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The Ubyssey Oct 24, 1952

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 JA-.
/  r
11 w
THEy1^'
Rugby
Game
Saturday
VOLUME XXXV
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, OCTOBER 24, 1952
PRICE 5c; No. 13
WAITING WITHOUT AVAIL to be rescued by engineers are these co-eds at last night's
pyjama party. The engineers managed to penetrate into building but fled in confusion
before two irate proctors. Photo by Hux Lovely
Debate On Religion
Packs UBC Foriim
By JOHANN STOYVA
Over 49 per cent of a packed student audience at yesterday's
Forum debate voted that religion had outlived its usefulness.
Though competing with both a VCF sponsored mass meeting
and a COTC compulsory military parade the debate drew one
of the biggest crowds that the Forum has had in recent years.
"Institutionalized    religion    has>
iserved  to  fossilize  thinking and
Wednesday last Day
Te Pick Up Cheques
AU scholarship and bursary
winners of UBC are requested
by ' W. White, university ac-
, count>ant to call at the accounting office, cashiers' wicket, not
later than Wednesday, October 28, to collect their scholarships and. bursaries cheques.
letard social progress," declared
ffjldb Loosmore, outspoken campus
socialist on the resolution that-
"Religion has outlived its usefulness."
Loosttiore charged that religion
In t^s^Mn*!^ajbalief in a eqper
natutwrbwnl,"ls Inconsistent with
our democratic way ot life.
DICTATORSHIP OP QOD
Religion involves the dictatorship of God 'and a position of servitude on the part of man. Religion,
he charged, hag been used to in-!
cite the masses "to work all day
live on hay and then eat pie In the
sky when they die.'' |
The speaker cited the  words of:
St.   Paul   who  advised   the   slaves j
of bis time to be "obedient to their
masters."
CHURCH  AS CLUB
l.oosmore charged that the
church serves as a club used by(
the upper classes to browbeat the
workers into submission. He pointed out that the church has even
gone so tar as to stir up strife.
He further declared that the
church has served not as a brlnger
of peace but as <i recruiting agent
for the governments of most modern countries.
The speaker's chief point was
that religion functioned as an instrument of reaction. 'Society today," he declared, "Is in great danger. It must be changed, and religion stands ln the way of this
change."
NOT DICTATORSHIP
Charlie Ripley, secretary of the
SCM, championed the orthodox;
point of view. Ripley maintained
that, Christianity does not constitute a dictatorship; on the contrary, the emphasis is on a loving;
and  merciful  saviour. |
Me also challenged  Loosemore's
statement  that  Christianity  is  an
other-worldly  religion.
EMPHASIS   ON   BROTHERHOOD
He maintained that, ln the'
Christian fulth, the primary emphasis is ou human brotherhood!
rather than on the affairs of the'
next world. Ripley finally declare:! i
that the only alternative to religion is chaos.
MOCK ASSEMBLY, RIAL MEET
TO HIGHLIGHT UH CEREMONY
Noon-hour, flag-raising ceremony conducted by Dr.
N. MacKenzie today, will start this year's UN birthday
celebration.    > ■ - .* ■.: - :i*--S ?*-:-*=*#.;*.   *■•/-•
Canada's Town Meeting will originate from Brock
Hall, at 3:30 p.m. this afternoon. Four UBC students will
discuss "Should Western Germany be Re-armed?"
Climax of the day's celebrations will be a mock General
Assembly fyeld in tihe Brock at 8:15 this evening.
Andrew - Jamieson
Have Heat Debate
In a free-swinging debate Prof. Geoff Andrew, Executive-
assistant to the President, and Dr. Stuart Jamieson, of the UBC
Dept. of Economics, discussed whether "The North Atlantic
Treaty Organization would supplant the UN."
Speaking    for    the   affirmative.^"	
Prof. Jamieson admitted that the
NATO could never be a substitute
for the UN but he said, "The NATO
principle and the UN principle cannot co-exist. t
"The basis or NATO Is military
strength concentrated in a Regional Organization. This detracts from
the hope of a powerful world forco
strong enough to enforce international law throughout the world,''
Dr. Jamieson said.
AID  NECESSARY
"In order to strengthen NATO
and its member countries the economic aid necessary to produce a
healthy world economy is being
channelled Into this regional alliance," Jamieson stated.
He warned that our whole thinking in international affairs was becoming regional and that this wus
directly contrary to what was necessary if the i'nited Nations was
to succeed in its work.
APOLOGY
To all the people who came
out to hear Chief Mulligan last
Wednesday, the SCM humbly
apologizes. The meeting was
caneelled at the last minute,
and, through an executive slip-,
up, no notice of the cancellation was posted. We are most
sorry for the resulting inconvenience to a large number of
students. You will have another opportunity to hear Chief
Mulligan, as he will be speaking
to us on Wednesday, November 19.
GENERAL MEETING of the re-
Juvlnated, reconstituted Arts Undergraduate Society will be held
Tuesday, November 4, at 12:30 in
Arts  20 1. |
Nominations are now being re-;
ceived for the offices of president,
vice-president In charge of special
events, secretary, treasurer and
chairman of the publicity commit-'
tee. All candidates please deposit,
their nominations, signed by TWO
supporters, iu the AUS box in the
A .VIS office before the November
1  meeting.
War, Man's Sin,
Sir Arthur Smith
By VALERIE  GARSTIN
"War   Is   not   Cod's   will,   It   Is
.Man's sin," said Lleutenant-Ceneral
| Sir   Arthur   Smith   in   an   address
"Faith Tested By War", Thursday
Andrew] in the Auditorium.
Many men through the ages who
have felt a call to arms have also
believed   in   dod   but   tbe   two   are
not  incompatible, be continued.
RIGHTEOUSNESS
It is rattier righteousness at any
cost and not peace ut any price.
Mut lie did not hesitate to add that
REPLACE UN
In   rebuttal,    Professoi
stated   that,   "To   consider   NATO
as an entity or as a natural community   which   could   reduce   the
UN   was   unrealistic."
He claimed that NATO had
grown up to fill the power vacuum
created in tlte world due to failure
of the UN to be able to establish
a strong central force. "When this] lie has the greatest respect for the
vacuum is filled then all the power J genuine and honest pacifist.
of NATO will, or should be. devoted to seeing that the principle;
on which the UN Is founded are
put   into 'effect."   lie  said.
