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The Ubyssey Feb 21, 1939

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Full Text

 POTLAOH
PALOMAR
THURSDAY
Published Twice Weekly by The Publications Board of The Universtyi of British Columbia
"SERENADE"
WEDNESDAY
AUDITORIUM
Vol. XXI.
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 19:39
No. 34
HEADLINE
From Canadian
University Press
FEATURES
By JOHN H. MacDONALD
KINGSTON, Ont.—One of the first
University activities to engage the
attention of the Federation was debating and for many years the Federation has sponsored tours of debaters across Canada. Most of these
► tours have been highly Instructive
and fairly popular. Teams have been
brought from the United States,
Oreat Britain and Australia and
Canadian teams have toured Oreat
Britain and the United States. The
Federation has also sponsored several
bi-lingual debates.
However, during the past few years
lt has been felt by the members that
this particular form of debating has
not been as popular as lt onoe was.
The .oson for this is that when a
visiting debating team sets foot on a
particular Oampus it ls necessary for
the local debating society to entertain the visitors—often for several
days. Such entertainment has proved
onerous on more than one Students'
Oounoil budget.
In view of complaints of this nature voiced at the biennial meeting
of the Federation in Winnipeg laat
winter lt has been decided by the
Federation to abandon, at least temporarily, this type of debating. It ls
true that a visiting team travelled
across Canada this winter and passed
through most Canadian Universities.
However, lt must be pointed out that
this engagement was entered into
well ln advance and that the decision
to meet this team had been made
long before the Meeting at Winnipeg
in the winter of 1037.
NEW POLICY.
In view of the wishes of the members of the Federation expressed at
the last biennial meeting lt was decided to revive the old form of radio
debating. The former Radio Broadcasting Commission sponsored a
number of Radio debates and indeed
offered a cup to the winning team ln
a series of trans-Canada debates.
The Federation is going to revive
this type of debating, ln a modified
form next winter, and lt is hoped
that the former handsome trophy
will again be put up for competition.
Besides sponsoring these Canadian
Inter-colleglate debates the Federation plans an interesting series of
International Debates along the line
of those sponosred by the Columbia
Broadcasting By tern in the United
States and already plans are under
way for a series of Canadian-American debates on matters of topical
international interest.
Skating Party
Gains for Fund
As proceeds from its skating party
at the Forum last December, a sum
of thirty-flve dollars has been presented to the Brock Memorial Fund
by the Alpha Delta PI sorority.
The    party    wns    organized    by
Eleanor   Bossy,   Alice   Gavin,   and
Marlon   Kersey,   members   of   the
sorority.    Tickets    were    sold   both
outside  and, on  the  campus.
Commenting    upon    the    much-appreciated   donation,  Carson   McGulre
remarked that  "it  ahowa what  amall
cluba   and   organization   can   do,   and
are  doing, towards the  provision  for
the   election   and   furnishing   of   the
proposed   Union   Building."
Tentative copies of the examination Hint, table for the Faculty
of Arts and Science have heen
posted on the notice hoards in
the Arts Building. Students who
flr.d a "Clash" in their time table
ure asked to report AT ONCE (In
writing) to the Registrar's Office.
No chunge can be made after
FKHIIUAKV   33.
STANLEY   W.  MATHEWS.
DAL RICHARDS' ORCHESTRA, which will be providing the tom-tom
beats and the Indian Brave music for the Potlach Thursday evening ln the
Palomar.    Vocal  selections will  be  provided  by the  petite  Judy  Richards.
Both the use of the ballroom and the services of the orchestra are being
offered free of charge ln aid of th Brock Memorial Fund.
"YOUTH MARCHES ON" STAR
INTERVIEWED BY UBYSSEY
Constitution
Passed For
Coed Sports
The constitution for a Women's
Athletic Directorate was unanimously passed' at the combined W.U.S.-
W.A.Ai meeting Monday noon.
The new organisation will completely sever the control of women's
athletics from that of the Men's
Athletic Association..
OBJECT EFFICIENCY
The object of the Directorate is to
give "maximum efficiency and cooperation ln the administration of the
extra-mural end lntra-rnural athletic
programme of  the  University."
The Directorate is designed to
to carry out long-term policies by
establishing a continuity ln Its personnel, which will Include the President of Women's Athletics, the Director of Women's Physical Education,
two student representatives, and two
faculty representatives.
SENIORS AND JUNIORS .
One of these latter shall be a member of the University Council on Athletics and Physical Education.
The    Directorate    shall    appoint
Senior and Junior managers on tha
recommendation of the presidents
of the olubs and will act In an advisory capacity to them.
It  shall  also appoint  coaches,  and
present   budgets   of  all   women's  at-
letlc   clubs   to  Students'   Council   for
approval.
By SCOTTY
To start an Interview story with
a quotation seems too trite for words
doesn't it; but we nearly did lt. Last
week we noticed ln the downtown
press a splash or so about a film
called "Youth Marches On", starring
Cecil Broadhurst, and Including on
the cast three U.B.O. students. At
once lt became a matter of interest
to this paper.
PERSONAL' APPEARANCE.
It was discovered shortly that the
star of the film was In Vancouver
making a personal appearance at the
theatre, an event that ls not very
frequent in this town. Consequently
we felt that we might interview him
for the Ubyssey. We did, at lunch.
We started by asking him where
he was born, how old he was, and
what he had done for a living.
He rapidly replied, "Winnipeg,
thirty, bank-clerk, aviator, radio
singer, commercial artist and University student."
Besides this we could see for ourselves that he was at least six feet,
five Inches tall—a goodly height—
and a film start
SINOER.
Cecil had just returned from Europe, where he had been moving about
with his ukelele, and an ability to
sing the songs that have made his
Aim famous.
He sang to Malcolm MacDonald,
Secretary of State for Dominions at
the time, to the Hon. Patljn, Foreign
Minister for Holland, to the League
of Nations Assembly, and to Ramsay
(Continued on Page 2)
See SCOTTY
TO THE MEMBERS OF
THE ALMA MATER SOOIETY:
At the Student Council Meeting of February 6th the tabled
motion concerning the dissolution of the Student Campaign
Committee was withdrawn and the financial statement, report
of progress, and statement of future plans were unanimously
accepted.
In the Council discussions the Junior Member was doing
his duty as he saw it ln criticizing the Committee. We believe
It ls the function of each responsible officer of the Society to
do that in the interests of the Society as a whole. We further
believe that it is the responsibility of Council to review its own
work and that of the various subsidiary organizations from time
to time. This ls the essential function of a democratic organization.
The remarks that were made about the Junior Member of
this Council should in no way cast reflections upon him or upon
his character. He was performing his duty as a Council Member.
The President and Members
of the Student Council of the
Alma Mater Society.
Mock Trials By
Law Society Wed.
Charges of arson, assault and battery, and Infringement of the Motor
Vehicle Act will feature the 'mock'
trials to be presented by the Law
Society members at their next meeting, Wednesday, February 22 at 12.30
in Arts 100.
The trials will be conducted ln the
form of a Magistrate's Court. Milton
Owen, a prominent Vancouver lawyer, has consented to act as magistrate during  the  trials.
WEIR TO SPEAK AT
SCHOLARSHIP LUNCH
"Universities and National Wealth"
will be the topic of an address to be
given by the Honorable Oeorge Weir
at a luncheon of the National Matriculation Scholarship Campaign Wednesday.
An invitation has been extended to
any University students who care to
attend.
