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The Ubyssey Mar 12, 1926

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 Issued Twice Weekly by the Students' Publications Board of The University of British Columbia.
' 'JSP;
^
Volume VIII.
VANCOUVER, B. C, MARCH 12th, 1926
No. 35.
Imperial Debaters
Address U.B.C.
Tuesday Noon
Tuesday noon the members of the
visiting Imperial debating team addressed a fairly large audience of
assembled students who were instructed by the impressions and entertained by the anecdotes of the visitors.
Johnny Oliver, tho president-elect
of the Alma Mater Society, acted as
chairman.
Mr. R. Nunn-May, of Birmingham
University, president of the National Union of Students in Great Britain,
paid special attention to the Question
of student union. He outlined the National Union ot the old country and
showed its success there as a binding influence among students. One
of the things Canada needs, according
to the speaker, is something that will
help the people of this vast Dominion to know each other—east, west
and centre.
A union of Canadian students oould
and would do much in this direction.
Mr. Nunn-May was impressed particularly with the great example of courage and foresight which has been
shown by B. C. in planning for the
future of this great university. "In
B.C.," he said "you are planning for
things that are not yet necessary; In
England we do things a hundred years
after they are needed. In closing,
he voiced his hearty thanks to the
one gentleman who made his pleasant visit possible—Christopher Colum-
but).
Mr. McDonald, the charming representative from Edinburgh, then gave
a talk, overflowing with humor, depleting the lighter side of Scotch
University life. The elections of Rector, which he described, evidently
outdo anything In the shape of the
Arts-Science conflicts which are sometimes found in B. C. With the fighting Scotch, elections are a serious,
yea even a sacred, turmoil. Every
three years, It seems, the students
elect a Rector from among the great
men of the day. He makes one
speech, which Is drowned by his constituents; and holds a seat on the
University government, which he
never occupies. The undergrads,
however, seem to get more kick out
of the election. For about three
weeks previous to the election
they conduct a lively v'ampnlgn with
such things as axes, eggs, soot,
pianos, battering ranis, fire hoses,
and tomatoes. Yes the Scotch arc
bonnle fighters. Mr. McDonald suggested that U. B. C might do well
to have a rector.
Mr. Paul Reed, of London University and Mr. A. H. Molson of Oxford
gave ultra humorous accounts of the
foibles and practices of their respective universities, laws relating to the
use of poE-o-sticks and marble?, to
"bump suppers." All of the men
were t'cellent speakers, fluent, pleasing and easy to listen to. The U. B.
C. certainly enjoyed their visit, so it
Is hoped that Mr. Reed expressed
their sincere sentiments when he
said that after coming 6,000 miles
they were amazed and delighted to
find they were not abroad but at
home.
Where the Voting
is to Take Place
Voting for Secretary and Treasurer
will take place on Monday, March
15th. Voting for President ot the
Men's Undergraduate Society, President Women's Undergraduate Society
and Junior Member, will take place
on Thursday, March 18, 1928.
.Nominations for President of the
Literary aud Scientific Department,
President ot the Men's Athletic Association, and President of the Women's
Athletic Association, will be received
until Monday, March 16, at 8:00 p.m.,
and voting for the above offices will
take place on Monday, March 22nd.
ALL VOTING WILL TAKE! PLACE
IN   THE   LITERARY   AND   SCIENTIFIC DEPARTMENT.
IMPORTANT!
IMPERIAL DEBATERS ARE
DEFEATED BY VARSITY
University Men Make Brilliant Showing- Judges Decision 2-1
MR. "TED" MORRISON
Cards for Scholarship Students are
now ready at the Registrar's office.
(By F. H. Stevens)
The Imperial and U. B. C. debaters
divided the honors Tuesday night at
Wesley Church. The visitors, according to the popular decision, won by
the rather close vote of 968 to 290;
while the home team was the best
In the eyes of the Judges who were
two to one for them. However, as
the judges decision was final, It may
be fairly said that U. B. C. was successful. The visitors, Mr. Reed of London University. Mr, McDonald of
Edinburgh, and Mr. Molson of Oxford,
were, to most of the audience, a bit
disappointing. A somewhat, serious
discussion of the question, "Resolved
that Western civilization is becoming a degenerating influence on mankind"—was expected. Instead, the
visitors, with but few exceptions, devoted themselves to some very pleasing, charming and humorous but
rather unsubstantial shadow-boxing,
Indeed one is almost tempted to describe their brilliant wit as "tea-
party repartee."
The B. C. men, Messrs. Craig, Kobe
and Stedman held, fairly consistently,
to a more logical and businesslike
treatment of the subject. They persisted in accumulating, pile upon pile,
or strong and unrefuted arguments to
buttress their case, leaving the lighter
sallies to their more polished opponents. When, however, they did venture Into the sphere of wit and humor,
their attempts, with but one or two
brilliant exceptions were either decidedly hat or oppressively personal.
The conflicting opinions of Judges
and popular vote Is probably due to
the different lines of attack ov the
two teams; the Judges were evidently
persuaded by the clear, logical arrangement and presentation of their
case by the B. C, men; while the
audience was swayed by the pleasing
and Interesting light oratory of the
Britishers.