I'rof.  Andrew  warned that there  faith   is
was a very real menace that when   will fail
NATO   forces   became   sufficiently
strong   there   would   be   those   who
would advocate a  "quick,  painless,
defensive    war."
IDEALS OF UN
In a tribute to the Ideals of the
UN he said it would take faith'
and work for many year*, but if
only in human effort if.
The strength of a wholehearted and genuine faith cannot
be overestimated. "My simple faith
lias been tested and I find if
works."
Redshirts Kidnap
Fails Completion
CCfHead"
To Speak
Here Soon
Campus To Hear
Winch, Coldwell
Three CCF party heads,
Don MacDonald, Ernie
Winch, and M. J. Coldwell,
will speak at UBC as a part
of the CCF club's fall program. First speaker, MacDonald, is scheduled for
Monday, October 27.
Heading the list will be a speech
by Don MacDonald, national
CCF secretary, who will appear
at "UBC on Mbnday, October 27.
MacDonald Is on an organizing
tour of Western Canada and
comes to the campus After vislt-
M. J. COLDWELL
ing many points in H.C. lie will
speuk in FG 100.
On November 5 there will be
a, film shown , also in Wl 100.
"We've Oot You Covered" is a
Saskatchewan film, outlining
the history of government car Insurance. Although some of the
statistics may not now be 'applicable, the film tells an exclt-
ing story of progress.
Ernie Winch, veteran of H.C,
politics, Is scheduled to speak
on November 19. Winch has an
ERNEST  WINCH
international   reputation   for   his
social    welfare   work.
Although born In England, he
settled early in Saskatchewan
as ii school teacher. During his
career he has been president of
the Canadian Teachers Federation, Chairman of a Saskatchewan Royal Commission, Kogina
Alderman, Ci.'F Provincial Leader in Saskatchewan, and national cl'iiniuui of the ('I'I'". He was
first elected to parliament In
lit.1.', and succeeded ,1. S. Woods-
worth as leader in I'.i-I2. Coldwell
was one of the Canadian delegation to the UN Conference at
San   Francisco   in   I ft ■!■">.
MAMOOK'S   EXECUTIVE    meet
in"    ev'll    lie    held    Friday    noon    in
itoom   I aS.   Hrock,
Brock Proctor Turns
Back Engineers
Bewildered engineers, standing around dumbly in the rain
outside Brock Hall, failed to kidnap Nurses Undergraduate
Society president Marion Brown from the WUS pyjama party
last night,
After rigging a "rescue" of the
nurse, planned as un addition to
Engineer's Smoker, over 30 "red
blooded wlldmen" were turned
back by Brock proctor, Bill Brad
shaw,
EXPELLED!
"If you dure to come into this
building tonight, I'll see that you
are expelled from university," said
Bradshaw.
The redshirts, who had gained
entrance to the building by way
of an unlocked window ln the Publications Board, had assembled at
the head of the stairs at the north
m
end of the Brock, and alter hearing
the approach of tbe proctor, tumbled
back down into the offices of the
Pub Board, leaving hastily by the
windows.
ONLY THE PROCTOR
Cries of "Do you guys call yourselves engineers?" and "What's
the matter, that's only the proctor"
were heard U3 the redshirts came
out onto the lawn ln front of the
Brock Lounge.
A single RCMP corporal, prowling the campus in a radio oar, and
obviously not suspecting anything
was going wrong with the WUS
Hi Jinx affair, came by the east
mail 'as the -sciencemen poorer out
st Hie Wbek. MrteSlng "ftere<B the
cops," the engineers hustled into
their cars and fled.
'TWEEN CLASSES
Nation-Wide
Show To
Salute UBC
A coast-to-coast radio salute ot
UBC's Great Trek will be broadcast as a part of the "Denny
Vaughan Show" on New Westmln-
ster's CKNW, the Monday after
Homecoming weekend, November
3.
This dally, 8:15 to 8:30 r*(Jlo
show has chosen a group to lltlg
"Hall UBC as Its closing number
on November 3, Stuart MacKsy.
program official has announced.
*r *r tt
McOoun Cup debate trials will bt
held today In Arts 105 at- 12:30
p.m.
9p 9p qp
Tht Musical Appreciation Club
will present "Lalo's Symphony 8s-
panole", on Friday, October 24 In
the Brock Men's Club Room.
m *r *r
L'Alllanee Franceses, Vancouver
branch, will present the seriocomic film "Monselgpeur" wltfc
Bernard Bller *nd -Fenm,n*-4*#o»* .
at the Studio Theatre Sundity, October 26 at 2:30 p.m.
Tickets may be obtained from
the French Department Professor
L. J. Pronger any time between
now and Saturday.
T *P *r
IN THE EVENT of rain the.UN
Flag Raising Ceremony will be
held In the Brock Lounge Instead
of at the (lag pole.
9p *p *p
Liberal Club general meeting for
the election of officers and for a
discussion of the year's program
will be held on October 28, tn Arts
201.
•P *r *P
UBC Film Society will hold a
general meeting today in FO 102 at
12:38 p.m. There will be constitutional revisions,and the election
of an additional executive member.
Mr. Norman Barton, director Of
Visual Education at UBC and honorary president of the Film Society
will speak at fie meeting.
Plans for a (Hallowe'en Party to
be held on Saturday November lat
will also be discussed.
V *r *T
CCF Club presents Don MacDonald, national organizer and
treasurer, on Monday, October 27,
in F(i 100 at 12:30.
Joe    Corsby,    president   of    the
British Columbia CCF on Wednesday will speak In FG 100, at 12:30
p.m.. on "Why We Need the CCF."
*r        v        *r
English Department will sponsor
five lectures on aspects of literature that are not usually discussed
in lOnglisli courses. Each lecture
will be held on a Monday noon
hour.
The lectures will be bold in Arts
loo from 12:35 to 1:15 p.m. 6a
the following dates and topics:
.Monday. October 27. "The Arts as/
Communication." Mr. Harry Adaskin, Professor of Music; Monday,
November   17.   National  Character
,     ,    ,      ,«nd  .Style,"   Dr.   A.   \V.   De  Groot,
or   more.   Any   person   who  lent   a i0      .  ,   ,
permanent    resident    of    B.C.    for i*pem    Le,'t,,per   '"   C,M"M   «»d
more than six consecutive  months !SlaVOn,,,,,:     MondHy'    Jal,uar>r    1{''
'"Poetry   and   Politics."   Mr.   O.   C.