The luncheon will begin promptly
at 12.30 In the Hotel Vancouver and
the price ls 75c.
PALOMAR SET
FOR POTLACH
DANCE THURS.
The Palomar Ballroom will be
available to University students on
Thursday, February 23 for the mighty
sum of twenty-five cents, conventionally known as two bits. The reason for lt all ls the Brock Memorial
Building which will be closer to a
reality if the affair at the Palomar
ts a success. The name ls to be the
Thunderbird  Potlatch.
The Palomar, donated by Mr.
Singer, the manager, will resound to
the whoops of students as they swing
and Jive ln true red Indian style.
With the Palomar Itself donated,
novelties will abound, with the one
consideration that 1600 tickets must
be sold.
The hours of rhythm will be from
0 to 1 a.m. The baton will be ln the
hand of maestro Dal Richards, and
Ihe songs of the evening will depend
upon Judy Richards (no relation)
for their production.
Tickets (1600) will be obtainable
from any Mamook (Pep Club Member), or at the foot of the Oaf stairs.
The best time to Invest ls at noon-
hour according to authorities. Council has asked for mammoth support,
"else," they say, "the Brock Memorial
Building may be unknown for many
moons I"
Club Prexies
To Organize
For Discipline
The  amendment  to  the  Discipline
Committee   by-law   has   been   passed
by  the  Student  Council.  As  lt  now
stands, the committee is to be made
up  of   the  presidents   of   the  Men's,
Women's,   Artsmen's,   Science,   Agriculture  Undergraduate  Societies.
The president of the Men's Undergraduate   Society   ts   to   be   the
chairman of the committee.
The committee must meet once  a
month,  and  can  be  called  at  other
times on the request of three of the
members.
Any student In any function using the University name or erest Is
directly responsible to the Student
Council.
The chairman of the Committee or
three members can call any student
before it on a charge from a recognized University club, a Student
Council member, or a member of the
Faculty. Fines up to five dollars or
other penalties may be Imposed, subject to the approval of Students'
Council.
One or more members of the committee Is to be present at every major University function. The chairman is empowered to call on University service clubs to aid In preserving
order during freshman week, class
elections and pep meets.
DOUO. FORD, veteran of the Mu
slcal Society und theological student
who provides the comic element in
"Serenade" which ls being presented
this week ln the auditorium. The
performance commences at 7.80 on
Wednesday evening.
As Columbo, the father of Yvonne
and a metropolitan tenor, he sings
his way into the tower of the Duke
of Santa Cruz, gives singing lessons
to an enamored tailor, and waving
"the last bottle of champagne ln the
cellar"  liberates  himself.
Today:
Record   Recital—Arta   100—12.30.
Wednesday:
"Serenade"—7.30—Aud.
Mock   Trial—Arts   100—12.30.
Thursday:
Thunderbird    Potlach—Palomar—
9.00.
"Serenade"—Auditorium.
Women's Publio  Speaking Club—
—debate—12.80—Arts 104.
CO-ED BALL
PLANS MADE
AT  MEETING
Plans for the Co-ed Ball, the main
W.U.S. function of the year, for
which the co-eds extend all invitations and pay all expenses, were discussed at a combined meeting of the
W.U.S. and W.A.A. yesterday.
The Co-ed will be held on March
2 In the Crystal Ballroom of the
Hotel Vancouver with Mart Kenney's Orchestra.
It was decided to follow the custom
of former years and make the dance
Informal but there will be a change
in last year's plans.
Co-eds  will  provide   their  guests
with    lee-water  Instead    of  punch
because   tt   was   objected   that   the
stronger  drink  was  too  expensive.
Tickets for the Co-ed will cost two
dollars a couple. The proceeds from
the dance will be added to the Womens' Furnishing Fund for the Brock
Memorial Building.
This was instituted so that the
control of Womens' Athletics will be
separated completely from the Mens'
Athletic Association.
Contact Alta.
By Short Wave
The Radio Club of the University
has established a twice-weekly schedule with VE4AJS at the University of
Alberta.
The U.B.C. transmitter, VE5ACS.
transmits on 40 metres with a power
of 50 watts. The equipment was loaned by Frasor Jameson in Applied
Science.
A new antennae is to be set up
and with this added equipment the
club hopes to work Seattle directly
as well as Winnipeg and Saskatoon
through relaying by means of VE4AJS
ln Edmonton.
Later, contacts such as McOlll,
Queen's and Hamilton, will be hooked
up in one vast network.
only  8  more  days to
buy your totem
FIRST NIGHT
OF 'SERENADE'
WEDNESDAY
When the house lights dim, and
the curtain opens on Victor Herbert's "Serenade", tomorrow night,
students will see the culmination of
a year of hard work by the Musical
Society.
The opera, with its swift moving
and ingenious plot, ls portrayed by
a series of brilliant and catchy tunes,
that will set the whole campus humming.
BALANCED  OPERA.
"Serenade" has been called Herbert's most balanced opera. With Its
colorful costumes, and scintillating
melodies, it is truly one of his most
beautiful works.
The two assistant directors have
had a long and tiring Job, but have
come yirough with flying colors. They
are: Mr: Oage, assistant dramatlo director, and Dr. McDonald, assistant
musical director. Both will be kept
busy until the last production night
is over.
The directors themselves, Mr. O.
Haydn Williams and Mr. E. V. Young,
deserve special praise for their untiring efforts to make "Serenade" a
success. Of any production lt oan be
truly said that It Is what the directors make It.
COMIC THEME.
The opera Itself Is one which
should appeal to any audience.
Comic in theme, yet with a well-
organized and sustained plot, lt Is
Indeed a credit to Herbert.
The scene of the opera is the
mountains of sunny Spain, in the
late 17th Century. The plot centres
about the efforts of an aged Duke
to keep his ward away from his
postilion. The postilion has won her
love with his "serenade", and as he
is a most persistent young man, the
Duke has quite a difficult time.
The opportunities for comedy provided by the plot are many and varied, and are used to advantage.
The most hilarious of the comic
scenes are the singing lesson In the
first Act, and the scene In the third
Act, where Colombo, the great tenor, goes on a binge that would put
the most veteran scienceman to
shame.
Highlights of the score are the
"Bolero" in the second Act, the
"Angelus", the Dukes song "I am a
Duke of High Degree", many others.
RECEPTION.
Following th"e Saturday night performance,   the  entire cast   and  business staff  will be  entertained at the
home of Dr.  and Mrs. McDonald.
Production  manager  Honor Vincent has charge of the committees
on   make-up,   properties,   costumes,
and     house     managing.     Program
manager    is    Prlscilla    Boyd,    and
house   manager   is  Bob   Buroughs.
Student  tickets for the Wednesday
and    Thursday    night    performances
may   be   obtained   at   the   Quad   box
office. Tickets for those who are not
students  may   be  obtained  from  any
number of the Musical Society, or at
Kelly's  on  Seymour.
LADYSMITH STUDENT
WINS NURSING PRIZE
Mis-- Lucille Oiovando, of I.lldy-
snilth, Vancouver Island, is the
winner of the $150 University
scholarship in Heulth unci Nursing,
It was announced hy the Senate of
the University of B.C., Wednesday
evening;.
A fourth year student In nursing.
Miss Cilovundo, receives the award
for general proficiency In provlou**
work of university grude, und for
satisfactorily completing the hos-
pltal probationary  period. Two
THE    DBY'SSBY
Tuesday, February 21, 1939
THE  UBYSSEY
Issued twice weekly by the Students' Publication Board of the Alma Mater
Society of the University of British Columbia.
