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UBC Reports May 10, 1984

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Array L
Volume 30, Number 10
May 10, 1984
Members of the UBC women's volleyball team are on an exchange visit in China until
May 13, with exhibition matches in Beijing, Shanghai, Hanchow and Nanking. Team
members Paulette Collier, Tracy Feltham, Teresa Hidber, Sheila Jones, Denise Klenk,
Alana Kurz, Karen Martin, Holly McLeod, Erminia Russo, Rhonda Sampson, Linda
Thomas and Pam Walker are accompanied by Dr. Thelma Cook, chairman of the
women's athletic committee, acting head coach Kim Harris, manager Brenda Chinn,
assistant Gail Campbell and trainer Jim Potts.
Budget balanced, with
loss of 190 positions
|^L     The University of B.C.'s Board of
^^■Govemors has approved a 1984-85
^^^riperating budget that calls for
^■'•^expenditures of $211,366,000, a decrease of
.almost $5.9 million or 2.8 per cent from
last year.
The University has taken two major steps
in order to produce a balanced operating
.budget that takes into account a 5 per cent
reduction of more than $9 million in its
annual operating grant from the provincial
government.
1. On the expenditure side, it has
reduced its teaching and support staff by a
total of 190 positions for a saving of almost
$7.9 million in salaries and wages; and
2. On the income side, it has raised
tuition fees by one-third to bring them into
line with fees charged at other major
Canadian universities.
Tuition fees for credit courses are
expected to yield nearly $31 million in
1984-85, compared to about $23.5 million
■fe in 1983-84. Other miscellaneous and non-
HLcredit fee increases are expected to result
*~ '   In total fee income of just over $36.2
million.
The reduced provincial government
grant of $171,677,000, plus income from
fees and other sources will give UBC a total
income of $211,316,000 in 1984-85. (See
table on Page 2.)
\    On the expenditure side, the permanent
reduction of 190 positions from the
teaching and support staff was achieved
largely as a result of resignations during a
hiring freeze and normal and voluntary
retirements.
The gross total of 219 positions removed
J   was made up of 103 academic positions
"*• ^and 116 support positions. The restoration
of 26 essential academic and three support
positions has resulted in a net personnel
reduction of 190 positions. (See table on
Page 2.)
The difference between the gross and
net savings resulting from position
reductions — $2,511,000 — has largely
been used by the University to increase
funds for student aid and to provide for
anticipated increases in utility costs and an
inflation allowance of $1,245,000 for non-
salary expenditures, the first such
allowance included in a UBC operating
budget since 1976-77.
The expenditure side of the 1984-85
budget makes no allowance for salary
increases for faculty and support staff
during the fiscal year.
Despite the reductions, it is estimated
that UBC will have a small deficit of
$50,000 in 1984-85, which will be met out
of unappropriated operating funds.
An estimated unappropriated balance of
$525,000 at the end of the 1984-85 fiscal
year represents only a quarter of one per
cent of UBC's total operating budget.
Here is the full text of the Board of
Governor's resolution, approved on May 7,
concerning the 1984-85 operating budget:
"That the General Purpose Operating
Funds Budget for 1984-85 be and is hereby
approved as recommended by the
President. In approving the budget, the
Board concurs with the findings of the
President's Advisory Committee on
Financial Matters for 1984-85 and declares
that 'the University is clearly in a severe
financial crisis'; and, in instructing the
officers of the University to operate in
accordance with the Operating Funds
Budget, the Board recognizes that the
President may be required to take further
measures in addition to those that have
enabled him to present a balanced 1984-85
budget."
President reports —
The battle is won,
but the war goes on
There is a strong possibility that UBC's
operating grant in the 1985-86 fiscal year
will be reduced by another five per cent,
President K. George Pedersen told a
meeting of the Joint Faculties on Tuesday
(May 8).
He told faculty members who crowded
into the 500-seat Lecture Hall 2 and spilled
over into an adjacent lecture hall of the
Woodward Building that the University
had been advised "to begin our budget
modelling for 1985-86 on the potential of a
further reduction (from 1984-85) of 5 per
cent."
At a news conference following his
speech to the Joint Faculties, President
Pedersen said the directive from the
provincial Treasury Board was a "bottom-
line" five per cent "with the possibility of
moving up to no increase at all."
The possibility of another cut in
University operating funds was one of
several major points made by the president
at the meeting of the Joint Faculties the
day after UBC's Board of Governors met to
approve a 1984-85 operating budget. (See
story on this page.)
In his wide-ranging address to the Joint
Faculties, which reviewed events over the
past 10 months, the president said that:
• The University and the Faculty
Association will shortly resume negotiations
for the fourth time in an attempt to reach
agreement on the criteria and procedures
to be used "should we be unfortunate
enough to find it necessary to terminate
faculty appointments involuntarily for lack
of funds."
