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The Ubyssey Sep 15, 1954

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C/-D _■ SWsWmV M
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FROSH
EDITION
VOLUME XXXVI
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 1954
Price 5c      No. 1
Council Issues Sharp
Warning To Violators
THE REIGN OR TERROR
Cairn Ceremony
To Be Relived
Newcomers to the campus
will participate in a ceremony
paying tribute to the initiative
oi their predecessors when the
annual Cairn Ceremony is staged
Thursday in the Main Mall.
Dr. W. G. Black, lecturer in
Psychology and winner of last
year's Garnet Sedgewick Award,
will lead the procession of colorfully robed deans and Student
Council members who take part
in the ceremony.
The Cairn commemorates The
Great Trek, a chapter of—even
the beginning of—UBC history
which is unmatched by almost
any other university.
In 1922, eleven years after
Point Grey had been earmarked
as the site of the University of
British Columbia, the university
was still housed in a group of
ramshackle 'buildings on part of
the General Hospital grounds in
Fairview.
Tired of their "Fairview
shacks," the students went after
government action on the "real
thing." They swarmed over the
city and gathered a petition to
the government containing
55,000 signatures. Then came
the Trek.
Students paraded through
downtown Vancouver in jalopies, then gathered en masse at
the site of the present University gates. Marching on foot
through bush along what was
then only a trail, they gathered
rocks on their way and piled
them into a mound when they
reached the university site.
This was the mark they left
to show they had been there.
Demonstrations lasted for hours.
They shouted, cheered and form-1
ed a human "UBC" in letters of
hundreds of students each.
The government was impressed, aTid invited a student delegation to attend a sitting of the
legislature, to present their case,
a move unprecedented in the
province's history.
Three years later students
moved into permanent buildings
on the present campus.
And three years after that,
copies of the 99,000 signatures
gathered by the students were
placed into a permanent cairn
constructed on the main mall to
commemorate the Trek oi '22.
By RAY LOGIE
Public Relations Officer Danny
Goldsmith Monday replied to the
threat of "unorganized hazing"
breaking out during the coming
orientation week.
"The Council ia prepared to
take immediate action if there
is any unorganized hazing" Goldsmith said.
"We have laid elaborate plans
for orientation this year," he
continued, "which demands
added responsibility from all concerned."
Engineering Undergraduate
Society head Bob Johnson said
the same day that "they are
going to have to write out the
law" before he, or his executive,
would take any stand on the
issue.
"In the case of the rioting"
Johnson said, "I don't know
how you can draw the line—Just
who would be guilty."
Coordinator of Activities Jer-
om Angel, organizing the Council's carefully laid orientation
plans, said Friday that he hoped
"there won't be any outbreak
of the usual Engineer—Frosh
battles this year."
Commenting on the "legal"
aspect of hazing Angel said "organized hazing is an important
part of orientation."
"It is enjoyed by everyone-
including those being hazed,"
he said.
The regalia regulations and
plans for punishment of viola-
Freshmen
Pick Their
Monarch
The Frosh Executive has finally taken the reins of Frosh
Queen selection into their own
hands.
■ Strong opposition was voiced
last session to the selection of
the queen by Lamda Chi fraternity. This year the Frosh Executive will run the whole show.
They will select the ten candidates, do the judging and award
the cup to the winner and run-
ners-up.
However, to further the broadness of the contest the executive
has made provision for a nomination system to supplement the
arbitrary selection of candidates.
Any five students can back
a candidate by signing a "ballot" and turning it into the Alma Mater Society Office in
Brock Hall. Deadline has yet
to be announced.
Archbishop
To Be
Honoured
The Most Rev, and Rt. Hon.
Geoffrey Francis Fisher, Archbishop of Canterbury, will receive an honorary degree from
the University of (British Columbia Tuesday.
He will receive the degree
of Doctor of Laws in a special
convocation in the university
auditorium at 2:30 p.m. Rev.
Hugh Frederic Woodhouse, D.D.,
will deliver the invocation.
Members of Chancellor Sherwood Lett's special party will
include His Grace the Archbishop, Lt.-Gov. Clarence Wallace, Hon. Eric W. Hamber, Dr.
L. S. Kiinck, Premier W. A. C.
Bennett, Attorney-General Robert Bonner, Education Minister
R. G. Williston, Mayor Fred
Hume and Dr, Norman MacKenzie, UBC president.
Others asked to walk in the
Chancellor's procession Include:
Most Rev. H. E. Sexton, Archbishop of British Columbia; Rt.
Rev. Godfrey Gower, Bishop of
New Westminster; Rt. Rev. F.
P. Clarke, Bishop of Kootenay;
Rt. Rev. H. G. Watts, Bishop of
Caledonia; Rt. Rev. Thomas
Greenwood, Bishop of Yukon;
Rt. Rev. Stephen F. Bryne,
Bishop of Olympia; Rt. Rev.
Hubbard, Bishop of Spokane; and
Rt. Rev. Benjamin Dogwell,
Bishop of Oregon.
A tea in Brock Hall will fol
low the ceremony.
tors constitute organized hazing
Angel explained.
However, it is spontaneous
hazing caused by lack of organization we are trying to get
away from."
Frosh Executive, ln their roles
as orientation organizers, have
set as their main aim to "make
new students feel a part of the
school."
Under the guiding influence
of Angel, the Frosh Executive
has set a maddening pace for the
Frosh. A week long orgy of tea
parties, dances and mixers
threatens to tax the most intrepid of freshmen.
To start the ball rolling, a
cook's tour of the campus has'
been arranged for an obvious
reason.   The   proceedings   will
Orientation
Schedule
Friday 17
9:30 a.m. Council programme
-address  by  A.M.S.   President
- introduction of Students'
Council
• explanation ot Frosh program
• Nominations   for   Frosh
Class Executive
11.00 a.m. Cairn Ceremony •
Main Mall
1:30 p.m. Tour of Campus
Saturday  18
8:30 p.m. Mixer in Brock Hall
Monday 20
3:30-5:30 Tea Dance • Brock
4:30-5:30 Tea for Frosh Queen
Candidates - Mildred Brock
Room
Tuesday 21
Regalia compulsory all day
5:30 p.m. Big-Little Sister Banquet • Cafeteria
8:00 pm. Big Block Smoker •
Brock Hall
Thursday 23
Regalia to be worn all day
Noon. Club day - Arts Lawn
3:30 p.m. Varsity Christian Fellowship reception in Brock
3:30 Newman Club Tea - Newman  Club  Room
Friday 24
12:30 noon. Her Scienceman Lover- -Auditorium
3:30 p.m. Tea Dance - Brock
8:30 p.m. Splash and Dance -
Gymnasium  and  Pool
Saturday 25
2:30 p.m. Football - UBC versus
Ramblers - Stadium
8:30 p.m. Frosh Reception • Armouries
get under way from the Auditorium Friday 17 at 1:30.
First all-student mixer of the
year, the "Registration Romp,"
to be held in Brock Hall, if
scheduled tor Saturday 18. The
gala dance,' features a live or*
chestra and a nominal 90 cent
admission fee.