Office: 206 Auditorium Building ... Phone Point Orey 206
Campus Subscriptions. $1.50 Mail Subscriptions. $2.00
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
Dorothy  Cummings
SENIOR  EDITORS
Tuesday
Irene Eedy
Sports Editor;  Orme Dier
ASSOCIATE   EDITORS
Rosemary Collins Lester Pronger
Friday
Jack  Mali-
Ted Underhiil
Associate Sports Kditors:  Basil  Robinson,  Myrne  Nevlaon.
ASSISTANT  EDITORS
Ossy Durkin       Florence Hurndall        Helen Hann        Joan Thompson
ASSISTANT  EDITORS
Florenoe Hurndall        Helen Hann
BUI Baokman.
Assistant Sports Editors:  Lionel  Salt, Jim Harmer, Austin  Frith,
Charles Craig.
O. U. P.  STAFF
Editor
James Macfarlane
Van Perry
PUB. SECRETARY
Virginia Galloway
Assistants
Ann Jeremy
Joyce Cooper
CIRCULATION MOR.
Harry Campbell
REPORTORIAL  STAFF
Jaok Margeson, Pat Keatley, Joan Haslam, Jacques Metford, Ruth Millar,
Janet Walker, Brlta Vesterbaok, Bob Manson, BUI Osborne, Ken Vernon,
Dick Jarvis
Advertising Office
Standard "Publishing Co.. 1037 Fender Street West, Vancouver, B.O.
Telephone:  SEYMOUR 4484
All advertising handled exclusively by Standard Publishing Co.
Editorials
SERENADE'
This week the University will see the product of four months'
work, the Musical Society's "Serenade." There is no other club
undertaking on the campus into which.goea more hours of labor
or more cheerful endeavor. In fact there is no other club on the
campus which embarks on such an ambitious program as the production of an opera. For the directors of tho Musical Society to
train ninety amateurs and place them on tho stage in a period of
only a few months, is a tremendous undertaking.
To most university students this production will not be as
finished as the professional theatre staging to whieh they have
become accustomed in moving pictures. To those students who
have attended professional opera last week the show may appear
even slighter. If these students have any imagination they will,
however, be able to appreciate the quantity of exquisite detail
which the "Serenade" offers. Although any university production has its limitations there is a great deal which any audience can
appreciate.
Therefore it is to be hoped that the student audience on
"Wednesday night will not bo^oo willing to condemn the performance for any superficial reasons. The production, judging from
rehearsals, is excellent.
TOTEM INFORMATION
All Seniors Fill In—Puleeae
NAME 	
FAOULTY 	
OLUBS BELONGED TO	
FRATERNITY or
SORORITY BELONGED TO
HOME CITY 	
HONOUR OOURSE or
MAJOR SUBJECTS 	
PLEASE RETURN TO UBYSSEY OFFICE OR TO BOX
AT FOOT OF OAF STAIRCASE.   THANK YOU.
EVOLUTION
OF ECONOMIC
UNIT TRACED
Under the auspices of the Vancouver Institute, Dr. Joseph Crumb, of
the University Department of Economics, lectured ln Arta 100 on Saturday evening, on "Planning for the
Economical  Millenium,"
Dr. Crumb traced the development
of the economic unit as it grew from
the primitive concept of a single
family, through the stages of the
manorial, city and country groups,
to its present state, Including the
whole world.
RESPONSIBILITY  SHIFTED
The characteristics of modern industry necessitate a shifting of formerly Individual responsibility to the
State, causing a rise of class interests, which are often classified as
economic  interests.
Different groupa have their own
Ideas   of  what  suoh  a   mUIenlum
should be. However, they all have
the     common     characteristic     of
wanting to receive more than they
give.
The  arch-planner  Is  the  capitalist
employer, who desires any means of
preserving law and  order,  and  property rights.
PLANNED ECONOMY
In   the   planned   economic   Millenium,    concluded   Dr.    Crumb,    there
would be an embodiment of the combined   reason  and   judgment   of   the
political and social  bodies of today.
It should not be defined arbitrarily: we have no right to force our
ldeulogies on future generations.
Nevertheless,     we     have     a     real
charge:   to   leave   the   ship   of   state
in good shape, with all sails trimmed,
and  pointed  to  the  Immediate  horizon.
Typewriter
Poundings
SCOTTY
(Continued from Pace 1)
i
Diamonds, Watches, Personal Gifts
FIRBANK and LANGE
USE  OUR CREDIT PLAN
Seymour  and  Dunsmuir
Opp. tbe Bus Depot
MacDonald,  then  Prime  Minister of
England.
But all this was a little too far
away to be practically applied to this
University of ours. Cecil, however,
pointed out that the same things
applied to Universities as to statesmen and diplomats.
In fact he appeared to be more at
home giving  a bit of simple philosophy   for   youth,   than   for   anything
else.
MORAL REARMAMENT.
At the moment he said he was
"One of a growing crowd of youth In
many parts of the world using my
talents constructively — no matter
what they are — in a program of
moral rearmament, and," he went on,
"what I like most about this type of
life ls that it gives me a ohanoe to
see the problems of the country, and
to see my position In relation to their
solution."
We at onoe asked him what he
thought Universities oould do In
solving some of our present difficulties.
"The  greatest  need  In  Canada  is
for moral and spiritual leadership.
"The need for leadership on this
basts ts up  to  Universities, which
are specially suited to provide It.
"Servloe should be the flrst thought
of both Universities, and their students, who so frequently—at least Z
did—spend muoh time In thinking of
the career whloh they wUl be able to
carve out of the country after graduation.
"We  must   pioneer  again,   with  a
simple belief In Ood as boss."
PROBLEMS SOLVED.
We suggested that this University
was very willing to be of servloe to
the Province but that we were ln
danger of being hampered by overcrowding.
Cecil said that "If the Universities of Canada produce the right
thing. If men see something different coming out of Universities, the
chief problems aueh as overcrowding and financial difficulties will
disappear."
He said this with firm conviction
based on his own experience. It did
not sound platitudinous, nor was lt
preaching to us.
It was the belief of a real Canadian
youth who has found a life that he
likes, and who has his country at
heart, to the extent of sacrificing a
career in order to spread his ideas
as to the solution of personal and
national problems.
CARNEOIE RECORD SALON
The Carnegie Record program this
noon will present a swing salon. An
analytic discussion of "Swing" will
be offered, Illustrated with such
classics as King Goodman's "Sing,
Sing, Sing" and Thos. Dorsey's ruthless massacre of the immortal "Song
of India."
Also on schedule will be Stravinsky's  "Fire  Bird."
Last Wednesday night the Monro
Pre-Medlcal Society had a meeting
open only to pre-medlcal students.
This meeting consisted of the showing of films pertaining to surgery
nnd medicine. As these Alms wire
being* shown a group of studenta
'crashed' the meeting.
The president of the Monro Pre-
Meds asked these students to leave
but he ' was Ignored; although one
student did have the decency to
leave later on.
These   are  the   facts.
Let  us  examine   them.
FRE-MEDICAL  SIGNIFICANCE
But first of all for the benefit of
our readers who are not familiar
with the Pre-Med Society we will
explain Just what it ls
The Monro Pre-Medlcal Society ls
an organisation of all students on
the campus who have signified their
intentions of studying medicine in
any of its diverse fields.
