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The Ubyssey Dec 7, 1951

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The
VOLUME
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, DECEMBER 7; 1951
5c Per Copy
NO. 31
UP A TREE
Chuck
I
Well, it's all over now.
!<*» Armour is back in the Editorial Office and all the Student
QOOnclllors can eat their Christ.
m»s Turkey In peace.
The most utterly ingenious
suggestion to come out of the
who'le crlslB was made by a chap
ceiled (Wilson at Student Council
meeting  the  other  night.
"We don't need u newspaper on
campus," Wilson said, "all we need
Is a great big notice board."
that's a great idea.
Most of the Ubyssey staff could
be dispensed with. No need for an
editorial board, just a notice board.
Every student would be his own
reporter, responsible only to the
Thuni'btfrck editor for the where-
withall to post up the news.
* ¥ ¥
f All editorials would be printed
on Asbestos paper and guarded
from stuck by non.partlsan guards
of engineers. Standard equipment
on Hie board would include a towel
for council members to weep on and
» bucket of cswrots for weak-eyed
students. '
(Carrots are also good for night,
blindness—in' case tbe lights fall
Ind the notice board is left in the
dfcrk.)
(Mr. Wilson didn't say how large
the board would have to be, but 1
seii a board two miles long and
three high. After all there are only
MOO students on the campus and
probably a few hundred* of them
are interested Jn what is happening on* can\pus.
If too many stampede the board
when as each issue is printed, oops
posted, council could pass a law
allowing the board to be viewed
by group of 300 students at a time.
Optometrists would malts a killing by selling telescopic glasses to
thos* student* toroed to view the
UbysSey board from the .back row.
*      ¥      #.. *
This IS It for 1951.
, If  everything  goes   well,   we'll
be up a tree next yew.  -,-■■
* Meanwhile, enjoy yourself with
a Happy Xmas and a hilarious New
Year.'
EVERYBODY had their say at Thursday's General Meeting of the AMS, called to discuss
the firing by council of Ubyssey Editor in Chief Les Armour. President Vaughn Lyon
finally Agreed to limit the number of speakers in order to bring the meeting to a close.
Twb-hour meeting was ended by vote of confidence in Armour
t
HAPPY EXAMS
^m—mmmmm—^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
Xmas Spirit Needed Now
Students May
Appeal Licence
Crackdown
"It is going to coat out-ofiprov-
ince student motorists money unless they get ibehind the effort to
change the present ipolicy of fin.
illg for not having B.C. plates on
their cars," said la-w students who
are organizing the protest.
"In order to get the university
to present a case to the provincial
government, we've gat to , know
that tbSre are a sufficient number
of students aMeoted," they said.
"We appeal to all students affected to give their names to the
librarian-on.duty at the Law Library or to Mr. Kennedy, Professor
or Law."
I there are sufficient number of
students Involved, then there is a
good chance of requesting thd administration to appeal to the gov.
ernment to change the ruling.
■y MYRA GREEN
Harrassed with a few minor
problems concerning Ubyssey
staff and policy, the publications staff just hasn't got
around to wishing the student
body a wet and merry Christ*.
mus and all that sort of stuff.
. Before the pubsters get down
to their own dusty books, we
would like lo wish each and
everyone* of the student body
and faculty a Very Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year.
May you slide through your
exams (that will probably be
the case), get the Cadillac you
asked Santa for, and have enough
green stuff left over for that
essential bottle.
.       It  is  not  possible at  such
short  notice,  to  give  sclent!-*
, fie list ot methods on how
to bring your notes In with you"
or "Translation of the Writing
of the Person Sitting in Front
«*t,y.ou"~SQ you-wjll hme to be
satisfied with wishes for
loads of luck and private
"know-how."
The annual  Christmas  Concert   for   the   Faculty   Wives
was presented Tuesday after,
noon In Brock Lounge.
In keeping with the prevailing Christmas spirit, the Placers' club and the Radsoc combined In putting on Dickens'
perennial "Christmas Carol.'"
. Adapted as a radio play by
director Joy Coghill, Christ.
ma« t Carol was done in front
of the studio audience.
Other Christmas projects include that sponsored by the
Aggie girls and a competition
for collecting food for poor
families by the Home Economics  Department.
Summer Jobs Open
In Government Service
The Public Service of Canada has announced a'number
of employment opportunities for students in the faculties of
Arts, Engineering and Agriculture during the summer
months. • t
Arts   Undergraduates   with   oher*>—
year of university training will re.
Med School
Applications
'  Filled  By Jan.
Application forms for admission
to the Faculty of Medicine are now
available in the JVIedical School
Office.   Hut   Bl.
All students wishing to enter
the class commencing next Sep.
temher are responsible tor having
their completed application forms
and transcriptions of University
and Senior Matriculation records
^ reach the Medical School Office
on or before January 15, 1952.
Merry  Christmas
For no reason at all. the LSE,
the Sixty-seven LSE Clubs and
their «ome 2600 members wish
each little person on the campus,
particularly the members of Stu
dent's Council, iv most Merry and
Enjoyable Christmas,
celve up to $125 per month, with
two yews, $140 per month, with
three years up to $200 per month.
Positions  will   be   available
for general,  commerce economies, sociology, library science
and geography students.
Graduates  will   he  appointed  as*
Technical Officers, temporary, with
a salary of up to $300 a month depending   on   qualifications.
Over 1000 potential vacancies
will be open to students in pure
ami applied science at salaries up
to $215 a month for undergraduates and $325 iv month for grdu.
tates plus subsistence for Weld
work and travelling expenses from
recruiting centre to field and return.
Aggie students can obtain jobs
at salaries ot* $125 per month with
oiie year or university training.
$140 per month with two years and
$155 per month with three yehrs.
For each season of satisfactory re-
1. •■U'd experience, an additional
amount of $15 a month will he
.I'ldcel   tc  the  basic  rates.
Applications should reach the i
civil   service   commission      of
Canada   not   later   than   Janu*
ary   18,   1952   for   Aggies   and
January  15 for others.
Applicants    must    be
as sturleiits al *.*.- university
In most cases preference In appointment will be given to those
following specialist or honors com*,
ses.
Engineering
Registration
Up 10 Percent
. i
Registration of Engineering stu.
dents i*,t Canadian universities In
1951 was up more tha 10 per cent
over 1950, It was disclosed by the
Engineering Institute of Canada
Wednesday.
While total enrolment Is down
from S.S29 to 7,500, the trend has
been reversed and the number of
first year registrations is 2105
as compared to 1874 in 1950.      ■
The number of prospective 1952
graduates is down considerably
trom 1951 and prospects for employment of young graduate engineers next spring should be excellent.