Mr. Reed, University of London,
aaid llrst speaker for the affirmative,
showed that aa a result of the growing material comfort and tho complexity of modern, life the human products
of the western civilization wero rapidly becoming a toothless, bespectacled, bald, bearded, race of long-eared
animals, Woman's hair which was
once so useful and beautiful, would,
he said, "scarcely make a decent-sized
shaving brush." Physically the race
Is rapidly degenerating. He pointed
out that the much lauded science, to
whose advance his opponents would
probably point with pride, had produced poison gas, submarines, and
battleships. He drew a picture of the
collapse of morality, of art, and of
democracy under the pressure of
western civilization. Regarding the
latter he said that he felt that there
was much truth In tbe statement of
a friend of his who claimed hat "the
only man who ever went to parliament with good Intentions was Guy
Fawkes." Prohibitory laws, without
sense nor reason, particularly drew
his scorn. "We have made progress
In science and material wealth," he
said lu closing, "but is mankind happier and better for it all?"
Mr. Craig, Ec'.'cation '26, the first
speaker for the negative, opened his
forcerul and eloquent speech by expressing his Inability to believe that
the pessimism of his opponents was
sincere. But then pessimism is not
a new thing, It was found in Egypt
and Assyria where similar prophets
deplored the signs of degeneracy In
their day. He went on to show how
the western clvllliatlon had bettered
man: slavery has gone, brutal Imperial Ism Is going, poverty Is decreasing, htimunltarlunlsm Is Increasing.
"Civilisation," he said, "Is based on
nian'H relation to man. These relations are constantly Improving. Hence
the basis of civilisation Is becoming
firmer and better." Cautioning the
audience against the danger of being
curried away by the fine words of his
opponents be quoted "Tlmeo Danaos
ei doua ferente"—I fear them though
they are bringing gifts, of the finest
oratory ever heard In  Vancouver.
Mr. McDonald, the handsome rente
sentatlve of Scotland declared tfcat
the supreme thing, according to fiUjtl-
osophy at least, is mind—clvlllsauon
must develop the mind. Is this being done? The wealthy man seeks
more wealth; the worker tries to satisfy his craving for happiness with
doses of synthetic pleasure; the medical scientist seeks, euros for the diseases civilisation itself has produced;
the art instinct Is satisfied by Jiggs
and Major Hopple In the comlo strip;
dishonesty is the keynote to "success"
In business; and Jaw is called muslo.
These according to the speaker show
how western civilisation has affeot-
ed the hum/in mind of the present
generation. "The very songs," he
said, "show the trend ot civilisation.
Instead of the sweet, lovely, old melodies, we sing 'Show Me the Way to Go
Home.' It's very title is significant."
Mr. Kobe, the Japaneso orator ot
Arts '28, In a speech which, perhaps,
had more direct bearing on the subject than any other during the evening, gave his view of Western Civilisation as seen through the eyes of an
Oriental. According to this speaker,
co-operation of man with man, man's
treatment of his fellows, is the criterion of progress. Applying to western civilisation, he dwelt on the treatment it has dealt out to the Orient.
"Forty, fifty, a hundred years ago the
motto of a westerner in the East was
'Do as you like, but make money"'
He went on in his denunciation of the
past policy of the Occident: "The
West thrust the curse of opium on
China," etc. But this Is not the case
now. "Indeed," he said, "the West
Is now so humble that our opponents
must be told by an Oriental that they
are not degenerating." This improvement In the attitude ot one race to another shows that It Is not by any
means degenerating.
Mr. Mollson, of Oxford, in a very
pleasing and delightfully prosented
speech, summed up the case of the
affirmative and made a valiant attempt to meet some of the numerous
arguments of his opponents According to him education was prevalent because it pays. "Hut the value
of education depends on what you
read and what you write," What do
we read'.' Ours, is material prosperity -material prosperity marked the
decline of Home.
Mr. Stedman, Arts '27, final speaker
for the negative gave a speech which
though brilliant and substantial, was
marred somewhat by the speaker's
platform manner and his recurring
personal references. Ho dealt with
the aesthlc und spiritual side of the
question and showed conclusively that
man's appreciation of the higher
things of life Is becoming decidedly
higher and more wide-spread. "In
religion," he suld, "we have left superstition, Intolerance, and star-gazing,
and are now preaching the practical
social gospel. Man's Inhumanity to
man has softened." But the speaker's
polite references to the arguments of
his opponents as "froth" and "hot-air"
did much to lower the high tone of
his speech.
Mr. Reed, In his rebuttal, took off
his gloves and proceeded to handle
the arguments of his opponents In a
mariner that seemed to Indicate that
he was a little peeved. Put though,
superficially, he simply wiped out
their case, In reality he left It untouched. Hl« rebuttal was not a rebuttal but a series ot brilliant verbal
gestures.
U. B. C. Is to be congratulated on
tbe excellent showing it made, and
It Is to be hoped that contests such as
this will be continued year by year.
Senior Aggies Entertained
The upper years of Agriculture were
the delighted guests of the Agriculture Faculty on Wednesday, the 10th,
at the Point Grey Oolf and Country
Club. The orchestra and entertainment were of the highest order, and
the party was one ot the most enjoyable  of  the  year.
Mr. Edmund Morrison was appointed Editor-in-Chief of the Publications Board for the year 1928-27, at
Monday's meeting of the Students'
Council. "Ted," as one of the Feature
Editors on this year's Ubyssey staff,
has proved a very valuable worker,
and will undoubtedly lead the publications through a successful year. He Is
a prominent member of Arts '27, being
the literary representative on the
clasa executive, and has taken an Interest In debating. He is the archivist of the Outdoors Club, nnd an outstanding member of the Letters Club.
Tbe Ubyssey extend Mr. Morrison
their congratulations upon his appointment.
Imperial Debater
Gives Ideas on
'Tygmalion"
Interesting Criticism by Mr.
