UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Jan 17, 1939

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0124147.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0124147.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0124147-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0124147-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0124147-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0124147-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0124147-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0124147-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0124147-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0124147.ris

Full Text

 JUNIOR
PROM       ;
JAN.
26
SPANISH DRILL
1                                                           '
Published Twice Weekly by The Publications Board of The University o, British Columbia
FROSH ELECTIONS
ARTS 100
TODAY, NOON
Vol. XXI.
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, JANUARY 17, 1939
No. 24
SWEET SWING, BALLOONS
LOVELY  QUEEN   FOR PROM
OPEN HOUSE
PROJECT MAY
BE BROPPED
SOME     DEPARTMs-His
NOT   ENTHUSIASTIC
Circumstances have ■ arisen
which may prevent "Open
House" being held thla year.
There has been no definite
statement made as yet, but it is
understood that some departments are not in aooord with the
general opinion that the Open
Day should be held this year.
The final decision rests with
the Publio Relations Committee,
which wUl meet today to discuss
the situation.
Some departments apparently
feel that "Open House" should
be held only every third or
fourth year, since the necessary
preparations take up so much
time. Their attitude is, apparently, that they should not participate in the Open Day unless
they cannot do this in two consecutive years.
Students' Council is of the
opinion that "Open House"
should be held, this year and
every year thereafter. They feel
that it is excellent publicity,
and will do much to promote a
favorable opinion, especially in
connection with the Union Building.
MATH MOTIF
FOR SCIENCE
ANNUALBALL
"A Science Ball In the Fourth
Dimension" waa the theme ohosen
by the S-M.U.S. Executive at a meeting today.
In the usual serious atmosphere
that accompanies the deliberations of
Sclencemen the Bxeoutlve made plans
for the social event of the season, the
annual Science Ball. Thla year lt will
fall on Thursday, February 18, the
place, the Commodore.
NO ARTSMEN.
Activities   will start   a week   this
Thursday  with  a  Pep  Meet  in  the
Auditorium, principally business. This
is a Science pep Meet, no Artsmen.
The same holds for the meeting
on the day of the Ball whloh will
be beld In traditional Science style.
with an orchestra and lots ot pep.
DATE BUREAU?
Several new Ideas are forthcoming
from  the lads ln the red and white
sweaters, foremost among which was
the suggestion that a date bureau be
inaugurate.',   for   the   benefit   of   the
lonely hearts in the Science Faculty.
Peppy young Arts women will be
In  demand, and  no objections will
be raised If they own cars.
The theme for the Ball ls a brand
new one and one which should prove
popular.
MATH MOTIF.
In the mathematical line, it will
feature equations and geometric figures, incomprehensible to the uninitiated Artsmen.
However, as Artsmen will be ln the
minority, a practically minus quantity, it ls hoped the motif will be
strictly  In  keeping.
Other tentative plans Include led
sweaters for the orchestra, and hats
for all guests.
Ticket sales will be limited to 300
at the ridiculously low figure of $3.00
per couple. This year the Artsmen
will have the special privilege of being able to buy their tickets one day
earlier than usual, namely Wednesday as well as Thursday.
TICKETS LIMITED FOR
ANNUAL PROM
It's running high!
Enthusiasm we mean. Enthusiasm
for bangestruppest Junior Prom in
years I
WESTERN OENTLEMEN.
Mart Kenny and his Western Qen-
*~men are practicing night and day,
P_l_-.ers are giving their all for a
Pep Meet featuring the ol' maestro
himself, Basil Robinson and his fran-
tlo executive are working their fingers to the bone.
Ticketsi 8830 per couplet placet
Spanish   Grill,   Hotel   Vancouver t
time i Thursday, January M, 9.S0 to
?  That's only nine day* away!
Tickets will be on sals in tho box
offloe In tho Quad for non-members
of Arta '40 this week—Tuesday and
Wednesday  noon,  next  week  Wednesday and Thursday noon.
FREE   TICKETS.
from Thursday of this week until
Tuesday of next (Pep Meet day) the
third year artsmen will bs able to
get their free tickets.
Tlio ballot box at foot of Caf
stairs will bo a hive ot activity,
bussing lull of votes by Arts '40.
naming tholr choice tor Junior
Prom Queen.
Nominations for Queen are pouring
in at Mr. Horn's offloe. See elsewhere in this Issue for the nominations list.
Tlokets are free to third year Arts.
Only 100 extra tickets will be sold—
limited accommodation.
The executive advise Lotharios
(escorts) to make their reservations
early by phoning the Orlll.
LIMITED DECORATIONS.
"Decorations," says Pauline Scott,
"have been tentatively limited to
streamers, favours, flowers, spotlights,
landscaping, and roughly 100,000 balloons." The executive will expand
this If necessary.
"Every olass member oan vote,"
says Feuhrer Robinson, "and If
you're In Arts '40, drop down the
Caf stairs and pop a boilet In tbo
bax. Or a baxle In tbe bole. Anyway, VOTEt"
And finally the dates to remember.
January 34th—Monster Pep Meet.
Mart Kenny. January 38th—Beg,
borrow or steal a tux. January aeth
—JUNYAH PROMMEI Dance with
Mart Kenny and his Western Oentlemen!    .
These are the tiny characters taking part In "Puppets on Parade" on
Wednesday noon in the Auditorium.   This Is a pass system feature.
Famed Theatre Presents
"Puppets on Parade"
Twins Arrive
On Campus
BIRTHS
January 11, to Mr. and Mrs. J.
Rabbit, on the root ot the Science
Building; twins, a son and a daughter; all doing well.
As a New Year present, twins were
born to Mr. and Mrs. J. Rabbit, who
live on the roof of the Sclenoe Building. Born January 11, they have been
carefully nursed by Dr. X (he was
too bashful to give his name), and
their daily exercise has been given
to them by kurse Bunty Butters.
Mother and Dad have had a separation and live ln different rooms. The
twins are ln the care of their mother.
Although the twins are pure white,
like their mother, their pappy ls a
coon.
Dr. X refused to give the names
of the Infants. "Some of the girls
might not like It," he said, "because
I named the kids after them."
Dr.  X  also has white quadruplets,
three months old, and he ls desperately  hoping  to equal  Dr.  Dafoe  by
producing quintuplets.
McFARLANE,
STAMATISFOR
FROSH_HEAD?
Today in Arts 100 at 12.30 the
Freshman Class will elect their
executive.
There are seven offices to Ail-
that of  President, Vice-President,
Secretary, Treasurer, literary Representative, and both  Men's'and
Women's Athletlo Representatives.
The powers of the Literary Representatives  have  never  been  clearly
defined but he usually handles the
Totem write-up and on the whole Is
an officer at large.
There have been two nominations for Prealdent > Oeorge Stem-
atls and Oordon MoFarlane a and
only one for Secretary—that of
Dorothea Tompkins.
DUTY OAIX8
Further nominations are expected
before noon today and will be supplemented at the meelng by nominations from the floor.
Laat year the class out did themselves with enthusiasm and inaugurated for the first time an active
campaign into their elections.
This year the prospects appear
brighter and more enthusiasm Is
noted. All members of the class are
duty bound to turn out and lend their
support.
BEVERIDGE DIRECTS
DOCUMENTARY FILM
James Beveridge was appointed
director of the Varsity Documentary Film at the general meeting of
the Film Society held Friday.
Jim will work under the supervision of a committee composed of
Mike Churchill, Reg Jessup, Alice
Mathers, Donald Munro and Dick
Jarvls. He will carry on from
where the committee left off last
term. .
INVASION INVITES
THE FOUR HUNDRED
Over the blue waves and through
the Islands of the gulf to Viotorla!
Two hours of dancing to the music
of a five-piece orchestra on the way
over, and three hours of dancing on
the way back! And one exciting
match after another ln Victoria—all
these await the three or four hundred lucky students going on the
Invasion.
ROWING  MEET.
The rowing meet will take place
right after the boat docks, If arrangements being made by Evan
apRoberts, who ls making all plans
for the Invaalon, come through.
The students will land, and
watch the two orews raoe up to a
flnlah In front of the Empress
Hotel.
After the rowing match, busses will
take the students to Macdonald Park
for the two English rugby games—
the McKechnie Oup game, and the
game between the second division
and Victoria Oollege.
BAND AND BURGHERS.
The band will be at the games, and
may   parade   through   the  streets   to
let  the   good    burghers    of  Victoria
know that there ls an Invasion.
Then back to the Empress Hotel
in  busses  for   the  tea-dance,  from
4.30  till  about  6  o'clock.  The  tea-
dance  will   cost   30c   a   person   not
5,0o  as reported  In Friday's paper.
At   a  quarter   to  seven,   there   will
be busses to the Victoria High gymnasium for the basketball game, and
then back to the dock at nine o'clock.
MONEY  AND HOLIDAY.