About 1717 positions will be open
In   1952   and   In   IDS*".,   about   1450 j
The present shortage is not likely
to  be  eliminated  for  a  number of
7 Colleges
OK Russian
Exchange
MONTREAL — (CUP) — Two
Eastern Canadian Universities yes.
terday became the sixth and sev^n*
th to approve the proposed exchange of student vlsists between
Canada and the Soviet Union.
Student meetings at the Unlver.
sity of Toronto and Bishop's Un-
verslty, Lennoxville, Que., favored
the exchange by tumping major!,
ties.
The Toronto meeting climaxed a
sometimes bitter twO.manth, campaign by The Varsity, daily stu-*
dent newspaper, to get Toronto
students, to reverse the negative
vote on the proposal their delegates cast In September. .
The Toronto delegation w,as one
of twelve that defeated the ex.
change plan when it was proposed
to the annual conference of the National Federation of 'Canadian University Students (NFCUS) in mtd.
September. Six Universities Voted
I'or the scheme at that time.
Bishop's vote yesterday — taken
at a meeting that attracted the entire student body —* wms a confirmation of the favourable vote Its
delegates cast at the conference.
AT   McGIUL
Meanwhile, M*c(illl student offlci.
als were still waiting to hear from
the NK'CU'S executive In answer
to  the  request  of the  McOlJl  Stu-
TWEEN CLASSES
Mundt
To Hold
Seminar   i
TODAY 3:30, Room 852 in Lib.
rary. Dr. Ernest Mundt, director
of the California School of Fine
Arts will give the last seminar
discussion, "Art as a Communicator of Meaning.'' *i
*       #       *$     .     «
LSE CONCENT SEASON tickets
go on sale shortly.' Right conceits for 17 (adults) and \% (students) at the AMS office or at
the Modern Music store. Refunds
will be forthcoming to those who
lu.ve already paid.
TT V V
LSE REQUIRES four persons of
hardworking capacity to exist
over the Christmas holidays in
publicity and business manage,
ment for production of Mozart's
"Cosi Pan TUtte."
TO THE MANY STUDENTS on
the campus who buy and cook
their own meals, the School of
Home Economics and' Health Serv-
ice will be offering a series of
demonstrations mi group discussions early in January. Suggestions will be made on how to mar.
ket for; Organiiss and present
interesting meats.
Watch for more Information on
this   subject.       *  *    < . '
tp Offi J|l
MUflC APPRECIATION CLUB
presents the Mass in B minor by
Bach on Friday, Dec. 7, a*t 12:30
in Double Committee Room, Brock
Hall.
ENGLISH DEPT. requires male
chorus members for its production of Auden and Isherwood's
"Accent of F6". Apply to Miss
Somerset, Extension Deptmont,
Hut  L10.
9p 9p 9p
SPECIAL EVENTS Committee
requires female singers for solos
and chorus parts in Stravtnskl's
"Les Noces." Watch Ubyssey for
rehearsals.
TO OFFICE
Editor Given Vote Of Confidence
At Thursday General Meeting
By JOE SCHLES1NGER .
Ubyssey Senior Editor
Ubyssey Editor-in-Chief Les Armour, tottering between
dismissal and reinstatement for six days and six nights, won a
vote of confidence* at a special General Meeting of the AMS
the  12  to  six
years,   Canada   has   heen   absorb.
lug engineering grduates at a rate | dents' Society that NFCUS official
!nf more than *!000 per year for tho! ly take a new vote on the matter
registered Past four years, so that the fact i lentil that happens,
or m*J thai fewer than 1500 per year are ; Vl,t<* stands,
ogni/ed standing and their courses'likely to be. available Is hound to j In Toronto last, night, as at the E. A. Worrall. Elizabeth Smith
must include subjects related to he* ve an appreciable effect on the j Bishop's meeting yesterday after.! Ron Tephson, Doris Anne Eisen-
tho work I'or which they are apply-! economic use of enginoers In In-1 noon, the vote was overwhelmingly hart, Hill Henderson, D. Pearson,
inK. jduatry. ] In favour o t'llie exchange. Kathlyn  Bahi, Richard  Buxton.
Filmsoc Plans
Big Program
For New Year
"Kinds Hearts und Coronets" on
Jan. 8, Filmsoc is brining a full
program of features to the campus.
Probably Etlmsoc's best show In
recent years, The Red Shoes, will
be playing to varsity audiences on
Feb. 6. To back up these two great
shows, Fiimsoo is also presenting
The Winslow Uoy. Pride snd Prejudice, Great Expectations, Mon.
sieur Vincent and Tight Little Island.
To round out the spring features, Fllnwoo Is showing All the
Klng^ Men aad They Were Not
Divided. All these features will be
shown on Tuesdays at 3:415, 6 and
8:16 p.m. snd standard Filmsoc
prices will prevail—IS cents for
students and staff only.
Watch the campus noticeboards
and this paper for show dates.
Would these elutoi who wish to
participate in either Brotherhood
Week (late February) or In Open
House Universities Week (early
March) please Inform the secret,
ary, LSE), in writing, including proposed or suggested plans and
events.
Film   Soelety  begins its  spring
season  with the witty production
of  "Kind   Hearts  and Coronets,"
Thursday, Jan. 8.
The.English Dept. production of
Auden and Isherwood's very good
and very controversial play "The
Ascerft of F6" directed by Miss
Somerset will take place Jan. 21
and 22.
Admin.
Official
Gives
Xmas
Out
Hours
Students and teachers alike are confused about when
they will have a return to classes.
The administration of UBC has 'been forced to make a
special announcement concerning the resumption of classes.
Classes will resume on Thursday, January third as
stated in the calendar.
The university will be closed Monday and Tuesday,
December 31 and January 1.
Administration office will be open Wednesday January 2. %
The meeting was called by Student Council upon the receipt of a
petition, signed by 140 students,
which requested that the dismissal
of Armour be discussed at a meeting or the student body.
However, Armour was reinstated
by Student's Council following a
meeting late Wednesday night of
a conciliation board composed ot
members cf the council und the editorial board of the Ubyssey.
THI COMPROMMI
The conciliation board worked
out a set of compromise proposals
.regulating the editorial procedure
of the pu*per.
Student councillors went before
the Oeneral Meeting with the sol.
utlon worked out Wednesday. The
proposals stipulated that a four-
member editorial writers' vumnlt-
tee be Set ujl to control all editorials.
A motion of confidence In Las
Armour as Bditor.in-Chlef was entertained from the floor.
VOTI OF CONFIDING!
In the ensuing debate a number
of speakers elaborated on 'the
events Reading up to the crista.