Paul Reed
Following is a criticism of the recent (Mayors' Club production, written
hy Paul Reed, a member of the Imperial debating team, which tho U.B.C.
had the honor of entertaining during
tlio past week. The criticism should
prove of special Interest to students,
not only becauso Mr. Reid is a promi-
nont journalist, but also bocauso It
representes the Impartial viewpoint of
a visitor with a wide background of
dramatic experience.
"Pymallon," like St. Paul's Epistle
to the Epheslans, Is It? is prolific In
advice ostensibly glveu to women, but
really meant for men. Giving advice
Is, of course, Mr. Shaw's peculiar
wetler. He will turn aside In a game
of tennis to lay down what treatment
the turf will require next winter. But
advice, good or bad, Is always objective and disinterested. I have heard
Shaw give cogent reasons why vegetarians are the scum of the earth,
and that not ironically, though he Is
himself one; and a man so detached
on the subject of good has surely
touched  the  philosopher's' stone.
The men In "Pygmalion" are all
spineless creatures, Even Hlgglns Is
shown to be but lath and plaster
when a pin Is stuck Into his Imitation
marble surface. The women are the
people who do things. It has been
foolishly thought, and Shaw means
to Insult women by bis constant assertion, express or Implied, that In all
serious things women take the Inltla
live, They are the crafty hunters
posing as the guileless hunted. In
fuel, of course, Shaw—a feminist to
the fingertips—admires them on that
account.
Ardent Shavians divided Shaw's
works, like Shakespeare's, Into four
periods, First, the comedies des
niocurn, second, "Heartbreak House,"
and "Hack to Methuselah,'* third, the
period that has as yet produced only
"St. Joan." "Pygmalion" has most of
the technical flaws and artistic Ineptitudes found In the first period plays.
(Continued on Page 4)
Who's Who in the
Coming Elections
MISS MARY ROSKRTSON
Miss Robertson Is a prominent
member of Arts '27. In entering for
secretary of the A. M. S. she has behind her a year's practloal experience
bb secretary ot the Lit. and Scientific
Department, a very Important position, and one which she has proved
herself fully capable in. She has
also gone in for athletics, swimming
in particular. She has been on the
women's swimming team throughout
her college career. She was a member of the Arts '27 executive as Women's Athletic epresentatlve in her
sophomore year. The experience she
has had in this position, but more
especially as secretary to the L. S. D„
would more than qualify her for work
in the A. M. S.
KATHLEEN BAIRD
Although Miss Baird Is only In her
sophomore year, she has already a
college record of which a senior
might well be proud. She distinguished herself In her freshman year, in
public speaking, both in interclass debating and in winning the Women's
Oratorical Contest. She was on the
Executive of Arts '28 last year, as
Women's. Literary representative.
This year she has surpassed her last
year's record. She has been vice-
president of Arts '28. In the field of
public speaking again distinguished
herself by debating successfully
against Puget Sound. Her work as
a reporter on the Ubyssey was such
that she was appointed Associate Editor. As well as being vice-president
of her year she was also vice-president of the Musical Society, and she
took a major part in their Spring production.
HAROLD M0WILLIAM8
Having proved his worth this year
us Business Manager of the Ubyssey,
Mr. McWIlllams has been nominated
for Treasurer of the Alma Mater Society. In his present position he has
handled a large part ot Alma Mater
fees and Is thus well qualified for the
position. In the realm of sport he
has been very active, especially in
track and boxing. He was on the
Intercollegiate boxing team in his first
year, and has starred on the track In
every year, having broken the records
in the mile, and half mile events In
the recent track meet
OTTO GILL
Following u successful year as
treasurer of the Men's Athletic Association, Mr. Otto Gill has been nominated for treasurer of the A. M. S.
Resides his work on the M. A, A. he
has hold several other positions. Mr.
Olll was president of his class, and
president of the swimming club last
year, the vice-presidency of which he
held tho year before. In sports, Mr.
Gill has been most prominent In
swimming and basketball. He broke
tho intercollegiate broad stroke record last week, and la expecting to
meet tho Dominion champion in the
near future, and has played on basketball teams throughout his Varsity
career.
LESLIE BROWN
Mr. Leslie Brown, the candidate for
junior member of tho Alma Mater
Society nooda no Introduction to the
student body. He has been In the
public In various ways since his freshman year when he took a leading part
In the Christmas plays, an accomplishment which he repeated this year. He
wns business manager for the club on
tour In hU freshman year and has
filled the same position for the city
this year. Other executive positions
Include the presidency of Artn '28 this
year, In addition he Is a public speaker of no mean ability, having debated
successfully in tho intercollegiate contest wilh Saskatchewan, and spoken
In the finals of the Oratorical Contest.
He lias taken a very great Interest In
athletics nnd has starred as a goal-
tender on U.B.C,'s grass hockey team.
WM. THOMPSON
Mr, Wm. Thomson, Arta '28, Is also
seeking election as junior member.
Mr, Thomson has a rocord which
should command the respect of every
student. He Is vice-president of the
husketbal club, with which he has
been constantly Identified since entering University, this year playing on
(Continued on Page 4) Til Us
is*    tt vt v a a w V
i'i        i;   i/   j.   g u u   i
March 12th 1926    •*
Slip HbllHBPll
(Member of Pacific Inter-Collegiate Press Association).
Issued every Tuesday and Friday by the Student Publications Board ot the
University of British Columbia, West Point Grey.
Phone: Varsity 1434
Mail Subscriptions rate: 18. per year.   Advertising rates on application.