• The net reduction of 77 faculty
positions had been achieved through
"regular retirements, attrition and
voluntary early terminations. Every effort
has been made to avoid involuntary faculty
terminations at this time and I am pleased
to report to you that at the moment it
appears to be possible to do so for the year
1984-85."
• Measures designed to assess UBC's
academic programs and personnel practices
are to be developed and initiated by
academic vice-president Robert Smith and
administration and finance vice-president
Bruce Gellatly, who will be guided by the
academic planning and priorities document
prepared by the Senate Budget Committee
and adopted by Senate in September,
1983.
• The University will take immediate
action to negotiate with the provincial
government to obtain the resources needed
for the early faculty termination
agreements that have been negotiated to
date.
What follows are other comments about
the future that the president made at the
meeting of the Joint Faculties:
It is appropriate that I comment further
with respect to the faculty positions that
have been terminated. The net figure of 77
positions has been achieved through
regular retirements, attrition, and
voluntary early terminations. Every effort
has been made to avoid involuntary faculty
terminations at this time and I am pleased
to report to you that at the moment it
appears to be possible to do so for the year
1984-85. In my view, to go through the
exercise of involuntary faculty terminations
without an agreement of fiscal ejrigency
criteria and procedures, if it can be
avoided in any way, would clearly not be
in the best interests of this University. The
latter comment should not be construed,
however, to mean that it may not be
necessary to take such action at some time
in the future, even the near future, and we
must take the responsible position of
anticipating such a possibility.
Having given you that good news, let me
hasten to tell you that it has related to it a
number of assumptions or caveats. The
first of these has to do with salary
negotiations for 1984-85. You will be aware
that with the exception of a few of our
employees who had two-year contracts, no
salary increases were provided at UBC in
1983-84. The budget. .  for this year
(1984-85) does not take into consideration
the question of salaries changes of any
kind. In general, this concerns me; more
specifically, I am particularly concerned
that we are presently unable to recognize
those outstanding members of our faculty
who contribute so substantially to the
overall quality of this university.
A second caveat has to do with the fiscal
provisions for the 36 cases of early faculty
termination. While it has been recognized
by provincial government officials that we
will have a problem of funding such
termination provisions, we do not as yet
have agreement as to the willingness of
government to underwrite our costs.
Third, and of considerable importance
as well, the balancing of the 1984-85
budget has included the use of a certain
proportion of non-recurring (one-time only)
dollars. In other words, these are funds
which are not part of our recurring base
budget and if the costs are allowed to
continue, funds will have to be found for
the fiscal year 1985-86 and thereafter.
Given that we were advised last week that
we should begin our budget modelling for
1985-86 on the potential of a further
reduction of 5 per cent, this aspect of our
budgetting in 1984-85 has to be of serious
concern.
Leaving aside the question of long-term
planning, there are a number of issues that
are of more immediate concern and I
would like to elaborate them briefly for
your reflection.
(1) As I have already indicated, no
provision has been made for salary
increases of any kind in 1984-85. Of course
this is a matter of negotiation and I
understand your Faculty Association
executive is seeking your advice on this
matter. In responding, I hope each of you
will give serious thought to ways in which
UBC can retain its able faculty, especially
those who for scholarly and academic
market reasons enjoy the potential of high
mobility.
(2) While there has been agreement that
a fiscal shortfall is an accepted basis for
the termination of tenured or tenure-track
faculty, we still do not have a common
understanding about the criteria and the
procedures to be employed should the
necessity of faculty reductions occur. From
my perspective, as I have already
suggested, it is imperative that this matter
be resolved, and the sooner the better.
Certainly it is preferable to resolve such
issues outside the framework of developing
Please turn to Page 2
See "THIS UNIVERSITY. . . " UBC Reports May 10, 1984
This University is of greater importance than
Continued from Page 1
a given year's budget. As well, I do not
believe that I need to dwell on the
potential for government interference into
the university personnel area.
(3) On the assumption that it may
become necessary to reduce the program
offerings of this university, it has become
quite evident as a result of the budgetary
review process that we need better
understanding about the need for, the
alternatives to, and the relative status of
the programs we currently provide,
whether academic or otherwise. In other
words, we must have better data about our
academic and support programs, assuming
quality and relevance to the University
mission are to be major considerations in
the event of possible future fiscal
reductions.