After two hours of debate a vote
was taken, expressing the stu-
ent'a confidence in Les Armour.
Council president Vaughan Lyon
expressed his gratification at the
result of the Vote.
"1 am sure that the proposals
agreed Upon on Wednesday will
enable tn amicable oo*.<i»ertlon between Council and the editorial
board and will be !n the bo<t in.
terests of the student body as a
whole," he said.
However, the churge**) and countercharges voiced dui*iu;r the pa«t
week have left many people baffled as to the Issues at stake.
STILL boNFUSID
MAD president Bill Sparling, one
of the leaders of the anti-Armour
faction, told this rdper.er after the
Oeneral. Meeting that he had no
comment to make as he himself
was getting confused by all the
complications that had set !«•,
It was generally admitted that
Armour's competence as the paper's
chief executive, was beyond ques-.
tlonlng.
Many of 'the speakers admitted
that they did not agree with tha
contents of the editorials, but sup-
ported Armour's right to ex i ss
his opinions editorially.
Lost Is Now Found
Owners Come Round
There is an array or lost articles, such as Coats, Jackets,
scarves,   and   other   clothing   at   the   Alma   Mater   Society
Lost and Found. If anyone has lost an article of clothing, please
try the Lost and Found to see if it has been turned over to us.
Will  the  following  please  come $> — *	
RIV. ft. J6NII
Pub Crisis
Spoils
Professor G. C. Andrew explained that a poor turnout to hear Rev.
Aichard D. Jons, Wednesday,,was
due to other- meetings being held
in conectkm with a publication
crisis. ■*'   ■ .'
Dr. Jones, who is Director of
Canadian Coqniil of Christians «nd
Jews, told students that good relations between groups Of people,
•wpeci^.^
ooncernsd, should be promoted in
three. Ways,
These were by attempting to
overcome employment problems;
by education, and by encouraging
understanding on' a social level.
He said that race prejudice, In
the United States was noticeably
on the decline in many spheres-
Citing the case of four negroes
whom he had recently seen hav.
ing luiu$ in a dining car in Florida, he asW:
"Two years ago that would have
been a lynching.'
Dr* Jones  Is  at  the  coast  In
connection with Brotherhood Week
which,twill be held In Vancouver
during, the third ^eek in February, 1952.
UBC Boxers
Homeless
Athletic Director Bob Robinett announced Thursday that
training of the UBC Boxing
team will have to be postponed
until next term because the
boxing room in the War Memorial Gym has not been completed.
J Sixteen    enthusiasts    have    al-
Heady  signified  their  Intention  of
to the AMS Lost and Found:
Pete Gregory. Johnnie Sihson,
Joyce Hart, Elizabeth Derry, T. B.
Prentice, Edwin B. Harp, S. Jamieson, B. H. Wurrender, David R.
Harding,   Don   Smyth.
D. R. Walker, Lenora Shohrooh,
J. O. Gould ing, W. G. Manson,
N, Brodeur, T. Cook, Trevor Jones.
Audrey Russell, J. Garner, Jan.
et Bishop, Mrs. Bladen, Doug Mclnnes, Evan Owen Price, Bill Elliott.
John L. Richards, Edith M. Johnston, Bernice Laird, Joseph How.
aid, Ir.it Col well, Dennis Campbell,
Sheila   Ctt-lrns.
Student Prince
e,        /.
Calls For His
Makers Of Music
Can you play a musical instrument? If you can, Mussoc urgent.
ly needs you tor their operetta
"Student Prince" by Slgmund Romberg.
Especially needed are violinists,
viollsts, cellists, harpists, trombonists, trumpeters and pianists, Any*
one who is interested Bhould get
in touch with John Yeomans at
A*l> 2429R, or Neil Carlsen. Rich.
1107R1. They ct*n also consult the
notice ln Mussoc's office, room 207
located   behind   the   stage   in   th
Auditorium,
joining the  team  which  will  represent    UBC    in    inter-colleglates i     Musical director for the operetta
boxing. Mr. Robinette ls in charge lis Harry Price noted for his work
and   Is   determined   to  produce   a} witli Theatre Under the Stars,
squadron that will give UBC strong!    yUmM   offldaU   ^^   ^^
representation   in   Intercollegiate I Ret mU|c|ftnB 8O0U the oper_
competition. I eUa w|H BU|te). ft flnanc*,al lo8g(
In addition boxing will move In-1
to lnter-mural circles to give t.ny
boxers who are not on the boxing
team* a  chance  to  continue  participating in  the sport.
The "Student Prince'' is to bo
presented In mid-February t*o all
you rnuslchwis should turn out right
away.
MERRY CHRISTMAS TO ALL
OH ••W"*'«k^ ..-fl-v'Sife ■■ 'sfc -esau •' '«0*'*^V''*V* Page Two
THE UBYSSEY
Friday, December 7, 1951
y
mi   .
■  ♦
<  t
!«
THE UBYSSEY
MEMBER CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
Authorized as second class mall by the Po«t Office Dept. Ottawa. Student subscriptions
$1.20 per year (included In AMS fees). Mail subscription $2.00 pr. year. Single copies
five cents. Published throughout the University year by the Student Publications Board
ot the-Alma Mater Society, University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions expressed
herein are those of the editorial staff of tihe Ubyssey, and not necessarly those of the
Akna Mater Sooiety pr ot the Valrersity.
Offices in Brock Hall, Phone A Una 1624          For dUplay advertising, phone ALma 3258
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF LES ARMOUR
EXECUTIVE EDITOR—ALLAN GOLDSMITH . MANAGING .EDITOR-DOUG HEAL
News Editor, Alex MacO-illtvray; City Editor, Dennis Blake; CUP Editor, Sheila Kearns;
Women's Editor, Florence McNeil; Fine Arts Editor, John Brockington; Copy Editor,
Jean Smith; Director of Photography Rruce Jaffary; Senior Editors: Sheila Kearns,
Elsie Gonbat, Joe Schlesinger. Guest Editor, chuck Coon.
t
Back Again
The principle of freedom of expression,
Won through tjhirty-five years of determined
endeavor has again been upheld by the student body.
As an individual, I am deeply grateful to
the students who turned out Thursday afternoon to defend a principle which I have
fought to maintain and which, I sincerely be-
ieve, they bold as tenaciously as I.
lam equally conscious, however, of the
moral obligation in^oaed upon me to see
that lhe rigfat accorded tne is exercised towards its fitting and proper end: the free dis-v
cussiem of iaeues vital *© * -university.