The price of the trip ls a little
higher   this   year   than   last   because
(Continued on Page »
See INVASION
Finlay   and   Graves   Work
Behind   Artistic
Settings
Tiny wooden characters garbed in miniature costumes of in-
nnitesmnl detail and intricate
designs, will appear at the University auditorium on Wednesday noon in the drama entitled
"Puppets on Parade."
The actors will be ninety puppets
each 8 feet high. Their program, directed by Oordon Oraves and Joseph
Flnley, inoludes a complete repertoire of numbers ranging through
interpretations of Chinese Jugglers,
Spanish bull-nghters, Russian folk-
danoers, trapeae artists, trick bicycle-
riders to finally a minstrel show Jamboree.
The unusual else of the puppets,
since they are the slse of an average
ten year old child, makes It possible
for every spectator to see the performance easily.
ELECTRICAL
TRANSCRIPTIONS
The entire musical acore, dialogue
sequences and sound effects are presented by meana of original electrical transcriptions.
Supplementing every dramatic action are the subtle and rhythmic melodies whloh are typical of the characters. Initiating the Inviting lyrioa
of the Spaniards, are many of the
background color pieces. Especially
designed sound and amplification
equipment render the tunes and musical selection more audible for a capacity sise audience than ia usual
for puppet demonstrations.
The young directors of the Hollywood  Marionettes  have   gathered
their experience In the art of manipulating  their  wooden  actors   ln
many countries.
Joseph Flnley, graduate of Washington  University  in  St.  Louis,   the
New York Sohool of Design, and the
Academy    Moderne    and    Academy
Ransom, in Paris held for a time the
position of set and costume—designer ln the Boleslavsky American Laboratory Theatre  in  New York.
STANFORD  ORAD
Oordon Oraves is a graduate of
Stanford University who has worked
with Ruth^St. Denis, the Anna Pavlova Ballet Russe, the Boleslavsky
American Laboratory Theatre, the
San Francisco School of Fine Arts
and the San Francisco Theatre
Guild.
Alfred A. Fatlo, stage manager
of the troupe, Is a graduate of
Paris and McOlll Universities and
was a professor at Ohio University
where he taught Frenoh and Dramatics. He waa the director of the
stage production of "Snow White
and the Seven Dwarfs."
VANCOUVER  SHOWING
The    Marionette    show    has    been
shown over most of the United States.
During the Christmaa holidays
It ran for ten days at the Vancouver Auditorium and at the Edison
Theatre In  New  Westminster.
This  varied  and  unusual  performance  will   be   a  feature   on  the   pass
system   for   students.     "Puppets    on
Parade"   will   be   presented   Wednesday noon  in  the  auditorium.
The puppet presentation ls being
brought to the University campus
by Mr. Oratlous, who ls Interested
In giving the public a type of entertainment which is both educational
nnd   amusing.
SMART CONTINENTAL PLAY
FOR SPRING PRESENTATION
McGOUN CUP
DEBATE HERE
WITH_ALTA.
Defense   of   the   onoe   elusive  McOoun    Cup,    symbolic    of    Western
Canada inter-collegiate debating supremacy,  will  take  place this Friday
evening in the Auditorium at 8 p.m.
when Morris Belkin and Struan Robertson of the Parliamentary Forum
uphold the affirmative of the resolution   "That   Germany   Should   Have
the Lost Colonies Restored to Hor."
Opposing the reaolution for the
University of Alberta will be Morris Schulmatcher and Bruoe Macdonald.
FORUM TBAM TRAVELS
Alex Maedona]d and Harold Rome,
also of the Forum, leave today for
Winnipeg where they will engage
with the representatives of the University of Manitoba in opposing the
same resolution.
This   year's  defenders  are   the
men who won the McOoun oup last
year for the University 6f British
Columbia—the first time in ita history that it has ever eome to Vanoouver.
Belkin   and   Robertson   last   year
defeated the U. of Alta. at Edmonton; while Macdonald and Rome won
over the U. of S. here. In Vancouver.
FAMED DEBATER
Belkin, who manages the Thunderbirds Hockey team besides being
president of the Forum, appeared
early laat fall against the world celebrated Lemoyne debaters.
Rome and Macdonald, who have
teamed aa debaters since high school
days, have engaged in two major debates this season—the Imperial Debate against Australian representatives and the Junior Board of Trade
last fall.
One of Eight
To be Queen
Nominations for the Junior Prom
Queen are now closed and the elections for the bevy of beautiful coeds are In order. However, no one but
the candidates will know the results,
until the actual coronation at the
Spanish Orlll.
Those  nominated  for the proud
position are.  Helen Hann, Pauline
Scott,  Jackie  McLeod,  Eileen  Me-
Klnnon, Janet Fleck, Joyce Cooper,
Dorothy Hutton and Irene Jenkins.
Amidst the expectant hush  (?)  of
the crowd, the queen will be crowned
by Dr. Ure, during the supper period.
Members of the Junior Class may
vote, by presenting their passes, and
others   by   buying  their  tickets.  The
ballot box will be at the foot of the
Caf stairs every noon hour until the
great event.
RIMSKI-KORSAKOV IN
CARNEGIE^ PROGRAM
In response to literally scores of
requests, today's Carnegie Record
Salon will feature Liszt's Second
Hungarian Rhapsody," ln Arts' 100
at noon.
Rlmskl - Korsakov's well - loved
"Sheheresade" will be the piece de
resistance. The garden scene with
the young Prince and dark-eyed
Princess Koh-l-noor Is io be played.
Closing the concert will be the prelude to the third act of "Traviata."
RAY SHARPE SPEAKS
ON BULLION MINE
The Vancouver Branch of the Engineering Institute of Canada will
hold a meeting on January 20 In the
York Room of the Hotel Oeorgla at
8 p.m. when Mr. Ray S. Sharpe will
be guest speaker.
Mr. Sharpe's subject will be "The
Bullion Placer Oold Mine, Bullion,
B.C." Mr. Sharpe ls the General
Manager of the famous Bullion Placer Oold Mining development at Bullion   B.C.,   In   the   historical   Cariboo.
The address will be Illustrated with
movie pictures.
"THE CURTAIN RISES"
DIRECTED BY RISK
. i
Stop press!
Monday noon, right on the deadline for Ubyssey "copy" the final
word Came ln from the Players' Olub
about their Spring Play.
After a hectlo week's waiting for
telegrams from Montreal and New
York, and two cables from London,
president Anne Carter announced In
the general meeting that this year'a
drama will be "The Curtain Rises,"
a bright fast comedy of the smart set
in modern Vienna, Just before Anschluss.
RISK DIRECTING.
The best adjectives for this pleoe
have already been used by Mr. Sidney Risk, this year's director for the
Spring Play. Mr. Risk will bo remembered for his adept work with
the Alumni ln producing their "Personal Appearanoe." His deft, sure
treatment of the play assures a first-
rate production when the Thespians
present "The Curtain Rises" this
March.
"Smooth,    smart,    sophisticated,
silky," says Mr. Risk in describing
it. "Up-to-date people doing smart
things tn a modernistic setting."
And unless your reporter misinterprets indications, this year's presentation is going to be so fast that
chromium-plated cubism is going to
look like the scenery for. one of Ben
Johnson's dramatic efforts.
GLAMOUR AND BROADWAY.
Jean Arthur, now a Hollywood
glamour girl, got her start towards
stardom ln this play when it debuted
on Broadway. "And we're going to
play It the broad way, too," add
Thespian wags.
Inconsequential, happy, carefree,
and blase, the play has been termed, "a slice of Life's fluff, glossed
over."
But there will be much solid material ln the finished production. Elaborate scenery muat be built, actors
must strive for a continental, Viennese effect, and hard-working committees must spend long hours, working without' applause or encouragement to ensure the polish of the ultimate three-acter. '
ALONE.
The story concerns a lonely but
gilded girl of 30. with a craving for
Love with a capital L. She tries to
persuade a matinee idol, Wllhelm
Melsslnger, to rehearse torrid scenes
with her.
Of course it's Just a plot to get
the smoothie to make sincere love to
her. This situation Is what gives the
play ita "umph", and the way it works,
out—well, you'll have to go and aee
it.
FISHERS COOP. COURSE
BY EXTENSION DEPT.
U.B.C. through the Department of
University extension announoes a
short course in Co-operatives for B.C.
Fishermen.
Leader is Rev. J. D. Nelson MacDonald from St. Francis Xavler University at Antigonlsh, Nova Scotia.
This University leads in all the cooperative work among farmers and
Ushers  In  Nova Scotia.
The lectures will be held on January 26, 37 and 28, the same time
as three of the large B.C.  fishing
co-ops meet at Vanoouver with  a
Flahermana'       Association       from
Seattle.
Other speakers will be Dean F. M.
Clement   of   the   U.B.C.    Agriculture
Department,   and   Oeorge    Dolsen,   a
B.Comm.   from   this  University   who
is   now   the   Secretary   of   the   North
Island Trollers Association. Meetings
will   be   held   at  the  Moose  Hall,   and
on   the   U.B.C.   campus.
On   Saturday   night,  January   88,
K«'\. MacDonald will speak at the
Institute  on   "The  Antigonlsh   Experiment-,  ln  Co-operation."