Andrew, Professor of English snd
Assistant to the President; Monday,  February 0. "Bringing Words
Franchise
For Filmsoc
Filmsoc has been given a
complete franchise of all campus shows sponsored by student groups, by a recent motion of the UBC Students'
Council.
Motion specifies that no cliarg°
• '
may be levied on projectionists'
services at noon hours. One dollar
may be charged for showings during university hours, and $1.50 at
any other time.
A certificate of competency shall
be granted to any person who
passes the film society's practical
examination ln projectlonlng, the
motion continues,
Appli/f tlons for projectionists
may be obtained ln Filmsoc club
house, Hut A2, behind tho Brock.
Film' library tjf the University
Extension Department will co-operate In the enforcement of this
bylaw.
Police Chief Whi/an
To Cheek Auto Plates
Police chief, Mr. II. Wliilan, and
liie. "staff will lie checking up on
vehicles from other provinces, in
the in Mr  future.
Students are requested to register the,, tears' properly in British Columbia. In accordance with
the Motor Vehicle- Act, anyone
who drives and is not a holder of
a subsisting driver's license, will
be liable to a fine of twenty dollars
!•
in   any
having
year,  will be exempt   from
a B.C. driver's licence.
i
CONTRAST IN JAZZ will be the to   Life.'   Miss   Dorothy  Somerset,
feature of the first campus concert
sponsored by .lazzsoe and ACS.
Lance Harrison's seven-piece hand
will present a musical discussion
nf both Dixieland and "cool'' jazz,
in the audit.lriuin, Wednesday. ()c-
lober   l':-i   al    12:.hi,
Director of the Summer School >t
the Theatre; Monday, March 2,
"Tiie Problem of Style and Communication in Scientific Literature,'' 0-. k. c. Dolman. Professor
and Ueail of the Department of
llacteriologv   and    llll IlllltlologV. PAGE TWO
i  %
TRE   UBYSSEY
Friday, October 24, 1952
THE UBYSSEY
MEMBER CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESfl
Authorised ag second class malt by the Post Office Dapt., Ottawa, Student subscriptions
$1.20 per year (Included in AMS fees). Mt»H subscriptions $2,00 per year, Single copies
five cent.?. Published throughout the University year by tne Student Publications tfoard
of the Alma Mater Solcety, University of British Columbia- Editorial opinions expressed
herein are those pf the editorial staff of the Ubyssey, and not necessarily those of the
Alma Mater Society or of the University.
Offices In Brock Hall For display advertising
Phone ALma 1624 Phone ALma 3363
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF  JOI 8CHLE8INOIR
Executive Editor Gerry Kidd      Managing Editor Elele Qorbat
Senior Editor, HAROLD BERSON
City Editor, Myra Oreen; News Bdltor, Ron Sapera; Women's Editor, Flo McNeill
Literary Editor, Gait Blkington; CUP Editor, Patsy Byrne; Editorial Assistant, Vaughan
Lyon; Staff Photographer, Hux Lovely. Desk Men, Pete pineo, Mike Ames, Top) #horter.
Letters to the Editor should he reetrlcted to 160 words. The Ubyssey reeervee the
right to cut letters and cannot guarantee to publish all letters received.
LETTERS TO EDITOR
Where's The Gin
,, At last we'have had a letter from one of
our readers asking us what happened to the
Old Ubyssey. He complains about the absence of "hippy girls with peek-a-boo bangs"
from our pages, and, after having rifled our
filing cabinets, the lack of gin (extra fine) in
ihe Publications office.
i
< While the writer of this letter has noticed
bloodshot eyes and a five-day stubble?" he
asks.
While vt»e writer of this letter has noticed
the reecnt changes in the Ubyssey, his questions bark up the wrong tree, in fact they can
he answered quite easily.
"Peek-a-boo bangs", it seems, are out of
fashion this year, which will be a serious
joss as far as the name itself goes.
An attempt was made earlier this year to
keep a bottle handy in the filing cabinet;
however, it was found that the bottle was
empty before it even got warm- As for the
beards: we figure that our five o'clock
shadows equal our predecessors' five day
stubbles.
Havii\g finished'with hyperbolic comparisons we can turn to the real changes that
have been effected.
The casual reader may not have noticed
that the Ubyssey turns to ribald only when
there is a lack of other copy. As witness to
this fact we submit this editorial
The lower ratio of cheesecake and allied
arts in this year's paper can, therefore, be
attributed directly to the increased efficiency
of the Ubyssey as a news gathering organization.
The Ubyssey, as always, stiil depends on a
few old standbys for its controversial editorial
material, specifically those organizations that
never fail to rise to the bait. There are the
Greek Letter Societies (how about thqse
discriminatory clauses, boys?), gqd of course
the good old CQTC (how did you like your
little compulsory lecture yesterday, or was
it a parade?).
If these and a few other organizations hfd
any heads to keep cool, the Ubyssey Would
probably have to find advertisers tp fill up
this column. However, as long as Russians
want to be exchanged, as long as councillors
insist on opening their mouths, as long as the
UBC blood corporate coagulates latter than
quotas can be met, in fact as long as there is
a single breath within the hollow cheat of pne
single engineer, this paper will he kept busy.
A Musical Ignoramus
There reecntly appeared in this paper a
criticism of the works and pronouncements
}<rf a contemporary Canadian composer. The
; writer of the column was, it should be stated,
'more critical of what the dpmposer had to
say 4dt herself in words than of her music.
Staff members of the Department of Music
have since taken «to task» the writer of the
column. Arguing that thoy as musicians
would not dare criticize the Van de Graaf
generator, the critic as a musical ignoramus
had no right to review a musical event.
5That critics be criticized is after all only
poetic justice. However, any critic, however
ignorant we may deem him, has the right to
express an opinion.
The writer of "Counterpoint" stated the
following: "Miss P. explained: 'AH my work
has a horizontal approach, and it is written in
two planes', personally we wllh Ubm P- V<wW
come closer to earth".
If he is to be considered an ignoramus and
if we keep in mind that he is writing for four
thousand fellow ignorami, it is not surprising
that the quoted statement floored him.
The Music Department is constantly striving to interest more laymen in music. These
ignorami, if they are to get interested, will
have to be sure that their opinions will not
be ridiculed.
The writer of "Counterpoint" is an amateur
enthusiast. The offensive article was his
honest opinion. The criticism directed against
him is certain to discourage his love for music
more than his criticism is likely to discourage
Miss P.