Editorial Staff
EDITOR-IN-CHIBF—A. Barle Birney.
Senior Editors—Miss Sadie Boyles and W. C. Murphy
Associate Editors—David Warden, Don Calvert, Miss Marlon Smith, and
Miss Kathleen Baird.
Feature Editors—Brio Dunn, E. Morrison and Q. Vincent.
Assistant Bdltors—Miss Florence Cassidy, Miss Alice Weaver.
Sports Editor—Dave Taylor.
P. I. P, A. Editor—George Davidson.
■uelneee Staff
Business Manager—Harold G. McWilliams.
Advertising Manager—J. Stanley Allen.
Circulation Manager—Dlgby Leigh
Edltore-for-tha-leeuei
Senior, William Murphy; Associate, Florence Cassidy
Assistant, Dorothy Arkwrlght
.» a i» ia'4
Correspondence
-a-**
STUDENTS DO NOT VOTE
Although students havo always taken pfroat interest in the presidential election thoy have never paid much attention to tho elections
for tho other Council positions. And Bince the president has alreudy
been elcted by acclamation, possibly even fewer students this year
will take the trouble to vote for candidates for tho other offices.
Evidently, failing to realize that it is of importance to the student
body for each Council office to be filled by the candidate best fitted
for the position, students manifest a reprehensible indifference to
their power of franchise. Last year, for example, nearly every student voted in presidential election, but only about one-fifth vegis-
tered their opinion in the poll for secretary. From the opinions
students express on the campus, a certain unconcern about the matter
is apparent. Some think that a sufficient number of other students
will vote; others consider the particular office non-important. Then
there is a last class, nnd these are our bigoted and stiff-necked campus Philistines, who think none of the candidates worth voting for.
These three class which wo have suggested could easily be
described in detail, therefore, we will refrain dilating on them. The
point that we wish to make is this: it is worth while for every student
to vote in the Council elections. If you do not bother to vote you
are not interested in what kind of government controls your conduct
here. Further, if dissatisfied with the candidates, run yourself, the
student body will rally round you.
FRESHMEN!
Simply because a dozen or so freshmen are track stars, and have
annexed a large number of points towards the Governor's Cup, the
class, as a whole, is very proud of itself. Now, it is a very good thing
to be proud of the prowess of classmates, but if you read of their
feats in the papers tho day after, instead of gaii-K to see them performed, your right to boost is extremely doubtful—hence, most of
the freshmen class had better be dumb upon tho subject. The same
lackadaisical, careless attitude displayed towards everything else,
has appeared in the most important student event during tho year
—elections—an eagerness to eat, and then stroll around tho campus
talking loudly and saying nothing, to impress un equally thoughtless
girl, has apparently cut down freshmen attendance at election meetings to an nlarniing extent. If the members of the class would realize
that they are mostly just immature boys and girls, who really do not
know everything in this world, it would be much better for themselves nnd their Alma Mater. However, with such an example of
primitive horse-play displayed by u member of the upper years at
Wednesday's meeting before them, perhaps, they cannot bo blamed
for thinking thnt elections are only a farce anyway.
NATIONAL ANTHEM
OMITTED
March 10th, 1926.
Editor, "The Ubyssey."
Dear Sir:
Might I inquire, through the medium ot your valuable puper, why the
singing of the .National Anthem was
omitted at last Monday's meeting,
addressed by Viscount Allenby, and
also at the meeting on Tuesday noon,
at which the Imperial debaters spoke?
Whether this omission was deliberate or accidental, I do not know, but
our distinguished British visitors, especially such a man as Viscount Allon-
by, must surely hnvo noticed and
wondered at It.
I hope that in tho future, those In
chnrgo of such meetings will .see that
duo respect Is pnld to the British
soverolgn.
Yours very truly,
D. N. MACLEAN,
Arts '29.
Class and Club Notes
'26 NOMINATIONS DUE
All nominations for the permanent
executive of Arts '26, comprising
president, vice-president, secretary
and treasurer, must be handed In to
the secretary not later than Friday,
the 19th of March.
Nominations for class valedictorian
and historian must also be In by that
date.
CHEMISTRY SOCIETY
Members of the Chemistry Society
met at the home of Mr. H. Grantham
on Wednesday evening to hear S
paper on "Dyostuffs," by Mr. 3, Logle.
The speaker classified dyestuffii according to chemical properties and
iiiisoclHtlnns, then he gave a brief outline of the progress that has been
a ado In the Industry during recent
years.
ENGLISH STYLE OF DEBATING
DIFFERENT FROM AMERICAN
We venture lo preillet tint what In,
in our opinion, the most valuable result of the imperial Debate will come
slowly, but at tho same time surely,
to take effect upon speakers and debaters at. this university. The feature
of the encounter to which we have
reference, is tho introduction into
British Columbia of a stylo of debating that Is somewhat novel to u:j, Inasmuch as It is diametrically opposed
to the manner of debate which we
have been accustomed to follow Ir our
contests with American colleges. The
difference between American and British practice In debate Is fundamental,
for the American theory is based on
presentation of fact, while the British
relies rather upon representation of
fact. Presentation of fact makes for
a speoch In which words and phrasos
are meagre flesh and blood to cover
a skeleton of statistical authority; absolute truth Is sought, un Irrefutable
determination of tho resolution by reference to facts und figures. Tho do-
bntor Is tho slave of tbe statistics
which dotormlne bis speech, and the
audience hears nothing more than
could be found In yenrbooks und almanacks, Reprosentntlon of fuels (nn
art In which the Imperial teum excelled) Ih, on the other bund, nn ut-
tempt to break from the slavish citation of bloodless authorities ns proof,
nnd to make a masterly use of a wide
nnd thorough knowlodKo of the subject In hand, for the sole purpose of
persuasion.