On   the   same   day   there   will   be   a
luncheon on the campus for speakers
und thoae attending these lectures.
J Two
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 17, 1939
THE  UBYSSEY
Issued twice weekly by the Students' Publication Board of the Alma Mater
Society of the University of British Columbia.
Offloe i 206 Auditorium Building ... Phone Point Grey 306
Oampus Subscriptions, $1.60 Mall Subscriptions, $2.00
EDITOR IN-CHIEF
Dorothy Cummings
SENIOR EDITORS
Tuesday
Irene Eedy
Friday
Jack Mair
Rosemary Collins
ASSOCIATE   EDITORS
Ted Underhiil.
Lester Pronger
ASSISTANT EDITORS
Ozzy Durkin, Helen Hann, Joan Thompson, Florence Hurndall,
Bill  Backman.
C.  U.  P.  STAFF
Editor
James Macfarlane
Van Perry
PUB. SECRETARY
Virginia Galloway
Assistants
Ann Jeremy
Joyce Cooper
CIRCULATION MOR.
Harry Campbell
REPORTOR.AL  STAFF
Jaok Margeson, Pat Keatley, Joan Haslam, Jacques Metford, Ruth Millar,
Janet Walker, Brlta Vesterback, Bob Manson, Bill Osborne, Ken Vernon
Dick Jarvis.
SPORTS  STAFF
Sports Editor i  Orme Dier
Associate Sports Edltorai Myrne Nevlson, Basil Robinson.
Assistant Sports Editors: Lionel Salt, Jim Harmer, Ormle Hall.
Sport Reporter< Austin Frith, Charlie Craig, Orantland Rice.
Advertising Office
Standard Publishing Co., 1037 Pender Street West, Vancouver, B.C.
Telephone:  SEYMOUR 4484
All advertising handled exclusively by Standard Publishing Co.
Editorials
THB LIBRARY
It is difficult to understand why the university library, the
most beautiful and most dignified of oil the U.B.C. buildings,
should be the object of such vandalism and such carelessness as
has taken in and about that building this year.* Many books, some
very precious documents, and some, though ordinary reference
volumes, equally precious to tho students doing work in their field,
have been taken from the building.
An unsightly hole was pushed in one of the main stairway
pillars and a handrail torn off the left stairway. Approximately
five times the front door was broken until it had to be completely
dismantled during the vacation. All these have been repaired now
but they have been repaired at tho expense of something else. Tho
money and time that went into eaeh of these jobs means that the
Arts Building class rooms cannot be swept regularly or the mud
on the Science Building stairs cannot be removed.
All these have been repaired but there are even more demonstrations of carelessness about the building which would give a
visitor to tho campus a very poor impression of U.B.C.'s students.
Tho front steps of the library are disgracefully littered with burnt
matches ond cigarette stubs that even tho heavy rains of the last
few days cannot sweep away. Furthermore the lily pond is filled
with an unfortunate collection of rubbish. Several empty cigarette packages, and n number of call slips are the more noticeable
bits of rubbish that have been thrown into the pond. This and
the fact that the packages are all of ono brand of cigarettes would
point to theory that it wns one person or a small group of persons
who wero responsible.
More than likely it is thoughtlessness and not malice that
prompts the students to damage their property in this wny but it
would be so much easier for the staff of tho university to keep the
campus in order on their limited budget if the students would
think twice before they throw their rubbish about nnd put undue
strain on the library facilities.
ELIGIBILITY
Tales are told of the insidious work of the Eligibility Committee and athletic careers thot have been blighted when Christmas or Spring marks didn't reach the Eligibility rule standard.
In actuality the Eligibility rules have always been avoided very
easily, especially if the student in question was near the border
line.
One rule reads: A student taking nine units must pass in six
with on overage of 60%. The registrar believes that this moons that
a student must have an overage of 60% oven if he passes in nine
but. on ordinary person might think that a 60% overage is necessary  when  tho  student foils three  units.
The ambiguity has boon brought to the attention of the Eligibility Committee year after year but nothing has beon done about
it. Even worse than this is the attitude one meets when asking
about the actual ineligibility of « student. Anyone will tell you
to forgot about tho matter, because the committee will probably
never meet and if it does you con quite easily have them make an
exception in your case.
This year's eligibility committee seems to be little bettor. The
reports on foil eligibility wore not filed until the beginning of
the spring term, when the Christmas marks changed their import
completely.
We hove been assured thot from the time of the eligibility
meeting tomorrow all will go smoothly ond the rules will be followed to the letter.
We expect that is rather difficult to follow rules to the letter
when the literal meaning of the letters is not clear. But we sincerely hope that the half-year late committee will treat the problem more seriously thou their predecessors hnve done.
i
BAND
Nothing hos added so much pep to o IT.B.C. game os did the
Varsity Band when they played at the Exhibition Forum last Friday night. The sound of "Hail U.B.C." when each goal is made
and tlio addition of peppy songs during the intermission cannot
help but encourage a team if they ore losing and keep them steady
if they  are  winning.
.Much credit should go to Ozzy Durkin for building up the
band into an actual working organization. And much credit
should go to the members of the band, on whom depend the final
success   of  the   undertaking.
Workers behind the soenes are Gordon Oraves (left) and Joseph
Flnley (right). Muoh of the success of the Marionette Theatre "Puppets
on Parade" depends on these master minds.
■HIMHMHHIMmiHIHHHHIIMHHIHHMHHIIIIHllllMtllHIIHII
HERE
AND
THERE
HHIIHHIHHMIIHHIIIIMfHHIIIHHHIIHMIHMHIIHHIHIIHIM
By J. D. MACFARLANE
Boom—-and a million dollar building ts blown to pieces in Winnipeg.
Hours later ln Vancouver, at seven
thirty In the morning the front page
ow your Ubyssey is being pulled to
pieces by a sleepy-eyed exchange
editor clad In old trousers thrown
over pajamas. In less than an hour
the whole paper ls on the presses,
and they begin to roll.
That Wire was received by your
editors Just before midnight laat
Thursday when the Ubyssey has been
put to bed for several hours. A hurried telephone conference between
editors decided what course should
be taken, and at about three-thirty
ln the morning the telegraph (alias
exchange) editor got to bed after
finishing assignments on his downtown work.
Several hours after that the alarm
went off and up he was again. With
the presses rolling, he wearily turned his back on the composing room
and went home to bed. While he was
sleeping his fellow students were
reading the story which he prepared
ln the wee small hours of the morning. THIS Is college journalism with
a really large smack of the metropolitan.
All this ls the result of the formation last year of the Canadian University Press by a small group of
forward looking young college editors who met ln 'Winnipeg.
The results are amazing. Talking
of the transmission of news we can
tell a real story of fast work. Last
fall a mass Indignation meeting of
students was held ln Montreal and a
near riot occurred. The Montreal
telegraph editor wired your B.C.
man, being us, and we wired back
asking for several hundred words.
The first wire came into our downtown office ln the afternoon right
after the conclusion of the meeting
In   the  east.
The wire was read by the British
United Press Kdltor there, as well as
by ua, and two*1 wires went to the
east at once, one from the Ubyssey,
und one from BUP, asking for more
news. And a first class newspaper
lace was on between a college news
network and a professional world
ranking  one.
The result was that Canadian University Press won by over two hours.
The CUP story, with complete details, was received In Vancouver several hours after the request for lt
had been sent out, at the same time
as an identical request sent by BUP.
That Is saga which ls worth recording, and one which made Vancouver
editors sit up and take notice.
MATRICULATION
NEEDS REVISION
DECLARES KING
That the present Junior Matriculation course In B.C. ls not of any practical use to students, and that revision ln curricula was necessary,
was the statement of Major H. B.
King, Technical Advisor to the Department of Education at Victoria,
In an address to the Vancouver Institute Staurday evening.
PRACTICAL STUDIES
He told his audience that the B.C.
Educational system was falling behind by stressing the old traditional
subjects, and stated that these were
of little practical value aa compared
with more modern studies, and methods of study.
Practical sciences and mathematics
should replace such ancient subjects
as chemistry and physics, algebra
and geometry. Biology, a more necessary subject, should be stressed, he
stated.
"The aim of the new curriculum
ls to make eduoatlon of practical
use to those who will not go on to
university," he aald.
"And in another Ave years we hope,
the university will feel the difference," he added.
Schedule Out
For "Serenade"
' "Serenade" continues to grow a-
pace. The first act has been pretty
well rehearsed, and the cast ls now
ready  to  begin  the  second  act.
On   Wednesday   the   chorus   and
some of the principals will check
over   Act   1   and   start   on   Act   3.
The orchestra, or most of It, will
be In the pit for next Saturday's
rehearsal.   It  Is  expected   that   at
same   rehearsal,   the   stage   hands
wl|l   begin   to   practise   changing
scenery between the two acts.