Plugged Nickle
Somebody stole my raincoat.
Now normally I wouldn't bother you with
my troubles.
XGUiook like you have troubles of your own. *
Anybody   that   looks   like   you   has   got
troubles.
This coat, however, was different. We had
grown very fond of each other, the coat and
>I. It used to clutch me tishtly and put its
arms around mine; on cold nights it used to
keep my chilly toes warm as I lay in bed.
And now it's gone.
What's more, it was a keepsake. ■ It had
been given to me by my father before he got
his tie caught in the disposal unit. Poor dad.
There he was, under the sink, all wrapped up
.in a brown bag. And now some heel has
taken his last offering.
I tried my best to get it back, too. I tried
the "psychology" ad: "Will the terribly nice
person who made the perfectly understandable mistake of accidentally taking the wrong
raincoat last Friday please return it at their
convenience?"
' And the sympathy approach: "Blind paralytic cannot find raincoat . . ." but to no
avail.
% jAAUKk.
My faith in human nature lies shattered at
tlle feet of suspicion. I trust no-one. As
Canada's best-dressed educator passes by, I
strain to read the label on his eoat. I lqok
weasel-eyed at my best friends; and any of
you that turn up with a new raincoat between
now and Christmas can expect to 'see a sullen,
determined looking character dogging you,
his old army ground sheet wrapped firmly
around his shivering irame. And when jolly
old Kris K tingle comes shooting down my
chimney with his merry HoHpHo (and a
bottle of rum, I hope), I'll be ryjht there in
my pyjamas with a search warrant to go
through his loot-sack.
My real reason for bringing the matter up,
however, is much more serious. You see—
and this is strictly confidential—this coat was
worn by a speckle-backed Koala £ear during
the recent British Atom Tests in Northern
Australia, and I'm really a famous physicist
doing research on the effect of radiation on
clothing in my secret laboratory under the
Law Building.
So whoever has it, had better get it back
quick before they kill thousands of innocent
people.
Besides, I really know who took it, and if
it doesn't show up in the next couple of days
I'm goin«' to have him or her or them arrested.
Editor, the Ubyssey
Dear Sir,
Now l don't want to be oat
who (a always after carrying
tales *nd gossiping, and each
like but there are some things
going on around this campus
that I think you should know
about.
And I think it's my duty to let
you know so you can do your
duty and let other people know,
too. After ill, news ia anything
that Is published In most newspapers, and the Ubyssey is no
exception.
Weil vetting down to what I
wus going to say. lt happened
that I was accidentally walking
past the Frederic Wood Tfysatre
recently nnd on the steps sat a
yonng ibib f ho appeared to be
in severe roentml anguish. When
1 (yon know, everybody* friend)
enquired into the cause of his
agonies, he looked up at tne, hie
glassy,   bloodshot   eyes   nearly
submerged  in the  bap  which
supported them ,w& moaned:
"Oh woe is me! Oh woe is me!
A.11 is sadnessl AU U gloom!
I'm snared in the cocpjwe—
This  actors'  tile  wiU  be  my
doom"
At this, point be waved to the
theatre and the shriek* of pain
emitting from U:
"Jmt look *t this! Ridiculous!
*W*twenty-one le «l#r4om
toowf
Never hae there b^en inch fuss,
Never has there been such
sound."
Then, he stood up, «nd assuming his most classic pose, (his
indefinite profile being shown to
advantage and his receding law
flluverlnj):
"Oh Zeus, oh Zeus, you sonofa-
moose,
Will  you' not  hearken  to my
prayer:
Agisthos dost attach! For-
soothe!
I must entrust me to thy care."
It must beve been here that
Afjstfcos   SJtohHed   Mm-   for   he
4hhf SnikVduds
mmm
srmm
This weather is like a young
man in love. It blows hot and
cold and early morning fog
mists the clear sight. But
sight won't help the citizens
of British Columbia if the
proposed telephone rate increase goes through. We are
willing to bet that the lost
art of letter-writing is found
again, and quickly.
Attribute the failure of the
Liberals In the B.C. Provincial
election of June 12 to whatever
you want from patronage to
political coalition. The fact is
the voters wanted a change, but
to what they didn't quite decide.
* * V
With all the lovely 'avion-bleu'
uniforms on the campus yesterday we civilians felt Intimidated.
But the feeling didn't last.
* *       *
Newapaner   men   and   women
wre just Uke other human beluga,
tbjy WW* for a living.
* #      *
What pore cf}n we say about
the Student directory this year
except that it's the best job
done t)o f'iir. The handiest handbook th«l ever cost a quarter.
* *       #
Now that UBC has Jltplly realized the ultimate goal: a Homecoming parade through downtown Vancouver with floats,
girls, streamers und old cars.
The duty of every student to his
Alma Mater Is clear. Don't stay
home during Homecoming Weekend, November 1.
staggered     slightly,     regaining
composure only after some difficulty   and   then   clasped   his
breast:
"Oh fate! Oh, Doom! Blood fills
the room
And rises nearly to my knees—"
Then as though all this were
too much for one human being
he cried:
"Enough! Enough; Let's stop this
guff!
1  th(pk  I'H  go get drunk,  by
Jeea!"
The poor chap turned to go,
but jjut at that moment there
stormed up the stair a wild melee of enthusiastic Thespians,
the like ol which I never expect
—or hope—to see »JRM». and as
they ro.are<J in, the very building
seeujed 4o shake. When the last
of them had disappeared, my
troubled Mend **• nowhere to
be «een; M»ay must have carried
him inside with them'
Has probably in there yet, for
every dgy now as I walk P»»t the
theatre, I he*r those stnange
noises   escaping   the   building.
Maybe gome day I'll stop in and
see—or maybe next year 1
might Uke Kngllsh 421 myaelf—
for I hear they're rehearsing $.
thus* three greek Pl*y» everyone
Is tulklug about.
J.   McBROMINK.
erary powers, especially one who
has had experience In th|s field.
This Is a student's paper, requiring student support.
I am also sure that Grace Is
"a real uice girl," but someone
should Bhake the lead out of her
. . . feet and direct her steps
down to the Pub.
ISABEL   RICHARDSON.
Editor, the Ubyssey,
Pear Sir,
it is aald that no place can be
as lonesome as the sldeltn.es at
a social dance, That truly anj^les
to the tea dancej at UBC where
there are plenty of men and
women but no two circle (flpul
Jones) mixers, snowhftU djUjces
or other ways of getting people
acquainted >and dancing.