The issue, as first raised, was clearly
based on the defence or the abrogation of that
principle; yet it would be folly to deny that,
underlying it, there was the current of dis-
attraction with The Ubyssey which attaches,
inevitably to a volunteer organization in the
public eye.
I personally, and the student body as
a whole, I feel, owe a tremendous debt of
gratitude to Mr. Frank Martin, the president
of the Agricultural Undergraduate Sooiety
who stepped into the gaping breach between
lhe Editorial Board of The Ubyasey and members of Student Council on Wednesday after
noon.
His calm and quiet persuasiveness led to
a full discussion of the underlying issues and
to an almost unanimous agreement on a
course of action.
The most immediate and practical result
of the discussion was an implied agreement
that the "ghost" staff recruited by certain
members of cotinpil to take over The Ubyssey
will come and, work with the present staff
in an effort to produce a better newspaper.
If such a happy situation materializes,
it will make possible the adequate implementation of the other recommendations of the
conciliation committee: the establishment of
a three man staff devoted exclusively to writing editorials and appointment of a full-time
personnel manager, to keep the organization
working smoothly. ijk   | *
Neither of these schemes has been possible in the past for the simple reason that we
lacked the trained staff essential for their
success.
However unfortunate the ivhole proceeding, we may be thankful that they ended on a
positive note.
-LES ARMOUR.
/
And Now A Merry Xmas
*> This has probably been the most eventful period in the history of the university
since the days ol Grant Livingston, four years
We have seen Students Council beset
by diverse opinions on several matters, we
have scon the administration standing firmly
on the ".uestipn of a fee raise, we have seen
the faculty asserting its right of discipline
over students.
We have also seen the Ubyssey vigorously, and not too carefully, attacking all .these
conditions.
This has resulted in stirring nip the students to a degree that most of us have never
seen before. Even the best of friends have
taken different sides on these questoins.
*•
Interest in the activities of student government has never been so high.
But looking back over the events of the
GUEST EDITORIAL
past semester in a somewhat detached way,
it can be seen that coming out of the mire
of all the arguments, is evidence of return of
interest in the central government of the
Alma Mater Society.
We have had the tendency in the last
couple of years to be far more interested in
the organizations which form part of student
organization rather than in the students as a
whole.
We can only hope that in the dbming
year that this' revived interest in student
government will continue.
In the meantime, may you be able to
guard yourselves against the inevitable distractions of the next few weeks so that you
like Mac Arthur, will come back.
From the editorial board: A MERRY
CHRISTMAS.
7* 71*
(tetters te the Editor should
be restricted to 110 words In
length. Ths Ubyssey reserves
the right to out letters snd
cannot guarantee to publish all
letter* received.)
Editor, Ubyssey:
Eric Nicol in Jtis column a few
days ago bemoaned the fact that
as far as culture went Vancouver
hasn't even started. He didn't state
specifically where in Vancouver the
stench of stale Jokes was the
worst, but I think I have a good
idea where it is.   '
He mentioned that the only ori.
ginal contribution of higher learning that Vancouver has made toward the enlightenment of man.
kind aire totem poles that we swiped
from the Indians. (Mustaches
would come under the same cate-
#ory but they are not original.)*
Now <where in the last year or so,
have the Cultured ones over done
themselves with a tremendous outburst of culture? Those totem poles
on Marine Drive didn't sprout out
of the grounds because some Forestry student drank too much tea.
'Somebody said they were petrified artsmen who couldn't hold
their liquor. There Is no 'basis of
fact tor this; besides artsmen don't
grow that tall.
Why are totem poles and mustaches the only show of culture
around this higher seat of learning?
There 1s only one cause underlying
most of the trouble around these
hallowed hulls:, namely the Engineers.
If the Engineers would stop electing an Arts Undergraduate
Society before the Arts have a
ohanoi *to elect one, (sob), culture
would come out from the underground (where it Is now burled),
if Uke fear of going swimming was
removed from the enlightened minds
(those which take knowledge fer
the sake of knowledge alone, apart
.from -those lowly barbarians who
take knowledge and apply it to
make money) light that would
equal the glory that once belonged
to Greece and Rome would once
again shine.
If the Engineers would stop
making so much pubUcity for them,
selves and give the editors and
staff of that thriving little voice of
the public, the U'byssey, more time
and space, intelligent articles may
be written.
I suggest, therefore, that the
Engineers be made to sign an oath
and swear that they will cease to j
smother creative art that tries so
hard to breathe on this campus.
Furthermore, I suggest that they
direct their efforts to more useful
pastimes, such as studying the conjugate vertbs of the tribes of the
upper regions of the lower Zambesi river.
Written by one of those Miter,
ate uncouth Individuals
an ENGINEER!
COACHING
TWO    1TII   YEAR    rTIEMIaTRY1*
students will coach cr hold class- i
es in Chem 100, 200, '390 for stu-j
dents who require h«ir>  !n  these
subjects.   Phone   AL    i?.0*Sl.   between 7 and 8 p.m. 22—1(1
SPANISH COACHING*    HEADING!
writing   and   practical    odnvetsa.
tion,   intensive   practice   in   <■•■-■:>)*
by n'ative Latin-American profess >;
very reasonable. MA 5987.     31—2
TRANSPORTATION
ONE PERSON NEEDED TO COM.
plete car chain—%:30 Mon. to Fri.
Vicinity of Oak to Arbutus between 12th and 15th. Ph: Andy CH
2461.
RIDE TO OKANAGAN, PENTIC-
ton or Oliver Tues in afternoon or
evening. Willing to help pay expenses. Phone Marlon Smith, AL
1900 after 6.
ANYONE DRIVING TO CALGARY
Dec. 19 or' after please call Km
at AL 0763R..
TYPING
TYPING, ESSAYS, Theses manuscripts, ©and work, letters of .application. Notes a specialty and
mimeographing. Elolse Street, Dalhousie Apts., -• .University Area,
Campus rates. AL 0655R.
TYPING OF ALL KINDS BY AN
experienced graduate. Accurate
and reasonable. Half Mock from
UBC bus .terminal, 4638 W. ith.
fast accurate. Call Mrs. Edwards,
AL 324SL. \  %
TYPEWRITING, EXPERIENCED
B. New uddress Corner of 4th
at 1980 Waterloo, CH 0264. 28—9
LOST and FOUND
LOST — YELLOW PSYCHOLOGY
note book in HA4. Please return
PUBLIC STENOGRAPHERf MISS
Esther Miller, 2865 West Broadway, CE 6816. Rates reasonable.
t 31—5
TYPING DONE AT HOME, REAS-
bnable and accurately. CE 9778.
