But it should no
longer be necessary to pay forty dollars
each week to outside musicians. Both in
Science and Arts, student orchestras have
been organized. There is no reason why
they should not fill the engagement at
all the dances held in the Auditorium.
Success to them in their attempt to reduce the high cost of recreation in the
U.B.C.
SINE QUA NON
Last week Sir Arthur Currie, president
of McGill University, was in Vancouver,
but no attempt was made to have him
address us until his itinerary was complete. This was unfortunate and shortsighted on our part, and should not occur
again when other distinguished visitors
come to this city. The Literary and
Scientific Department might well appoint
a committee whose duties would be to
arrange in advance with such men to
speak in the University Auditorium. Such
a programme was strongly advocated by
our ex-Alma Mater president, Mr. W. G.
Sutcliffe, but it has never been realized.
H-ere is an opportunity to "start something. '
Owing to the lack of space, we have
been forced to leave out several letters
this week.
BY THE WAY
Why not apply Dr. Davidson's smoke-
consumer on some of the 'Varsity
smokestacks?
Keep to the right in the hallways, and
keep moving.
Why doesn't the Science Jazz Band
appear at the Rugby games? It would
help a lot.
Walter Cowper says that "Doc" McKechnie, formerly of Arts '20, is still at
Berkeley, doing well in his Senior year.
The genial "Doc" is much improved in
health. j ^
Would it not be possible to remove the
"excess baggage" from the letter-rack at
least once a month? November 4, 1920
THE   UBYSSEY
VE^'orrespoi^de^ce
WANTED—A COP
Mr.  Eastman.
Dear  Sir:—There  are  a few first year
students not attending the History class.
Please   find  out   who   they  are,   and   see
that these lost hours are made up.
"Respectively" yours,
A PARENT.
Editor "Ubyssey."
Dear Sir:—One wonders why your critic
s-hould call himself Cognovi. Possibly my
Latin is bad, but I think his pseudonym is
not very relevant to the tone of his remarks.
His one word of construction is "it (the
"Ubyssey") should bo composed largely of
interesting articles on subjects of immediate
concern." Of concern to what class or type
of student? Upon the inception of the paper, our policy was to produce a literary
paper, and what was the result? The
splendid short essays upon economic subjects bored the scientifically-minded, the
dissertations upon scientific research caused
ennui among the artistic temperaments, the
poems and storyettes were a source of irritation to the practical student. The staff
were accused of slighting athletics (so
essential to promoting college spirit), of
neglecting the events of college life, of excluding news of the societies, in order to
give "literary tone" to the paper. I think
your policy is a good one as far as the
greatest number is concerned. If Cognovi
was at the Science smoker, or the Players'
Club reception, or any of the games, or
attended any of the society meetings mentioned in No. 3, Vol. 3, he may rejoice to
read of such in the years to come. The
College paper is not the place for economics,
science, poetry, politics, philosophy, etc.
Please save us from student effort in these
lines—let the profs, do all that. The Annual
last year was a great triumph, as a comparison shows. If I use it as often as I have
recourse to the earlier ones, it will be worth
a great deal to me. I realize you can "stick
up" for yourself, but only those who have
been at the thankless job know how difficult
your position is. You have to cater to so
many varied dispositions, a very limited
space in which to work, and a fair financial
problem. I feel a word of appreciation
should be given to the honest effort put
forth by the whole staff and for the incalculable amount of time involved both in the
editorial and business end of the undertaking. The unfair criticism of Cognovi, his
inapt suggestion, his unmitigated "piffle" in
regard to the Annual, and his unsophisticated reference to the advertising columns,
show a serious lack of perspective and business insight. PUI.
Editor's Note: "Fui" speaks with some
authority. He was one of the first associate editors of the "Ubyssey."
Editor  "Ubyssey."