As a student new to UBC this
year and a lover of daocjag. I
wae quite disillusioned with the
lack of Vancouver hospitality displayed, it 'seems to me that
dance club members could be
helpful by acting as hosts find
hostesses to see that everyone
had a good time.
How about it, tea dancers.
A DANCE LOVfin.
Editor, the Ubyssey,
Dear Sir,
ftrfce M»^Ken»le, o»r trim*
from away down South, presented some valuable ^criticism on
the Woman's.Page last issue.
The Ubyssey does not claim to
sponsor masters of repartee, but
rather would welcome aijy such
individual to contribute her lit-
mmmmmmmmmmwrmm
Mm sity Tht*fr»
mmmmmmmmm
WHW
I
mr
William Powell • Julia Adam*
"Treasured!
{Color by Technicolor)
Dick Powell • Peggy Dow
f'Yqn Never Cw -f0P
.1—:
i
DOUG
WfttfHT
MAMIMNQN M. MfMUMMY (Arcbmtbgy <SI)
Hyii "The longer ym cau keep somttbitff,
tbe mere interest It fains."
• 11 Tht game thing happen* to your moat?
io
Bank or Montreal
Your Bank on the Campus . . .
In the Auditorium Building
MERLE C. KIRBY,
Manager.
WOIKINS) WITH CANADIAN* IN IVf«V V)|A|K OJ lift   SltyCI   -
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4&
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PAcific 5321
Save Wisely TODAY,.
for TOMORROW
Consult uny of the following Sun Life Representatives who have had wide experience In budgeting
your income to meet essential insurance needs:
JOHN TENER J. J. CAPOZZI
LARRY WRIGHT J. R. BRANDON
JACK PEARSON
ROYAL BANK BLDG., VANCOUVER
SUN UFE OFCANADA
ww^^pwimp^"
■WPKW Friday, October 24,1952
X
THE  UBYSSEY
PAGE THUS
.wmmmm^m* i w      s e we ■ i^p»—i— .unnm
ithHkkhea L    |     1     C    If    Ak    WL- ' T
-mrmmemnF
w_m    MJL     W_m     w_%    ^L    W_\ rntttNa wfanklyn
mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm
There is a trend in modern novate towards more abusive laagu-
oje. *&wm Here to Eternity';
Jamms Jones realistic novel of pre-
W«r fcmfttag. used so much US
Ar»y barrack* language that the
r#Vii«K«r of the London Times de-
acrtbed It as foul and filthy, and
a hook he would hate to leave
WPMUd. the house lest it fall Into
tbe hands of the young and im-
pi\e*slon*ble.
However, wrttars of the P#*t
Irwlmi ^he *»W«fet of abuse much
»«r« delicately. Must of them e>-
ttffeittf in shaipeulng their rapier
wmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmiim^
wit at the expense of their slower
witted adversaries, etartlftg with
the classical eplgrgms of the Romans, such as Martial and Horace.
Martial was a well known Roman
writer, most of whose epigrams
were obscene, but Who oftened
abused his fellow clttsens..
He oalled ihee vieieue, slid  he?
i.yJ«i Mlfl
Theu art rvg ylelous, thou art Vice
Iteelf.
The Gxmit writers were no less
clever al their repartee, and the
(ollowing epigram might well be
mtpJM to some modern politicians.
m
wjmm
UBYSSEY CLASSIFIED
TU1CFOR SALE, 42, TAU* II0.M.
TA,. «,W7. John. Excellent condl-
u«a. (i*)
|)»P»miifiN€ED PARISIAN TEA-
cher, Just back from Peris. Has
French diplomas. Will instruct
MttlvaieKy students in French. Ph
Madame Juliette Fraser, CE. 3622.
■iw w. lath. (1$)
TYPING: ESSAY JJ, THESIS,
Notes, expertly and promptly
typed at moderate rates. We have
served UBC studenta since 1*48.
hone AL. OflUR. Mrs. 0. 0. Robinson, 4180 W. llth. ' (27)
SINOLE, ROOM, BREAKFAST
and dinner for male students In
quiet home. AL. 0T81R.
NEW CAR,, 105? PREFECT, 440Q
jpiles^ hejUw, and det. chgins4 apti-
freege. 4fl miles per gal. Cost $1*75.
# Asking HW or offer Call Peter
Moori, AL. *M2L. (13)
FOR SALE, f 3.5 tfonka Cam»ra,
35 mm, coupled range finder,
spwide to WMkth see. Case, portrait
lens. 0. llfht meter and case, all
for t*§. Phone OB. 0577.          (16)
1 PAIR'OF LADY'S NEW SKJ1S,
steel edges, Kanadar harness, new
poles. Phone KErr. 3A85L. (13)
GENTLEMAN'S FAWN ENOUSH
gabardine raincoat. Condition, ner-
feet* Very reasonable. KErr. 5150L.
(18)
MAN'S LIOhT BROWN TWO-
trQiwer SUM, eljse 38. Hardly worn.
KErr. 5160L. (13)
2 PBTWTAL' BIRCH DESK, SIZE
54 inches by 30'inches. Phone Mr.
Rolfe. CH. 9.239. Business phone No.
MA- M*i- di)
QE^TJiEMAN'S     8PR1NO     AND
i«jj coA $w& conauton. sine am.
AL, VfflU
R^MKS FOR THE MAN WHO
retniHM) my packetbook. P. J. S. on
inaide- Please leave ut pub office.
(14)
LUTHERAN BTUUENTS. STUDY
lectures each Thursday 12:30, Arts
10.1. Student Advisor, Rtv. Satre of
Dnnliar Lutheran Church. (II)
PASSENQERS WANTED FOB
8:30'* »hd return Monday to Frl
day. Leaving 19th and Oak via
12th. Call CH. 2993.
WANTED, BH3ER8 FOB 8:30'«,
from vicinity of 36th Avenue West
*nd M««Ke«sie Street. Phone Ivan
gt mrt. 32#8R.' <14)
PASSENGERS WANTED FROM
vicinity of Renfrew and Charles.
Can go 10th or 12th, 8:30, Mon.-
8m. Phone HA. 779»L. (14)
WANTED, PASSENOER8 FOR
8:30's. i come west from Broadway
and Gamble. Contact Joe Quan in
the photo studio, Hut A3 behind
the Brock, after 1:30.