Exchange   tickets   for   "Serenade"
aro on the campus, and will probably
be released some time this wv ek. The
following   ls   a   timetable   of   the   rehearsals  for the  coming  'week:
Tuesday!    13.SO,   all   men.   Wednesday:   10.80,  drums;   13.80,  woodwinds   3.80,  tenors)   8.80,  ensemble
on . stage.   Thursday:    13.30,    trio;
Yvonne,     Colombo,     Oomes    with
woodwind    and    strings.    Friday:
10.80,  drums  and  trumpets;   13.90,
all vocals; 3.30, 3nd violins, desk 3;
3.80, 2nd violins, desk 1.
Pigs & Steins
On Prop List
By  JOAN  THOMPSON
The list of properties for the forthcoming Musical Society production,
"Serenade" reads like the inventory
list of a combination armoury, pet-
shop, and home-furnishings department.
Mlml Sohofleld and her assistants have the lot of gathering a
collection containing the fearsome
following; 18 carbines, four pistols,
one dagger, one stiletto, one blunderbuss, two long swords able to
produce large and brIUIant sparks
when struck and two dozen surefire percussion matches.
The production calls for frying-
pans, rolllng-plns and boiler covers.
Mimi says she'll raid her family's
cupboards. Of the source |of five
steins needed for the chorus she's
not  quite   so  sure.
The remainder of the interesting:
items     composes    a     menagerie.       A
INVASION
(Continued from Page 1)
the Invasion, any way you look at it,
is a losing proposition.
Last year, the Counoil had a little extra money to spend on such
an enterprise, but this year, there
is none.
The University will be closed on
Saturday, February 4 for the Victoria
Invasion. All lectures and labs will be
cancelled, but the Library and the
labs will remain open for those who
are not going to Victoria.
parrot and a singing canary must be
found to grace the stage; also a dead
rabbit and a dead salmon, freshly
killed.
But Miml's most difficult assignment, her sticker, ls a small pink
Pig, "preferably pink but any color
will really do," says Mlml.
Extensiye   Investigation   to   see   If
pigs had little ones ln  February has
been   carried   on   but   it   was   Anally
found,   on   good  authority,   that  pigs
will  be   pigs  at  all   seasons   but  that
production   does   fall   off   slightly   ln
February.
THE NEWMAN CLUB will hold a
meeting Wednesday, January 18th at
8 p.m. at the home of Molly Glen,
4069 West Fourteenth. The subject
will be "Convention and Constitution."
"Let me serve your oar and your oar will serve you"
"Frank" Fioke
U.B.C. SERVICE STATION
34-Hour Emergency Service.
SOUTH END OF McGILL ROAD
Complete Repair Facilities.
PT. OREY 63
llltllltlllMtlMMnMlllttMMIMIIMIMMIIMIMItilMMIIIIIIIIMtllMIMIIIIHMtlllMIIIHIIIltMIMHIIMMIIIMtlltlllllMllltlMilHIMMIMI
UNIVERSITY BOOK STORE
Hrs.t e a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturdays B a.m. to noon
LOOSE  LEAF NOTE BOOKS, EXERCISE  BOOKS AND
SCRIBBLERS
AT REDUCED PRICES
Graphic   Engineering   Paper,  Biology  Paper, XMAS CARDS
Loose Leaf Refills,  Fountain  Pens and  Ink NOW  ON
and Drawing Instruments. SALE
IIIIIIII.IIIIMIMIIMIIMIMIIMHIIMMIIIIMIIIIIIIIItllMII.IMIMMMIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIirillllllllllllllllllMIIMIIIIIMIllllllllllllllllllllM
Dane* at
Commodore Cabaret
873 Oranvllle Street
Seymour 41 for Reservations
Letters to the
Editor
Dear Madam:
The sad need of oollege spirit on
our campus is an outworn topic:
Co-eds, did it ever occur to you to
help remedy this atrocious condition? There is little evidence of it.
A W.U.S. meeting lately was attended by the "same few" who literally attended but that was all.
When the Prealdent asked for opinions no one had sufficient enthusiasm to offer any suggestions, or
even to approve the propositions
brought forward. The consequence
was, the meeting was over while
late-comers were taking their seats;
the President was ln a dlllemma; she
begged for a criticism, but no one
opened her mouth.
The W.U.S. Executive have booting* to draw up schemes whloh the
President puts before the women
of the University at a general
meeting. There are only three or
four of theae  gathering* a  year.
Did it ever occur to you to support
the officers you have elected?
(Oranted the quorum on the day of
the election was disgracefully small).
All that ls required of you ls to give
the presiding officers a minimum of
co-operation. If statistics are required, here they are:
(1) Only 400 women of the 800
W.U.S. bothered to mark out a
ballot ln last spring's eleotion.
(3) Only 166 of said number attended the Hl-JInks this year.
(8) In the last three years, only
one woman  had  the  gumption  to
speak at an Ainu* Mater meeting.
After all, this ls a democracy and
we   enjoy   the   privilege   of   freedom
ot speech—let us not shun our birthright   nor   be   neutral   members    of
society.    Let    our    voices    be    heard
where    some    helpful    discussion    is
penitent.
AN IRATE  CO-ED.
CLUB WRITE-UPS
WANTED FOR TOTEM
Members of the following clubs
please bring this notice to the attention of your executive, and executive
please notice also. These organisations must have their Totem write-
ups ln before January 30 for Inclusion ln this year's book. Leave them
in the Publication offloe:
Biological Discussion Olub, Agricultural Discussion Club, Ohemloal
Society, Chinese Students, Cosmopolitan Olub, Engineering Society, Forestry Club and Q. M. Dawson Club.
German Club, Historical Society,
International Relations Club, Japanese Students' Club, Letters Olub,
Menorah Society, Newman Club,
Physics Olub, Political Discussion
Club, Psychology Olub, Student
Christian Movement and Varsity
Christian Union.
It is reported that there will be a
presentation of specially printed
Totems to T?helr Majesties King
Oeorge and Queen Elizabeth when
they visit the University during their
short  stay  in   Vancouver.
The   Hotel   Vancouver
presents
MART KENNY
at the  Spanish  OrUI
Exclusive Camera PORTRAITS
At Popular Prices
THE   AGRICULTURAL
UNDERGRADUATE   SOCIETY
t On Friday, Jan. 20, will Inaugurate
a public speaking course, open to all
Aggies. The course will be under the 1
direction of Mr. McDermott of New
Westminster, and is sponsored by
Sigma Tau Fraternity, an honorary
agricultural fraternity composed of
agriculture graduates. The meeting
wtll begin  at  7.30  p.m.
MRS. DON MUNDAY, the celebrated mountain climber, will give an
illustrated lecture on Bella Coola and
the Tweedsmulr Park ln Christ
Church Cathedral Crypt, Jan. 18 at
8 p.m. This is given under the auspices of the Cathedral branch of W.
A.  There  will  be  a  sliver  collection.
OET VALUE
IN PRINTING
for the activities
of your—
SORORITIES
FRATERNITIES
SOOIAL
and
OLUB  FUNCTIONS
THB
CLARKE & STUART
0O. LIMITED
Stationers and Printers
SS0   SEYMOUR  STREET
VANCOUVER, B.C.
Here's T^ews . . .
HOTEL   GEORGIA   presents
TREVOR   PAGE  and his Orchestra
WINDSOR HOOM
SATURDAYS    -    9.110 P.M.
$1.25 per Oouplo! Tuesday, January 17, 1939
THE    UBYSSEY
Three
CHANG SUEY
AND
THE CASE OF THE
Copped Cornerstone
CHAPTER ELEVEN
THE DIRTY NINE  SHOWS
ITS  GRIT
"Many people who wear large, black
boots has feels to match."
—Chang Suey, xviiiii.
A guttering candle cast weird
shadows on the walls of the
secret cavern in which the Dirty
Nine was holding its council of
war.
The leader, Carsize McMlre, paused
in his battle talk to take a deep
breath, and the rest of the Dirty
Nine leaned back instinctively as the
interlocking letters on his sweater
became a separate B and O.
They blinked as he brought his
fist down on the old, oaken table
with a crash that made the unborn
acorns squeak.
Miss Petman was taking down
his angry words on her special
asbestos writing  paper.
"Chang Suey has led us around by
the nose too long I" roared Carsize,
tenderly fingering his own plummy-
looking proboscis. "He pinched our
Onion Building cornerstone with the
scienceman speclman, Oberon Stench,
Inside It. We can spare Stench, but
. . . SLAP  BOBERTS.
we  can't afford  a  new  cornerstone.
Chang Suey must be crushed!"
BABBLING BROOK.
"HearI Heart" cried Slap Boberts,
making himself heard with some difficulty above the babbling of his
water on the knee.
But at that moment, Carslse noticed a strange figure standing In
the entrance to the cavern. It was
a short gentleman, well bolstered
about the equator.
"What's your name?" thundered
Carsize.
"What's your name?" thundered
back  the plump man.
Carsize peered at the intruder suspiciously. It was easy to see the
damnable cunning of the man.
Suddenly, Jad Avis jumped up with
an alacrity that earned him a small
round of applause.