(4) On the basis of the restraint exercise
we have just completed, it also appears
that we should review our personnel
assessment practices, whether academic or
otherwise. From the perspective of faculty
appointments, it is essential that I and
other senior administrators be in a position
to defend strongly such controversial issues
as tenure, having full assurance that this
important aspect of academic life remains
considerably more than a semantic version
of academic job security. Every one of us
in the University academic community has
an important stake in ensuring that the
normal expectations for scholarly work and
teaching are being satisfied by all of our
membership. It is quite proper to note, as
many of you have in recent weeks, that if
some faculty members are falling short in
fulfilling the terms of their contract, their
release should not be dependent upon
fiscal exigency.
(5) The final problem which is of
immediate concern has to do with the
almost completely ad hoc nature of our
academic and fiscal planning. This is not
to suggest that I do not think we have done
well in our planning, given the time
available. However, having little or no lead
time with respect to government intentions,
indeed learning of provincial government
priorities with regard to universities well
into our fiscal year for the past two years,
makes the administration of this university
and our two sister B.C. institutions
extremely difficult. The responses required
within such unreasonable time constraints
will inevitably lead to inefficiencies and less
than optimal decisions in our institutions of
higher education.
There are a variety of activities that
must be undertaken in response to the
problems just identified. Some will be quite
obvious, but regardless of the degree to
which they are evident, it is essential that I
emphasize that UBC is an important
institution in which each of us, along with
every citizen of B.C. and Canada, has an
important stake. Solutions to the current
and future problems facing UBC will
demand a certain amount from each of us
in the way of thought, understanding and
self-sacrifice. In the final analysis, it is
obvious that this University is of greater
importance than any single individual
within it and consequently the institution's
preservation and enhancement must take
precedence. From the relatively short time
I have been here, I feel assured that I can
count on each of you to make the
appropriate contributions at this time.
Let me move on to talk about some
immediate actions that I expect will be
required.
First, it is important that we try to deal
with the salary situation for 1984-85 in
such a way that our capacity to retain
faculty, and indeed our reputatioii as a
future recruiter of needed new faculty, is
improved or at worst is not reduced.
Furthermore, it is of importance that the
manner in which we deal with salaries not
be perceived by government as an
admission that faculty salaries are too high.
Second, I have already commented on
the need to put in place an acceptable
policy with respect to fiscal exigency as it
may affect tenured or tenure-track faculty.
In my view, it is absolutely essential that
we as a group of academic colleagues
assume responsibility for handling the
destiny of UBC and that includes our
ability to handle all contingencies, not the
least important of which might well be
unfortunate cycles in our financial support.
Third, I see it as extremely important
that we have adequate information about
the academic programs that we presently
provide and the auxiliary support that such
programs receive here at UBC. In the
unfortunate event that it becomes necessary
to reduce the breadth of our program
offerings, it is critical that we be in a
position to retain those offerings that are
central to our mission as a university and
which are noted for their excellence,
whether provincially, nationally or
internationally. As a consequence I have
asked the two vice-presidents, Bob Smith
and Bruce Gellatly, to develop and initiate
appropriate programs of assessment in their
respective areas of responsibility.
A fourth response which I regard as
necessary at this time is a review of the
personnel practices which we employ at
UBC. Should it become necessary to resort
to involuntary faculty terminations, I
believe it essential that we ensure first that
the employment of those who satisfy the
normal scholarly and teaching expectations
of a good university is protected. At the
same time, as the very important issue of
tenure for faculty comes increasingly under
attack from without, we as an institution
and as individual academics must be
prepared to come to its defense, a defense
which obviously has to stem from
unqualified satisfaction that faculty tenure
has not become synonymous with job
security for some of us.
It remains of overwhelming importance
that we commit ourselves to ever-increasing
excellence in all that we do. That may
sound like little more than wishful thinking
to you at a time when actual dollar
support is declining, inflationary factors
completely aside. My response to such a
reaction is to suggest to you that UBC may
very well have to trade off its current size
and its present range of programs in favor
of ensuring that whatever we do, we do
extremely well. We must never lose sight of
the fact that the much overworked word
"excellence" is basic to the operation of
every outstanding international university
of which I am aware. If we aspire to that
latter status, and I most assuredly do, we
may very well have to face some difficult
decisions in the years immediately ahead. I
can only hope that we (and I say "we"
because in the final analysis in universities
such decisions are collective ones) have the
courage, should we be called upon to do
so, to move in directions that only make
UBC better.
I am extremely sensitive to the fact that
for many of you these are most troubling
times. I wish with everything that is in me
that I could appear before you and
indicate that we have at last "bottomed
out" and the future looks more promising.
That is obviously not the case, given our
planning guidelines for next year, and
therefore I am very much limited in what I
can do in the way of providing assurances.
Let me say a few words, however.