WANTED, RIDE FROM 25th AVE.
and Oak St. for 8:30's Monday,'
Wednesday and Friday. Please
phone Bhirley, CH. 3628.
STUDENTS FOR RIDB, LEAV-
ing 10th and Oak. Phone Harold,
CE. 6203.
LOST, a small Evergood mads in
France pen. park blue. In the
Chem. building or on the way to
the Ubrary huts. Please return
to the Lpst aq4 Found In the AMS.
RIDE WANTED FROM N. VAN-
couver, 8:30 classes. Leave qniyer
at Alma Mater office.
1 PAIR QLASSES tjtf BROWN
leather case. Please phone John
MacDonald at CH. 0»3ft.
Q£AY &APPH1BE STONE LOST
hetween Caf and Commerce Dots.
Reward. CE. 9380.
LOST, PARKER 61 PEN. BLACK
with silver cap and gold clip. Phone
Joy, AL. 0939R,
LOST, LAST WEDNESDAY 15TH,
double strand of pearls, Rhinestone
clasp. Pirone HA. 4876L. (13)
SAT. MOWING, 10:30, DABK
blue burbwy. Phygics room 200. J.
Carter, Fort Camp. Reward.
LOST, LADY'S I4TT4J! FfNGER
ring with crest engraved In bloodstone. Sentimental value- Phone
KErr. 6623-L. (15)
ENGLISH CONEY COAT, SIZE 12
strapless evefllug gown, gold satin
nylon net, bust 32, waist 24. Made
to nieusure, uever worn. Phone CH.
8fi67.
GENTLEMAN'S SPRING AND
fall coat, good condition. Slae38-9.
AL. 0257L.
LOST, FRATERNITY PIN, INITIALS R. I. S. on hack. Finder pleaso
call CH. 5737. (15)
Fortune advanced thee all might
ever
That nothing Is Impossible to her.
This sort of writing established
a literary tradition that can be
traced all through literature I The
Elizabethans larded their plays
with a rich store of colorful Invective, using every type of metaphor
and stmllie. The Elizabethans were
strong stomached, but no doubt
such Shakesperian phrases as
'"Thou green sarcanet flap for a
sore eye," or "That bottled spider,
thou foul huch-bak'd toad" had an
Indigestible effect.
> The classical influence ls seen
most strongly In Pope, whose heroic couplets are Ideally suited te)
the abusive* epigram. He* was a
small, deformed man who looked
on  life cynically, and one of his
particular   butts  was  the  English
aristocracy.
And  all  your  courtly  civet  cats
can vent
Psrfum to you, to me Is, excrement,
Literary men have often had
scientific Interests. Shelly, for example, set off bombs at Eton, and
Samuel Johnson did 'involved experiments on finger nail growth,
but few had such a notable scientific achievement td their credit
as Sir John Harrington, an Elizabethan wit and scholar. His aristocratic' nose was offended by the
smell emerging from castles and
hovels alike, so he Invented the
water closet, writing an extremely
amusing   and   coarse   book  <about
■Q
Here Is your opportunity to
puretutM a preciiion-madt
watch, at a pric* thai
represents substantial
savings.
17-jewel Rideau
movements mad*
in Switzerland
exclusively
for f)irkt
9M. yellow gold 50.00
Yellow top, steel back     22.50
\\ I ll K S
JEWELLERS
GranviUe at Georgia, Vancouver
Presenting the NEW SMALL MICROSCOPE
"A L L MIK R O"
A German Quality Product
Optica of high quality
Precision Work
Magnification:
60-120.180 Times
PRICE:
$16,95
Particularly recommended to:
Pupils, Students, Botanists, Zoologists
and all Friends of Nature.
THI IDEAL CHRISTMAS GIFT
A amall Down-payment will hold it for you until
Christmas . . . Terms if desired
tjerc* liftittd
.Importers
Room 406 Shelly Bldg.
119 West Pender St, Vancouver 3, B. C.
PHONE MA. 2Mfi
SHB
y\m wwvL-m
it. As a result ot his extra- literary
endeavours, this was his suggested
epitaph.
Lie gently on  him  larth for  he
Took many a heavy lp**d from thee.
#      ¥      ¥
AWous Huxley is a man whopej
learning ls almost as great as
Pope's, and he has absorbed some
of the same spirit of ferocious
misanthropy. Most of his books
tear apart the shallowness of society artificiality and he(sums up
the whole attitude of the unhappy
hermit ln the following quatrain:
The leach'e kin, tha squid embrace,
The prurient apt'e defiling touch
And d« yfV I'M t*M »!"«"•" rf«••
Nqj not rnwh.
tt     m     m
Contributions haye b^en coming
in with gratifying frequency, and:
we hope to be able to print a full
sized literary page soon. We need
short stories. It will be a welcopie
change to print somebody else's ma-,
terial,   because   we   find   literary*
columns hard to write. After flc»
finishing this one,  we feel with
Pope:
Yeu beat your pate and fairey wit
will  come—
Knock at you will, there'a nobody
at heme.
SWJSETCte
j
•mm
-mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmrm
a
Evening Stars
Go Formal I
On enchanted evenings you'U be the belle
of the ball denying in a clpud of misty
flame net. To sparkle the whole picture,
wear a scattering of rhinestone*. An
Alp
ensemble of beauty chosen for you
from EATON'S
The Gown: soft velvet top
and trim or net. Dainty
stqle.    Flanje   red.   9tef
Dresses • tecond Pleor
Necklace,
Prycplet,
Earringjo
1S.00
*&$QO$*
Jewellery . Main Floor
'The Evowiug Piu-ms: soft
white i'ahric. Clasp has sik
sparkling rhinestones.
4.tf
Handbags • Main Floor
"**^WII
mv /
PAGfcFOV*
THE   UBYSSEY
* '■•» i*
Friday, October 24, 1952
. )|     • ■   el .m I
ALLAN
FOTHERINGHAM
'..   TUDteNT8 who were wonder-
Sing lest Saturday how we were
going to develop a strong football team didn't have to look any
Jartber than the footbaU team At
half time to find 'their answer.
On the field during intermission
were two teams of kids 8*10 years
old. who put. oh a fair exhibition
of the game of football. Unconsciously* those kids on Saturday
afternoon showed! students what
Is wrong with their football team.
Across the border on Saturday
that same scene was being repeated thousands of times in sand lot
games, in pickup games, in public
school games and in high school
^mes.
in B.C. it was repeated exaotly
once.