Dear Sir:—I notice that, while scarcely a
week passes without some "criticism," or,
more truly, insult, to your paper, appearing
in its correspondence column, there is a
noticeable absence of replies to these letters.
I should like to know if the writers of
these criticisms (I have, at present, that of
October 28th in mind) believe that they are
helping the Publications Board to better the
"Ubyssey." If so, they are sadly "misdirected,"   to quote  "Cognovi."
why is it that he finds fault with every
word which goes to make up the College
weekly, even the very necessary advertisements? Is it because some grand and glorious "literary achievement" of "Cognovi's"
has been at some time rejected by the editor
.of the "Ubyssey" through tack of space?
Or is his complaint merely indigestion, or
some  other affliction  of youth?
Again, I venture to ask why it is that he
objects to notices of meetings to be held,
and write-ups , of College activities—surely
the most natural of all things to appear in
a College paper?
"Cognovi" and I may move in different
"sets," but I have always found that a
write-up of a College initiation, for example,   is  as  interesting  to  those  who  partici
pated in it as to those who — not at all
through lack of interest — were unable to
be present. I could go on to point out that
every notice — even the "twaddle" about
stars at the most recent Rugby game — is
of interest to some portion of the student
body: hence the rush to the benches on
which lie the "Ubyssey" every Thursday.
With regard to their longevity: How many
of us are looking forward to lives empty
enough to permit of the examination of
every weekly published during our four
years at College? I, for one, hope to be
better employed during the remainder of
my three-score years and ten! And for the
present I feel, and know that my feeling is
not unique, that the "third-rate parodies
and twaddly verses" are more appreciated
each 1 lUrsday than would be the "interesting articles on subjects of immediate concern." In fact, I am afraid that many
copies of the "Ubyssey" would remain
where they are placed on the benches until
swept oh by the janitor, or gathered to the
sorrowing hearts of the little "Cognovis" of
the editorial staff, should such an enlightened state of affairs come  to pass.
I do not mean to say that our paper is
perfect; but what paper is? Moreover, I
think greater progress could be made in its
improvement by appreciation and worthwhile contributions, than by insult. I am
surprised that the "gutter newspaper" is
even "glorified" in the eyes of its critic!
Let us therefore stop slamming our weekly, hoping only that the ten minutes' enjoyment, which even "Cognovi" admits most of
us do derive from it, may soon grow to
twenty,   or even half an hour!
In the meantime, if we ourselves feel unable to help in the process of the betterment of our paper, let us at least be content
with what we have while we have it.
R.   I.
Editor  "Ubyssey."
Dear Sir:—May I be permitted to bring to
the notice of "Cognovi," a correspondent in
your last issue, an extract from an essay
by Dr. Samuel Johnson, entitled "Dick
Minim the Critic"?
After describing some of the finer arts,
the author  continues  as  follows:
"But every man can exert such judgment
as he has upon the works of others; and he
whom nature has made weak and idleness
keeps ignorant, may yet support his vanity
by the name of a Critic." .... "All the
other powers of literature are coy and
haughty, they must be long courted, and at
last are not always gained; but criticism is
a goddess easy of access and forward of advance, who will meet the slow and encourage the timorous; the want of meaning she
supplies with words, and the want of spirit
she  recompenses  with  malignity."
SCRIBITUR.
Ceylon
Flannel
Blouses
FOR  SPORTS SERVICE
$5.75 Each
Smart, warm and serviceable Blouses
for wearing at golf, for skating, or
for any occasion where an extra
weight blouse is required. These come
in mauve, flesh or white, in combination with black, mauve or flesh, and
all are in effective stripe patterns.