81—«
LOST - BLACK SUIT JACKET
with cuvtirad buttons on Saturday
uiyUt iiiiide UliO gate. Please ph,
West '»r*L or Urn in at AMS.
WUvL* PER-SON WHO 'BORROW-
ed" lOjuch slUe rule from loose
leaf In Physios Bldg. Wed., Nov.
21 pleaw* relH'n to owner.
VOBJ -- BLACK SHAEfFFER
pen in Library on Tues. Reward-
IXJST -- LEATHER MITTS, FUR
backed (grey) In Arts (7) Tues,,
Nov. 27th. Phone AL 0920. N.
Lampman, reward.
LOST ~ GOLD SIGNET RING,
initial M.L.M. Phone AL 0594Y.
LOST IN HOMROOMING WEEK
cngfce parade a bandied briefcase.
If found call P. Cardell, Hut 35,
Acadia.
WgJb   PERSON    WHO    FOUND
tooled  wallet Tuesday please* re
turn It to Lost and fWnd. Reward, if you need it that badly,;
you   oan  keep  all   the   money.
PARKER LIOHTER - IN BROCK
Willi finder please retwn to Lost
and Found or phone OH 6888. -Reward. This lifhtei* Is of -great per.
sonal value to owner.
BLUE  SfUa»U*RY   WITH   PLAiTO
lining, Frldiiy, Nov. SO. at Home
Ec. Fort Camp Mixer. Gontaot Hut
14, Rm. 2, Fart Camp.
eLO&r  K.  <E.  PQLYPHAftE  DUP-
ilex slide rule, yellow case. Name
on case. Phone AL 0088, D. Patrick.
LOST — MAN'S BLUE BURBER-,f
ry,   woru   lining   from   Home   Ec-
Building Sat. night. Finder pleivse
phone   Jim    Maclntyre,   PA   6498,
after 6.
FOUNTAIN    PEN,    BLUE    WITH
gold  colored  top.  Ph.  AL 1278Y.
CHRISTMAS
TRADITION
BEAUTIFUL  FLOWERS
ARE A PART OF
CHRISTMAS
Thert't Still Time,
Ht your
CHRISTMAS
fomim
at
STUDIO
4538 West 10th Ave.
(Opp. Ssleway at 10th & Sasamat)
AL. 2404
Student fees       I   *
nj »*.       i fit . I      ■ ■
Against Racial Discrimination
I would like to draw attention to the
excellent opportunity now presenting itself
for UBC students to demonstrate their sense
of justice and social responsibility. I refer
to the present activity of the Vancouver Joint
Labor Committee to Combat Racial Discrimination. The Committee, supported by
such organizations as PTA, Church groups,
both Trade Union organizations, has prepared
a Py-Law for presentation to the Vancouver
City Council, entitled: "The Anti-Discrimination By-Law." It has been drawn up on
the example of other similar legislation across
Canada, and with the assistance of a Vancouver lawyer. There is a very great need
for such legislation in Vancouver now.
A letter by Knute Buttedahl, secretary
of the Committee, was recently published by
The Ubyssey asking for student support. This
support, according to Mr. Buttedahl, could
best be shown by letters from student organizations to the City Council expressing
approval of the By-Law. A copy of the letter
should also be sent to the Labor Committee.
Copies of the By-Law may be obtained from:
Secretary,
Vancouver  Joint  Labor  Committee
lo   Combat   Racial   Discrimination,
Room 113,'
~r Shelley Bldg.,
119 West Pender St.,
Vancouver 3.
The By-Law will go into a Committe of the
Council, and letters should be sent as soon
as possible.
Some of the campus groups which, by
their very nature, should be interested in this
project are: the political clubs,-Liberal, Conservative, CCF-UN Club, Civil Liberties Union, SCM, VCF, Newman Club; L*uthern Students Organization, ISS, ISC, Social Problems Club.
Most of these clubs bring speakers to the
Campus and have some serious social or religious purpose. Will this purpose now be
shown to mean something in actual life? Will
we fulfill our internationalist, religious, or
social and political principles? Or will these
groups, like so many others throughout our
history ascend into an Ivory Tower and fail
to exhibit the necessary courage to face the
problems of today?
The response to the Labor Committee's
appeal will show what place this University
holds in the struggle for social justice and
human brotherhood.
—JEAN McNEELY,
President University CCF Club.
Editor, Uibyseey
Your recent editorial entitled,
"The Same Old Stall," peered a
new low in bad-mannered inaccurate reporting.
Mr. Lord's letter was quite clear
to anyone who had not decided]
In advance that the Board of Gov.
ernors Im high-hatting the Student;
Council. The key word in the
letter \yas that the Board would
reconsider the question of decreasing fees on RECEIPT of the govern,
ment's grant.
This is the only way responsible
men with a ipwblic trust cart oner-
ate. They cannot disburse a grant
until they have it to hand, any
more than a responsible journalist
should hand out advice and opinions until his stock of facts is at
hand*
In this respect it is -worth point,
ing out the compact ignorance of
your statement re the greater student contribution to the University
than either government, or both
combined. The Provincial grant as
announced for this year was just
over 11,900,000.
The student registration was
6400, but one thousand of these
were veterans whose fees are paid
hy the Dominion government.
Therefore, at a round ,fee*of 8240,
5400 students paid $1,300,000. These
figures are In the Calendar, which
may have -been padded by the
Board of Governors.
Two final points of significance
are that while the grant will undoubtedly arrive, no one knows
whether It will 'be available ln the
fiscal year, or how much UBC's
share will be. Both of these points
are the kind that auditors tend
to be sticky about.
T. A.  Rogers,
Agriculture 4.
Save Wisely TODAY.,
for TOMORROW
Consult any of thc following Sun Life Representatives who have had wide experience in budgeting
your income to meet essential insurance needs;
FRED McCOLL
JACK PEARSON
JOHNTENER
LARRY WRIGHT
J. J CAPOZZI
J.R.BRANDON
BOYAL BANK BLDG., VANCOUVER
PACific 5321
SUN UFE OF-CANADA
T-Wt 0KRISTMAS
m jhhh rnnMl
ROYAL PORTABLE
Heres the most appreciated
gift you could give
A gift that will be a Hie-long friend*
Only « Royal offers all this*
e Nnger-Plow Keys
e Magic* Margin
e Speed Spacer
• "Office Typewriter"
Keyboard and Control*
Drop in today—make soma-
one you love happy in the
years to come.
BYRNES
TYPEWRITERS LTD.
692 Stymour
CLEARANCE SALE
Discontinued Text & Reference Books
SeJIing for Va Price And Less
In  Old  Snack  Bar  Rear Of The  Post Office
Starting Monday December 3rd
eie
, t,
Pac. 7942
^jijmggj*!*
Exciting! Full-fashioned . ..