BAGS  AGAIN.
"That man ls V. Burlington Bags I"
shouted Avis, knocking over his Big
Blocks in his excitement.
"Yeah? Well I'm Little Red Riding Hood!" orled Carslse, who wasn't  really  Little  Red  Riding  Hood
at   all.   "Seise   him,   men,   that's
Chang Suey in disguise!"
The speed and purposeful manner
with whioh the Dirty Nine reacted
was something to marvel at. (Pronoun.)
Slap Boberts lateralled himself out
of a baok exit, thus giving his red
corpuscles the rare treat of paddling
through the white caps on his water
on the knee.
OUR HEROES.
Mannle (the Mauler) Rathison
Jerked up a trapdoor and dove
through the opening, yelling that he
had to go to see a man about a basketball loop between Varsity, Cloverdale and Slam.
Jad Avis started a thorough survey
of conditions beneath the table, where
he was rather surprised to see Mr.
Hedgequlck Jumping up and down
on a tin can,
"What can I do for you, sonny?"
crooned Mr.  Hedgequlck,  who  was
busy proving   that   you   get more
fun from a thing if you have to
flght for It.
The rest of the Dirty Nine herded
behind Carsize, as he straightened
his tie for the change. But the proposed victim anticipated them by
grinning happily and falling flat on
hia face.
BILLET-DOUX.
He had been stabbed In the back
with three wlng-jings and a Mary
Ann column. With trembling fingers,
Carslse withdrew the column and
slowly read the words written therein.
"Dearest Carslse:
"Spring ls coming . . . have you a
secret craving for a bustle? ... or
are you already wearing a bustle?
... or do you need to wear a bustle?
... If so, try BUtzwhlfter's Little
Man's Shoppe . . . for all shades and
weights of bustles . . . ranging from
93S6.9B, F.O.B., Camden, New Jersey
. . . also socks ln alluring hues that
will flatter your calves . . . and make
you want to wear garters again. . . .
One (count 'em) thing ln favour of
Mary Ann . . . she's no prude . . . the
other day a Janitor winked while she
was passing . . . and it took the poor
chap 35 minutes of fast talking . . .
to convince her that he had a cinder
in his eye. . . . And Carsize, If you
have any 8.30 lectures . . . don't forget to try the Huggleheaver Bros,
new big toe caps . . . for people who
walk ln their sleep. . . .
Signed,
DR. CHANQ SUEY, M.D.,
(Mass Destruction)."
Carsize beat his head in rage, as a
horrible laugh rang through the cavern.
(O.K., ma, oome and help me get
back Into this straight- Jacket. Were
you ever out of it?)
We caught Chang Suey's friend in the Varsity Time studio
ln the Aggie Building, taking his audition and took it upon
ourselves to pttfer the super-secretive flies. Here are the results:
VARSITY TIME
Application Form
Name—SHRDLU  ETAOIN
Vear—Eternity Faculty—Pub. Age—Inf.
Phone—Llnotyper's  test
Address—Any Llnotyper's office
Dramatic Experience—Every book or other publication put out
by means of linotype.  Plays included. U.B.C.  Muck.
What noon-hours have you free?—I am always at your service.
State other  activities—Anything literary.
To be filled in by Casting Director—Name, voice, vice, enunciation, radio personality all perfect. This person can flt
Into  any or all  parts  with  remarkable  facility.
Class—A-f-.
Voice Classification
Name—SHRDLU  ETAOIN
Pitch—Variable Clarity—Absolute Inflection—Versatile
Articulation—Perfect Impediments—None
Quality—Variable Rate  of  Speech—Any required  rate
Strength—As  required Emphasis—Perfect
Earnestness—Exceptionally convincing
Appeal—Exceptionally   convincing ,
Adaptability—Perfect Dramatic   Quality—Perfect
Age—Infinite. Faults—Absolutely  none
Fraternity and Sorority
Printing and Engraving
Our Specialty
DANCE    PROGRAMMES
INVITATIONS,   'AT   HOMES,'
LETTERHEADS   and
CHRISTMAS  CARDS
GEKRKE'S
566   Seymour   St.
THE  MONRO PRE-MED  CLUB
The Monro Pre-Med Club will hold
an important meeting on Wednesday.
January 18, at 18.30 noon In Arts 208.
l$Hftaiarteff
As Roy Brown, the editor of the
Sun, told us at the Pub. tea: "A
newspaper, to exist, must give its
readers not what they ought to read
but what they want to read." So in
order to please our masculine readers, we give you the following, written by a cynic of 1033:
From the general tone it sounds as
If one of the despised women in question must have done him wrong at
some time.
OH EVE!
"Woman had man kicked out of
the garden of Eden, made him go to
work and has kept him at it ever
since.
"Women are divided into two
classes, women who talk most of
the time and thoae that are planted In cemeteries.
"Women have worked man out of
every Job except that of being a
father. A woman may have twenty-
seven hand-painted hangers each
draped with a dress and still say she
hasn't a stitch to her back.
OH ADAM?
"A man will look through the shiny
seat of his pants and be filled with
hope that they will keep him from
Indecent exposure until the coat ls
paid for.
"A woman will have eleven bther
women in to bridge and spend fourteen dollars on roses, prizes, salted
peanuts, whipped cream and olives
but if a man brings home a good
scout, who has saved him from the
sheriff, the ball and chain will tell
him that she isn't running a soup-
kitchen for bums.
"If a man shows little Interest in
his wife she says he is leading a
double life t and If he Is nice to her,
she says he has a guilty conscience
and runs a temperature wondering
who the brazen hussy Is.
"A woman will cut her dress down
from the top and up from the bottom
to please a man, and then says she
has been Insulted if he should take
an eyeful or show his appreciation.
MOSTLY SOFT.
"A woman ls soft of flesh, soft of
heart and often soft of head, but she
becomes  harder   than   case-hardened
roller-bearings when some other woman speaks to her bundle carrier."
Fraternity   rushing   took   Its   toll
of student mentality  In  1D33  even
as it does today. Here Is an example
of the after effects.
"Dere Fren,
"Ws ovr to Eta bl Bita Pi Frat Hs
1st nt and gt lt ln fr brj gm? Imagine.
I hd prty gd Ik at first and then nt
so gd. So py my Iky rbts ft on tble
bt ate lt in mstk fr piece of f j. It was
a brown rbfs ft. but my littl brthr
has a grey one.
So I will nt mk sm mstk again;
then I gt up am and walked around
the my chr 3 tms bt in 1st trip rnd
slpy slpt on ls piece of crpt and sprnd
ankl."
SERIOUSLY.
My   good   friend   and   critic.   Mary
Ann, has Just told me that this column ls all right except that it gives
an   unbalanced    view   of   University
life.   She   ls   afraid   that  it  will  give
the Impression that the student body
of  1933 was composed solely  of  unbalanced  cymes and  Fraternity men
fast heading toward the Psychopathic
ward. So here I am back ln the Library, lunchless and forlorn, trying to
And something touching on the serious side of campus life.
Here are the results:
In January  1934, student reporters Interviewed Almee Semple Mac-
Pherson who was visiting Vanoouver  on  a   lecture    tour.    Together
they   discussed   atheism,   evolution,
marriage    and    drink.    They    were
puzzled as to whether she was the
world's greatest  actress or fanatic.
The Players' Olub successfully produced Ibsen's "A Doll's House."
The whole campus was ln a great
state of agitation over a name for
Varsity athletic teams. ' This movement was culminated by a Pep Meet
where   the  audience  almost  came  to
HOT NUMBERS IN THE
STUDENT DIRECTORY
Students! Some of you havo not
purchased your directory yet. There
are only one hundred left and those
of you who are so unfortunate as to
not procure on. will undoubtedly regret lt the rest of your life.
Just think of lt — the telephone
telephone number of every girl on
the campus at your finger tips. Can't
you see the Implication? Why, that
one-half way down on page 7 might
turn out to be the girl you have always dreamed of. . . . Now, If you
haven't obtained the directory you
might go through the rest of your
life without your one and only helpmate.
HOT BLONDE.
That one with the long telephone
number on page 9 might be a ravishing blonde or a soleful brunette—
such would be one's Joy on coming
to meet her that the one small dime
expended for this privilege would be
a small charge Indeed.
Those girls who have always wanted to meet some of the big executives
of the campus can find them conveniently listed ln the baok. Don't be
bashful about phoning them, girls—
they are ln reality only bashful men
with a lot of work to do and only
too willing to hear from some sweet
young thing who will take their mind
off their work.
SEX APPEAL.
Next year lt is rumoured that the
males and females will be sent over
to the Biology labs where they will
be classified according to their general attractions to the opposite sex.
Thus if you are listed as a BXP you
will look for a feminine address of
the same qualifications, and the old
method of choosing one's mate by
trial and error will be eliminated.
Addresses and phone numbers so
conveniently listed are a necessity to
any busy student. Considering that
the book cost twelve cents but sells
for ten cents it la an undeniable bargain.