Some of the models are made with
long roll collars and have smart turnback link cuffs; others are made with
convertible collars. All sizes in the
assortment.    Each      $5.75
—First Floor
575 GRANVILLE STREET
©RPHEUM
Week Commencing  •
Monday,  November 8th, 1920
CAMERON SISTERS
SOCIETY'S  DAINTIEST
ENTERTAINERS
Edwin Weber at the Piano
WILLIAM GAXTON
and Company
In   "THE   JUNIOR   PARTNER"
By Rupert Hughes
BOB— —ELMORE
MURPHY AND WHITE
In a Peppy Arrangement  of
Tunes and Laughs
JAMES— —ELEANOR
McCORMACK & IRVING
In  "TELLING THE  TRUTH"
By Ben Ryan
CHARLIE WILSON
The Loose Nut
From  the  Tree of Laughter
HUBERT DYER
Assisted by BEN COYNE
A Laugh a Second
KITTY THOMAS
A  Mite of Personality
British   Weekly
Concert Orchestra
JUST PUBLISHED
30th ISSUE
The Canadian
Customs Tariff
Showing List of Articles Subject to
Luxury Tax, etc.
Price, $2.75
We have it.    Get yours to-day.
Ollark? $c Stuart €0.
LIMITED
Wholesale and Commercial
Stationers
550 SEYMOUR STREET
VANCOUVER,  B. C.
Tel. Ex., Seymour 3 THE   UBYSSEY
November 4, 1920
UNDERWEAR
STANFIELD'S SILK AND
WOOL UNDERWEAR. This is
one of the most popular garments
on the market to-day. So many
men cannot wear wool — this will
take its place, the wool and silk
being woven in such a way as to do
away with the irritating effect that
wool often has, yet retains all the
warmth-giving qualities of the wool.
Unshrinkable. Shirt or Drawers,
per garment    $5.25
Combinations     $10.50
We carry the above line and also
all other popular lines of Stanfield's
Underwear.
David  Spencer
LIMITED
Evans & Hastings
PRINTERS
— of-
"The Ubyssey"
for  1920-1921
WE MAKE A SPECIALTY  OF
College Annuals
Magazines
Ball Programmes
Etc., etc.
578 SEYMOUR STREET
VANCOUVER,  B.C.
High-Grade Work and Quick
Service characterize our up-to-date
establishment.
CORRESPONDENCE (Cont'd)
AN OPEN LETTER TO THE STUDENTS'
COUNCIL
Dear Sirs:—You have all, no doubt, heard
something regarding the disgraceful incident
which took place in front of the Arts building on Tuesday, October 19th. May I ask
if it is the intention of the Students' Council
to allow the president and'vice-president of
Arts '24 to conduct themselves in such a
manner?
At a meeting of the freshman class, held
early in the week following initiation, the
class of Arts '24 voted to let this soph, go
free, as he put up a much better excuse
than that given by the other prisoner — a
freshman. Twice, after that, they take this
soph, out and subject him to ridicule in
front of the Arts building. On another
occasion they were going to take him out
and haze him properly, but were forced to
stop by a handful of sophs. Then, on the
19th, they raised a mob of about 75, and
initiated the soph., but they omitted (?) to
bring the freshman along for his share of
the fun.
The result was that the soph, was taken
to the hospital to have his eyes treated and
cleansed from the chemicals which were
burning them. He was in the emergency
ward for two hours before he was sufficiently respectable to again appear on the street.
This is clearly not a case of an initiation:
it is an exhibition of animal spirit. If the
president and vice-president of Arts '24 disapproved of the vote taken, they should
have protested at the time, as they were in
charge of the meeting.
This incident is not only an insult to Arts
'23 — it is an insult to the A.M S. Is every
freshman class going to be allowed to act in
this impartial manner? Students' Council,
"Tuum est!" .
Respectfully yours,
GLENN' ORLANDO.
TAKE NOTICE
A number of the members of different
classes in the University have in the last
few days received invitations, purporting
to be from the executive of Arts '22, inviting them to be present at the class
party on Friday, November Sth. These
have not been sent by the executive of
Arts '22. To clear matters up, hereunder
is a list of the persons invited, exclusive
of the patronesses: The members of the
Students' Council, the presidents and
vice-presidents of the first, second and
fourth year Arts, all former members of
Arts '22 and Agriculture '22.