Classed as "top secret," the
ominous sounding "Frosh Project" slated for 3:30 Tuesday 21,
has baffled the most astute ot
sleuths. The soiree occurs in the
Field House.
Another top flight secret is
the "Cleansweep" scheduled fo*
Sunday 26 at 1:00 p.m.
Contrary to popular opinion
the whispered about Big Block
Smoker on Wednesday 22 at
8 p.m. U not held solely to sell
Season tickets. There are other
plans afoot.
Varsity' Outdoor Club, Newman Club, Varsity Christian Fellowship, Dance Club, Players
Club all plan to entertain and
impress the Frosh during the
week. Their name is legion.
Jabour To
Head New
Pep Club
A new UBC pep club has bee*
organized on the campus after
an absence of two years.
Filling the shoes of the old
"Kickapoos," the new club is
organizing a cheering section in
preparation for UBC's first home
football game on September 25.
The Club is under the chairmanship of third year artsman
Don Jabour. His assistants are
Phil Greenberg, Tom Anthony
and Bob McLean.
The group has already demonstrated its energy in placing a
float in the Pacific National Exhibition parade through downtown Vancouver August 22. The
float carried representatives of
the rowing crew, football, basketball, rugby, ice hockey, grass
hockey and swimming teams, as
well as a bevy of pretty co-eds.
Ruth Genis, cheerleader at
UBC from 1947 to 1951, is coaching a corps of students-male
and female-- to act as a cheering
section. Drum majorettes will
also be trained for appearances
with a university marching band.
BIRDS OPEN GRID SEASON
IN HOUSE BEER BUILT
UBC Thunderbirds will give a preview of their Evergreen Conference expectations Saturday in Montreal when
they play McGill Redskins in the annual "Paraplegic Bowl"
football game.
Redskins won the Sir Winston Churchill trophy last
year in the first east-west game with a score of 22-4.
Thunderbirds recorded their first win in two years
last fall when they beat the Vancouver Cubs, scrub team
of the B.C. Lions, but then went on to lose every game
but one in the Evergreen Conference. TffE
UBYSSEY — September 15,1954
Pwe 2,
THE UBYSSEY
•     MEMBER, CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
Authorized as second class mail, Post Office Dept., Ottawa.
Edlter-ln-Chief   PETER SYPNOWICH
Managing Editor—Rey Legle Mews Editor—Stan Beek
Executive Editor—Geoff Conway        Sports Editor—Xen Lamb
CUB Editor—Bert Gordon Feature  Editor-Pat  Carney
At Last
We are pleased in a particular way about the good things
that happened to UBC sports during the summer.
The British Empire Games did. much for us, but what is
especially pleasing is that sports boosted were minor sports
so long unheralded on this campus.
Football is something else. No matter what effect the
EC. Lions will have on the Thunderbirds, football has too
long been a spoiled child on the campus for us to fawn over
. it now.
Construction of the B.E.G. swimming pool on this cam-
' pus will provide first class facilities for our swimming team.
It will be able to regain the reputation it once possessed but
which has gradually become threadbare.
Coed Alice Whitty's acheivement will stir greater interest in track and field here and the wonderful victory of
our rowing crew will have unpredictable effects. It was ironic
to see these two sports bring fame to UBC after their enforced
obscurity in the past.
It is certain swimmg, rowing and track will be at least
three minor sports which will not be treated as poor relatives
in the future while the carpet is rplled out for football and
basketball. v
A Warning
Another year, another 1000 frosh.
Most of you won't be back next year. Stupidity and inertia will have taken their tol.
Good movies at low prices, rah rah at football games,
organized farcility at AMS meetings, self expression in LSE
clubs, more parties than anyone would want; all these are
yours for the asking.
We would like to warn you, though.
If you are looking for an escape from studies, you'll find
campus activities a useful vehicle. Many are the students
who blame failures on one or another of the campus groups.
The danger of extra-curricular activities or over-balancing studies isn't a serious one.
Most of the Frosh won't do either.
Shake
We would like to extend congratulations to those
coeds who will shortly be admitted to sororities at the close
of the current rushing period.
We would like to point out to skeptics that these girls
will find the sorority system is characterized by honest
virtue, genuine kindness, a true Christian spirit, healthy
social relations and an admirable democracy.
However, we can't.
*
BEST WISHES
to the
UNIVERSITY STUDENTS
•
•
CROSSMAN MACHINERY
CO. LTD.
806 BEACH AVE.                                VANCOUVER, B.C.
,                                               . .             .-■.».-
What's Wrong With Our College?
«    REPRINT FROM TflE NEW YORKER   j
I'm sorry that I can't give
real names in the paper.that I
am about, to commit to paper,
but there's the question of taste
and it might get an innocent
girl into trouble—not into real
trouble, but maj roe onto the
Dean's list, and I wouldn't want
even that on my conscience,
which is dangerously overweight already. I'm sorry I
can't use real names, because
it is terribly hard for me to reflect life, which is what I propose to do, while using made-
up names. I have never been
able to understand how novelists could do it. Do you suppose
they use real names in the first
draft, and then cross them out?
Who was Nastasya Filippovna,
in "The Idiot," before Dostoevski turned her into Nastasya
Filippovna? I mention this because this summer I read "The
Idiot" and think it is a splendid
book, reflecting life to beat the
b((nd. All those snarled-up
people, jumping from the frying pan into the fire. I like it
because it makes me feel as
though I were living in a mill-
pond, which is where I want
to live.
Well, anyway, I was reading
"The Idiot" in Nantucket,
where I was staying with some
friends whose library, refreshingly enough, didn't contain a
single copy of "Moby Dick,"
and along came their eighteen-
year-old daughter, whose name
is not Miss Margaret M. Nuthatch, and asked me if I would
help her answer a letter from
the Dean of Women at East-
chester College, which is not
the name of the college, either.
"Dear Margaret,' it didn't begin
and continued, in part:
It is indeed a pleasure for me
to welcome you to the East-
chester campus, and to greet
you as a member of the 1958
class! Although September
seems many weeks away, I am
getting anxious to meet you
and to have you join us in our
many campus experiences. We
really have a lot of fun, in addition to a lot of hard work.
We think Eastchester is a great
school, and we are eager for
our freshmen to feel that way,
too.
I know you must have questions galore, such as, "Where
shall I live?" "Who is my roommate?" "What shall I bring?"
During the summer months I
shall try to answer these and
other questions for you, so that
you will have a good idea as to
what is expected of an East- \
Chester woman.