I think that this is the time for each of
us to undertake a form of self assessment of
what it is that we are doing for this
University. Is our individual contribution,
whether it be through the traditional and
all-important role of researcher and
university teacher, or that of an interim
academic administrator, or some other mix
of responsibilities, is that contribution one
upon which there can be no further
improvement? For example, as a
researcher, am I bringing in every dollar of
support that I need and which may be
available to me? Similarly, are the
programs of which I am a part ones which
are in a position to be considered very
favorably in any national or international
context? Are my programs ones that attract
students from all over Canada, and indeed
from outside this country? What I am
trying to say, and probably not saying it all
that well, is that if you are satisfying as
well as you are able, the widely accepted
expectations of high quality university
research and teaching, and the programs
with which you are associated are
considered to be of genuine academic
importance, then you should have
assurance that everything possible will be
The University
of British Columbia
Budgetted
Position Reductions
as at
April 1
1984
ACADEMIC POSITIONS
OTHER POSITIONS
Faculty/Department
Reductions
Additions
Net
Red
uctions
Additions
Net
Full
Partial
Full   Partial
Full
Partial
Full
Partial
Full   Partial
Full
Partial
Instructional & Research
Agricultural Sciences
3
3
3
3
1
1
. 1
1
Applied Science
4
4
3               0
1
4
3
0
3
0
Arts
33
0
14               0
19
0
1
3
1
3
Commerce
2
0
2
0
Dentistry
2
1
2
1
Education
20
1
9               0
11
1
12
0
2               0
10
0
Extra-Sessional Studies
0
0
1
0
1
0
Forestry
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
Graduate Studies
0
1
0
1
1
1
1
Coordinator Health
Sciences
1
1
1
1
3
1
3
Law
0
3
0
Medicine (Preliminary)
0
7
0
7
4
7
4
Pharmaceutical Sciences
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
Science
15
0
15
0
5
0
5
0
Total Instructional &
-
Research
93
10
26               0
67
10
34
12
2                0
32
12
Academic Services
16
7
16
7
Administrative Services
8
4
1                0
7
4
Centre for Continuing
Education
3
0
3
0
General
Physical Plant
25
3
25
3
Student Services
2
2
2
2
Sub-Total
0
0
0               0
0
0
54
16
1               0
53
16
TOTAL REDUCTIONS
93
10
26               0
67
10
88
28
3               0
85
28
Summary
Total Reductions
219
Less Additions
29
Net Reduction
190
in positions
The Uniu
General Piucp
Interii
Budgt
Apr 'i
INCOME
Provincial Grant
18J)J
Fees
m
Tuition
W
Non Credit
4$
Miscellaneous
3
Subtotal
28,2
Other Income
Interest on Short
a
Term Investments
Sundry
i
Subtotal
4,3
TOTAL INCOME
213,2
EXPENDITURES
Instruction & Research
14£*
Academic Services
22,0
Administrative Services
8.4
Centre for Continuing Education
5,1
Fellowships,
Scholarships & Bursaries
3,0
General
1.1
Physical Plant
23J
Student Services
J
Allowances
!■
Inflation on non-salary items
Designated purposes
Salary increases
TOTAL EXPENDITURES
213,2
Excess Income over (under)
^
Expenditures
-*
Unallocated Oper. Funds
(83/03/31)
Estimated Surplus 83/84
Estimated Balance 84/03/31
Less 1984/85 estimated deficit
Estimated Balance 85/03/31
T
1" UBC Reports May 10, 1984
my single  individual within it'
done to ensure your continued association
with UBC. I am certainly committed to
providing that sort of support.
During the 10 months that I have been
associated with you and privileged to serve,
as one of your administrators, I have come
to have a great regard for UBC, an
affection that has obviously built upon
some earlier associations as a student here.
I have come to regard this institution as a
"good" university, not an "excellent" one as
yet, but one which has clearly the potential
to achieve academic greatness in the
international sense. Indeed, it is my view
that we have a limited number of
academic units that are easily recognizable
at the international level. In spite of our
current difficulties, it is my expectation
that we will continue to move in the
direction of greater academic excellence
but in order to do so it will require the
utmost in contributions from all of us —
but most particularly from you and from
me.
Let me close by indicating to you that
personally I have undertaken every
opportunity of which I am aware, but
within certain obvious time constraints, to
let our various external communities know
of our present situation. Of greater
importance in my view, I have also
attempted to make people outside our
University aware of the resources which we
provide and the importance of those
resources to our future economic and social
development in this country. I know that
many of you try to do the same sort of
interpretation and I thank you for the
assistance. The delivery of this latter
message, which is in the final analysis the
basis of government and private sector
support, is not one which can be left to a
limited number of faculty and
administrators. It takes the help of every
one of us, of our support staff, of our
students and of our alumni.