"THE NEW GERMANY"
The first meeting of the Historical Society was held last Thursday evening at
the home of Prof. W. N. Sage. Papers
were read on the subject of "The New
Germany," Mr. W. H. Coates dealing
with the economic situation, and Miss E.
Abernethy with the political. The discussion which followed hinged on the
merits of the Eng'ish historian Cain, but
this was pleasantly interrupted by the
serving of refreshments.
Mr. S. M. Scott was elected treasurer
and Miss N. E. Willis corresponding
secretary.
SCIENCE JAZZ  ORCHESTRA
Of growing fame is the Science Jazz
Orchestra. It made its debut at the
fourth annual Science smoker, which was
held in Pavlowa Court, October 23rd.
That alone is sufficient to establish it as
high class. Well! what s the use of telling you this? If you heard it, you know
what it's like; if you didn't, you've taken
the wrong course.
V
ancouver
Citizens' Club
(Non-Membership)
UNDER  THE  BIG   CLOCK
We serve a 60-cent
MERCHANTS'  LUNCH
TABLE  D'HOTE  DINNERS,   $1.50
SUPPER PARTIES  and  BANQUETS,
with   private   rooms,   our   specialty
SUPPER   DANSANT   Wednesday  and
Saturday evenings, from 9 to 12, $1.00
Phone, Sey. 796
A. WATTS, Mgr.
PREPARE
for the world of
BUSINESS
by taking a short course in the
Sprott-Shaw School
of Commerce and Telegraphy
Day and  Evening  Classes
Phone, Seymour 1810
R.  J.  SPROTT,  B.A.,  Manager.
A SAVINGS
ACCOUNT
By carrying money around
in your pocket you will
never learn the habit of
THRIFT. Deposit your
spare funds with this Bank
in a Savings account; interest will be paid, and you
can withdraw both principal and interest at any
time.
We   welcome   small   accounts.
The Canadian Bank
of Commerce November 4, 1920
THE   UBYSSEY
SOCIETY BRAND
CLOTHES SHOP
Rogers Bldg., 450 Granville Street
CLOTHES  FOR  YOUNG  MEN
Glad   to   show   the   new   models.
They are entirely different.
FIT-REFORM
WARDROBE
345 Hastings Street, West
J. W. Fofter
Limited
WE   SELL   CLOTHES   FOR   YOUNG
MEN AND MEN WHO STAY YOUNG
NEXT TIME
TRY THE BUNGALOW
For     Light     Refreshments
Ice  Cream and Candies at
774 GRANVILLE STREET
UNIVERSITY STUDENTS
We carry a large assortment of
Loose-Leaf Note Books, Fillers, Waterman Fountain Pens, and all requisites to complete your records in your
studies.
the Uancouver Stationers Eta.
SOCIETY STATIONERS AND
PRINTERS
683 Granville St.    Phone, Sey. 5119
H. E. BUSHELL
Many University students will be sorry
to hear of the death of Herbert Edward
Bushell, formerly of Arts '23, who was
enrolled this session with Science '24.
The death of this student occurred on
Tuesday, October 26th, at the home of
his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Isaac Bushell,
2221 Fourth Avenue, East. Bushell was
born on October 3rd, 1901, in Birmingham, England. He came to U.B.C. from
Britannia High. School, and entered with
Arts '23, taking a great interest in Chemistry and other scientific subjects.
THE BOOK EXCHANGE
A report of the Book Exchange, which
was inaugurated this session by the Arts
Men's Undergraduate Society, has been
handed to the editors of the "Ubyssey"
by Mr. Jimmy Lawrence. Although
written in Jimmy's inimitable style, it
contains many interesting items. He reports that over fifty books were handled
by the exchange, and that $18.75 was
received. The 'books were sold at approximately two-thirds of their original
value.