Cashmere-treated lambswool;'
Soft! Beautifully finished!
In many exciting new shades.
Now, at better stores.
Cardigan $8.93
Long Sleeve Pullover $7.93
Short Sleevtf Pullover $6.93
GlEN AYR.KNIT    LIMITED    TORONTO Friday, December 7, 1951
THE«S¥SSEY
Page Tkrti
Poor Alice was getting more
im<l more  bewildered  by  the
1 . state of the world, and sought
I     advice frppi Humpty Dwniipty.
ALICE:   If everybody wants
, . peace,   why   are   the   govern,
ments of the West so annoyed
,    with the people and  the organisations   supporting   t h e
-/J- Stockholm   Peace   Committee?
i£;: HUMPTY DUMPTY:   Because
:rjr|be Peace Committee has the
2r?mupport of  the  Soviet. Union,
;?: It means that the Peace Com-
~   mittee Is a Communist Front
organization.
ALICE: Does that mean that
*     the West 4oes not want the
Communists or their supporter* to have peace?
HUMPTY DUMPTY: Not *t
all, Alice. The West really
wants peace, and perhaps it
wants peace even more so than
tbe East.
ALICE: Really, now, how
can ypu believe ln peace nnd
not believe in peace at the
same time?
Just Peace
mmmmmmm*immmm'
HUMPTY DUMPTY: It is
really very simple. We want a
just peace we do not want
■peace at any price.
ALICE: Does the Peace Committee want peace at any
price?
#WPTY DUMPTY: Of
course not. The Committee certainly does not want peace
at any price.
ALICE: Well then, it should
be simple to have peace, be. .
caus.e neither the JSast nor the
West wants peace at any price,
and that means the East and
the West agree.
IjtUWFTY DiUMPTY: Nert so,
my child, the •East .and the
West have violent disagree-
ment.
ALICE: Well, I don't see.
HUMPSTY DUMPTY: Of
course you don't. The East
wants peace on their terms,
and the West wants pea.ce en
their terms.
ALICE: But 1 thought peace
was the opposite of war.
Agreement?
HUMPTY* ©U-MITY*  It Is.
ALICE: And -the West wants
the opposite of war?
HUMPTY UMPTY: Yes.
.AUiCE: And the East wants
the opposite of war?
HUMPTY DUMPTY: Yes
ALICE: Hurrah, then, the
East and West are In agreement.
HUMPTY DUMPTY: You
silly child, the .East and the
Weat really, do not agree, and
now you are contusing me.
ALICE: I'm sorry, but I am
still confused.
HUMPTY DUMiPTY: See
here! The East and the West
both want peace, but each side
is  afraid  that  the  other  side
Wn^Mij
FOR SALE
FULL - SIZE CELLO WITH CAN.
vas case, $45. AL 3237R. 31—3
•WHITE LAPIN (RABBIT) EVKN-
ing cpe, worn once. Size 14-18.
Call KE 4!),-.3R. 31—2
TUJWiDO,   DOUBLE   BREASTED,
Like   new,   size   36.38   and   accessories, $35. M. Allen. North 49.
1950  AUSTIN  STATION   WAGON.
Will accept  trade .  Eng.  car preferred.   DE   1935T.
640-15    SNOW    TIRES.    USED    3
months only. Fits Studeihaker, etc.
Phone Jim, DE  1543Y.
MEN'S  SKI  BOOTS,  SIZE 9,  $15.
or net.re.st offer. Ph. North 2744R3
1933     CHBV     SEDAN     DELUXE.
Good   running   condition   $200   or
offer  for quick  sale.  AL 068.'M.
LADY'S   BICYCLE  COM   'CADET'
model,  20  Inch   frame,  completely
overhauled, fine condition. $25. PA
2871   after  6  p.m.
BOARD and ROOM
ROOM     &     BREAKFAST     FOR
mule student. Room will be shared. 2 blocks from UBC gates. Ph.
AL  1641L 31—2
ROOM & BOARD FOR 2 MALE
students. Slitli and Dunbar. 3
meals and washing. $55 Phone
KE   3.-.97L. 31—4
WANTED  	
HAS ANYONE A SET OF History 313 (Renaissance) notes foi*
sale, rent or loieii? Let me know
ut  CI**  out.  Thanks. 31—2
AN OI.DKIJ MODEL ENGLISH
car and $:!,"i a month tor my 1950
Austin station wason. Ph. DE
1935T.
CRUMB MONEY AND HANKING
for Economics 3no. Phone Grant
at  AL 2l3Ut. 31—2
will  gr»ln  advantages.  }Xe want
a just and honorable peace.
ALICE:  And what is a just
and honorafble peace?
No Answer
. HlfMPTY DUMPTY: No one
knows the answer to that ques.
tion.
ALICE: Oh dear, how, then,
HUMPTY DUMPTY: Now,
see here, Alice, the Hast was
much stronger than lhe West
and the West was forced to
defend Itself. ■''
ALICE: But If the Bast Vivas
much stronger, why didn't she
attack us then?
HUMPTY DUMPTY: Because
she knew that that would bring
HUtfPTy DUMPTY: She
had  better, or else!
ALICE: Oh Humpty Dump-
ty, you're not very helpful, but
you said something that makes
me think of Tweedledum and
'Pweedledee. l'»p going to ask
them.
Alice repeated the conversa.
tion to the Tweedles, and they
Q. ix)ohld Java} 'Joh
are   we   ever   going   to   have
peace?
HUMPTY DUMPTy: Very
easily child. All have to do
is to be so strong that no one
will dare attack us.
ALICE: And that is why we
are re-arming?
HUiMiPTY DUMPTY: Of
course.
ALICE: And I suppose, then,
the East is doing the same
thing   for   the   same   reason?
on World War III and she
would be blasted to pieces by
our  atomic  bombs.
ALICE: Oh dear, I can't
make sense out of It. 1 suppose
that when the West gets
stronger she will attack the
East?
HUMPTY DUMPTY: Shame
on you, Alice, the West is not
going to attack anyone.
ALICE: Does the# East be.
lieve that?
"I know what you're thinking about," said Tweedledum,
"but lt Isn't so, nohow."
"'Contrariwise,' c o n t Inued
Tweedledee, "If It was so, lt
might be; and If lt were so, it
would be; but a* it Isn't, lt
ain't.   That's  logic."
"I was thinking,''' Alice said
very politely, "which ls the
best way out of thie wood; It's
getting so dark. Would you
tell'me please?" Dr. B. Savery.