A review of the events related to the
funding of our three B.C. universities
during the past two years shows clearly how
vulnerable we have become. Indeed,
because we have become so highly
dependent for funding on a single source
British Columbia
rating Funds Budget
/85
)0)
Changes
During
83/84
368
368
(itOOO)
Revised
Budget
83/84
180,713
23,476
4,774
329
28,579
3,158
175
Changes
During
84/85
(9,036)
7,424
137
67
7,628
99
Budget
1984/85
171,677
30,900
4,911
396
36,207
3,158
274
(1,000)
3,333
99
3,432
(632)
212,625
(1,309)
211,316
of funding, namely the provincial
government, it obviously can be argued
that the concept of university autonomy
has limited or even no meaning. Whatever
your views on the latter, it is clear to me
that UBC should strive, and strive hard, to
extend its sources of fiscal support. I close
by asking that each of you weigh seriously
how you, not the person on either side of
you, can help to attain this important goal.
UBC administrative
structure reorganized
^3,298
21
48
4
150,476
22,091
8,465
5,123
(6,281)
(569)
(158)
(230)
144,195
21,522
8,307
4,893
(53)
^ 678
3,056
1,074
24,455
2,517
429
199
(467)
(59)
3,485
1,273
23,988
2,458
1,245
1,245
4,000
217,257
(5,891)
211,366
1!,6S2
(4,632)
4,582
(50)
475
100
w
575
(50)
525
A major reorganization of UBC's central
administrative structure has taken place
following the resignation of Prof. James
Kennedy as vice-president for University
services.
Prof. Kennedy, a vice-president since
1980 and a faculty member since 1966, has
returned to teaching and research duties in
the Department of Computer Science.
The administrative reorganization
announced by President K. George
Pedersen involves name changes for several
key University departments as well as the
appointment of Prof. James Dybikowski,
the current head of the Department of
Philosophy, as associate vice-president for
faculty relations reporting to Prof. Robert
Smith, UBC's vice-president academic.
In his new post Prof. Dybikowski will
assume major responsibility for the conduct
of formal and informal relationships with
the Faculty Association, including
negotiation and administration of various
collective agreements. He will work closely
with Prof. Charles Bourne, advisor to the
president.
Departmental name changes under the
new administrative structure are as follows:
The Department of Finance becomes the
Department of Financial Services;
Employee Relations becomes the
Department of Personnel Services; and the
Department of Institutional Analysis and
Planning becomes the Department of
Budget, Analysis and Planning.
Reporting directly to President Pedersen
will be: Prof. Smith, vice-president
academic; A. Bruce Gellatly, vice-president-
administration and finance; a vice-
president development, who has yet to be
appointed; and Prof. Charles Bourne, who
continues as advisor to the president.
Reporting to Vice-President Smith will
be:
• The deans of UBC's 12 faculties and
the coordinator of Health Sciences;
• Prof. R.D. Russell, associate vice-
president academic services, who will have
administrative responsibility for Audio-
Visual Services, the Botanical Garden,
Centre for Continuing Education,
Computing Centre, Cooperative Education
and Internships, Extra-Sessional Studies,
Guided Independent Study, the Library,
Registrar's Office and the UBC Press.
• Prof. Peter Larkin, associate vice-
president research, who will have
administrative responsibility for Animal
Care, Biohazards and Radiation
Protection, Research Services (contracts
and grants) and the Western Canadian
Universities Marine Biological Society
(WCUMBS), a consortium of five Western
Canadian universities which operates
Bamfield Marine Station on Vancouver
Island.
• Prof. Neil Risebrough, associate vice-
president student services, who has
administrative responsibility for Athletics
and Sport Services, Awards and Financial
Aid, Canada Employment Centre, Child
Care, Graduate Student Centre,
International House, Office of Women
Students, Student Counselling and
Resources Centre, Student Health Services,
Student Housing and Conferences and
liaison with the Alma Mater Society,
chaplain service, fraternities and sororities
and the Student Union Building.
Reporting to Vice-President Gellatly will
be:
Allen Baxter, treasurer of the University;
Michael Hartwick, director of Internal
Audit; Graham Argyle, director of the
Department of Facilities Planning; Robert
A. Grant, director of Personnel Services;
John Chase, director of Budget, Analysis
and Planning; John Hedgecock, director of
the UBC Bookstore; Christine Samson,
director of Food Services; Neville Smith,
director of Physical Plant; Sidney Potter,
director of Purchasing; and Alan M.
Hutchinson, director of Traffic and
Security.
Also reporting to Mr. Gellatly will be the
director of Administrative Systems
Development, a new post. The director will
have administrative responsibility for the
University Coordination Office and the
administrative systems development
division.