Owing to lack of space, only the textbooks available for third and fourth year
students were handled, but it is the intention of the A.M.U.S. to enlarge the scope
of the work next session. In his report,
Mr. Lawrence suggests that the books be
received at the end of the spring term,
and that they be held over until fall, as
it is very difficult to get the proper books
at the beginning of the session. Only
text-books specified in the calendar
should be received. If room cannot be
found for storing these books, he adds,
they should be turned over to the book
store for storage.
When Wanting Nice
Things to Eat
C U S I C K
CAN   SUPPLY   YOUR  WANTS
From the very finest Chocolates,
Home-made Candy, Ice Cream and
Soft Drinks, Pastries, and such like,
to the daintiest little Dinner and
Light Lunch you ever ate.
Make sure you go to Cusick.
Cor. Heather and Broadway, West
One Beauty of Our Shoes
Is their perfect comfort. Built, as they are, in the latest models, with every
attention to style detail; nevertheless, comfort has not been sacrificed in the
slightest degree.
Our new Winter Footwear is smart, indeed, yet as comfortable and long-
wearing as shoes can be made.
Their prices represent the Biggest Shoe, Values in Town.
THE INGLEDEW SHOE CO.
SIX-SIXTY-SIX GRANVILLE ST.
"Vancouver's Smartest Shoe Store"
MEMORIAL SERVICE
Members of the University Service
Club and their friends gathered in large
numbers in St. George's Church on Sunday evening last to pay honor to the
memory of their comrades who fell in
the war. The address was delivered by
Rev. M. H. Jackson, who emphasized the
importance of remembering these men
and the sacrifices they had made. He
pictured the rude cross on the battlefield,
and the story which it had to tell of the
soldiers' hopes and fears, ideals and sorrows. There were two sides to this
story—the one, black, which told of the
wrongs and oppressions which made war
possible; the other, bright, reflecting the
Light from the greater Cross on Calvary,
and from the lesser ones which recorded
the lives of those who had sacrificed
themselves for the cause of Right, all
through the ages. The former idea it was
our duty to hate, the latter to love and
cherish. There was a grave danger of
our failing to take up the work from
where these men had left it.
Special music, including a quartette,
"We Scatter Flowers,' and an anthem,
"The Lord Shall Wipe Away All Tears
From Their Eyes," marked the service,'
which was concluded by the sounding of
the Last Post. The wardens of the
church have forwarded the offering to
the Leroy Memorial Scholarship Fund.
FROM THE JAPANESE
(Translation by G. G. C.)
Life
What does it seem,
All this strange life of ours;
Is it a dream,
Which, at the dawn of day,
. Tracklessly sails away?
Song
Moon?    There  is  none!
Where are Spring's nodding flowers?
I see not one.
All else has changed, but I
Love on immutably.
Farewell
When I am gone,
Though lone my dwelling be,
Plum tree,  live on.
O'er the eaves build thy bower;
Wake—to the April shower.
Wakare
I  dete inaba
Nushi naki yado to
Narinu  tomo
Nokiba no ume yo
Haru wo wa suruna.
NOTE:—This conventional Japanese
form of a five-line verse is a near equivalent to our sonnet, only is more limited
and called "Tanka."
J. M. SYNGE
The Letters Club met Tuesday evening
at the home of Dr. McGuire, when a
paper was read by Mr. A. L. Stevenson
on J. M. Synge, the modern Irish
dramatist. Considerable interest was
taken in the discussion which followed. THE   UBYSSEY
November 4, 1920
TRACK MEET "STUFF"
(Continued from Page 1)
sel, Arts '21; Saunders, Arts '23. Time.
2:14.
Discus Throw—Mathers, Sc. '23; Buchanan, Sc. '24; Elliot, Arts '24. Distance, 83 ft. 1 in.