DRAUGHTING
INSTRUMENTS
From $10.00
T-SU^RES,   PROTRACTORS
SET SQUARES
MECHANICAL   ENGINEERS
AND
POLYPHASE   8LI0E   RULES
AMIS LETTERING
INSTRUMENTS
ZIPPER   RINQ   B00K8
Complete with Sheets and Index,
From 92.69
•FOUNTAIN PENS
Clarke & Stuart
Co. Ltd.
STATIONERS   end  PRINTERS
860 Seymour St. Vancouver, B.C.
»w«Pc«i!*P€«eNr^i«
\iook YtwrBest
This Christmas
why not let us
CREATE
that
HANI STYi€
MEANT JUST FOR YOU
Portable Typewriter Headquarters
all makes       16 models to choose from
TYPEWRITER RENTALS
Special rates to students
Vancouver Brownlee Typewriters
611 West Pender
PA. 6445
Mozart Opera
Opens Series
IjSE Special Events concert season opens Monday, January 7, 9
and 10 with Mozart's comic opera
"Cos! Fantuttl," directed by John
Heeves and produced by, Gerald
Newman. The cast Includes: Karl
Norman, Ian Docherty, Mllla An.
drew, Joyce Newman, Elizabeth
Brougat,    and    Bob    McPherson.
From the excellent quality of the
rehearsing to date, Cosl promises
to be a fine and enjoyable production, as well as the only classical
opera to be preented ln Vancouver
this sea*son.
A stage crew (Including makeup, properties and lighting) is needed. Would those interested please
call Allan King at CH 905.'. after
examinations.
Letters Home
The AMS will write two letters
home I'or each oyt-of-town student
this session. All the students have
to do is adress the envelopes.
i
"We're trying to give the folks
at home a general picture of the
printable side of student life on the
campus," Jane Banfield, editor of
the newsletter, said.
LEARN TO DANCE
•    QUICKLY
•    EASILY
•    PRIVATELY
3 Lesion* $5.00-10 Lesions S15.0C
Frances Murphy
Dance School
Alma Hall
CE. 6878
3679 W. Broadway
— BA 342!
We've Moved!
i
CALIFORNIA POTTERY
BOWLS
WOODEN HOSTESS
TRAYS
GLASSWARE
ENGLISH CHINA
PENGUIN and PELICAN
HOOKS
PENGUIN PRINTS
HUMMEL FIGURINES
Mr a fits
SeUduTnajj
HUMOROUS & NOVELTY
Chriitmei Cards
GERALDINE'S OFT SHOP
I4443W. 10th Ave.
ALma 2«
CASTLE JEWELERS
4560 W. 10th Ave. (Alio 752 Granville) Alma iPJi
■fiee  Our  WATCHES  by
Bulova, Elgin, Gruen, Rolex, Etc.
EXPERT WATCH REPAIRS
SPECIAL 10% DISCOUNT
FOR STUDENTS
Uie our Xmas Lay-Away Plan. Any
Deposit Will Hold Article! Until Xma»
ras
THE VANCOUVER
lo many new attraction! have bean added te The Sunday
lun in recent months that it hat become a much blfjer
end, we think., a much mere interaitint weak-end compendium of newt and failure* than m,V before, Such
things al the new Wee^e^d Picture Ma««slpe In roto-
•ravure, and the 20-pata taction of Comics In full color,
are outstanding, but ithe improvement ii notable in all
department! . . . tha naw B.C. Msgatine being an
example. And when one eeniideri that the good old
'.street price of ten ccnti ttlll prevails, with .the whole
Sunday Sun issue belnf Included .In a regular fun subscription at $1.25 per month, tha value-for-money it one
wa can heartily recommend.
■W^****************".
Modelled by Suzanne Shears
Copy by Joon
ANTIDOTE FOR COMING EXAMS-holid^y parties. For the sea-
son's whirl, thc Christmas belle ot thc ball chooses her clothes from
EATON'S..
Lustrous furs mean elegance. Pictured is a classic four-ripple back
cape-jacket of sable-dyed muskrat flank. 225.00
Pur Salon, Second Floor
For formal evenings, why not this dress with its wonderful skirt of
white net over crisp taffeta? French Room touches — the narrow
white velvet sash, the single scarlet rose on the taffeta bodice. 69.50
French  Room, Second  Floor
Creamy pearls fashion this unusual bracelet and necklet. A striking
Christmas gift for some lucky lady. Necklet 17.50
Bracelet 12.00
Costume Jewellery,  Main Floor
Precious white kid gloves, an investment, that pays dividends in
good looks and long wear. Three, eight, and twelve button lengths
well cut in beautifully finished French kid.        Pair 4.95 to 12.50
Gloves,  Main  Floor
EATON'S Papei
AHE UBYSSEY
Friday, December 7, 1951
wrsm SpoRTS
Bird Basketballers To
Meet Central Washington
UBC Thunderbird basketball team will play their final
pre-conference home games or
Friday and Saturday nights
when they meet the quintette
from the University of Central
likes You
Washington   at  the   Memorial
Gym.
The Washington team will be
lead hy i*tarry. Ken Teller, 6*5" centre and a recent transfer from the
University of Wyoming. Guards Billy L»e and Gen Keller and Forwards Bill Baber and Don Krenter
compose the rest of a team that
appears litoely to Rive the Birds
a lot of trouble. Lineup for the
'Birds is unchanged with centre
Art Phillips spearheading the attacking   trio   of   John    Southcott,
; Phillip-* and Don Seymour. Guards
Buz/.   Hudson   and   Dan   Zaharko
j will complete first string team.
\ A preliminary game starting ut
6:30 will be played each evening
before the main attraction which
begins at approximately 8:0t). UBC
junior Varsity team will take o*n
the juniors of Pacific Lutheran on
Ifclfl-WIHMW--^^
Sasamat 5c, 10c & 15c Store
4515 W. 10th Avenue Near Sasamat
Christmas Cords      Tree Decorations
Carda to lUlt every taite A wide and colorful variety
Toys ond looks - Toblt Decorations
GIFTS for every age, suitable for
Dad, Mother, Brother, Sister and
all your friends, young and old.