The vice-president development, when
appointed, will have administrative
responsibility for relations with the UBC
Alumni Association, the Department of
Information Services and the Ceremonies
Office.
President Pedersen, in announcing the
administrative changes, paid tribute to
Prof. Kennedy, who rejoins the computer
science department. "Jim Kennedy has
been enormously helpful to me in the past
year," Dr. Pedersen said, "and I know that
we will be able to call on him in the years
to come for advice and counsel on
important matters affecting the
University."
Prof. Kennedy joined UBC in 1966 as
director of the Computing Centre. He was
appointed a professor in the Department of
Computer Science in 1968 and served as
the department's acting head for one year.
Prof. Dybikowski, the new associate vice-
president faculty relations, plans to
continue some teaching duties in the
philosophy department.
He is a graduate of Amherst College in
Massachusetts, where he was awarded a
Bachelor of Arts degree in 1963, and of
the University of London, where he
received the degree of Doctor of Philosophy
in 1966, the same year he joined the UBC
faculty. He has been head of the
philosophy department since 1981.
fames Dybikowski. .. new associate
vice-president for faculty relations.
Beryl March
acting dean
Prof. Beryl E. March of the poultry
science department has been appointed
acting dean of UBC's Faculty of
Agricultural Sciences effective July 1.
The present dean of the faculty, Prof.
Warren Kitts, retires June 30.
Prof. March, who took B.A. and M.S.A.
degrees from UBC, has an international
reputation in poultry nutrition.
Bruce Gellatly, UBC's vice-president
administration and finance, will
receive the honorary degree of Doctor
of Laws on May 24 at the University of
Waterloo, where he was vice-president
finance, comptroller and treasurer for
26 years. The degree recognizes Mr.
Gellatly's contributions at Waterloo as
well as "very significant contributions
to administrative and financial
management at provincial and
national levels. "
August
• Association of Commonwealth Universities
— Staffing Assistance to Developing
Universities (31) ..   _      . _. ..
• Australian Inst. Nuclear Science &
Engineering
— AINSE Research Fellowship (31)
• Bell, Max Foundation
— Research (1)
• Canadian Research Inst, for Advancement of
Women
— Grants-in-Aid (31)
• Damon Runyon-Walter Winchell Cancer
Fund
— Cancer-directed Fellowship (15)
• Distilled Spirits Council of U.S.
— Grants-in-aid for research (1)
• Donner Canadian Foundation
— Program and Research (1)
• Health Effects Institute (U.S.)
— Research
• Hereditary Disease Foundation
— Research (1)
• International Copper Research Assn.
— Research Contract (15)
• March of Dimes Birth Defects Fdn. (U.S.)
— Clinical Research - Human Birth Defects
(1)
— Social & Behavioral Sciences Research
Program (1)
• McLaughlin, R. Samuel Foundation
— McLaughlin Fellowship in Medicine (15)
• MRC: Grants Program
— Grants-in-aid - NEW (1)
— Major Equipment (1)
• National Multiple Sclerosis Soc. (U.S.)
— Research (1)
• New Zealand Natl. Research Adv. Council
— Senior and Postdoctoral Fellowships (1)
• North Atlantic Treaty Organization
— International Collaborative Research (15)
— Senior Scientist Program (15)
• Ontario Economic Council
— Contract Research in Manpower and
Education (1)
• Secretary of State
— Canadian Ethnic Studies Program:
Professorships (15)
— Canadian Ethnic Studies: Research (15)
• Spencer, Chris Foundation
— Foundation Grants (31)
• Sugar Association, Inc.
— Research (IS)
• Whitehall Foundation, Inc.
— Research (1)
• Wolf Foundation (Israel)
— Prize in Science and Arts (31)
• World Wildlife Fund (Canada)
— General Research (1) UDC
CaiSTdaR
Calendar Deadlines
For events in the weeks of June 3 and 10,
material must be submitted not later than 4
p.m. on Thursday, May 24. Send notices to
Information Services, 6328 Memorial Road (Old
Administration Building). For further
information, call 228-3131.
SUNDAY, MAY 13
Storytelling Presentation.
Storyteller Laura Simms and instrumentalist
Steven Gorn perform. Admission is $3, $2 for
students and seniors. Program is best suited for
children aged eight years or older. For more
information, call 222-5261. Great Hall, Museum
of Anthropology. 7:30 p.m.
Student Recital.
Works by Mozart, Schubert, Dowland, DeFalla
and Korean Folk Songs. Jung-Yeon Chang,
soprano, and Pamela Taylor, piano. Recital
Hall, Music Building. 8 p.m.
MONDAY, MAY 14
Cancer Research Seminar.