220 Yards — Livingstone, Arts '24;
Hunter, Arts '22; Weir, Sc. '24. Time,
24 sees.
Pole Vault—Hunter, Arts '22; West.
Agric. '24; Wallace, Arts '23. Height,
9 ft.
Broad Jump—Williams, Arts '24; Wolverton, Sc. '24; Hunter, Arts 22. Distance, 19 ft. 3 in.
440 Yards — Livingstone, Arts '24;
Palmer, Arts '24; Russell, Arts '21.
Time, 55 sees.
High Jump—H. Russell, Agric. '24; P.
V. McLane, Arts 23, and Williams, Arts
'24 (tied).    Height, 4 ft. 9 in.
One Mile—Arkley, Sc. '24; Bickle, Sc.
'24; Hope, Agric. '24.   Time, 5:18.
Hop. Step and Jump—Wolverton, Sc.
24; Williams, Arts '23; Clarke, Agric.
Distance, 37 ft. 5 in.
Marathon (3 miles)—MacLeod, Arts
'22; Demidoff, Arts '24; Neiderman, Sc.
'24.    Time, 18 min. 35 sec.
Relay (half-mile)—Arts '24: Livingstone, Palmer, Procter, Williams; Arts
'21: Schell, Russell, Fisher, Galloway;
Sc. '24: Weir, Henderson, Cant, Rowley.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Nov. 4—Arts '24 Skating Party.
Nov. 5—Arts '22 Class Party, Agriculture Banquet.
Nov. 6—Rugby, Brockton Point: 'Varsity II. vs. Rowing Club II., 2.15 p.m.;
'Varsity I. vs. Rowing Club L, 3.15 p.m.
Soccer, Moody Square, New Westminster: 'Varsity vs. Port Mann, 3.00 p.m.
Service Club Smoker, 8.00 p.m., Pavlowa
Court.
Nov. 9—Chemistry.
Nov. 10—Women's Lit.,  Men's Lit.
Nov. 11—Inter-Class  Basketball.
Nov. 12—Arts Men's Dance, Inter-
Class Basketball.
A University dance orchestra has been
formed, consisting of piano, violin, traps,
trombone and saxophone, and is open for
engagements at class parties, functions,,
etc. This orchestra will be under the
Alma Mater Society.
Prof. Hutchinson: "You have doubtless heard of Luther Burbank's latest
marvel. He has at last succeeded in
growing potatoes on the desert, by carefully crossing a potato with an onion.
The onion makes the potato's eyes
water."
THE FELLOWS ARE
RECOMMENDING
CLELLAND
Mostly all Clelland's customers are fellows who
come in and say they have been recommended by
someone else; and this is exactly how he is building up quite a fine  business.
That's why his name doesn't appear in the
papers very often. Of course, it really isn't necessary.
The new range of Suits and Overcoats are the
best we've seen yet.
Clelland gives personal attention to every order,
and his customers can depend upon absolute satisfaction.
There is a special reduction given when ordering Suits with extra pair of Pants.
The express elevator takes you right up to
Clelland's room in less 'n a minute, and he stays
open till 6 o'clock on Saturdays.
James Clelland
1225 Standard Bank Bldg.
510  Hastings Street,  West Vancouver, B. C.
Phone, Seymour 7280
The Barron Hotel
and
Restaurant
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Phone, Seymour 2011
HAS IT OCCURRED
TO YOU
—that your Photograph as a Christmas gift would be highly appreciated
by your friends, especially the absent
ones?
Pictures are very easy to mail, very
inexpensive, and very appropriate.
You'll get the quality kind at
Bridgman s Studio
413 GRANVILLE STREET
Vancouver, B. C.
jflagfopn - (Kraft
Quality Clothes
FOR YOUNG MEN
STYLISH
GUARANTEED
The Shop of Fashion-Craft
Thos. Foster
& Co., Ltd.
ONE STORE ONLY
514 GRANVILLE ST.

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