POEMS . . .
and STUFF
LEWIS  ROBINSON
TO A SCIENCEMAN
Into your eyes, so deep, so clear,
I gaze anew
With fondest hope,
Oh, what care I for wine or beer
When I have you
My microscope.
* •      *
TO A PRE-MED.
The old Doc bled them ln the arm.
And left them with a nurse;
The newer school takes nurse in arms
And bleeds them ln the purse.
• •      •
Thought of the week: Some women
prefer not to use make-up, others
simply haven't got the face to go
without lt.
REV. H. BURKHOLDER
TO ADDRESS S. C. M.
Rev. H. Burkholder, general secretary for the R.E.B. of the United
Church of B.C. and Alberta, will address the S.C.M. Vesper Service at
Union College at 4.30 on Tuesday,
Jan.  17.
The S.C.M. Is planning a weekly
vesper service to take place alternately at the Anglican and Union
Colleges on Tuesdays at 4.30 of each
week.
The next study group meets on
Tuesday, Jan. 17 at 11.30. Stan Bailey, chairman, will speak on the
"Phsychology of Life." Future speakers Include Bob Tillman, Mrs. Burkholder, Harry Morrow and Jerry
Hundal.
These meetings will take place on
Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and
Friday of the next four succeeding
week. Everyone ls Invited to attend.
blows over the two favourites—Seagulls and Thunderbirds. When the
smoke cleared away—well, the result
ls known to everyone.
And, the popular song of the moment was "You're Oonna Lose Your
Gal."
HtHHIHIMtlllllllHIIIHIIIMIIItllHIIIIIMIHIIHIHIIMIIIHtllMII
VARSITY SERVICE
STATION
"AT THE GATES"
"OUR SERVICE MEANS
HAPPY MOTORING"
HHtHHrHHHttH,HMtHHIHHHHHHHHHIHHHHHHH,„l
iHHHIHtlHHHHHHHIHHttHHHHHHHtHntHHHttHIHHIHIl
Just   about   all   you   could   ask
for    .    .    .
ARISTOCRATIC
. HAMBURGERS
1 Limited
1 10th and  Alma
I     TAKE    SOME    HOME
,11IHIHIHHHHHHH Hit IIHHIHHtlHHHtHHHIHHHIHItlHItl I
It is astonishing how frequently ono is reminded of the
truths that one
LE LOUP * learned unwill-
ET L'AONEAU   ingly during the
torrid sessions of
a French 2 course. Only this
week we found ourselves dumbly mumbling "\>b. raison du plus
fort est toujours la meilletvre,"
and equally cynically pondering
on the simple illustration that
friend I.a Fontaine uses to emphasize his moral.
We heard a delightful yarn the
other day ot a situation that proves
the dangerous position of the average student if he gets into any trouble. This particular undergraduate
was taking a course which required
his attendance at numerous laboratory periods which in turn involved
a considerable amount of work.
At the close of last term the student handed in his laboratory work
in the due and appointed manner to
the regular authorities of the department. But at the opening of the
Spring term, when marks are available, the unfortunate student discovered to his dismay that his mark had
no magnitude! (Do we make ourselves clear?)
As the student was not the type to
be quelled immediately, he determined to Investigate the
PROTESTANT Department Head's
reasons for the cruel gesture. Eventually the reason
was given out that said Department
Head did not think that the laboratory work handed in was the work
of the student, but rather that it waa
a composite effort of the student and
othera unnamed.
Now his proof was not certain; in
fact his proof was no more than
his verbal decision. The student's
proof was more certain; his proof
waa his own actual experience. More
than this the other students in the
particular department were ready
and willing to vouoh for the fact that
the Ill-omened student had done the
work himself.
COURT  OF APPEAL
Arguments of the student, however, fell upon barren ground. The
Department Head realized that his
word would be supreme over all
others. The student went to the Dean
of the particular Faculty.
Here he was met with some enthusiasm, was welcomed ln fact, but
was told that the Dean had no choice
but to accept the word of his Department Head, who had by this
time announced that he no longer
wished the student in his department.
And so there comes to an end a
modern fable. Not unlike the lamb
that was accused by the wolf of polluting the stream of water, this student 'was 'destroyed' to the extent of
almost a year's work. It ls a tragic
thing to think that we students are
regarded as being inherently dishonest, chronically deceptive. Or perhaps lt would be more tragic It we
all admitted that we were, ln order to
agree with the Ideas of our professors.
The student has been compelled
to withdraw from the department,
to take up a new course of
MORAL studies. Whether he or the
professor — pardon us, the
Department Head and the Doctor—
was the  liar,  we  shall  leave  to you.
INSTITUTE LECTURE
SPRINGSCHEDULE
Mr. John Ridington announces the
speakers for the spring terrrf of the
Vancouver Institute lectures. Following ls a list of the speakers:
Jan. 31—Mr. Drummond Wren,
"Education—What For?"
Jan. 38—Rev. J. D. Nelson McDonald, "The St. Francis Xavier Experiment with Co-operatives."
Feb. 4—Dr. Isabel Maclnnes, "The
Mediaeval Oerman Town" illustrated.
Feb. 11—Mr. Roger Ouimet, "The
French-Canadian View of Confederation."
Feb. 18—To be announced. Prof. H.
J. Laskl has been invited to lecture
on this date.
Feb. 28-—Mr. R. H. Tupper, "Changing Views of Oovernment."
Mar. 4—Colonel H. F. O. Letson,
"Oanadlan Defence and Its Relation
to the People."
Mar. 11—Mrs. Florence James, "The
Theatre in Community Life."
Mar. 18—Mrs. John Creighton, "The
Destructive Element—A Note of Contemporary Literature."
Mar. 25—Dr. Joseph Crumb, "Planning for the Economic Millenium."
Apr. 1—Mr. John Ridington, "The
Menace of Propaganda."
NURSES' BAIL IN
AZTEC THURSDAY
With the Science Shield In Neon
and waving balloons providing a gay
background, the Nurses' Ball will
take place on Thursday from 8.30 to
1 ln the Aztec Ballroom of the Hotel
Georgia. Music will be under the
baton of Wilf Wiley.
Patrons of the ffair will be Dean
and Mrs. J. N. Finlayson, Dean
Bollert, Dr. and Mrs. C. E. Dolman,
Miss G. M. Fairley and Miss Mabel
Gray.
The ball, which ls the annual
function of the Nurses' Undergraduate Society, is being arranged by
president, Pauline McMartin and
oonvener, Florence Jackson.
WEIGHTLIFTER8 NOTE
Eight more dollars necessary. Pay
fees to Ted Margetts, Psl U. table ln
caf on Tuesday, Wednesday and
Thursday at 12.30. Thursday ls the
last day. Those who have not paid
their fees by Thursday will be Ineligible for membership.
THE B. C. T. F.
The B.C.T.F. will hold a supper
meeting on Wednesday, January 18,
at B.30, In the Caf. The purpose of
this meeting ls to complete plans for
the Valentine Dance which ls to be
given by the Federation on February
14, at Klllarny Hall. There wUl be
an address by Mrs. Delmage, of the
Parent Teachers' Association. All
members are urged to be present.
LOST: Will the person who found
one black leather zipper strip bag in
the Oym on Friday afternoon, please
return to Mr. Home's office.
NOTICE
Will the following please call at
the Publications Offlce for Totem receipts: Don Bannerman, Terry Lord,
Evelyn E. Carter, Olive McDonald,
Frances   Ashworth.
A   meeting  of  the   University  Law
Society will be held on Thursday,
January 19, at 7.4S p.m. in the Students' Council Room. The speaker
will be Mr. D. E. McTaggart, corporation counsel for the City of Vancouver.
Totem Staff meeting in Arts 108
today at 12.30
We know the answer. We do not
feel that the Dean of the Faculty in
question did. (Have we made ourselves  clear?)
7Bo and
$1.00
"AS NEAR AS YOUR PHONE"
caii...       SEYMOUR 2405
Free Delivery Anywhere ln City Limits
RITCHIE'S   .   .  .   840 GRANVILLE
IMIIHIHIIIIHIIIMItllllllHIHIIIIIIIHHHIItllllllllt Mill Hill I HI II Mil III (till   IHIMIHHIHIIItllHllHtlHIHIIHHIIHIIHIIIIItlllHHIMM
Pioneer Laundry & Dry Cleaners
Seymour 8334
A complete Laundry and Dry Cleaning Service
Licensed Sanitone Dry Cleaner
IIHIIMHMHimHIHHIIIIIIHIHIIIIIIHIHHH Illll IHHItl'lHHHIIIMHHIHIIMHHH HHtt It llll IIMIMIHI HHIHIIH 11111*1 Illllll HIIMI
u.
i
1
LUNCH 25<
B.C. ROOST
SALISBURY LODOE ANNEX
35c
"Where The
3
Gang Meets''
DINNER 'BIRDS GROUND AIRMEN 5-1, PLAY BULLDOGS
BASKETBALL
WEDS. NITE—OYM.