. . . Meanwhile I hope you j
have an enjoyable summer fill- j
ed with pleasant anticipations!
of college life. If you have an |
opportunity to visit the campus j
be sure to stop in and say, \
"Hello!" Also, if you have any
questions with which I can help j
you, be sure to write." j
"Dear  Dean,"   I  dictated  to;
non-Margaret, who is a wiz at j
shorthand, "Well, I have question^ galore, and one of them :
is   "How   will  your  answering,
such questions as "Where shall
I   live?,"     "Who   is my  room-j
mate?"    and    "What    shall    ij
bring?" give me a good idea as j
to what is expected of an East-,
Chester woman?" The answers;
must  be something  like  'In  a
dormitory,    you    little gobse,' i
'Evelyn Goodfellow, of Evan-
stn, Illinois,' and 'Three middy
blouses and a turtleneck
sweater '—none of them unexpected replies, to be sure, but
involving matters so humdrum
as scarcely to justify the resounding phrase 'an Eastchester woman.' Now, if you had
suggested the questions 'How
shall I live?' 'Will I be able to
get along with a roommate who
has never been to the Stork
Club?' and 'What shall I bring
along in the way of mental,
moral and spiritual equipment?
that would have justified it,
and would have enabled me to
greet you, as Dean, with
greater pleasure than I now
feel.
"Another question I have is
'Why is campus fun listed as
an addition to hard work?'
Isn't work fun? They told us
it was atBrearley, or Chapin,
or Garrison Forest, or wherever the hell I've been these
past several years, and I hate
to think things are different at
Eastchester. If the work there
isn't fun, the place can't really
h. a great school, can it? You
make it sound like a rock pile,
with time off for hopscotch,
butterscotch, and maybe Scotch
and soda. Moreover, if you
know I have, questions galore,
why do you write, if you have
any questions , a couple ot paragraphs later? I'm afraid—"
My friends' child stuck her
pencil behind her ear and gazed at me in astonishment. "The
scales have dropped from my
eyes," she said. "I'm going to
Sarah Lawrence. I stopped in
there the other day and said
'Hello!' to Harold Taylor, the
president, and he said 'Hello!'
right back, so I don't anticipate any trouble. He's the
author of 'Philosophic Thought
in France and the United
States' and a co-author of
'Democracy in the Administration of Higher Education,' so I
imagine campus experiences
there will be pretty rewarding."
She tore the letter up, and
I beat it for the airport before
her father came back from golf.
He's a Harvard man with an
inquiring mind, and I felt there
would be questions galore, such
as "How would you feel about
reimbursing me for the twenty-
five dollar reservation deposit
fee I sent Eastchester last
month?"
—GEOFPREY T. HELLMAN
Big
Welcomes
The Big Block Club would
like to take this opportunity
to welcome all frosh to the
campus. It is our hope that by
the end of the term we will be
considering many of you for
membership. We urge all of
you who are athletically Inclined to try and participate in
your favourite sport.
At this early date it may be
advisable to explain to you
what is required in order to
win your block. It is not enough
just to play on a team or even
be a star. In order to become
a member of the Big Block
Club it is necessary to fulfill
several ogligations.
-Besides being an outstanding
member   of   the   Thunderbird
team (the first team of any
sport)   an   athlete   must  be  a
t member in good standing of the
Alma Mater society (i.e. he
must be a good citizen and
also pass his year). He must
have attended practices regularly and also have the recommendations of his coach and
captain.
And so you see that the Big
Block represents more than
just an athletic award; it does,
in fact, represent an all round
award.
The members of the Big
Block Club will at the service
of the freshmen at the "Frosh
Smoker" on Wednesday, September 22 and any further
inquiries you may have will be
answered at that time. Don't
miss it!
—Bill Whyte,
President, Big Block Club.
KEY-
TAB
Th* original punched exercise books with subject lab
attached.
Five large 56-paga books to package. Each book tabbed
in a different position for handy reference.
Available in narrow, wide or plain ruling.
SMITH, DAVIDSON & LECKY LTD.
Vancouver — Victoria — Calgary — Edmonton
Manufacturers  of  UNION   made   KEYSTONE
Iniversity Supplies rY YESTERDAY, over-flowing today, the Armouries become the focal point for registering students. Campus bookstore is temporarily housed in the Armouries to handle the influx
bf students.
THE UBYSSEY — Seytataber 1$, 1954
•mie
Paget
Oar Champs Praised;
Will Get Silver Trays
University of B.C.'s rowing
team will have further honors
to add to its British Empire
Games gold medal, Sept. 30,
when they are presented with
inscribed silver trays at the
Alma Mater Society semi-annual
meeting.
Student Council approved a
$200 expenditure last week to
provide the gifts for each of tha
12 members of the winning row»
ing team.
The silver trays will be presented for the team's remarkable
performance in winning tha
eight-oared event at the B.E.G.
City Symphony Society
Holds Annual Bargain Sale
FROSH ENROLL
Registration Begins This Week
Registration this week could
bring an increased enrollment
which could make UBC the
second largest English-speaking university in Canada.
A sharp climb in enrollment
ls expected by 1960. However,
Registrar Charles Wood says
that the jump won't be too apparent this year because of no
increase in high school graduates.
But an addition of only 300
to   400   to  UBC's  enrollment
of 5500 last session could move
the university to second place
in size, edging out McGill
University.
McGill's enrollment has been
the same for several years and
is not expected to increase
this year.
Largest English-speaking university in Canada is the University of Toronto. Leading
them all is the French-speaking University of Montreal.
UBC's enrollment reached
its peak in the 1946-47 session,
when   enrollment   soared   to
more than 10,000. From then
on it dropped steadily until
last session when a slight in*
crease appeared.
By 1960 enrollment is expected to again reach 10,000.
More than 1,000 freshmen
are expected to register in the
Armouries today and Wednesday.
Students at UBC's new medical school registers more than
a week ago and other faculties
will register during the rest of
this week.
Vancouver Symphony Society
will hold its annual bargain sale
again this year.
The Society is offering UBC
students a 26 percent reduction
in the cost of concert tickets.
For 50 cents a concert, students
will have the opportunity to
hear the 12 regular Symphony
concerts.
This year the Symphony, con
ducted by Irwin Hoffman, will
feature such distinguished artists as the renowned English
pianist Solomon and famous
violinists, Mischa Elman and
William Primrose.
Student tickets will be on salt
only during registration week.
A special Symphony booth will
be set up in the Armouriea
throughout registration.
Your Community Green Grocer Wishes
Success to the University Students
FRESH FRUIT AND VEGETABLES BROUGHT IN •
FOR YOU DAILY
VARSITY PRODUCE
FREE DELIVERY
10th Ave. and Sasamat ALma 1141
H
Compliments of
Commodore
Cabaret
Compliments of
University Transfer
4217 W. 13th Ave. AL 1005
• FROM TRACY'S CAMPUS SHOP
ALL WOOL
Mohawk
Blanket
Coat
A Tracy's Feature
$29.95
as
sketched
. . . this sporty little all wool wonder coat is the rage of
the Campus Crowd, and no wonder . . . it's warm, versatile
and cosy for the games (as worn by Florence Chadwick. the
great swimmer). ... In beautiful pastel shades, candy stripes
of red, green and yellow on white. Sizes 12 to 18 (as
sketched). Made from the very famous Mohawk Tepee
Blankets, famous since 1872.
DOUBLE BREASTED BOXY COAT with       AA gg
inverted pleat at back «... Amv*
DOUBLE BREASTED COAT .. . Halt belt    OCJ#0Q
ill DcaCit ...--..,•■  ^oW ^kW
TheyVe Warm , . . They're Showerproof.