CYO and Blue Bombers were
Playing a Big Four Canadian Foot*
bail gaart et Brockton Point. That
.was the only other g*me in .Brit*
lah Columbia lost Saturday.
US sehools are power houses In
football tor the sain* reaaon that
Ctoada produces tb* belt hookey
player! th the world. In both cases
the kids start »s toon aa they
can walk; in one case with a football, in the other with ft hockey
site*.
'While American high •chool students detote all their spare time
to practising football our high
school boys are playing either rug*
by or soccer.
0Oly by having the high schools
til this province play football can
UBC be assured of adf quale toot-
till material each year.
' sin, average high echool football
player hi the US is at thi same
ftfig* of development as art a lot
*f UBC pUyers. Amarloan kids
£a*§ been playing football elnce
p^Hc jcbooi,, And they are well
•eqturtated with the fundamentals
Oi th* game toy the time they grad-
• iwte.  ■•■;'■
NO IXRIRIINCI
mt at UBC Jelly Andersen
gats players each year who
hav* never played football
before in their lives. He has to go
through the frustrating process ot
teaching fundamental! to these
players, something tbey should
learn in high school.
.« How can a coach be expected to
produce a winning team when be
bas to start from scratch with
Ipnyers who have never thrown a
block before or who don't know
hdkw to go about making a tackle?
' At present only five high schools
In Vancouver play football: King
Edward, Kltsllaeo, King George,
Magee and Byng. This year Magee
are rumored to .be dropping the
gaibe.
A private school, Vancouver College, produces the bulk of the
material tor UBC each year. Col-
ltege Is the only school In B.C.
which has a proper football program. Since they play with American schools they patterned their
program after the Amerkoan style.
Practically every boy at Vancouver College plays some kind ot
football. By the time students
graduate from VC they are well
grounded In the fundamentals of
the game and in the discipline
which is necessary tor a training
program.
Bird Ruggers Meet
Vindex Tomorrow
Miller Cup Rugger
Takes Over Stadium
By BRIAN WHARF
Varsity's champion rugger squad takes over the featured
spot in weekend athletic activities when they battle the Vindex
club tomorrow afternoon in the stadium.
NO BLOCKING •
UT81DE Vancouver the only
0 football played ls in Penticton and Victoria. Penticton
has a junior team which was allowed in the Big Pour tor the first
time thin year. Victoria has a four-
team league but they play Canadian ball like Penticton. And Canadian football players who switch
to the American code find difficulty
in their downfield, blocking assignments, one of the principle weaknesses on the UBC team.
A step ln the right direction is
the formation of a Uttle League
Iqotball in Vancouver. Copied attar
tiie tremendously successful Little
League Baseball system: the program starts kids playing football
In organized giames, with competent coaches, equipment, playing
fields 'and publicity. And it produces the crowd-pleasing type of
same you saw during half time on
Saturday.
When the Little League system
is firmly established on a city wide
and.provincial scale, when all high
schools in B.C. start playing toot-
ball In the (all with adequate
coaching then we will have a good
football team.
At present, some form of athletic
selW|elp program would aid
things, a cooperative Senate und
administration would help, but only
a high .school roottall ■program will
help I" thP Ions run.
Currently tied foi' second place f*
In downtown Miller Cup competition, Birds have thundered to two
straight- wins ln ae many starts.
Trouncing the upstart Meralomu
squad 13-0 In the opening fixture,
Birds continued their victory
march last Saturday by crushing
the Ex-Brtts 11-0.
Vindex Is, however, the leading
club, having managed two wins
and a tie ln three games. If Birds
triumph tomorrow they can take
over the top position with <a game
in hand and With the knowledge
that they have defeated the three
toughest tjaams. The remaining
fixtures should present iittle dlffl
culty.
Although Birds hold the Mc-
Kechne Cup, massive emblem of
Pacific Coatt rugger auperemacy,
the Miller Cup eluded them last
season. Finishing a dismal third
in very close competition Birds are
now out to bring the Cup back to
ita former home.
LINIUP CHANOIt
Coach Albert Laithwaite, experimenting with lineups before the
more vital and tougher matches,
has come up with a revamped team
for tomorrow's game.' Don Spence,
formerly a wing three-quarter mau
with Meralomas and (Vancouver
Reps will start at fullback, in yet
another attempt to fill that troublesome spot.
Hughle Greenwood moves from
his regular centre three-quarter
position to right wing while fleet
footed John Newton will, as usual,
patrol the left flank.
Gerry Ma'ln «nd newcomer Russ
Wright wilt be In the centre three
slots with Bill Whyte and Danny
Oliver >at fly and scrum half respectively.
Front row forwards are Doug
McMUland.Fishman and Jim Mo-
Nicol; second rankers are Charlie
Brumwell and Bob Morford while
Frank Gower, Derek Vallis and
Joe yVwrnock will fill the back
row positions.
BRAVIS  IN  GOOD  FORM
The senior second division squad,
the Braves, tackle Vindex seconds
at Douglas Park tomorrow after
noon. Braves, showing surprisingly
good form this season, have kept
pace with their big brothers.
They too have won their only
two games to climb Into second
place ln the BeU Irving Cup race.
Braves whacked the Ex-Brtt ne<v
onds by a horrendous 28-0 score
last Saturday in the most lop-sided
game seen for a long time.
The other varsity rugger teams
will also 'be In action tomorrow as
the Tomahawks meet the Rowing
Club seconds at Douglas Bark East
and the Redskins tackle North
Shore  seconds  at  Hlllcrest  Park.
Senate Is Stumped
About Freshmen
Playing Football
The recent furore over the controversial freshman and transfer rule
came to a dead stop when the UBC
Senate failed to reach a decision
concerlnlng ther ullng at a meeting
Wednesday evening.
The ruling, which would have
barred freshmen and transfers
trom other universities from playing varsity sport until they had
completed one full year at UBC,
was passed by the Senate at the
end of the summer but did not reach
student attention until two weeks
ago.
Because the ruling would practically ruin UBC's. football team tor
several years the MAD presented
a motion before Student Council,
asking that the ruling be postponed for two years until three
were enough playing fields and
coaches to accommodate freshmen
in athletics.
The Student Council asked the
Senate to reconsider their ruling
so that it wouldn't be enforced for
two years.