VARSITY va. STACY S
*
if*^                                               ^^—                   ^^^^                                               ^^m*\*\\\\\\\mm%m*.                                          ^^^^                             *m\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\W
jHSshM^W^^I^                                 ^^^^^^                  m\\\\\\\\^^^^^*\\\\\\\\                           ^^m\\^^^^^^^^^m\\^*^ks.                              _^_B^^^^_^                                             ^^_^_^^^^^^^
Ms ___r                          ^V                     ^^T^                     ^^^                    ^-*\^m              ^1   ^^^_^_^_k_.                     ^1
IOE HOOKEY
FRIDAY NITE—FORUM
VARSITY vs. DUMONTS
Pour
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 17, 1939
VARSITY HOOPERS BEAT W. W. COLLEGE 4S-43
SPORT
VIEWPOINTS
—By Frank Turner
Don't look now . . . Just charge It
up to that old adage: "Once a sport
scribbler, alwaya a aport scribbler."
That's the only reason, plausible or
otherwise, for explanation for reappearance. (Ed. Note: Any reference
to persons living or dead hereinafter
Is purely coincidental.)
LOOKER LOOKEB.
Did you ever overlook the roster of
the Ubyssey sport department? It's
really enlightening I The Survey: Ye
ed. Orme Dier, scrappy oentre on
Hookey sextette, worries about puok
tilt: "Hey Robinson! Write about the
loe tussle willya? If Harmer or I
scribble lt, readers will undoubtedly
point fingers and smirk 'glory
hounds I'"
Associate Ed. Basil Robinson, one
of the best Rugger sorum halves In
these parts, not to mention star soc-
cerite, hollers out: "Kow much, er.a
is Hall (Ormy to you) poi-r.amg out
UB.C. or Varsity rugger tilt?"
Star Reporter Orrny Hall: "What
'ell you guys I I've only got eight
minutes today—toss up, sirs, for my
servioesl"
Associate Ed. Myrne Nevlson, perennial stalwart on Varsity's grass
hoekey squads and comely mlas in
her own right, demurely suggests
possibility of submitting her "Co-ed
Sports". (The same being UB.C. Coeds' Journalistic standby for three
years.)
STAR DUST (?).
Star Reporter (they all are on this
rag—take lt from Dier) Lionel Salt:
"Olmme that assignment, I've only
got from 10 a.m. on to spend In the
pub (Ubyssey office, wise guy I).
Star Reporter (repeat last classification of same) Jim Harmer, Canadian football, English rugger and loe
Hockey standout: "Hey Dier, I oan't
write rugger and hookey because . . .
Intramurals? T'-'ll with . . . okay,
okay l"
Oolumnlstlc Note: It usually ends
up in a "everyman for himself, and
the devil take . . . charge of the sport
pagel"
• •     •
CAUSTIC  COMMENTS.
Editorial writer on this rag in last
Tuesday's issue definitely needs education, which Is the only reason for
allowing continuance of the same at
this institution. What editorial, sir?
The one about detects in sport managerial system—the aforesaid scribbler being sadly misinformed, thus
formulating erroneous  conclusions.
How so? Because the system as in
effect these days, although with defects common to all human organizations, ls definitely an asset to sport
cn this campus. Reference: Men's
Athletic Prexy Rann Matthison, and
the Athletic Directorate, which body
has considered all aspects of sport
administration. (After that dissertation, readers may relax and breathe.)
* »      •
BOUQUETS:   (Donees listed below.)
1. The University of British Columbia Ice Hockey team, for patient
practice and surprising showing. Special flowery tribute to Manager Morris Belkin for superb publicity work,
to Ooalle Ed Benson, for remarkable
playing ability, to every member of a
championship-contending squad, and
to Blue and Oold studes. All we say
is:  "Let's not stop now I"
2. Byron Straight, hoopla artist, for
developing a Frosh basketball quintette. That's the only answer to the
dearth of annual aggregations of star
players. Coach Straight ls also applying the typical U.B.C. offensive and
defensive systems to his squad.
3. Athletic Director Maury Van
Vllet, all-round athlete, Thunderbird
coach, etc., etc., for gradually Introducing the idea of compulsory physical education on the campus. Van
Vliet's statistics should be sufficient
to swing  the innovation,
Maurymen Beaten Saturday,
Win Mon., Play Fri. & Sat.
University of British Columbia successfully started their
month of homecoming basketball exhibitions against touring colleges yesterday when they just managed to nose out Western
"Washington College 45-43.
After going through the flrst half
wtth only one point separating them
—Washington 38—Varaity 34, both
teams continued to match baskets
throughout the last canto and at any
one time not more than a pair of
baskets  separated  either  side.
MATTHISON  HERO
Captain Rann Matthison settled
the whole thing with only a minute
to go by looping In a peaeh of a long
shot from Just inside the oentre
stripe. The mighty mite took his
time and the paoked gym let out a
roar as the ball swished htrough
without touching the hoop.
Aotually Varsity were a tiny bit
lucky under the hoop and their long
shots were likewise rimming the
hoop and dropping back Into play.
LUCAS ooon
If any honors were to le handed
out, the biggest of these wculd drape
around the broad shoulders of "galloping" Alee Lucas. "Luke" was
riding high and handsome and his
wild gallops down the floor almost
gave Mary Van Vllet nervous prostration. In any case the lanky, likeable Luke dropped in 10 pointa to tie
Rann Matthlaon for top Varsity
scoring honors.
Following Matthison and Lucas
was Don Livingstone with an even
half dosen markers. Wally Johnston, the Chllllwaek rookie, looked
good again but two baskets was his
limit. Surprise of the afternoon was
young Doug Alexander, who electrified the crowd with 5 points in Just
under a minutes.
Best for Washington were Eyer
with 0 points and Foxx with 11 markers.
The heavy Varsity schedule continues all thla week with blue and
gold oopers meeting Harlem globe
trotters Friday, Stacy's Wedneaday
at noon In the gym and Paolflo Lutheran College at noon Saturday on
the oampua.
LOSE ON SATURDAY
Varsity dropped behind In the
inter-olty baaketball race Saturday
night when they lost a rough enoounter, 44-80, to Tookes. The refereeing
was rank and many of the Tooke
Points and certainly the 5 point margin waa due to extra markers resulting from free shots.
Although the outcome was gloomy for Maury and hla boys there
was at least one brought spot ln
the  person of young Wally Johnston of Chllllwaek playing his flrst
season of senior ball.
The   pink-cheeked    one   played   a
whale of a game and picked himself
off an even dosen counters.    His specialty is a fake shift followed by a
pivot and then the   shot—which,   at
loast on Saturday night, was working
to perfection.
Rann Matthison, Frank Turner,
and By Straight all tallied 6 points
wlhle big Alec Lucas turned ln a
peach of a game bagging an even
8 markers.
—By Ormle Hall
BOYS' INTRAMURALS
Even the gala pep meet on Friday
failed to dim the enthusiasm for
inter-class basketball, and a smashing double header put the Intramural
'melon drama' further under way.
Sc. '42 whipped Sc. '41 (13-7) with
Davies leading the way, scoring ten
points. Sc. '40 were taken by Arts '39
17-7. However, no teams are out before they lose two games and every
class is still right in there.
The  flrst  round  will  be  completed
on  Wednesday    when    Sc.    '39  clash
v    h   Arts   '42.   The   two   first   round
losers. Anglicans and Arts '40, square
off to complete the double header.
Wanted, a flock of strayed Frosh
for  Wednesday!   Turn   out   for   the
team, even if you've never seen It
before!
'BIRDS BEAT
W. VAN 32-0
Varsity started the 1M» Vancouver Rugby Union season with a
Held day Saturday when they walloped West Vancouver Rarbartans
SS-O at the Stadium.
Conditions were deplorable and the
rain greased the ball to the extent
that handling was next to Impossible
after the llrst half.
However, ln the flrst canto the
Thunderbird backfleld opened up
with a das-ling running attack and
Ranjl Mattu, Harry Lumsden, Johnny Bird and Jimmy Harmer all raced
over for tries. Tod Tremblay and
Harmer booted converts to make the
soore 16-0 at the half.
SWEET SIXTEEN.
After the crossover Mattu Immediately crossed the West Van line again
and minutes later Strat Leggat also
galloped over on the end of a three
line break.
Towards the end of the game Sandy Lang fought his way over from
3 yards out, followed shortly after by
Tommy Robson who climaxed a 80
yard handling effort.
Ted MoPhee and Jim Harmer
booted extra pointa to bring the second half total to identically the same
as the first halt 16 points fiesta. Add
the two 18's and you have the story
of Varsity's 33-0 shutout.
'BIRDS TENDER?
On the whole the Thunderbird display was pot impressing. It was
largely a case of the Barbarians not
being very good that spelt the whitewash. The Blue and Oold are still
definitely out of shape and they will
have to play better rugger It they are
to win the Miller Oup. And incidentally sensational rugger If .they wish
to cop the McKechnie bauble.—Hall.