Much a course demands greater ability In n speaker than does tho Ameri
can method. Ill the lalter method, it
is what one reads thai is all-linport-
ant; in tho former, what one reads is
equally important, but more important
still, is bow one Interprets it, and paramount and most dlfllcult consideration of all, Is In what manner ono
applies it. to the ease and gives It to
the audience. The American tendency Is toward a factual cpeech and
final proof; tho British is toward a
more artistic speoch and ultimate persuasion.
The peculiar merit of the British
method is sboivn In tho fact that tbe
audience at the Imperial Debate, by a
comfortable majority, gave Its decision to the visiting team, even though
our own tenm had made u creditable
attempt to adopt some features of the
British manner. Tho audience should
be regarded as a final judge, whose
conviction determines tho success of
Ihe debaters. A debate In which np-
pointed Judges deride tho victor by
formal standards, and which leaves
the audience unaffected Is, after all,
wasted,
'Chose Interested fn forenslcs nt this
university are determined to develop
in greater measure this manner of de-
lni(e, properly judged, by them worthy
of our best efforts, which last, Indeed,
It will require In full, Hut, however
great the difficulty, the effect of such
practice us will be undertaken, with
Its consequent conferring upon the
speaker the power of persuading an
audience by appeal to Its Intellectual
discrimination, will more than Justify
(lie effort.
IMPERIAL DEBATE RESULTS
Vote of Audience.
First Count,
Aft- 383.    Neg.—306.
Second Count.
Aff.    366.     Neg.—270.
Spelled—17.
BADMINTON   FINALS SATURDAY
The finals nf the university championships will bo played on Saturday
In the Drill Hall, commencing at 8
p.m.
Campaign Meeting
Is Poorly Attended
As Tommy Taylor so crisply said,
"This meeting has beon a farce." The
meeting of course was the campaign
meeting of the Alma Mater Society
for the election of treasurer. In the
flrst place It was very poorly attended, due possibly to poor advertisement,
but more likely to the general apathy
so prevalent this year on the campus.
In the second place thore was very
little pep or enthusiasm shown by
what audience was there. This was
possibly due to the fact that the
speakers were cowed by the chairmen's opening remarks In which the
speakers were informed that mud
slinging, in past years, such an in-
dlspenslble part of student elections,
as far as arousing enthusiasm la concerned, was absolutely taboo.
Otto GUI the first candidate to
speak, spoke in praise of this year's
council and said that he would do his
best, as they have done to further Intercollegiate sport. He also spoke of
the need of a gymnasium and playing
Hold for which he said he would work.
Harold McWIlllams, on the other
hand, did not choose to discuss matters of athletic policy but said that
If elected, he would concentrate his
energies upon an equitable distribution of Alma Mater funds among the
various organizations.
The Chairman then called upon
various supporters to speak for their
respective candidates. George Miller
opened tbe case for Otto Gill, said he
thought Mr. Gill possessed good Judgment, was a good student, an all-round
man, and was easy to got along with
Harry Seed started the ball rolling for
.McWIlllams. He said that McWIlllams
possessed the two indespenslblo qualities of a successful treasurer, experience In handling large sums of money,
and a broad-minded outlook on matters
of general policy.
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
Tl- Mill   AVI' NUh
Hull Hindi  West of Granville St.
SUNDAY, MARCH 14th.
11 a.m.,
Rev. Ada Tonkin
7:30 p.m.
Rev. J. Buchanan Tonkin
Subject:
FRANCIS THOMPSON'S POEM
"THK   HOUND   OV HEAVEN."
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ft
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1)111 Bain said that he had worked on
an executive with Mr. GUI, and spoke
highly of his ability. Eddy Mulhern,
speaking for McWilliams, showed a
hitherto unknown eloquence, giving
what was probably the best effort of
the meeting from a standpoint of both
matter and method. After gaining the
attention of his audience by few apparently flippant remarks, he went on
to say that he considered that one of
tbe most potent arguments for McWIlllams was the diversity of his interests. Both were capable men, he
said, but McWilliams, by his business
experience on the Ubyssey was in
touch not only with a large section of
the Btudent body, but with the down
town business men, and had represented the university in Press Conference with other Universities, TheBe
things, be exclaimed gave to Mr. McWilliams the broadening influence of
many contacts.
The next speaker was Mr. Earle Birney, who vouched for Mr. McWIlllams'
ability as displayed by his administration of Publications Board finances.
No other speakers being forthcoming, Tommy Taylor closed with an exhortation for better interest, and attendance at the Friday meeting. He
regretted that there had been no
women speakers and adjourned the
meeting.
Evans & Hastings
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Schools represented are:
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34
HAPPINESS
That priceless possession —
an easy mind— is the immediate reward of insuring
the happiness of your dependents against the day
when you can no longer
help them with your living
presence.
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PR9k)yCERSs£ASSOCiATi0N
DEMENTIA
In another two or three months,
when 1 am busy in the noble task of
digging ditches beneath the benevolent glance of a dirty foreman ot
doubtful ancestry, I will no doubt look
buck upon this very hour, this very
moment, with the greatest of regret
und longing. In the Intervals when
tho boss's buck le turned I will probably sit down upon an adjacent log
und sigh for the glorlOB that aro departed: but at the present moment my
chief desire Is to be decidedly elsewhere, In fact, I would like to adopt
u very definite policy of solf-efface-
mont and hie me to fresh green fields
and pastures new. f am sick ot attempting to work, and I can't do it.