See These Wonderful Coats at Tracy's {
JjUUJfjL
THE FASHION CENTRE
524-530 Granville Taylor Prexy In
Faculty Shuffle
Thomas M. C. Taylor, UBC
graduate  and  member  of  the
faculty for eight years, will head
the Department of Biology and
Botany. He replaces Andrew H.
Hutchinson, who retired in June.
Malcolm  F.  McGregor,  UBC
graduate and former professor
i of classics and ancient history
\ at the University of Cincinnati,
I is. chairman of the Department
| of Classics,   Professor Emeritus
I Harry T. Logan has been acting
as chairman for the past two
years.
I     Dr. Harold E.  Taylor, Asso-
t elate Director of Pathology at
f Vancouver General Hospital, has
• been   appointed   professor   and
i head of the Department of Path-
f ology. He replaces Dr. William
Boyd, who retired lit June after
serving for the past four years.
Other new appointments in
clude: Dr. Jan Wolff, formerly
wlth-Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, assistant professor of physiology; Dr. K. A.
Evelyn, of McGill University
and the Royal Victoria Hospital
in Montreal, professor of experimental medicine; K. D. Naegele,
formerly of McGill, Columbia,
Harvard and Oslo Universities,
assistant professor of sociology.
Miss (Helen Codere, formerly
of Vassar College, visiting lecturer in anthropology; Dr. F. E.
Bryans, formerly of the University of Torohto, associate professor of obstetrics and gynecology; Otton Relscher, of Arlington, Va., special lecturer in Slavonic studies; Dr. C. C. Robinson of Vancouver General and
Shaughnessy Memorial Hospitals, associate Professor of Pediatrics.
THE UBYSSEY — September IS, 1184
ft* 4
Football Queen Thrilled
7b be Chosen by Judges
A UBC coed has been selected
to enter a beauty contest which
may win her the title of Miss
Football of the United States.
This week Sylvia Tremaine,
retiring Lambda Chi Alpha Frosh
Queen, will compete with girls
from eight American universities in the Miss Football of
1954-55 competition sponsored
by the Berkley Chamber of Commerce.
Thrilled to be chosen by UBC
judges, Sylvia left for California
Monday to face a. week-long
whirl of parties, parades and
entertainment.
Highlights of the week will
be the Coronation ceremony
Thursday and Saturday's football game between California
Golden Bears and University
of Oklahoma.
The only Canadian University
invited, UBC has the signal honor of being asked to participate
in the contest for the second
time. Last year UBC was represented at the Football Queen
Contest by Kathy Johnson.
"A second invitation is exceptional and a wonderful credit
to Kathy and to UBC," said
Danny Goldsmith, AMS Public
Relations Officer.
Other universities participating this year are Utah, Minnesota, Oklahoma, Maryland and
Texas.
•M
Best Wishes
from
DEAN'S
Fine Foods
Mellow Whip
Ice Cream
10th & Sasamat
ALma 2596
banking A&hviaiL o^
The Canadian Bank
of Commerce
at
The 10th and Sasamat Branch
(4473 West 10th Ave.)
R. E, McKinnon, Manager
The University Branch
(University Blvd. at Western Parkway)
Gordon C. Hull, Manager
Or at Any of the Other 30 Branches in Greater Vancouver
H il
EVERY SUCCESS
to the
University of British Columbia
SHARP AND THOMPSON
BERWICK. PRATT
ARCHITECTS
SPECIALIZING in PRINTING
for
FRATERNITIES
and
SORORITIES     r
GEHRKE
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Best Wishes to the U B.C. from
J. & William* ^ Son
ASSAYING AND ORE TESTING
Metallurgical Work Exclusively
580 Nelson St.
MA. 5821 More Money Planned for
Publications, Clubs, Radsoc
Increased funds for men's
athletics, publications board,
radio society ind clubs and societies under the Literary and
Scientific Executive are planned
by Alma Mater Society treasurer
Ron Bray this year.
Budgets for undergraduate
societies will be cut by ten cents
per student, each undergrad
society getting $1 per student
this year compared with $1.10
last year.
Publications board budget,
which includes the cost of three
issues per week of The Ubyssey,
student handbook and the Totem,
University of B.C. yearbook, is
$11,193 this year compared with
$10,200 last year, an increase of
20 cents per student.
Not included in the $18 AMS
cards for the society. An additional 53 cents is required for
photographic and printing costs
to produce cards for each student with his picture printed
on It.
The cards may be obtained
free without pictures, Bray said,
but students not purchasing the
cards would have to supply their
own photographs to paste on the
card and would not get their
picture in the Totem.
Budget plans, which come .before the student body for approval at the semi-annual general
meeting October 30, include a
10 cent per student increase for
the Men's Athletic Directorate,
bringing the total to $3.20 per
student.
The largest single budget Item
is the $5 per student used to retire the debt resulting from construction of the War Memorial
Gymnasium. A total of $68,000
remains to be paid before the
gym is debt free.
Evergreeners Swell
Summer School Ranks
UBC's Summer. Session this
year not onlyienjoyed the largest enrolment recorded since
the 'veteran year" of 1946, but
also managed to include an estimated 5000 Vancouver citizens
in its public activities,
Crowds of Vancouverites turned out to the school's concerts,
lectures and plays. Presentations
included five lieder recitals, a
concert production of "The Marriage of Figaro," theater productions of "Our Town," "Aladdin
and His Wonderful Lamp" and
"The Merry Wives of Windsor."
In a report submitted to the
University Senate early in September it was revealed that British Columbia residents comprised 93 per cent of the student
body.
Other Canadian Provinces, the
United  States,  South  America,
Germany and Hong Kong were
also  represented.
Hold an ta Your Hats;
They're Real Kaon
Frosh Executive's new cry
"hold on to your hats" cannot
be taken too literally.
The modernized beanie being sported by Frosh this year
is, according to executive head
Phil Greenberg, "a start towards a school cap."
"It should not be something
you wear for a week and then
throw away," he said.
Greenberg reported the
! Frosh Executive as feeling
that the stylish beanie is more
likely to be worn throughout
the year than previous products.
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Gifts From Castle Jewellers
Watches by Elgin, Bulova,
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Graphic Industries Ltd.
•
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Vancouver 4,  B.C. PA.  4174
Bray estimated it would take
six or seven years to retire the
present debt, but student contributions toward the cost of roofing the British Empire Games
swimming pool and interest costs
would considerably increase the
time students must continue
paying $5 per year.
Bray refused to disclose the
amount of the Increase planned
for University Radio Society,
but said there would be a "small
increase over last year's budget."
Safety margin allowed ln the
budget is five percent of the
total, slightly less than last year
when five percent plus income
from bank interest, barbershop
rental and college profits, totalling $1200 was allowed as a
margin.
Cost to students of supporting
undergraduate societies is 54c
per student, almost half of what
undergrad societies receive because the largest group of students, the arts faculty, have no
undergrad society.