Frequently throughout the term
the Society has for. the benefit of Its
members, talks by leading specialists on medical operations, practises
and theory.
Last Wednesday night the meeting
was devoted to the showing of dims
appertaining to surgical major operations of Interest only to medical
students.
CRASHERS
However these pre-meds were
joined by a group of curiosity
'crashers' who, uninvited, calmly entered and proceeded to watch these
films.
These students had no intereat ln
medicine or In the Pre-Medlcal
Society. They had not signified their
Intentions of either joining the
society or of adopting medicine as
their profession.
Hence they had no business whatsoever of attending this meeting
which was open only to students
working  for thetr medical  degree.
Nothing would be said If they had
left at the request of the president
of the Monro PTe-Med Society. But
even here they did not reveal any
depth or character or respect for the
desires of other persons.
PUERILE
Their very attitude, which waa
one of puerile attempts of exhibitionism, speaks IU of their own
training, their education, and their
general mental calibre.
The average student who heard of
the meeting did not become suddenly afflicted with a uncontrollable desire to satisfy hts childish inqulsitlve-
ness. You and I as average students
direct this curiosity and Interest towards the fields which we have
chosen as our life's work. We do not
attempt to intrude on the rights of
others.
Obviously then those who crashed
cannot be considered to be either
average or normal students. Showing
lack of courtesy, laok of will power,
these students oan be considered to
be members of that unfortunate tribe
of peoples wandering on this earth
who need desperately mental direction and mental supervision.
Because of this interruption it has
been suggested that since the M.P.-
M.S. cannot conduct a oloaed meeting behind unlocked doors without
interruption as other clubs on the
oampus can do, the next meetings
will have to be had behind locked
doors to ensure privacy for pre-med
members.
"Let me serve your oar and your oar will serve you"
"Frank" Fioke
U.B.C.  SERVICE STATION
24-Hour Emergency Service. Complete Repair Facilities.
SOUTH END OF McOILL ROAD PT. OREY 63
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UNIVERSITY BOOK STORE
Hrs.s 0 a.m. to 5 p.m.! Saturdays B a.m. to noon
LOOSE LEAF NOTE BOOKS, EXERCISE  BOOKS  AND
SCRIBBLERS
AT REDUCED PRICES
Graphic   Engineering   Paper,  Biology   Paper, XMAS CARDS
Loose  Leaf  Refills,  Fountain  Pens and  Ink NOW  ON
and Drawing Instruments. SALE
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U.B.C. ROOST
SALISBURY LODGE ANNEX
"Where The Gang Meets"
LUNOH 25o
DINNER 350
SPECIAL UNIVERSITY RATE
Saturday Night—$1.00 per person
PRESENT YOUR STUDENT PASS
Commodore Cabaret
872 Granville Street
Sey. 41 for Reservations
"ACOUSTICS OF AUDITORIUM
PERFECT,"  DECLARE TRIO
"The A pitches perfeotly in your
auditorium," declared Ida Nelson, the
violinist in the Canadian sister trio.
Both Anna and Zara _ heartily
agreed with this observation on Friday after their performance at* noon
in the University Theatre.
They went on to explain the difficulties Incurred  by  climatic  con-
- dltlons of tuning their Instruments.
"The worst time of all was In Africa
when  it   was   ISO   degrees  In  the
shade," said Anna.
Other obstacles encountered by the
sisters    were    related.    "Once,"    said
Zara,   "the   piano   whloh   Anna   was
playing  was  so  small  that  half  the
time she was playing on air on keys
that weren't 'there."
ARTISTS.
The flmsned performance of the
Nelson trio was the result of Intense
musical appreciation and sympathetic Interpretation on the part of the
artists.
The  smooth   melodious   tones  of
the   viotln   were   balanced   by   the
deep   mellow undermelody   of the
cello,, while the piano blended with
the   two   string   Instruments   and
formed a perfeot background.
One of  the outstanding selections
was  the  staooato  duet  between the
cello and violin. Eaoh solo perform'
anoe given by the musical slaters was
an    aoeompliahed    unit    in    itself.-
W.I.B.
FIRST SHORT WAVE
MESSAGE  REPORTS
INJURY TO FRESHMAN
The worst accident suffered in the
university for several yeara resulted
Wednesday in a serious skull injury
for Jack Skalltsky, 24, freshman
student from Viking, Alberta.
Playing ln the inter-faculty hookey
game last evening Skalitzky apparently struck hla head on the Ice
while checking an oncoming forward.
According to eye witnesses Don
Olenn was carrying the puck. Skating In from the side he was body-
checked by Skalitzky and both fell
to the Ice. Skalitzky was carried
from the Ice unconscious and taken
to the hospital.
Eye witnesses stated that Olenn
was ln no way responsible for the
accident. Skalitzky was not a regular player, Wednesday evening's
fame being the second In which he
had   played   this  year.
Interviewed by the Gateway Thurs-
mornlng hospital authorities said
that hla condition waa very serious
but that he was progressing as favorably as could be expected.
NOTICE
"How can Canada and the U. 8.
best further the cause of world
peaoe" will be the subject of a symposium debate to be held by the Wo-
roan's Public Speaking Olub on
Thursday at 13.30 in Arts 104.
GET  YOUR TOTEM  J3X  THE
OAF, PUB OFFICE OR
OOUNOIL OFFIOE.
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BRYN MAWR OFFERS
GRAD SCHOLARSHIPS
The Graduate School of the Bryn
Mawr College, Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania, announces its fellowships and
scholarships for 1030-40.
Twenty Resident Fellowships, value
$860 each, and twenty Resident
Graduate Scholarships, of 9400 eaoh,
are being offered for students who
have completed, ln the former case,
a year of graduate work at some
college or university of good standing.
SOCIAL  SCHOLARSHIPS
Other scholarships offered are the
Susan M. Kingsbury Research Scholarship of $800 in Sooial Economy and
Social Research, two Special Resident Oraduate Scholarships of $400
eaoh in Spanish, and six Non-Resident Oraduate Scholarships of $300
for any subjeot in whloh a fellowship
is offered.
Candidates for scholarships must
be graduatea of some oollege or university of acknowledged standing,
but need not have done graduate
work. Holders of scholarships are
allowed to do a small amount of
teaching or other paid work, but
fellowship holders are not permitted
to teach or to hold paid positions.
Applications should be made by
Maroh 1, 1938, and applications
after that date will only be considered if all the scholarships have
not been awarded.
Further information may be found
in the Bryn Mawr Calendar of Oraduate Courses whloh will be sen on
request to the offloe o' the Pean ot
the Oraduate Sohool, Bryn Mawr
College, Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania.
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THE    UBYSSEY
Three
CHANG SUEY
AND
The Case of Slierbert's
"Lemonade"
CHAPTER FIFTEEN
C.S.—THE INHUMAN MONKEY
WRENCH
"Haven't yon got something better
to do?"
—Chang Suey txix
"Ladlfs and gentlemen, Flooffluft
er's Fly Paper, whose sloogan, *Onats
to you,' and picture of the expiring
bluebottle, are known the world over
ls happy to bring you the battle of
the century, between the Who's
Whoslcal Society, ln purple trunks,
and Chang Suey, ln everybody's
trunk  ..." •
Pan Verry clutched the mike excitedly as he rattled off the broadoaat of the worst licking Sher-
bert's "Lemonade" had suffered
slnoe the Olupf Bros. Moving Flayers out It Into small cubes ln Cloverdale, ln the summer of "88.