Its not that I don't want to, its Just
that I can't. Exams are four weeks
off, and I can't. My mind isn't made
that way, I suppose. I was Intended to
be a wealthy man of leisure, a patron
of the Arts, of Science, of Literature,
I was intended, I am sure, to roll up
to Varsity in a Rolls Royce, carrying
a silk hat delicately in one hand, and
presenting prizes for industrious
study with the other. I was meant
to be an Honorary Butchelor, an Honorary Doctor, and an Honorary Master, of all the arts and sciences. I
know that I would show off scarlet
robes to the very best advantage, and
could give the most magnificent
speeches. I would be an ornament to
any University. Instead of w|hlch,
what do we find? We find me deso*
late, desperate, and despairing,
swamped to the eyes with essays,
theslses, notes, bills, bankruptcy,
boarding house breakfasts, and general blueness. There is not a ray of
hope. All Is torment and darkness,
ignorance and woe. And still the merciless hours roll on, and still the
dreadful days draw nigh, and still I
have to pound out ceaseless drivel and
rot like this on the Pub. typewriter in
order to sutlsfy the inane craving of
Idiots and the supercilious sneers of
so-called seulors. Yours In sorrow,
pain, despair, und distress.       "G."
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         «
KONTRIBUTORS'
OLYUM
IT MAY HAPPEN AGAIN
There was a young lady called Betty,
Who cunio to the U. of B. C;
She was a great flappor, wus Betty,
And like all Freshettes, fell for mo,
But, alas, or dismay! For Betty
Is not at tho U. of B. C;
She fell for the Profs, who at Christmas
All gave her tho B. A, at C,
—Diogenes.
COLLEGIATE
Frei» Varse
"He has never BEEN YOUR face,
Yet JUNE,—
YOUR youth, lovely and FRESH—
MANagod to charm him;
And SOPHO.—
MORE than ever by your beauty
Is entranced."
AMONG MY  LADY FRIENDS ARE:
The hangman's daughter — she
knows the ropes.
The garbage man's daughter — we
have swill times together.
The tolephone operator—she has an
awful line, always busy.
The moron—she thinks one plays
poker with Saratoga chips.
The woman who came to a make-up
exam with rouge and lipstick.
That person who wanted to know if
Italian flappers are called guinea bens.
The prodigy who thought a poet's
lariat was his line.
The genius who thought a veterinarian didn't eat meat.
The patriot who thought the Japanese national anthem was, California,
Here I Come.
The eccentric who thought that an
artistic strain was like a backache.
The egotist who says, "Who is the
best looking girl In the room? And
why am I?"
The home girl who thought that
Peter Pan was a new kitchen utensil.
The liur who thought that a falsehood was a wig.
My best girl who thinks there Is
still hope for mo if people read this
sort of stuff.
—Rutgers Chanticleer.
'28:    Why Is 0 freshman?
'2ft:    In order to give the college
originality.     —Bucknell Belle Hop.
Clothing clerk: Can I show you
some durable neckwear?
Kx-convlct: No, I just escaped the
noose. —Oregon Orange Owl.
The University
Book Store
Open from !):fl() a. in.  to 1 |>. m,
■J    p. in.  to 4  p. ID.
Saturdays, \)uM a. m, to 12 noon.
Loosn-Leaf Note Books,
Exercise Books and Scribblers
At Reduoed Prices
Also, Graphic and Engineering Paper
Biology Paper, Loose-Leal Refills
Fountain Pen Ink
Penoile and Drawing Instruments
ALL YOUR BOOK SUPPLIES Sold Here
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THE   AMBASSADOR
610 Seymour Street
- Haaslquartars to* Sarvica 	
Club Luncheons, Dinners and Banquets
Private Dining Rooms for Privata Part Us.
Suitabla for Matting* and Socials. Fraternity Banquats a Specialty.
LUNCHEON, Served Daily, 45c.
MUSIC and DANCING KaSVJ
EVENING
lo liOO aja.
THE CANDIDATE
After repeated requests from his
numerous admirers, Mr.Shrolu Eatoln,
Chiropody '29, has consented to run
for tho coveted position of Secretary-
Treasurer of the Alma Pater Society.
His nomination has been endorsed by
all the intelligent members of the
University, including the entire Feature Staff.
Mr. Eatoln's record is Indeed an
enviable one. For two years be has
been third-assistant vice-Magnificent
Emperor of the Eta-Hunka-PI Fraternity, and also Gaboon Commander of
the Nicotine Inhalation Society. In
addition he has recently accepted tne
difficult office of Third Spare Reformed Sinner of the S.O.N.
Our candidate is one ot tha most
versatile men in the U.B.C. He has
proved himself to be a talented musician by his skill in playing the baboon
in the Varsity orchestra. As an athlete he holds the world's championship In African Golf, and as a social
light has won the annual Petters Club
prize for sixteen times in succession.
in the Academic world he stands supreme, having been a senior (or tbe
past fifteen years. His efforts have
been recognised by tbe tempting offer
of a vacancy In Besondale Institution..
If elected to the Stewed 'uns Oloun-
cil, Mr. Eatoiu will carry out sweep*
ing reforms. He will at once raise
American football to the status of a
super-major sport, and greatly in*
crease the population of Vancouver by
importing the necessary coaches. He
has promised to satisfy the most progressive groups of students by changing the course of the Arts '20 Relay
every year. If he has the support ot
the Freshmen vote he will provide the
Vigilants with new gum-shoes to prevent noise In the corridors. Finally
he will give two votes each to each
member of the Alma Mater Society.