Role of Phosphatidyl Serine in Macrophage
Recognition. Dr. Alan Schroit, Anderson
Hospital and Tumor Institute, Texas. Lecture
Theatre, B.C. Cancer Research Centre, 601 W.
10th Ave. 12 noon.
Regional Mass Spectrometry
Discussion Group.
Recent Analytical Developments in GCMS and
LCMS. Dr. J.D. Henion, Cornell University.
Room 126, Chemistry Building. 2 p.m.
Biochemical Discussion Group
Seminar.
Regulation of Lipolysis in Cardiac Tissue. Dr.
Dave Severson, Pharmacology and Therapeutics,
University of Calgary. Lecture Hall 3,
Woodward Instructional Resources Centre.
4 p.m.
TUESDAY, MAY 15
NRC Meeting.
National Research Council Program for
Industry/Laboratory Projects. Alain Albagli,
NRC. Board and Senate Room, Old
Administration Building, 10 a.m.
as
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Biochemical Discussion Group
Seminar.
Caenorhabditis elegans: The Complete Cell
Lineage of a Complex Metazoan. Dr. John
Sulston, MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology,
Cambridge, England. Lecture Hall 4,
Woodward Instructional Resources Centre.
4 p.m.
Student Recital.
Music of Mozart, Saint-Saens, Zelenka and
Osborne. David Boddington, bassoon, and
Grant Hurst, piano. Recital Hall, Music
Building. 8 p.m.
WEDNESDAY, MAY 16
Lecture.
Public lecture by explorer and navigator Charles
Burton, who participated in the first pole to
pole circumnavigation of the earth from 1979 to
1982. Admission is $5, $3 for students and
children. Tickets are available at the door or by
calling 222-2181. Lecture Hall 6, Woodward
Instructional Resources Centre. 7:30 p.m.
THURSDAY, MAY 17
Royal Society of Canada
Rutherford Lecture.
International Cooperation in Science. Sir Arnold
Burgen, Foreign Secretary, Royal Society of
London. Room 104, Angus Building. 12 noon.
Pharmacology/Physiology Seminar.
Conformation and Selectivity in Receptors. Sir
Arnold Burgen, Foreign Secretary, Royal Society
of London. Lecture Hall 1, Woodward
Instructional Resources Centre. 4:30 p.m.
FRIDAY, MAY 18
Medical Genetics Seminar.
Genetic and Clinical Aspects of Migraine. Drs.
S. Whiting and O. Suchowersky. Parentcraft
Room, Grace Hospital. 1 p.m.
The Vancouver Baroque Ensemble.
Works by Molter, Boismortier, Quantz, J.S.
Bach, Telemann and Kleinknecht. Paul
Douglas, flute; Karen Koch, oboe; Lon Rosen,
cello; James Bailey, harpsichord; with guests
Joni Alden, soprano, Ken Lee, violin, and David
Boddington, bassoon. Recital Hall, Music
Building. 8 p.m.
SUNDAY, MAY 20
Asian Studies Lecture.
My Master, My Calligraphy. Mrs. Shiko
Kataoka, interpreted by Prof. Leon Zolbrod,
Asian Studies, UBC. Auditorium, Asian Centre.
3 p.m.
MONDAY, MAY 21
Victoria Day. University closed.
TUESDAY, MAY 22
Biochemical Discussion Group
Seminar.
Characterization of Yeast Chromosomal
Centromeres. Dr. John Carbon, Biological
Science, University of California, Santa Barbara.
Lecture Hall 5, Woodward Instructional
Resources Centre. 4 p.m.
WEDNESDAY, MAY 23
Student Recital.
Works by Mozart, Brahms and Poulenc.
William Jenken, clarinet, with piano and string
quartet accompaniment. Recital Hall, Music
Building. 12:30 p.m.
THURSDAY, MAY 24
Canadians for Health Research
Lecture.
Advances in Prenatal Diagnosis: Learning about
Normal Human Development. Dr. Judith Hall,
Medical Genetics, UBC. Part of a lecture series
entitled Frontiers in Medicine. Arts, Science and
Technology Centre, 600 Granville St. 7:30 p.m.
FRIDAY, MAY 25
Medical Genetics Seminar.
Host Defenses in Cystic Fibrosis: Modulation by
Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Dr. D. Speert.
Parentcraft Room, Grace Hospital. 1 p.m.
SATURDAY, MAY 26
Botanical Garden Celebration Day.
Guided garden tours, demonstrations, treasure
hunts and hot air balloon rides are all part of
the UBC Botanical Garden's celebration day.
For details, call 228-3928. Main Garden, 6250
Stadium Rd. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
WEDNESDAY, MAY 30
Congregation.