In the orchestra pit, Mr. Hatln'
Bills had gnawed his baton down to
Where  Is  Oscar  Scrlbblewell?
a mere sliver and was starting in on
the first violin seotlon. In a desperate attempt to save the show, he ran
the ohorus on to take a crack at
the fandango.
RED SAYS STOP
But as soon aa It started to danoe,
the solenoeman in the balcony stood
up ln a body, ln the free translation,
sang the first 00 verses of "The Engineers,"  jumped over the rail, and
tried to glide down to the stage by
kicking his feet out behind him.
He   was  forced   down   In   about
the   fifteenth   row   back.   Several
people were out by the flying glass,
and It took Ave strong men to drag
the solenoeman away from licking
the floor.
Meanwhile,     on     the     stage,     the
chorus  had  been  scattered  by  Miss
Barjorle   Ousher,   who  was  blasting
around and around the scenery, with
Chang Suey ln close pursuit.
SLAM AGAIN
Doug Buick was holding up the
lap cards for Miss Ousher, and aa
she went into her twenty-fifth lap,
she gunned her engine to a vibrant
roar. The crowd got a great klok out
of it.
Then Mr. Oauge stepped out to
the front of the stage, opened his
mouth, and was caught by a wlngjing Just between his cosine and
his x-axls. He hobbled off Indignantly, to return a moment later
canned In a suit of armour.
"Ladies and gentlemen," he said,
"due to ciroumstanoes not under our
control, there may be aome slight
divergences from the story of "Lemonade" as Sherbert wrote it, but . . ."
ON WITH THE SHOW
Mr. Oauge was interrupted at this
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point by the cheers of the audience,
as Miss Ousher pulled into the pit,
was jacked up, received gas, oil, and
new tires, and roared away again
before Suey could gain a lap.
This waa followed by three tremendous    explosions    behind    the
scenery, and  Romero  and  two  of
his bandits looped into the balcony
In perfect V-formatlon.
"... but we believe you will be
able   to   follow   the   story!"   finished
Mr. Oauge, and clanked off hurriedly aa Chang Suey advanced towards
him brandishing a huge can-opener.
ALTERNATIVE
The enterprising gentleman was
walking up and down the aisles
again, shouting:
"Tomatoes!     Tomatoesl     You     oan
either eat 'em  or throw  'em,  folksl
Hit any member of the cast or orchestra,  and  you  get another  tomato
free! Hit Chang Suey, and you get a
one-way ticket to the Paris sewers!"
Mr. Fretty (It Stinks) Woodcuts
waa sitting In the balcony with hts
darling,     little    twelve     year    old
sneer.
Fretty was chagrined because, for
the prioe of admission, he oould have
gone to the Orpheum and hated a
double feature and a Donald Duck.
GLAMOUR POSE
On the stage, Chang Suey had
struck a glamour pose while three
wobbly retainers of the Duke of
Santa Crus, who had bedded down
tn a tuba, aimed their droopy oar-
bines at him, and fired.
One of the carbines backfired, materially improving the face behind lt,
another got a sharp squawk out of
the floutlst,  and  the third  ploughed
THE DUKE
into the door.  A thlok, black  liquid
(spurted up through the hole.
"It's crude oil!" somebody yelled.
"No,   It's   Caf  Coffee!"  orled  an
other.
"It's sOU crude oil I" yeUed baok
tbe flrst. "And I do mean crude!
It's a gusher!"
"That makes two of us!" shouted
Miss Ousher, as she skidded Into her
476th lap.
SIREN CALLS
Patrolman W. (Big Chief Sitting
Bull) Appleyard sped down the aisle
on his bell-equipped tricyole, fired a
couple of rounds from his cap pistol,
gave a sophomore In the 18th row
a tioket for speeding, and fainted
dead away.
Then the Varsity tVtm brigade
arrived for the purpose of driving
the fiend from the stage with Jets
of water.
The audience was amused to watoh
the fire-eaters crawling around on
their hands and knees, following an
ancient bloodhound named Maale.
MAIZIE,  MAIZIE!
Malsie oould generally be depended on to And a hydrant, or a reasonable facsimile, sooner or later, but
that evening she didn't get up to
snuffle until Mary Ann had been carried out.
By  that  time,  Chang  Suey  had
started  throwing  souvenir  bottles
of nltro-glycerlne to tbe audienoe,
and tt was generally agreed that It
was time to go home, or a reasonable facsimile.
And as the roof lifted off the University Theatre,  everyone  concurred
that  lt  had   been  the   best  show the
Who's Whoslcal Society had ever put
on.
(It might have helped If you had
never learned to read. But we still
want to know where Scrlbblewell
Is? If you want to know read the
preceding chapters).
The   Hotel   Vancouver
presents
MART KENNY
at   the   Spanish   Grill
HoofUng
Were you born on Tuesday, February the seventh? If this auspicious date really was 'your birthday,
here is your horoseope as compled
by a soothsayer of 1036.
"I'm sorry but people born on this
day are just out of luck. They will
never pass their exams and they will
probably have hangnails. Besides
this they may be nominated to Council.
VENUS?
The Influence of Venus on Saturn
to Neptune (4 to 1, Jones up) last
Friday Is still felt today and boy, oh
boy, . . ,
People born on this data are aen-
■slttve, calm, dynamic,  outstanding,
modest      personalities     (If    that
doesn't satisfy you, I don't know
what wUl).
Other famous people born on this
date are Rufus Mo Ooofus, Napoleon,
Julius Caesar, Roofus McGoofus and
Chang-Suey.
Unlucky days for you are "anytime
after exams."
CHILD PSYCHOLOGY
One of the chief hobbies of the
students of that time seemed to be
child psychology. A particularly public spirited youth, named Angelic
Pater, even gave up the precious
spare time that he might have spent
lolling in the caf answering and
solving the problems of worried parents.
Here is on'e particularly thorny
question but Angelio Pater answers
it with the calm and assuram assurance of a trained psychologist.
"A mother has written me asking 'What oan I do, to Improve relations between my nine year old
son Cedrlo and our milkman?'
Cedric's uncle in Chicago sent him
two  revolvers   when   the  child   was
three  years  old,  and   he   refuses   to
part with them.
He la really quite careful with the
guns, but Insists on shooting horses
on sight, which annoys our milkman.
I have taken the guns away from
him from time to time, on several
occasions, but eaoh time he burns
down the house.
I find  it cheaper to  buy the  milkman a new  horse every day.
NO MILK?!
Nevertheless he Is becoming most
unreasonable of late; he threatens
to stop his milk delivery, which you
must admit would not be ln the Interests of C. Seddy's welfare. Can
you suggest any solution to this
problem?"
"Do not worry.
Wait a while."
Cedrlo la Just one of those red-
blooded, healthy-minded fellows
seeking expression of his normal
Instincts.
We parents must be patient with
our children. The golden years of
childhood with their joyous adventures in the fairyland of bluebirds
and butterflies will soon pass away
and your Cedric will be face to face
with the.grim realities of life. Let
Cedric express himself in his own
way and I'm sure he'll grow up a
well-balanced individual quite capable of looking after himself.
In his childish mind the milkman's
horse probably represents all that is
evil and ugly in life, and in shooting
the animal he has given expression
to his desire to see evil punished and
virtue rewarded.
Be patient."
DIRECTOR
SPRING RETREAT AT
WHITE ROCK FEB. 25
The 8.O.M. "Spring Retreat" will
be held at White Rock this coming
week-end.