After the meeting a Senate
spokesman declared thet the situation does not require an Immediate
decision, and that the body was
going to study every phase of the
problem before voting.
Inter-Mural Sked.
INTRAMURALS—Mens
Monday — Mechs ,B vs. Sigma
Mus; Sigma Foo B vs. T.T. B;
NeianaaA vs. TT. A; Phi Delt P;
vs. Newman B; Kappa Sig B vs.
Sigma Chi;. Beta B vs. Commerce.'
Tiiiaday—Zete vs. V.Q.C. Alpha
Delt A vs. Anglican College; A.T.O.
vs. lambda Chi;  Fife A vs. Div
Grads; Fort Camp A vs. Phi Delt
B; A.T.O. B vs. Dekes.
SOCCER
Monday—Aggie vs. Eng.
Tuesday— Beta vs. Newman.
Wednesday — Sigma  Alpha
vs. Lambdtr Chlr"
rridiy-^D.U. vs. Kappa Sig.
TOUCH   FOOTBALL
Monday—Dekes vs. Psi A.
Tuesday—ilCappa Sig vs. Sigma
Alpha Mu.
Wednesday—Meds vs. Mechs.
Friday—Pre Med vs.. Lambda
Chi.
Mu
\
ALBERT'S UNDEFEATED mugger squad takes over from
Jelly Andersen's uncrowned champs of the Port Kells
Mumbledypeg League as the matinee attraction in the stadium at 2:30 Saturday. Meanwhile, Jelly has taken his
Birds to Cheney, Washington on a lecture tour entitled
"How to Lose Football Games and Win American Friends"
or "Who Filled my Gastank with Peanut Butter?"
Four New Big Blocks
Awarded By Executive
Four new Big Blocks and four rewins were awarded to
campus athletes' as a result of the Awards Committee's fall
npt
selection meeting.
TRACK AND FIELD
Big  Blooks—Rewln:   Poter  Harris.    Small   Blocks—Harold   Bush,
Eddy Cinlts, Barney lowers. Don
Barrlou.
TENNIS
■ag   Bloeke—New   Wins:   Lawrence Barclay. Bruce Jaffery. Small
Blocks—David Hemphill, James W.
Kllleen.
OOLF
Big Blocks — New Win: Oeorge
Barnes. 'Small Bloeks—Max Swan-
mmmmammmm--mmm^mmmtmimmmmm^mm
*-
P O R T S
Bill Hutchinson - Editor
Swimmers Build Muscles
There is still room for more entries in the UBC Swim
Team.
The conditioning program has now begun under the
guidance of the swim team coach, Doug Whittle. The program consists of exercises including general calisthenics
and some bar-bell work. •
All those interested in trying out for the team should
contact Doug Whittle at once or meet with the other team
members in the weight lifting room in the new gym at noon
Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday.
Bob Strangrobm, UBC grad and swim instructor at the
x Y, has been named to assist Whittle in the coaching. Due to
graduation there are many berths to fill so don't be bashful,
come out and swim.
son, John Russell.
GYMNASTICS
Small Blacks—Sev Helberg, John
Hodgins, Mo Slutsky.
ROWING
Big Block's—-Rewins: John Warren, Harry Sastllllou, John Drlnnan.
New    Win:     Malcolm    Matheson.
Small   Blocks—Sel   Fox,   Ii   R.
Rendell, Glen Smith, Andrew Small,
Doug Holbrook.
MANAGERIAL AWARD
Small Block — Robert Brodie.
What is the
best personal
Investment Plan?
A;
."•*
One based on
Life Insurance.
When you aave through life
Insurance you put your.,
savings on a sound, regular
basis. You are sure of saving
a set sum each year through
your insurance premiums.
This money is Invested by
your insurance company
skilfully and safely. For long
term profitable re»ulu (plus
family protection in the
meantime) saving through a
Mutual Life of Canada "policy
cannot be excelled.
Vancouver Branch Office
402 W. Pender Street
Eric V. Chown, LL.B., C.L.U.
Branch Manager
MUTUAL HIE
t   A U  l\ i» A
Gord Has Tea Party
Tonight In Cheney
Somebody Hat To
Win Thit Gome
URC Thunderbirds left* Thursday
afternoon for Cheney, Washington
still hoping for their first win of
the season against Eastern Washington College of Education.
The luckless Birds meet the Sav-
plges from Eastern {Washington
Friday night at Woodward Field,
Cheney, and while the possibility
is remote, might even come up with
a win.
The Eastern Washington win,
like the Thunderbirds, is wlnlens
so far this season. UBC has dropped
four successive games to Whitworth, Central Washington, Western Washington and Whitman.
The Savages haven't been able
to win In three tries and last week
were two-touchdown losers to
Centnal Washington, the club which
squeezed past the IBrds 20-13.
The Birds will have Gordy Flem-
onm» buck in the charge of the T
but will definitely not be at full
strength. Stu Mathews, who rilled
in at quarterback for part of the
game last Saturday and John Mac-
Don>ald, offensive lineman, are out
with injuries and did not travel
with the team.
Mike Chyrknluk, Bob Knidshnw
iiiul Hill llortlo went down with the
much action due to minor injuries.
Several other players are crippled
up with lumps, bumps and bruises
but will be out on the field on Friday night.
Abe Poffenrothfl coach of the
Savages, feels that his team is
"up'' for the game and thinks his
single-wing attack will be enough
to give the Eastern Washington
players their first win or the season.
GIRLS' INTRAMURALS
Volleyball
Mon. Oct. 27—Tudors vs. Blue
and Little Dippers vs. T.T., 12:30.
Tues.. Oct. 28—Pre-Meds vs. Mlgs
and VOC vs. Home <Ec, 12:80.
Wed.. Oct. 29—P.E. 1 vs. Wesbrook and Pharmacy vs. Bronze,
12:30.
Thurs., Oct. 30—'Aggies vs. Maclnnis    and    Turkeys    vs.    Ghouls,
12:30;    Pinks   vs. "'Ad*   Amblers,
1:15.
Hockey—All games 12:30.
Mon., Oct. 27—Sparks vs. P.E. 1.
Tues., Oct. 28—'Mlgs vs. T.T.
Wed., Oct. 29—-Maclnnis vs..Arts
Amblers.
Fri., Oct. 31—Aggies vs.  Nurses.
Mon., Nov. 3—Colonials vs, ex-
Jayo.
Tups..    Nov.   4 -    Wesbrook    vs.
Newraau.
till

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