THE UBYSSEY — September 15,1854
Page 5
Eat Wuku
AND A YEAR OF SUCCESS
Bell and Mitchell
LIMITED
Insurance and Real Estate
641 RICHARDS ST. VANCOUVER, B.C.
MA. 4441
'Ci'TiT llriTft'ri'   rJll
EATON'
51   *
W*tir sk     •<<
;v>        :*•>       /il>
Students of UBC from
Princeton and Penticton,
frorm Fraser Valley and the
Chilco Area, from inside
British Columbia or far away
Etheopia . . . Welcome!
We at Eaton's Wish You
Good Luck and a
Crammed-with-Happiness Year
Eaton's Vancouver—MArine 7112, West 1600
Eaton's New Westminster—N.W. 4811
y
«sy
:>v THE UBYSSEY — September 15,1M4
Page*
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ROSELAND MARKET
4329 Watt 10th Ave. ALma 1918
WtkcmsL tflaAL ofc '58
The BAMBOO TERRACE, a restauraant of distinction,
takes this opportunity of welcoming you to the University
Campus. In the past we have catejed to University functions, and we invite you to dine on our superb Chinese
food at your next party.
& ami*** Terrace
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Internationally known for tops in Chinese cuisine, hospitable friendly service and exotic Chinese decor — truly
a restaurant of distinction.
We invite you to listen to our unique radio program
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L SI
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ly  PAT  CARNEY
540 Beatty Street
MA. 0511
In the maxe of alphabetical
combinations which signify the
names of campus organizations,
the initials LSE are possibly the
least understood.
Yet the Literary and Scientific Executive is one of the most
important \ organizations on the
campus, and its function and
efforts should be known and appreciated by students.
Students have a chance to appraise LSE clubs on Club Day,
September 23. Transforming the
Arts lawn into Carnival Row,
clubs compete to entice cautious
frosh into filling club ranks and
coffers.
LSE has two main purposes;
to direct and coordinate club
activities on the campus and to
give clubs an effective voice on
Student Council.
Since UBC supports more
clubs than any other university
in North America, LSE has a
huge job on its hands.
The Executive Is directed by
an elected President, Dick Riopel, who represents the Executive on Student Council. The,
main body of the organization |
is composed of president or his
representative of each club.      |
This year Riopel and his ex-|
ecutive plan to group the sixty j
; member clubs into political, re-!
j ligious,   international,   engineering  and fine arts councils,  according to the common interests
of   the   organizations.
LSE allocates the budget set
by AMS treasurer Ron Bray for
use by the clubs, and occasionally sponsors controversial speakers visiting the campus.
In cognizance of outstanding
work done By individuals in
club activities, LSE gives Honorary Awards to five or six students annually.
Club representatives can contact LSE executives every noon
hour in Brock Hall.
Siwash Wants
Sex Writers
AvantGarders
"Siwash," the name that
brings tears to the staunchest of
literary magnates, will live
again.
' So great was the reception
received by UBC's famous literary humorist magazine last year
that the editors have consented
to produce another edition.
These same editors have also
consented to let all you budding
Brownings or Nicols to submit
doggerel or drivel to grace the
pages of the second edition of
"Siwash."
The demand for "Siwash" last
vear reached monstrous proportions. Within an hour of its re-
ease every copy was sold.
; Product/ion is scheduled to
get underway immediately. This
year the editor* are planning to
produce not one, but two edi-
ions of the magazine.
All interested parties are invited to submit their literary
endeavors. It is felt that so
iiigh is the literary standard of
the average UBC student—anything goes.
Sincere
*. *
To The Studei
FROM THE FOLLOWING PROffi
Jourex SakerieA
9rank #oaa
buncan Crux
Ttonleii *€r HtatheJoi
(jeorae C tfeifrl
Jack blamtnd
Canadian Cxploration
£oM & Kerr
Custom  Brokers
WchoU ChemicaU
Co. Ltd.
W. (j. Iflurrin
Cornett£roA.Xtd.(l9$i
Makers of Fine Quality FootweaJ
Chancellor
Sheruood Xett
CJLK. Van Horman
H.J. Sirdt* Company iu
Investment Securities
Senator j. W. JarriJl
(jeorae Cunninaham
/eon tadner it Wishes
»f The University
AND BUSINESS MIN AND FIRMS   i
ft. £ JukeA
J. £. bixon
I. e HtaclKiUan, CSC
2. J. Klein
Hon. £ W. Hamber
(jeorae florfan
(jroAlenor Hotel
H.C. William* Co. ttl
IC htitrict Telegraph
hai (frauer
foot Cromle
\£en. Stanley IflcHeen
(jorden WUmer
W. H. Htaftin
Ulr. & iHrJ.
Ronald (fraham
(jordcn Jarrelt
hank H. Sroion CSX.
(jar fin jfce and 9uel
Co.  Ltd.
}acifjic )Heat Co. Xtd*
THE UBYSSEY — September 18,1M4
Pate 7
Prexy Welcomes Frosh;
Commends Advantages
I would like to take this
opportunity to welcome the
freshmen class of 1984 to our
Point Grey Campus. I would
like to commend to you the
many opportunities which this
university offers you.
The Alma Mater Society is
chiefly responsible for your
extra-curricular well being
during the coming year and it
is with this in mind that we
have tried to arrange as varied, Interesting and fruitful
a program as could be devised
within our budgetary limitations. 1 would urge you to
participate in and savour the
many extracurricular opportunities available on the campus.
Over 70 clubs duplicate
many of the activities which
we find in the world outside
making the university a society all its own. Many of these
clubs are designed to help fur
ther your academic interests,
which it must be remembered
are your prime reasons for
attending an institution of
higher learning.
A comprehensive, varied,
intra and extra mural athletic
program is designed to suit
the needs of all students. The
intra mural sports program is
especially designed to give the
average student an opportunity to participate in athletics
without being subjected to the
rigors of the more highly competitive extra mural program.
Over one-third of the student
body takes part in these intra
mural athletics.
Other events are taking
place this year at UBC which
require your support and enthusiasm. This week the football team plays the McGill
"Redmen," Miss Sylvia Tre-
maine, last year's Frosh Queen
is in Berkeley representing
UBC as Queen candidate in
the Berkeley Football festival.
Other challenges* are before
the students: The Empire Pool
must be roofed arid made available fqr year-round use. Homecoming will take place November 6, and next March the
triennial Open House ceremonies will, we hope, draw over
00,000 people to see your university.
All these and more will require your help and participation as the newest citizens of
the university community. Be
sure that when April comes
.you will not feel you have
failed to partake of the opportunities which were there for
the asking this fall.
Best wishes for a successful
academic and extra curricular
year.
—DICK UNDERHILL
g> i" &*-t
r.*V>
HBC Welcomes
UBC's'54 FROSH
University life is exciting and enriching, both academically and socially. We hope you'll enjoy it, and wish you
the best of luck, freshmeh, in your days at UBC.
We hope you'll visit us for all your college needs . . . and
invite you to make HBC your shopping headquarters
during your university years.
l^ttV<m*T^ (SWjwna
INCORPORATED 2?»  MAY 1670.
-I Need A Shave, A
Don't Leave The
Shot?
UBC is a community, and like
other communities, has certain
facilities and services available
to its members.
Anything from razor blades
to diptherla shots can be obtained on the campus and students
can cash cheques or mall their
Christmas parcels wHhout leaving the quad.