Cars will leave early Saturday afternoon (February 28) and will return Sunday evening.
Forums on "Techniques of Religious Living" firesides, song and
mirth, will comprise the program.
Applications should be made at
once ln the S.O.M. room, 312 Aud.
Bldg., and the price, Including transportation, will be two dollars.
WANTED
Young man to help a fellow student with the lessons on Economics
1. Apply to Pub. Office. Willing to
pay for help. Phillip Snider.
IIIIIIIIIIIIIM,,,,,,
IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIM
Just   about   all   you   could   ask
for    .    .
ARISTOCRATIC
HAMBURGERS
Limited
10th and Alma
TAKE    SOME    HOME
IIIIIHIIIHIHHHIIHIIHHHIIHIIIHIHHIIIHIIIIHIHIIIIIIHIlft
C. HAYDN WILLIAMS, director
of "Serenade," upon whose shoulders
rests most of the responsibility and
work  in  connection  with  the  opera.
Mr. Williams has been ln charge
of Musical Society productions for
several years and takes much of the
credit for the high artistic standards
attained  by  the  Society.
Students obtaining their tickets
will be admitted Wednesday night
and some Thursday. The curtain
rises at 7.30. Performances will alao
be given the following Friday and
Saturday nights.
IIIIIHIMIIIMIHIIHIIMIMIHIM'MHIIHIIMMIMIMMIHMIIHMMMIJ
angel with
black wings
bs foo
IIIH-IIHIHMMHIMMMIIMmmMllimMMItlMimMMIIHIIIMMI
The Scene: Last Friday night, at
10.00 p.m., ln the flrst row of the
gallery in the Auditorium.
The Oast: Mary Ann, and a dark
haired young man whom she had
never met until the Intermission ln
the show.
The Plot: Mary Ann, and the young
man In a decidedly cosy scene, just
Ave minutes after being introduced.
The Motive: Mary wanted a lift to
the barn-dance.
Mary Ann ls a heel
And Chang Suey too,
The dirt that you want
Ia that dug by FOO.
Now Offormd
In the familiar pouch or new
slide packages. A tastier, milder
cigarette made from much
better tobacco*. Try them.
Buckingham
C I G A H I   T  I I   S &
Talk of
the towi
RICH- DARK, PRINCH
STYLI CHOCOLATI
PAtKID WITH CRISP,
CRUNCHY ALMONDS
DOO LOST
Wire haired terrior pup, wearing
red collar. Last seen on University
bus Thursday morning. Phone Elliot
836-L.
There is only a short time left for
you to order your 1939 Totem.
An Alpha Phi escaped from two pursuing Betas at the Aggie
barn dance by spending most of the evening in the dressing room. . . .
Her Beta partner retaliated by leaving the dance and collecting up
another partner for the affair. . . . We nave been bribed indirectly not
to print the end of the story. . . .
fi fi fi
Students and faculty have both found it advantageous to enjoy
the comforts of small dinner parties at the Dolphin on Marine Drive . .
the ideal dining room . . . with its eastern habitant air and rustic whitewashed brick fireplace, provides an atmosphere congenial for friendly
dinners for small clubs . . . Point Grey 103 will bring the information
to you first hand . . . the prices are reasonable while the fare is deli-
ciously appetizing. . . .
We hear that the Zeta Psi fraternity has been presented by the
Aggie faculty with a bill for damage done at the Aggie barn dance by
crashers. . . .
Co-eds are asked to make their reservations early for pre-ball
dinners , . . for the one event in the year when co-eds have to return
a year of dates. . . .
fi        fi        fi
Phi Kaps staged a jam session in the wing of the library on Friday
evening ... to the music of the portable radio that was plugged into
the wall and aerial across the study tables. . . .
fi        fi        fi
Then there is the mercenary Phi Kap who states that his sole ambition is to marry a rich girl who is just this side of the grave. . . .
fi fi fi
Vitality and vivacity are reflected in the color scheme for this
season, particularly in the youthful hosiery of sheerest chiffons and
crepes ... at 713 Dunsmuir Street three thread chiffons in the new
tones are $1.00 per pair. . . . Intriguing colors such as tiger lily, animation and pagan lend a note of variety as well as interest in the
hosiery for the coming easter season. . . . Who was the young lad who
left a math lecture several minutes early, just to get a seat at the
science pep meet? . . . With exams and essays on hand, treat yourself
to a carefree time . . . invest in a pair of fashionable hosiery in the
newest tones at 713 Dunsmuir Street. , . .
fi fi fi
A trail of broken hearts and desolate lads are the results of the
D. G formal last week. . . . Evidently only one university lad was
favored with an invitation. . . .
fi fi fi
Overheard  the following conversation  the other day ....
He: Won't you?
She: No.
He: Ah please. . . .
She: No!
He: Can't you ever say anything but "No?"   AU I want is a piece
of cake.
fi fi fi
Then there is the radio technician who has been taking telephone
lessons from a red head on "how to win girl friends."
POEMS .. .
and STUFF
CompUed by LEWIS ROBINSON
What ls love? The shepherd sang.
Thoro'ly smitten with a pang;
Something that he ate, no doubt,
If he'd been able to find out.
But he sought Its cause elsewhere:
In laughing eyes or yellow hair;
Blamed a sharp dyspepslo pain
On haughty glanoes of disdain.
Saw in gout and other woe
Evldenoe of love's strong'bow;
Tried wedlock Instead of diet,
And found good cooking kept him
quiet.
We in modern age can see
The reason for our misery—
It Isn't love but peanut butter
That   puts   our  hearts  In  suoh  a
flutter.
• •     •
He called his girl not Peaches
But Grapefruit, and did sigh;
For every time he squeezed her
She hit him ln the eye.
• •     •
Just a thought: The plural of whim
is women.
Vancouver
Symphony Society
GRIGORI GARBOVIT8KY
(Ouest Conductor)
Orpheum Theatre
Sunday, Feb. 26 at 3 P.M.
Tickets:  88c to $8.00
at M. A. KELLY CO.
659 Granville   Trinity 1638
BOOK SEATS NOW
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Spring Samples
of Distinctive
TIP TOP CLOTHING
at
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Apparel
8664 Oranville Buy. 0680 REPS OUST 'BIRDS IN McKECHNIE CRUCIAL
SATURDAY RESULTS:
Vanoouver 8; Varsity 6
Varsity 6; Pro-Reo 0 -
Frosh 0; Harlequins 8
BASKETBALL RESULTS:
Varsity 37; Western 86
Frosh 26; Shores 43
Four
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 21, 1939
'Birds Lose Playoff Tilt To Munros
LEAGUE FINISH SATURDAY
FIZZLES OUT. 46-42 MONDAY
A fighting Vnrsity basketball team that just couldn't score
enough baskets to keep np with a flock of inspired Munro Furriers,
dropped out of the running for hoop honors for another year by
coming out on the short end of u 46-40 contest Monday night at
"V.A.C. gym. This was a. sudden death game for the right to meet
Westerns in the semi-finals of the league championship.
After sneaking into the playoffs by a long shot coming home
to a photo finish in the last league games last Saturday night, the
students just didn't have enough on the ball to oust the Furriers
who were beaten by one basket last Saturday night by the last
ditch stand of the out-of-the-running Stacey squad.