GRADS UPSET
UBC RUGGERS
MUDDY   BATTLE   ENDS
IN 6-6 DRAW
Saturday on that quagmire in
Stanley Park, more familiarly known
as Brockton Point, the Orads Rugby
Football Club stage done of the major upsets of the rugger year by holding the U.B.O. squad to a 6-0 score.
True enough, all Orad points came
as the result of penalty kicks, but
even ao they must be given credit
for holding the strong Ubeecees to
six markers; consisting of two unconverted tries on efforts by the student backflelders ln the second half.
Orads took a three point lead into
the last half as a result of a penalty
goal, but a try by Oeof. Mackie pulled the Blue and Oold to even terms.
ORAD  TACKLING  OOOD.
The student scrum was working to
perfection throughout 'but their efforts were wasted by tough Orad
tackling or the extra slimy pigskin
slipping through the hands of the
backfleld.
Cleve Cunningham put the U.B.C.
team three points up by scoring the
last try of the day, only to see their
win fade as Orads converted their
second penalty in the dying moments
of the game.
HOCKEYISTS
TRAVELLING
TO SPOKANE
BEAT     AIRPORCE     AS
HARMER    STARS
By CHARLIE CRAIG
Before a crowd of 1500 cheering fans, who flocked en masse
to the Porum on Friday night,
the Varsity Ice Hookey team
walloped the Air Force stick-
swingers to the tune of 5-1.
The Varslty-Alr Force battle was
the feature attraction In a program
whloh Included a game between Du-
moots and the Cubs, and an exhibition of fanoy skating.
The Thunderbird boys began early
in the game to prove they really had
something on the puck, and two minutes after the atart of •the game,
Charlie Ouiguet whlased one past
the Air Force goalie.
BENSON OOOD AGAIN
The flrst period saw two more
goals for the Varaity Icemen — the
flrst by Austin Frith on a pass from
Norman Otll and the seoond from
the euper-co-operatlon of Orme Dier
and Jim Harmer who executed one
of the smoothest plays of the evening.
In the scoreless second period
"Bashful" Benson, tbe boy from
Klmberley, continued hie inspired
performance ae goal-keeper, and Just
to make the game more interesting
for the Airmen, he played "hide the
puok" by sitting on it, thus stopping Air Force attacks.
LAMBERT  SCORES!
The play speeded up in the third
period when Marcel Ouiguet soored
for Varsity with an assist from Brother Charlie, and a solo rush by de-
fenoeman Maury Lambert accounted
for Varsity's fifth goal. Thirty aeoonda before the final whistle blew
the Airmen swooped down on the
Thunderbird net, and soored their
only marker.
Defenoemen Jaok Moxon and Angl
Provensano were greatly responsible
for the Varaity win slnoe they more
than onoe broke up threatening Air
Force attaoks.
Honorable mention goes to BUI Ka-
pak and Norm OUI and also to the
Varaity band which provided the
music and atmosphere for a real college game.
TRAVEL AT NIOHT
The biggest test of the Thunderbirds of the ice Is Is scheduled for
Saturday night when they meet the
hard-hitting Oonsaga Bulldogs ln
Spokane after an all-day trek by
boat and train.
Nothing is out yet on who ls to
make the trip, but only eleven men
will be able to go, so there will have
to be aome paring done at the practice of the hockeyists called for tomorrow night at the Forum.
If the boys can beat the Dumont
outfit on Friday night and then travel for the next twelve hours and
put up a good battle against the biting bashing banging Bulldogs, they
will all be eligible for at leaat the
Victoria Cross.
DEBATING MANAGER
Manager Morris is not expected to
make the trip as he is supposed to
debate in the McOoun Cup series
over the week-end. Former manager
Irman Fiorello will no doubt take
charge of the boys on the long tough
journey, and will do his best to get
the whole team back In time for the
Caster Exams.
No faculty representative has been
appointed yet to make the trip, but It
ls expected that Coach Frith will
take charge of that enc» of the proceedings.
HELP
when you need It. Just write for our catalogue r 1 College Helps,
listing more than a thousand and one aids, outlines, and translations   for  coUege   courses.
THE BOOK EXCHANGE
"Canada's nook-Olssrlng Xohh"
370 Bloor  St. W.,  Toronto,   Ontario
RICH, DARK, FRINCH
ITYLI CHOCOLATI
PACKID WITH CRISP,
CRUNCHY ALMONDS
9ftr i I _»i nta
BURHTAIMOHD
V
l     P     I     N
I      -     I      I <      M    < >    <      O   I      t\    T     I
SOCCERITES
LOSE AGAIN
TO STVREGIS
TODD.   ROBINSON   SCORI
IN 4<a L.OSS
Ding - dong,    knock - 'em • down,
drag-'em-out football was the order
of the very wet afternoon spent by
the Varsity soeoerltee at Cambie St.
Saturday   when they   engaged St.
Regis in mortal combat and emerged on the short end of a 4-8 score.
At full strength for the first time
this year, the campusmen started out
In    an    Inauspicious    manner,    the
Hotelmen    registering     first    blood
within five seconds or so of the kick-
off.    Undaunted    by    this    setback,
Charlie   Hltchens   boys   came   right
baok before the interval to equalise
through Doug Todd who soored on a
long  shot which  left  the  St.  Regis
goalie unsighted.
WATER HAZARDS.
With the second half the fireworks
started again. Play began to be muddier and rougher, and the downtown
squad again went ahead when Leong
failed to get his hands to a ball that
slithered annoylngly through a large-
sized puddle situated conveniently
near the goallne.
The well-known college push
brought the students right back in
the skirmish, however, when Ben
Herd tallied his first goal of the season to even matters. At this point
there was but fifteen minutes to go
and everything pointed to a Blue and
Oold victory march. Everything but
fate, that ls.
The remainder ot the story holds
little interest for the partial reader.
Two goals ln ten minutes spelled defeat for the collegians and the robust
Jim Robinson didn't help matters
much by engaging In two battles, one
physical with a Hotelman, and one
verbal with the referee. The outcome
of this bevy of beefing was Mr. Robinson (J's) banishment and the game
ended on a quieter note.
GLOBETROTTERS TO
PLAY THUNDERBIRDS
FRIDAY NOON IN GYM
Harlem Olobe Trotters, the modern
basketball Houdlnls, will make their
annual appearance on the campus
Friday at noon when they play the
Varsity Thunderbirds at the gym.
The "cuhlad" gentlemen from Harlem are the most entertaining of all
the touring basketeers and the usual
overflow  crowd  ls  expected  to cram
•••••••Mmmm|-|-'MH**-|-HMIMMIMMHM>M.'**m*-*M*H-*M**"
CO-ED SPORTS
Ry MYRNE NEVISON
i-mmimi-iiiiiihm--*--------iii-**-h--i-hi------ii--**--*-*-*--------i
ORASS HOCKEY.
Hanging up their sixth shut-out In
nine games, the smart UB.C. grass
hockey squad overpowered the fighting Orandvlew Orads 3-0 Saturday
afternoon on a soggy Connaught
Park pitch.
Varsity, true to form, appeared
with but seven ambitious players and
had to default their game with Ex-
Kitsllano. However they had enough
people out to play a practice match
which they proceeded to lose 4-0.
Despite the downpour and slippery
field, the U.B.C. eleven played a fast
breaking game sweeping goalwarda In
quick passing attaoks.
Sheila   Wilson,  Anne   Carter,  and
Faye  Burnham,  each  tallying onoe,
supplied  the scoring punch for the
students.
PERSONALS.
The U.B.C. eleven, more powerful
than It has been for years, should
prove well-nigh Invincible this year.
It's time the girls .had a team that
can win a few games—they are travelling to Victoria on the Invasion
and expect to make up for their defeat of last year. . . . The collegian
fullbacks, Hortense Warne and Betty
Cole, make a powerful combination
and' scare the opposing forwards
away.
CO-EDS TRAVEL.
The basketballers have the travelling bug, too. This Saturday the Senior A girls wUl go to Port Albernl to
try their luck there. Last time they
played an out of town team, they
actually won; so, gosh, if they win
this one, why, it will be three victories in one year.
The girls have also been asked to
show  their    wares    in    Viotorla,   but
plans for this trip are still very tentative.
SENIOR B's.
I.X.L.'s, the young Amazons that
set back Normal last Wednesday by
a mere 103-6, will meet our Senior B
quintette in a preliminary to the
boys' game this Wednesday at the
campus. The collegians aren't making
many pre-game predictions but they
have certainly got their fingers crossed.  We  don't  blame  them.
Hookey Teams: U.B.C. — Wilson,
Carter, Burnham, Armstrong, Norle,
Scott, Wright, Warne, Cole, Lean.
Varsity — Kenny, Chowne, Teagle.
Thompson, Henderson, Munro, Crowe-
every Inch of the gymnasium.
WORLD BEATERS.
If you are fortunate to be able to
take ln Friday's exhibition you will
probably see the finest basketball
team ln the world (n action as the
Harlemltes are rated'superior to even
the pro teams of the vory fast New
York circuit.

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0124147/manifest

Comment

Related Items