Students who have survived
the rigours of registration have
probably realized that they can
buy their textbooks and stationary supplies here on the campus.
MOVING DAY
After registration week the
campus 'book store moves from
the Armouries to the hut at the
end of the quad.
Opposite the bookstore is the
campus post office. Off campus
mail can also be posted at the
post boxes at the bus stop and
the AMS offices. Mall for campus clubs can be posted in letter
boxes in the AMS office and in
front of the post office.
Fastest growing agency on the
campus is the College Shop.
Irrepressible Wendy Sutton,
AMS Vice-President and chairman of the Shop expects to
double last year's net profit of
$300. '
TAKING BTOOk     '
Manager John. Hanson will
stock the Shop with UBC sweaters, umbrellas, Christmas cards,
razor blades, >bromo%elfzers,
crests and chocolates for Monday's opening,
College Shop will sell faculty
pins, decals and pennarits in
Armouries during registration
week. Customers will be supplied with Hail UBC song sheets
with each purchase.
Students Placement Bureau
can supply jobs ranging from
setting pins to playing piano for
students in need of cash. The
Bureau handled 20,000' requests
for student help last term, ranging from short term work to
summer and permanent employment.
By PAT CARNEY
MORE NOTCHES
Lt. Col. J. F. McLean, head of!
Student Placement Bureau feels
that  although   job   possibilities
remain numerous, there will be
a "tightening up" this year.
Students interested ln part-
time work are asked to register
with Miss Crompton of the
-bureau during registration week
and are advised to maintain constant contact with the Bureau.
Applications for student Self
Help programme were closed
September 1, and positions will
be filled after registration week.
Under the Self Help program,
students are paid at union rates
for .employment on the campus.
Since there are 300 applicants
for the ISO jobs available, students entering UBC on scholarships are given preference.
FOR NOTHING
The university also maintains
a modern health service for
students. Every student is given
a free physical examination at
the beginning of the university
session and a twenty-six bed hospital is maintained in the Westbrook Building.
Out patient and infirmary ac-
commodattons are subject to
regular BCHIS regulations.
The AM!S supports an Acci
dent Benefit fund of $3,000.
This is paid to students who are
Injured in the line of duty; that
is, anything from a football injury to falling down at an AMS
sponsored dance.
Detailed information of campus organizations are listed in
the Student Handbook which
will be published later this term.
-»n-
THE UBYSSEY — September 15,1984
Page 8
EXTRA HELP REQUIRED
The Hudson's Bay Company requires a number of people
to help out on sale days or at other busy periods during
the fall and winter season. Students With previous sales
experience who wish to earn some extra money in this
way should apply now to the Personnel Office, 5th Floor,
Hudson's Bay Company.
USC Grad
Fits Post
Two familiar figures on the
campus have left their posts in
the University Extension Department, one of them replaced
with a new appointment.
Jbhn L. Haar, assistant director of the department, left September 1 to assume the post of
Citizenship Liason Officer for
the Province of Alberta.
Philip W. Keatley, supervisor
of conference, night schools and
(Continued on Page 10)
See CHANGES
Varsity Theatre
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only
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A good-running little car, has
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8-1950 Prefect Sedan
A verry clean car in excellent mechanical order.
$475.00
9-1949 Hillmon
Dark blue. A sound little
car in excellent shape. See
this at—
$595.00
10-1947 Foard Coach
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$695.00
11 -195b Hillmon
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A fair car in every respect,
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12-1947 Chevrolet
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Very good tires and motor '. .
clean inside and out.
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By PAT CARNEY
Ever since Hollywood showed
Bdgart slumming around newspaper offices in a trench- coat,
most of us have repressed a
desire to work as a newspaperman in an atmosphere of Pilsen-
ers, politics and printers ink.
Some of us pack this ambition away with our dolls and
our dreams of climbing Everest;
the rest of us join the Publications office.
The Pub offices combine the
spirit of downtown daily's city
room, a slick paper magazine
office, a Books and Letters Club
garret and the dark room of
Flash  Magazine.
The advantages of working for
the Pub far outweigh the cold
shoulders of your narrow-minded friends and the dubious looks
of your English professors. Warm
shoulders are supplied by -the
Pub, and most Pubsters have
passed English 100 several times.
The Pub covers enough scope
to satisfy the creative urge of
any red blooded college student.
Staff of the Student Directory-
get first right to the telephone
numbers of every co-ed who registers.
Literary intellectuals work it
off in Siwash, annual campus
lit and humour mag. Working
for Totem editor Ann Rogers is
pure joy if you like your editors
pert and pretty.
The Ubyssey, trl-weekly campus newspaper, satisfies other
creative urges. Pub parties and
especially stocked train compartments to Canadian University
Press conferences are rewards
for covering lectures on the
Mating Habits of California
Konders and aching backs acquired by lugging galley trays
around on  press  nights.
And pubsters have other talents. Not content with editing
Canada's best college paper, they
have gained a reputation for
athletic prowess.
But this is not likely to be
upheld. A startling expose reveals that Student Council need
never have suffered such an inglorious defeat at the hands of
the Pubsters on the basketball
floor last spring.
It is one thing to win the AMS
president's luxurious desk. It is
another when thc desk has to
be hauled down stairs through
narrow door jambs into the pub
office.
New Pub policy affirms that
basketball is for the 'Birds and
furniture moving for the Building and Grounds Crew.
Pub.stcrs have an artistic bent,
too. Their attempt at redecorating the Pub offices gives you
a new perspective on Michael-
angelo's doodlings on thc ceiling
of the Sistine Chapel. Thc'Pub-
sters had it tougher.
Paint and tempers ran rampant as they contested hotly
whether the paint was red or
wine. A senior editor slapping
paint on tiie window sills in
true CPR style was followed
by another who wiped it off as
fast as it was applied. The Editor
in Chief was near tears because
the baby blue paint he had specified for his office had dried
a  nauseous green. j
The   renovated   offices   added i
6NE OF THE If-pW drawbacks in a Pubster's life; toothsome
co-eds continually insinuating themselves against harried editors
in the hopes of a byline.
a splash of colour to the Pub and
a splash of paint to the floor.
Celebrities never panic a true
Pubster. When Mama-and-Mar-"
garet O'Brien accepted an invitation to visit the Pub, the welcoming  delegation  consisted  of
one lone Pubster busily painting
a lewd mural on the wall.
Seems that the feature writer
assigned to interview Margaret
had spatted with the editor and
See "PUB'
(Continued on Page 11)
WELCOME FROSH
We Wish You Every Success and
Good Luck!
CAMPUS FLORISTS
FASHION FLOWERS
We're Ready to Serve You With Smartly Styled Corsages
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from
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AL 1679
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AL. 0660 - AL. 3465 Students Finally Secure
Partial Athletic Control
THE UBYSSEY - September 15,1954
PafelO
By KEN LAMB
A long standing fight waged
between students and the administration to have spectator sports
•recognized as an integral part
of a university function will be
finally settled this fall when the
new constitution for the Athletics Department is passed by
the Senate.