After taking a quick six point lead
in the first few moments of play from
the push-up shots of Army Bumstead, the black and orange team
fought right down to the flnlah line
by matching the blue and gold basket by basket and never letting the
miss-firing Thunderbirds within four
points of tying the soore.
AMD YET SO FAB
Then Varsity got baok in the
game to click for six points, but in
doing so allowed the Munroes to
olick for four themselves, and the
students continued to face a tantalising deficit. By half time the soore
read 32-18 and the blue and gold
hopes were high for a viotory.
Three quarter time rolled around
and Varsity was still behind by Ave
points, the soore standing at 85-80.
TURNER'S TURN
The usual raasle-dassle ln the last
quarter failed to click with the stolid
winners and even two beautiful baskets by reliable Frank Turner did
the student cause little good and the
game ended with the Men of Maury
still pressing and still missing passes
and   baskets.
Don Livingston topped Varaity
scoring with 12 smart pointa while
Alex Lucas came home with 8. Frank
Turner picked off 7 and Rann Matthison netted 6. By Straight managed
to get 8 while Wally Johnson, Doug
Alexander and Brud Matheson each
pioked off 2.
VARSITY WHIPS WESTERNS 37-35 IN SAT. GAME
Sport heroes will come and go, and
last-minute finishes will continue to
set fans on the edges of their chairs
for ages to come, but never, not even
In the most fanciful story-book, will
there be two more crucially-thrilling
games than were staged Saturday
night at the V.A.C. gym.
And so it oame to pass, that the
slimmest mathematical chanoe of
Varsity gaining a playoff berth became a definite possibility as the
collegians took the favored Westerns
Into camp 37-35, deprived the Dominion champs of their playoff bye,
and then sat baok and watched a
gallant little quintette of coaohless
Staeys struggle to a breath-taking
38-27 win over Munros and necessitate a sudden death ga.i.? to decide
possession of third place.
Losing  16-8   at    the   flrst quarter
breather Maury Van Vliet's boys
didn't exactly look promising as they
muddled around and watched the
champs drop In the melons. An overwhelming difference was noticeable
as the second quarter started and
Varsity plunked ln 13 points while
holding tlie famed Bardsley, Willoughby orew to 2 counters. The half-
time score of 30-18 for Varsity seemed almost too good to campus supporters, who began to see hopes of a
possible playoff spot appearing in the
not-so-far-distant future.
The clever shooting of Wally Johnston from Chllllwaek, and the steadying influence of the ever-adequate
Rann Matthison, kept the Maury-
men ln the battle in the third quarter. Even at that, however, the Western sharpshooters were levelling their
sights and managed to draw to within one point, 30-28, at the breather.
STACYS OBLIGE BY BEATING MUNRO FIVE 27-26
The last quarter was Just one of
those things where you are expecting
any minute to burst your aortic
blood vessel, and all' the time you're
hoping you'll be around long enough
to be ln at the finish.
s
Fortunately (?) this correspondent
came through the mill with flying
colors, only so confused as to what
happened, he may not be able to render a very accurate account of proceedings.
While the Blue and Oold heroes
tried valiantly to stave off defeat and
with it oblivion till another year, the
champs were creeping up ln a most
disconcerting manner. It got past the
disconcerting stage, however, when
they   were   ahead   35-34   with   45   sec-
onds to go; it was positively aggravating. Pessimism was climbing to Its
highest and gloomiest pedestal.
We had counted without our perennial little old stager, skipper Rann
Matthison, however, and it was the
same "Little Poison" who snared a
Western fumble in mid-floor and unhesitatingly looped lt over to Brud
Matheson who sailed In for the winning marker. As the New Westminster sophomore was going in for the
shot he was fouled by Wllloughby,
and under pressure came through
with the foul shot to put his mates
two up. The last 45 seconds were an
absolute nightmare, and shouldn't be
referred to beyond the statement
that the campusmen held their lead
and set the stage for Staeys valiant
iron-man effort.
HOCKEYISTS DRAW
The Varsity grass hockey team was
held to a scoreless draw by Nomads
on Saturday at Brockton Point. The
Thunderbird stick wielders clomin-'
ated the play but just couldn't strike
pay-dirt. Gav Moviat played a bang
tip game and Jack Helsler was ln
great form to chalk up his first shutout.
The Brockton battle was slowed
down considerably by the close
checking of the Nomad squad. To
date, Vavslty has dropped but one
game ln four starts, and are out to
win the league.
SOCCERMEN TROUNCED
5 - 0 BY HOTELMEN
Varsity's roundballers, tho Charlie
Hltchens special, were still smarting from their 5-0 lacing at the hands
of the St. Regis Eleven at Cambie
Street   on  Saturday.
The win against the hot and cold
Varaity squad gave the Hotelmen
undisputed possession of the top spot
in the Vancouver and District Soccer League, breaking a second-place
deadlock with the West Vancouver
outfit. West Van missed their
chance    to     keep    pane    with    Hegls
THE HAT TRICK QUEEN AND THE MIGHTY MITE
<*~S5*'
*%*>Z3$' £Z*
MVRNE NEVISON, the attractive co-ed on the left above captains the
U.B.C. grass hookey team with suoh efficiency that Saturday she soored
her third hat trick of the season by banging ln three goals.
RANN MATTHISON, the handsome collegian on the right above,
captains his baaketball team with such efficiency that he sparked them
Into the playoffs Saturday night by making the play that gave the Thunderbirds their great win over Westerns.
FROSH BASKETMEN
DROP FINAL TILT
Varsity's fighting Frosh basketeers
took the count again when they were
most rudely bounced by the highflying Shores quintette at the Y. W.
C. A. gym last Friday 43-36.
The Collegians functioned muoh
more smoothly than last time out,
with their four man zone defense effective at times. However the Shores
superior sharpshooting told the tale
and sunk the little Frosh frigate
quite masterfully.
With a never say die gleam in his
eye. Coach Byron "Jitterbug" Straight
announoed after the game that Varsity would officially offer a challenge
by barbed wire to the Jewellers for a
return exhibition tilt at the Campus
Oym.
Teams  and scores  are  as  follows:
Shores: Davies 3, Panasls 17, Samson 10, Keating 5, Pedlow 4, Forrest
2,   Davey   2,   Heathingtoh   1,   Fagan,
Burgess, McLean. Total 43.
Varsity: Roddan 4, Elel'thery 4,
Rees 13, Ryan 2, WyarO 2, Roussell
2, Stewart, Townsend, James, Young,
Physick. Total 26.
SKI SKW1NTS
Five universities will converge
here as guests of the Outdoor Club
Friday and Saturday to take part In
Ski Meet to settle the North-West
Inter-Collegiate Supremacy. They are
Washington State, College of Puget
Sound, University of Washington,
Oregon, and Oonzaga with the C.P.S.
and Washington squads favoured to
come through—next to the U.B.C.
experts.
Last week-end the Varsity stalwarts packed 350 pounds of food up
to the Hollyburn Ski Camp to take
care of the hungry throng.
when  they  dropped  a  count   to  Kerrisdale 4-0.
The half time score of the St.
Regls-Varslty flasc a was 2-0 from
which It can be ascertained that St.
Regis netted three goals ln the sec-
end half, or don't you get Mr. Oage
for   Maths?
ItlHMIMIMIMMIIIMMIIIIMMMIIIMimiMMHM.mHIIIIHtllMMIM
CO-ED SPORTS
By MYRNE NEVISON
iMMmMIIMMI'lliMHMMIIIimMHIHIMMIMMI-MMIMMIIIHMMMI
Continuing In their winning ways
the U.B.C. hockey squad, minus two
regulars, coasted to an easy 6-0 victory Saturday at Connaught Park
over Pro-Recs, one of the two teams
that defeated the co-eds last fall.