Mr. Eatoln deserves the wholehearted support of every student in
the University. The Freshmen are
standing solidly behind him. We are
sure that every thinking man, woman
and child, will raise the battle-shout:
"VOTE FOR EATOIN. PERSONALITY, EXPERIENCE AND JUDGMENT."
DOPE FOR DEBATERS
Owing to the Interest In debating
as demonstrated by the attendance at
the Iniperlnl Debate, the "Ubyssey"
publishes    the    following    advice    to
would-be orators:
1. Diet. Kat food and drink liquids,
Do not depart from thin rule If you
value your life.
2. Fish Ih good for the brain. Eat
hearty. If you want to be a shark at
the game eat shark-moot.
,'!. Develop your cheek by the follow-
lug dully exercises: (a) Ask your
professor for a time extension on your
theme or thesis. (Don't be disheartened if you ennnot leave the hospital
for a few days), (b) Mark, learn and
Inwardly digest the Feature Page of
the "Ubyssey," You will profit by example.
4. Memorize a few jokes, mainly
about Scotsmen and Englishmen, local
wenther and thirst. Fill your speeches
with thoin, but wutch reports to see
that thoy aro not published on more
than ten occasions in the same city.
5. You enn develop two styles ot debating: (a) Tho humorous monologue
stylo to get the vote of the audience,
lb) Tho statement of facts, to bore the
audience and keep tho judges busy.
6. Learn a set speech on each of th*
following subjects: (a) World Peace.
(b) Western Civilization, (c) Socialism, (d) Democracy, Combine them
by formula for any sot topic. Thus—
Speech on Declaration of War by People     *oi* + ,'l W.I'. ■■ -— r rt Dt-m.
7. Quote slatIhHou and authorities
that exist In your imagination only.
S, Avoid your opponents' points.
It. Say that y iur opponents' points
are Irrelevant,
ll). liefer to the other sldo as, "My
Honornhle and Worthy Opponents,"
then quote speeches that they have
made that show the opposite.
It. Meniorhe your speeoh, make
copious notes, then forget everything.
Your speech will be much more enter-
tattling und convincing.
12. Don't go into debating at all. It
only gets you behind In your work. THE   UBYSSEY
March 12th, 1926
QUENE YIP
Above Is plotured Quene Yip, Varsity's star centre forward, regarded by
many soccer fans as the best centre
In the province. Because of bis speed
and trickiness, Quene continually
eludes opposing defense men. He is
also a track star, and will no doubt
be a member of the Varsity track
team, whioh will meet the College ot
Puget Sound on March 20th.
Criticism by Mr, Reed
(Continued from Page 1)
So many, indeed, it has been argued that the plece"s only attraction
was Its novel wealth of profanity.
That I do not believe, for I first saw
"Pygmalion" In Stuggart, and naturally the full effect of the expletives
was last In translation, and certainly
lost on mq at that stage of my German.   Yet the play gripped.
Friday's presentation by the U.B.C.
players gave me immense pleasure.
It was thoughtful and sincere. The
only general criticism I can offer Is
tluit the tempo was a little laggard in
Arts 3 and ■». Ills dat qui clto dat
waa prophetically written of Shavian
dialogue.
The honours of the acting fall to
Miss narton. Eliza Is an intensely
difficult part. Ita emotionality is full
of pltfulls and temptations for the
amateur. Miss Barton was admirably
subtle and restrained, yet the necen-
sary spark of Are was there at the
right moment. A really outstanding
performance that one will not readily forget Miss Kldd as Mrs. Pearce
carried conviction Instantly. There
was outraged propriety In the very
set of her shoulders, and the swirl of
her skirts. Mr. Price's' Hlgglns was
splendidly spontaneous and vital, so
vita) that he allowed his enthusiasm
to betray him Into over-emphasis on
occasion. Mr. Warren did all that
was possible with the lay figures of
Col. Pickering by succeeding amazingly in looking like a boiled cod at every
distressing contretemps, and Mr. Matthews as the Ineffable Freddy was
Impeccable. About Mr. Marsh's Alfred I have difficulty. He gave mo a
new conception of the Cockney sage,
hut I am not sure It was ShawA conception. His command of perfoctly
controlled gesture and expression I
can unreitcrvedly admire.
Comparisons are not always odious
(I know I misquote, but why worry),
and there In no doubt at all th-t
U.B.C.'h "Pygmalion" was at. least
equal to tho average university production 1 have seen at home.
1 must congratulate the club on
Its firm handling of latecomers, even
thougn It made me miss the first act.
It was firm Indeed. In fact, tt Is the
first time I have been kept outside
the main door, and not even allowed
Into the foyer. I hope the path of
latecomers will be made thus uncomfortable everywhere. Personally, Indeed. I woulrt like to see the surround of a theatre sprinkled liberally
with man-traps once the curtain 1. up.
PAUL REED.
U.B.C. Cubs to
Meet Meralomas
Saturday aftornoon at 2.30, in Mo-
Bride Park, the Canadian Rugby
team engages the Meralomas In the
final game of the series, with a cup
at stake. Though the Meralomas
have once beaten Varsity, both teams
have been altered somewhat, and the
Cubs nave gone through some strenuous training since then, Henoe there
is every prospect ot a cIobo and interesting game, with a good chance
ot a victory for tbe Slue and Qold.