Essentially, the plan does two
things. Bus Phillips, hired two
years ago with a view to such
a move has now been given full
responsibility of the department
of athletics, reporting to the
Men's Athletic Council, on which
the voting is equally divided between faculty members and
students.
Secondly, the MAC, which before was responsible to the Council for the School of Physical
Education, will now be known as
a committee of the President
and will be on a par with the
school council, which is formed
entirely of faculty members.
STRONGER VOICE
In essence the plan gives the
students a much stronger voice
in the administration of sports
and also places a greater responsibility upon them. In no way
does it change the position of the
team coaches as paid teachers
for the school of P.E. Nor does
it change any of the present
financial arrangements, though
the students have more control
over how it will be spent. As
it is, only one coach is paid any
part of his salary by the athletics department.
Though the move creates a definite split between athletics and
the school of education, director
Bus Phillips said last week there
would be no friction between
the two todies.
"I feel that athletics are «
definite part of physical education," he said. (He expressed
his views on the matter earlier
this year in an article in the
Alumni  Chronicle).
For years, the students of the
university, who pay for the athletic program some $3.20 each,
plus $9 toward the gymnasium
debt, have ibeen trying to have
some say in the administration
AN the fishing grounds, in our
canneries, in our offices ... the
men and women of the
NELSON
Bros. Fisheries Ltd.
WELCOME YOU BACK TO UNIVERSITY
Sincere and Best Wishes
for a
Successful & Happy Student Yoor
Marshall - Wells B.C. Ltd.
573 Co roll Street
Vancouver, B.C.
of the sports program. Often
they have not even known how
the money was being spent or
why.
Although most of the noise
was created by the students, the
administration has set up a sort
of passive resistance, which Indicated it was reticent to put athletics on a high plane. One of
the oft quoted reasons for this
resistance was the fear that an
,over eharped athletic program
would be the cause of a general
lowering in academic standards.
But when the new constitution
Is officially ratified, much of the
confusion and hard, feelings
caused by the unenviable situation will have gone far toward
being cleared away.
MORE POWER
Bob Brady, president of the
Men's Athletic Directorate, a
group composed of the student
managers of every campus team
and, the sports' editor of The
Ubyssey. says that the constitution will give increased power
and responsibility to the MAD.
CHANGES
(Continued from Page •)
citizenship affairs, will leave for
London September IS with his
wife to enroll in the Central
School of Speech and Drama.
His post was given September 7 to graduate Gordon S.
Selman, formerly a research officer with the National Research
Council in Ottawa.
Both Keatley and Haar are
UBC graduates and well-known
among alumni and students.
Haar was the president of the
Alma Mater Society during his
senior year in 1990, and also
headed the campus branch of the
Canadian Legion. He served
overseas for five years with the
RCAF.
Keatley is well-known in theatrical circles, as is his wife. He
has worked with the University Players' Club Alumni, Everyman Theater and the Canadian  Broadcasting  Corporation.
Selman returns to UBC after
an absence of four years. He received his teaohing certificate
here in 1991, and stayed on as
a student assistant in the department of history while he studied
for his master's degree.
:0mefo**&
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APMNiRONG
1822 W. Broadway   CE. 1611
2263 W. 41st at Yew St.
KE. 1871
BOOKS ond
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From    Germany,    France,
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Austria, Holland and
other  European   countries:
Comprehensive Information
skilled   advice,  fast  order
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Your source for
international literature
in   Vancouver:
Continental Book
Centre
914 W. Pender Street
(opp.  Hotel  Abbotsford)
Phone PAcific 4711
U-Fix It Yourself
Students
The only way you con moke your
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WE LOAN TOOLS AND SUPPLY PARTS
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Telephone: CMerry 4818
1823 West 4th Ave. (4 doors off Burrard) Vancouver, B.C.
Jo JlfUL   TfatWStMlfy
from
Jantzen of Canada Ltd.
10th Ave. at Kingsway     Vancouver, B.C.
UNIVERSITY BUS FARES
Special Student's Fare with Certificate
On presentation of a University of British Columbia
Identification Card, students may travel within the University Endowment Lands fare zone with payment of a
10 for 55c Student's Ticket or 6c cash. This fare does not
permit a transfer. The Identification Card to be presented
is issued in the Registration Booklet and is the same card
used for identification at the Library.
Regular Fares
If Identification Card is not shown, the regular fare
of 10c cash will be charged.
Transfers are issued if requested on payment of regular fare which wijl be honored at the Blanca Loop for
travel on City lines on payment of a 4 for 50c ticket in
place of the regular 15c fare.
Vancouver City transfers are honored on the U.B.C.
bus at Blanca Loop on payment of a 10 for 80c ticket in
place of regular 10c fare.
B.Q. SkdMc had trotted off to soothe her
ruffled feathers with a new hairdo. .The editors who invited the
movie star had all presi passed
their way into the New Zealand
All-black rugby game. Blase,
these boys.
' Those press passes are useful
things. Waved vaguely at the
doorman in the Auditorium a
pass can save you admission
money to add to the Brock Beer
Fund.
(Continued from Page 9)
Pubsters graduate like other
college students, and the list of
ex-pubsters who have made the
top reads like a Who's Who of
Canadian  Journalism.
Stu Keate, publisher of ,the
Victoria Times, Pierre Burton,
McLean's managing editor, Don
Fergueson, head of the North
American desk of Reuters News
agency, Eric Nicol, famed humourist and Vancouver. colunt-
nist, Andrew Snadden, London
SmL hMtihitL
McGAVINS
OUR BEST WISHES
Sasamat 5 & 10
4513 W. 10th Ave.
ALma 1013
IP———P—-w
WELCOME BACK
to the old and the new faces from
VARSITY JEWELLERS
We Wish You Every Success in the Coming Year
4479 West lOtth Ave. ALma 3104
The Photographic Survey
Corporation Ltd.
Western Division
AIR SURVEY ENGINEERS
Manager: Norman E. McConnell, P. Eng.
VANCOUVER INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT
KE. 7800
correspondent for the Southam
chain all worked for the Pub
at one time.
JOIN THE PUB
If you are interested in journalism or just want some place
to eat your lunch when it rains,
join the. Pub. They need reporters, photographers, deskmen,
typists, copy and coffee boys.
Would be Pubsters should
realize that working for the Pub,
as in other exciting jobs, has a
few occupational hazards. But
there are a few simple rules for
survival.
Pubsters should put discretion
before valour when meeting
more than 500 Applied Science-
men. It is not vital,that you
inform your English 100 professor that you are now doing
some REAL writing-for the Ubyssey.
Never refer to COTC types
as "trained killers." If they do
confirm your suspicion*, it does
you no good physically. And
whether you teli your friends
and parent* that you are now
an Illegitimate Child depends
on your friends... and parents.
And above all, don't confess
that you Never Touch a Drop.
Think of ' your reputation,
woman.
THE UBYSSEY — September 15,1954
—■■■—"^■—*^p-*«»-_--
Page 11
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By Special Request a Packaged
Programme Has Been Prepared by
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A DIVISION OF HYGRADE RADIO LTD.