The students found the game little
more than a work-out and a good
chance to try out new plays. The one
catastrophe of the game (from the
point of view of the collegians) occurred when centre-forward Faye
Burnham, was hit on the nose by a
raised ball and had to leave the game
a few minutes for repairs. At that
she managed to soore two beautiful
goals.
Tomorrow the U.B.C. team will
take to the field again; this time to
play a high sohool—Grandview Commerce want a little work out so they
challenged the students. The game
is scheduled for 3.45 at the university
field.
Rep teams selections just out show
that the six co-eds who tried out 'for
positions all got a place on one of
the two teams. On the "A" squad are
Faye Burnham as centre-forward,
Pauline Scott in the centre-ha'f slot,
and Varsity's little wonder, Peggy
Crowe, goal tending.
The "B" aggregation are honored
with Oerry Armstrong as right-
inside, Bettye Henderson and Hortense Warne, fullbacks.
All these girls have shown brilliant
form throughout the campaign and
deserve the honor of representing the
league against the High Schools All-
stars.
INTERCOLLEGIATE
SKI MEET SOON
Telegrams assuring definite entries
ln the coming Northwest Intercollegiate Ski tourney on Hollyburn Ridge
this week-end have been received
from Oregon State College, University of Washington, Washington
State College and College of Puget
Sound, It ls reported here.
Tentative entries have also been
received from Reed College of Portland   and   the   University   of   Oregon.
The teams will be competing for
the possession of the Northwest Intercollegiate      ski     championship    at
A to Z       	
"College Helps" is a catalogue listing aids for every possible college oourse—outlines)—keys—translations—yes everything. Write
for your free copy now.
THS BOOK EXCHANGE
"Oanaaa'n Bool.-01cari-._r Kouse"
370 Bloor  St.  W„  Toronto,   Ontario
VARSITY RUGBY FIFTEEN
OUTPLAYED IN WINDY TILT
Varsity bid farewell to a dear friend last Saturday on the
turf of the Stadium when the Thunderbird Fifteen bowed before
the gusto of Vancouver Reps in the feature McKechnie Cup
battle, 8-5,
Playing in a stiff wind, the two teams put on a furiously-
contested flght that saw the 'Birds blow a five point lead, amassed
in the flrst half, to the pick of the First Division teams.
Going with the wind ln the flrst
frame, Varsity team failed, through
poor generalship to take advantage
of the wind behind them, electing to
run with the ball rather than kick.
Foot-loose Tod Tremblay manoeuv-
ered the only Varsity soore when he
broke away from his man on the
wing, and tore down the side marker.
Bob Casement, high school star,
blocked his passage to paydirt, but
Tremblay, after drawing him out,
passed to Howie McPhee who streaked across the line for a Varsity
score.
The MoPhees pulled their famous
brother act on the play, as Ted Mo-
phee kicked a perfect convert to add
two more points to the three collected by brother Howie.
That was the finish of the Varsity
scoring, and the Varsity scoring
threat. From here on, the Reps took
over, and carried the play deep into
Varsity territory, and only by dint of
the tremendous flght put up by the
Blue and Oold, were held to eight
points in the second half.
Hump Payne, Meralomas gift to
the Reps, started the parade off
when he climaxed a short run by
the threes to slice through the Varsity defence for a try. West Vancou-
verlte Bud D'Easum tied up the
score with a convert.
Steve Covernton, veteran of many
a Varsity-Rep battle, cinched the
victory for the Reps and virtually
took the Old Mug from right under
the noses of fifteen men ln blue.
Steve gave the Reps the margin
of victory with a try late in the seoond half, but It was his generalship
throughout the game that really
caused Varsity's downfall
The fate ot the McKechnie cup
now rests between the Reps and the
Crimson Tide of Victoria, and present showing favours the Victoria
laddies.
FROSH RALLY
TO WI[N 9-8
Gallantly overcoming an eight-
point disadvantage, the Frosh rugger
fifteen rallied In the second half to
down Harlequins 9-8 ln a feature tilt
at Lower Brockton. The victory,
fourth ln a row for the Freshmen,
virtually cinched them flrst spot in
the second half schedule of the Vancouver Rugby Union. The Greenmen
have won all four of their scheduled
games and have yet to bow before
any team. With one more game to
play the boys look to be a shoo-In
for second-half honors.
With the Harlequins breaking fast
and wheeling the Frosh sorum, the
Collegians were hard put to hold the
opposition to the eight points they
managed to collect in the opening
canto. Scores by Vic Klassen with a
try, and a penalty klok and convert
by Perkins put the Frosh down eight
points.
With their flrst defeat staring them
ln the face as defeat ls wont to do,
the gallant flrst year men stemmed
the Harlequin scoring threat, and
with the scrum functioning smoothly,
and the threes breaking nicely,
fought to overcome the disadvantage.
PHYSICK  SCORES.
Genial Morrie Physick, hard-playing wing man of the three line, was
the flrst Frosh man to score when he
plunged over for an unconverted try.
King Neill, effervescent three-man,
also carried the leather over the
lime-line for another major score for
the Collegians.
Red-thatched Gordie Pyie, he of
the unerring toe, finished off the
scoring and swung the verdict ln
favor of the Frosh when he rooted a
perfeot penalty kick smack between
the uprights to give the Freshmen
their fourth consecutive victory.
'The Frosh now have but one game
to play ln the second-half schedule
and are conceded a cinch to cop this
remaining tilt.
Should they do lt, the boys will
then meet the winners of the flrst
division for the league championship.
Nuts to the McKechnie Cup, we'll
take the Frosh.
present   held   by   the   University    of
Washington.
It seems that the boys from the
College of Puget Sound, led by one
Bob Kemp, who has skied ln the
Alps and way points including Germany, will be gunning for a victory
at least over the locals who defeated
them lately at Mount Rainier.
INTRAMURALS
^	
There Isn't a great deal of tradition
behind the new intramural rugby
trophy, but on the upper field lately,
30 men have been gathering at noon
to stage a 40 minute 'massacre' to
try to get flrst hold of the mounted
football.
Last Thursday the Frosh swamped
Science '42 and on Friday Sclenoe '41
came from behind to take Arts '41
8-3. At noon today Aggies start the
second round, meeting Science '40.
Arts '42 play Science '41 Wednesday.
The basketball finals will be staged
on Friday, Science '42 having eliminated Science '39.
Speed.. •
Seymour 4484
Quality...
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PUBLISHING  00.  LTD.
1037    WEST    PENDER    STREET
IIHMMHIHItMIHHIIIIMHMHM. Mill tHtMIIHHHHHIHHHHHtlHttHtHH tllllHMMMIIIHHHt Hill •••*
HOW'S YQUR
GOLF GAME?
To be nccuratc you
must learn the Fundamental-! of tho Oolf
Swing. The winter »eu-
son Ih thf* time to iron
out your difficulties und
loarn how to enjoy
Oolf.
Hal Rhodes Goll School
1153 W. Pender Street        Seymour 5333
II.HtlHHIIIHIIHIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIItll.tllllltlltHHIIHIHIIMIHItHHMHHIH.
■ IMIIIHItllitt'
fl'll'I'ltlMI I|. | IIIIllll.

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