Harold Kelly, ot English Rugby
fame, will strut his stuff at fullback;
Cece Helmer, captain of the Frosh
team, will direct the team from the
quarterback position; Doug. McNeil Is
sure to play a brilliant game as flying wing; Harold Moscrap can be depended upon at center. The whole
team is on their toee, with a heart
full of destructive intentions.
The absence of other athletic events
for the day will leave Varsity rooters
free to support this one, and a Httlo
encouragement from the side-lines
may be enough to turn the tide in
favor of the Blue and Oold. The resemblance of Canadian Rugby to
American Football, recently approved
by the student body, will bring an
added Interest to the game.
Election Candidates
(Continued from Page 1)
the Senior "B" team. He was one ot
the men resposible for bringing the
Ottawa Rldeaus here last spring for
tho Canadian Champnionshlp series.
He is at present president of the
Rooters' Club, which organization, besides arranging and supervising all
pep meetings and controlling notice
boards throughout the year, will end
up by publishing a University song
book. As athletic representative he
served on his class executive last
year. As vice-president ot the American Football club, he is one of those
who "put the game across."
ROWING CLUB
PLANS MEET
Regatta ia Scheduled for
March 20th
On Saturday afternoon, March 20,
the Varsity Rowing Club 1b competing against tho Vancouver Rowing
Club. In this, the first regatta to be
held between these two clubs, Vancouver, with a wealth of material to
chooso from, Is onterlng very strong
crews. The first race starting at two
p.m., will, however, be between two
college crews, the freshmen eight and
the Varsity II. The freshmen have
been training consctentounly and
white every man in the boat is In his
first season, the crow is beginning
to hit its stride. The seconds will
havo their work cut out to win as
they have been unable to practise
much together so far, ' Next on the
programme will be a mile race for'
lour oared crews. The Varsity four,
captained by Barton, Is rowing In
good form and should have excellent
chances of turtiiug In a win. This
will be a good race as the Vancouver
men are masters of four rowing and
are to bo counted on to put up a
strong race.
In the next event Varsity's tack
weight (145 lbs.) crew will go up
against the rowing club track-weights
who have been training hard. This,
Varsity boat will be stroked by Dad
Hartley. The big event of tho day
will come off last when the Varsity
flrst eight races the boat Vancouver
has. The crew has been training
hard under coach "Bimbo" Sweeney
who has been whipping them Into
shape three times a week.
RESULTS OF STOCK
JUDGING CONTEST
The results of the annual stock-
Judging contest ot tbe Aggies, held at
Agassiz on February 26. were announced at a meeting of the Livestock
Club on March 8. The following were
tho cup awards:
High man ot the competition, Jack
Berry, Ag. '27.
High freshman, Blanche Blair.
Dairy cattle cup, Sid Bowman, Ag.
'27.
Horse cup, Don Waterfield, Ag. '29.
Sheep cup, Oab Luyatt, Ag. '27.
Swine cup, Roy Berlet, Ag. '27.
In the general competition, Jack
Berry led, and won the big cup, as he
did as a freshman. Blanche Blair,
Cameron McKenzie, Don Watrefleld,
und Roy Berlet followed In order, In
the team competition, Tommy Wilkinson's "Neversweats" won from a keen
Held.
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"When he fell out of the window
did he hurt himself much?'
"No, he had on his light fall overcoat."
—Brown Jug.
Rogers Building Barber Shop
The Finest In Canada
Ladies' "Beauty "Parlor
464 GRANVILLE STREET, VANCOUVER
•IV. 7SS3-0 W. aaiNNAh, MB-,
/*=
HIGHEST GRADE
MEATS
FRESH DAILY
Your  Patronage  Solicited
POINT GREY
MEAT MARKET
Phone, Point Orey 14
- Varsity Lunches -
SASAMAT ELECTRIC BAKERY
Near 'But Terminal
Phone, Point Grey 507
Auto Repairs
Tire Repairs
Battery Servloe
Ignition Work
Trimble Service Garage
GENERAL GAS
Oils and Greases
Accessories
Phons, Point Grey 606
4401 10th AVENUE, WEST
Vancouver, B. C.
Phono. Point Grey 129
Moodies'Meat Market
C. H. Moodle, Prop.
CURED MEAT SPECIALIST
Fresh Meats, Fith, Poultry, Butter,
Eggs and Cheese
439S Tenth Ave., West
*•*•«-
Be   C.  E.4.   R.
WAITING ROOM
And Ticket Office
CANDIES, CIGARETTES,
SOFT DRINKS,
GLACIER BARS, Etc.
ON SALE HERE
ALL FRESH STOCK
For Your Convenience
—4
Pt, Grey Pharmacy
H. W. Warner. Druggist
Your Patronage Appreciated
Phone, Point Grey 130
10th Avenue and Trimble Street
Wear A Mann's Shirt .
VARSITY SHIRTS
The New Spring Creations
Brocaded Effects in
London Lavender, Pontiac Cream, Snow White,
Talbot Blue.
$3.75
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MANN'S MEN'S WEAR
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AND PROVISIONS
Service
Quality
BUCK'S DRY GOODS
Men's Wear
SPECIAL-
LADIES' SILK HOSE
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Phona, Point Gray 864
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Our stock is large
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OVERCOATS
FOR
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Also, Dry Cleaning and
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Wouldn't you like an
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•very three months ?
Watch for Announcement
Next Week
British (mmsm ^hmmcMDmO)
VANCOUVER HSSE^ VICTORIA

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