One Hour of Short Talks and
Demonstrations given by Experts
This Five Service by Appointment Only
SE
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Swiss drdawing instruments and sets.   German slide
rules and scales.
ARISTO-PLASTIC SLIM RULES
No. 99»E The preferred slide rule in General
Engineering   9 8*05
No. 914     A special slide rule for Electrical
Engineering  „  $12.00
No. 958     Surveyor's Slide Rule with Stadia   $10.25
No. 968 Polyphase duplex, with trigonometric side containing T, ST, DF,
CF, CIF, CI, C, D, P, S: Exponential side  containing  LL01,  LL02,
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Vancouver, B.C. Coryell's Men Ready
For Montreal Tilt
By KEN LAMB
Autumn's failed.
The grass don't rli,
I wonders where the 'Birdies
UT
The 'Soldi. Is on the win.
But that's absoid.
Whoever heard of the wlnnln'
Thunderboids?
You can lay down the egg,
freshman, the poetry? ls not all
mine. Neither is the theme, for
that matter, but it is one that's
been applied to the Thunderbird
Football teams ever since the
Blue and Gold entered the Evergreen Conference.
UBC has been holding up the
rest of the league from way
back when, and it will likely
be a few years before we can
look down from the top and
sing "Hail, UBC" with a real
roar. But every .fall we get a
little better. Last year when
coach Don Coryell took over,
he was left with a few good
men from the season before.
, IMPROVEMENT
Yet before the last ball was
carried he'd formed a club that
powdered tr.e Vancouver Cubs
114, bounced Oregon College
of Education 2045 and at the
same time was at or near the top
of the Evergreen Conference in
almost every department except
touchdowns. This is a far cry
from the days when UBC would
be playing a good game to lose
by  thirty  points.
And though we're not the
champs yet, the happy part of
it is we're getting closer every
season. This year might really
put us in there. With the biggest turnout in UBC gridiron
history and the finest on-paper
backfield to ever tramp the turf
this season could be the big one.
in the Howie McPhee Stadium,
The line will be no slouch
either, with the defensive players already ripping into the back-
field  to  nail  the  highly  rated
Best Wishes from—
Martin's Bakery
& Delicatessen
.... 5784 University Blvd.
backs. But Dick Mitchell, line
coach for the. Birds, ls faced
with a lighter line than last
year's and a lot of new faces.
Generally, Coryell feels his
team is a week ahead of last
year and that it will be a while
before his offensive squad performs . to his satisfaction. But
the Birds have been working
out for two weeks and show
a lot of promise.
FIRST  TEST
The first test comes Saturday when the Birds take on
McGill Redmen in the annual
Paraplegic Bowl game at Molson
Stadium in Montreal. The 30
man squad, to be picked about
Wednesday, will fly to the east
Thursday night. First home game
will be against Seattle Ramblers
on the following Saturday.
In preparation for the McGill
game, which UBC lost in the
second half last year 22-4, Coryell has had his team working
hard, with two scrimmages per
day. The game will be played
under Canadian Intercollegiate
rules, with downfield blocking.
Though the platoon system is
illegal in the Evergreen Conference it will be used on Saturday, and Coryell has been forming the Birds into offensive and
defensive units in preparation
for Saturday.
Ther you have it, give or take
a few players. Out of this outfit coaches Coryell, Mitchell and
Hughes will select the thirty
man squad that flys east. It's
too early yet for any predictions,
the only sure bet is the Thunderbirds won't lose all their games
this year.
Inexperience is the big factor
and a lot depends on how fast
the raw material can be made
into a good ball unit. By Sunday morning there will be a
fair indication of the 1994 edition of the UBC Thunderbirds.
REDMEN  UNKNOWNS
Incidentally, if the McGill
team is as poor as it's information department, we'll walk
away. While the Montreal outfit have been burning the wires
asking for material on the Thunderbirds, and it, until Saturday
Coryell had received no infor
mation on the Redmen. By the
time you read this the situation
may be changed, but it still
doesn't give Don much time to
work out a defence against whatever coach Larry Sullivan cooks
up, though it's a fact he did
coach a "T" in high school ball.
Sport Scribes
Needed Now
If you are young, like parties, are looking for advancement, want to travel, like
parties, know only enough
about sports that you can read
a sports page, want to get into
games free, and like parties,
then the sports' desk of the
Ubyssey is the place for you.
You can be any sex (a
women's sports reporter is
badly needed), you don't have
to know how to type, there
are dozens of people here who
will gladly show you (especially if you want to cover
women's sports).
And as for parties, the
Ubyssey has a long unchallenged record as the holder
of the campus' best .fun fests
—ask any pubster. So if you
are interested, drop around
to the Ubyssey offices in the
north basement of Brock Hall
any time next week, and you
are hired.
Best Wishes to the University
Trimble Service Garage
4494 W. 10th Avenue
ALma 1551
COLLINS
and
COLLINS
CHARTERED ACCOUNTANTS
470 Granville Street
MA. 9564
THE UBYSSEY — September 15,1954
Page 12
JUNIOR FOOTBALL
BACK ON CAMPUS
UBC will revive a dead letter
this season and produce a training ground for future football
talent when a Junior Varsity
football club is formed under
the coaching of former UBC
stirs.
Dave MacFarlane, former
UBC star and Calgary Stampe-
der, and a coach of the new club,
says the prime purpose of the
team will be to give fellows
without enough time'or experience to play with the Thunderbirds an opportunity to still play
football.
He urges all men on the campus who are interested, to turn
out to an organization in the
stadium at 12.90, Tuesday, September 21. Equipment will be
given out Saturday, September
28, and a light workout will be
held the following Monday.
Dave's sidekicks on the coaching staff will be Len DeVlto, a,
great Thunderbird line prospect
before medical reasons forced
him to retire, and Jerry O'Flan*
agan, a star lineman from the
'93 Birds.
Bargain Of Year
On Sale Today
So you want to be a cheapskate, or at least a bit careful
about where and how often you
lay out cash. We don't blame
you, prices being the way they
are.
But though the cost of living, including entertainment,
being up the way it is, all is not
lost in the pocket book department. Yes sir, one of the biggest bargains ever offered, one
that'll out sell the used car
sharks any day, is offered right
here on the campus. In fact,
you'll find this little bargain
right in this big barn where you
register.
So just step right up to wherever they are sold and ask for
an "A" CARD. This flashy
little bit of foM pasteboard, with
a big blue "A" stamped on it is
the pass you can use to get in to
every scheduled home game of
every team. That means all the
basketball, football, rugby and
What have you that a fellow can
see, and its all yours for five
bucks.
Just go to five of the football
squad's seven home games and
you start saving money from
there. The rest of the year is
free. Don't forget, while you've
still got some money left, pick
up an "A" card, sold in the
armouries and the gym, only $9
for at least $15 worth of entertainment.
Best Wishes For the New Term
from' the
[
Hrs. 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.      Sat. 9 a.m. to Noon
Owned and operated by
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
BEST WISHES
CANADIAN FOREST PRODUCTS
LIMITED
999 W. Pender St.
MAirne 7341
Vancouver, B.C.

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