Friday   evening   and   on   Saturday
night will go against the Senior A j
Clover Leaf squad. |
The  Birds  wiil  play two games
during  the  Xmas  holidays   before
j beginning   their   conference   schedule. These games will take placp
'In the States with College of Puget
'Sound from Tacoma providing the
opposition  In  the  first  tilt on  December   27   and   Seattle   Pacific   in
ithe second,  to  be held  in  Seattle
on the following day.
j     Evergreen   Conference   play   for
ithe  Birds starts on January  4  at
the    Memorial    Gym    when    they \
| play host  (although, wo hope, nol
In   a   polite   manner)   to   the   Col-'
j lege of Puget. Sound. J
j    The most welcome news to I'BC I
! basketball   tans   Is,  however,   thut'
I on  January  11   and  Vi  the   world
jtamous Harlem Globe Trotters, the
j equally renowned Kansas City All
j Stars,  the  top local squad  at  the
1 time   nnd ' the   Thunderbirds   will
play against each other In a tournament   very  similar  to   the   recent
I Totem  Tournament, For an  exlil. ■
bltlon  of  basketball ils   It  should
be played and  also for sheer en-1
tertalnmetu these 2 might well be j
hard to beat.
Pucksters Xmas Games
The UBC Thunderbird hockey team will be playing
three games in the local Vancouver Commercial Horltey
League during the next two weeks. Birds meet the Buroany
Beavers next Wednesday Dec. 12th and again the following
Wednesday, Dec. 19th. On Friday of the same week Dec 21st
they will meet the B.C. Electric "White Hawks."
At present Thunderbirds are on the top .of the leas.no
standings by two points and victories in the next two weeks
will consolidate their position. All games are at the Forum
and UBC's games on the" 12th and 21st begin at 7:45 pin.
and the one on the 19th starts at 9:00 p.m.
Letter To  The  Editor
Kditor, The Ubyssey
While agreeing with the compromise decision of the Student's
Council to revoke its motion to
fire Les Armour, I, at the same
time, feel that the. meeting just
held failed to sanction the com
promise. 1 think that Armour
should be retained as Editoi*;in.
Chief because it is tho most prac.
tlcnl way to keep the Ubyssey u*nd
the Student's Council both functioning.
However, the meeting was sway,
ed   into  a  debate on   whether Ar-
ilwnce in tv, compromise proposal
of*the Ainu Mater Society and the
editorial stal'i of The Ubyssey. As
thit^s staiH* ow, I feel that Ar-
motirw>s in..* sufficiently censured
£«*ur> thai he may feel a vote of
lOntfideiiiP vium tererl hearty aifree-
niPiit with hi.*- policies.
Yours   truly,
Doug II. Cherry,
•       5 Graduate Studies.
K*TWW'ffWWItl«'«^*t^'t»€<<«i€i«WC^
■   *— ■■■i~~   - ^■" ' tau
lli'' ■ 9
mour shonld be given a vote of
confidence or not. Several students contended that If the motion
for a vote of confidence were defeated then Armour would be out
of office, automatically. I believe
that this was an incorrect assumption and that many of the students
voted In favor of the motion in
order to keep the Editor-ln-Cltlef
in his position rather tlutn to express outright, approval of Armour  himself.
We ma? have been wiser If we
had  forwarded  a  motion  of confl
.   *       Open Saturday
S%Ev.Bin9to9p.m.
Financial Security, like academic
training, ii planned step by Step,
and can b£*t be accomplished
through life insurance.
#* ■ e^Yi «'*'*■
*> ?
o.rv*
o » * *
Chiefs Seek
Revenge
Varsity Chiefs will open their
McKechnie Cup series on Satur-!
day afternoon when they meet!
North Shore's representative team j
iu   the   UBC  stadtwm at  2:*10.       j
Smarting under the defeat suffered last wek at the hands of;
the local Britannia squad in Tis. j
die Cup play the Chiefs will he
going all out to register their in-
initial win in McKechnie Cup. But
it promises to be a close game t.nd ,
defenitely should be a very good j
one. [ i
Chiefs will still ba without such j
star playes as Ralph Martenson, j
Stu Clyne, Hughle Greenwood, but |
Captain Gerry Main will be In his
old position on the three-quarter
line after playing fullback last
week, and Prank Cower, Bill Wal-
smly und Danny Oliver will also
he in action after an enforced ab.
scences due to inurles,
UNIVERSITY BOOK STORE
Hrs.: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturdays 9 a.m. to noon
«
Loose Leof Note Books, Exercise Books
And Scribblers
GRAPHIC ENGINEERING PAPER, BIOLOGY PAPER
LOOSE LEAF REFILLS, FOUNTAIN PENS AND INK
AND DRAWING INSTRUMENTS
Owned and Operated by the University of B.C.
• Tyrol Ski Boots
• ■•*     i.
• Norwegian Skiis
I • Ski Pants
MADE TO MEASURE?
9 Full Line of
Accessories
• Steel Edges
EXPERTLY INSTALLED!
George Sayce
SPORTING GOODS
4451 West 10th Ave.    AL. 1414
in the University District
CLIFFORD'S   GRILL
UNDER    NEW   OWNERSHIP
And are at your service to help as much as possible in
the serving of meals. Our prices are very reasonable: The
highest is $1.25, the lowest is 7c. Therefore, if you ask
the cook what you can have to make your odds and ends
meet, he will gladly help you out.
P.S.—If you don't believe this — ask some of the people
that have been here. THE MANAGER
Open Daily from 7 a.m. to 2 a.m.
4423 W.l 0th Ave, AL.2507
^
WHITE DOVE
CLEANERS
Ask for 3-day Regular or 1-day Special Service
FAST PICK UP AND DELIVERY
* COMPLETE DELUXE LAUNDRY SERVICE *
4567 West 10th ALma 1688
A NEW RENDEZVOUS
For Your Club and Group
Vancouver Branch Office — 402 W. Pender Street
ERIC V. CHOWN, LLB., Branch Manager
Dances
Meetings
Socials
Frat and
Sorority Dos
Lion's Gate Halls
One of Kinewt Social Centres in City
Host Modern *Ap|)oliitinientH   -Small Dance Floor, Stage, Etc.
— Reasonable
INCORPORATED 2*9   MAY   1670. -
BIRKS
Granville  of Georgia MA  62 I I
_ ASK YOUR SHOE DIALER FOR fff*yyS57"~THE SH0I of <HAMPi0NS
Ski-Weather A-Head
. . . and you're off to snowy slopes . . .
but first ... to the newly opened SKI
SHOP on the Bay's Third Floor for the
best and brightest selection of ski togs
that a gal on a budget could ever hope
to find!
Downhill Ski Slacks . .. Rayon
and wool. 12 to 20.
10.95 to $25
Nylon Ski Jackets . . . Hooded
ot* not! 12 - 20. 16.95 to $25
Kumfortitcs ... Nylon and wool.
12 to 20. 7.95
Peaked Ski Cups 2.95
Ask to sec our Imported Ski
Wear  from Switzerland! . . .
it's beautiful! — and reasonably
priced!
HBC SKI SHOP, Third Floor

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