Degree-granting ceremony for students receiving'
B.Sc., M.Sc. in Science and Ph.D. in Science
degrees. Honorary degrees will be conferred on
Henry P. Bell-Irving and Dr. Charles McDowell.
War Memorial Gym. 9:30 a.m.
Congregation.
Degree-granting ceremony for students receiving
the following degrees: Ph.D. in Arts, Music, and
Family and Nutritional Sciences; D.M.A; M.Sc.
in Family and Nutritional Sciences; M.A. in
Arts, and Family and Nutritional Sciences;
M.F.A.; M.S.W.; M.Mus.; M.L.S.; M.A.S.;
B.A.; B.F.A.; B.H.E.; B.Mus.; B.S.W. An
honorary degree will be conferred on Mstislav
Rostropovich. 2:30 p.m.
Canadian Association for
Information Science.
Records Management: Do You Need It? Noella
Bordian, Records Manager, Expo '86. RSVP
Cathy Graham at 273-0788 or Jane Price at
228-3639. B.C. Research Conference Room,
3650 Wesbrook Mall. 7:30 p.m.
THURSDAY, MAY 31
Congregation.
Degree-granting ceremony for students receiving
the following degrees: Ph.D. in Audiology and
Speech Sciences, Medicine, and Pharmaceutical
Sciences; M.Sc. in Audiology and Speech
Sciences, Medicine, Pharmaceutical Sciences,
and Dental Science; M.S.N.; M.D.; D.M.D.;
B.S.N.; B.Sc.(Pharm.); B.S.R.; B.M.L.Sc. An
honorary degree will be conferred on Thomas
Shoyama. 9:30 a.m.
Native Indian Teacher Education
Program.
A reception will be held to honor eight NITEP
graduates who will be receiving their B.Ed,
degrees. Lounge, Scarfe Building. 10:30 a.m.
Congregation.
Degree-granting ceremony for students receiving
the following degrees: Ph.D. in Education;
Ed.D.; M.A. in Education; M.Ed.; M.P.E.;
B.Ed. Elementary; B.Ed. Secondary; B.Ed.
Special Education; B.P.E.; B.R.E. An honorary
degree will be conferred on Saburo Okita.
2:30 p.m.
Zoology Physiology Group Seminar.
Respiratory Nociceptors. Dr. G.H. Satchell,
Physiology, Medical School, University of Otago.
Room 2449, Biological Sciences Building.
4:30 p.m.
Faculty Recital.
Works by Lotti, Kuhlau and Beethoven.
Anthony Averary, bassoon; Paul Douglas, flute;
and Philip Tillotson, piano and harpsichord.
Recital Hall, Music Building. 8 p.m.
FRIDAY, JUNE 1
Congregation.
Degree-granting ceremony for students receiving
the following degrees: Ph.D. and M.Sc. in
Agricultural Sciences, Engineering, Forestry,
Community and Regional Planning, and
Interdisciplinary; M.A. in Community and
Regional Planning, Interdisciplinary; M.A.Sc.;
M.Eng.; M.A.S.A.; M.F.; B.Sc.(Agr.); B.L.A.;
B.A.Sc.; B.Arch. B.S.F. An honorary degree
will be conferred on Leopold (L.G.) Bentley.
9:30 a.m.
Congregation.
Degree-granting ceremony for students receiving
the following degrees: Ph.D. in Commerce;
M.Sc.fBus.Admin.); M.B.A.; LL.M.; B.Com.;
Lie.Acet.; LL.B. An honorary degree will be
conferred on retiring Chancellor J.V. Clyne. W.
Robert Wyman will be installed as the
University's new chancellor. 2:30 p.mv
Faculty Recital.
Works by Bach. John Sawyer, baroque violin;
Nan Mackie, viola da gamba; and Doreen Oke,
harpsichord. Recital Hall, Music Building.
8 p.m.
Notices...
The Pedersen Exchange
The Pedersen Exchange, a weekly opportunity
for members of the University community to
meet with President George Pedersen to discuss
matters of concern, will not take place during
the summer but will resume in September.
Food Service hours
During the months of May and June UBC's food
services outlets will be open the following hours:
Yum Yum's — 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.; Arts 200 —
closed; Barn Coffee Shop — 7:30 a.m. to 3:30
p.m.; Bus Stop Coffee Shop — closed for
renovations; Edibles — closed; IRC Snack Bar
— 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.; Ponderosa — 9 a.m.
to 1:30 p.m.; SUBWay Cafeteria — 7 a.m. to 7
p.m. May 7 until September.
Walking tours
UBC's Department of Information Services offers
free guided walking tours of the campus at 10
a.m. and 1 p.m. Monday through Friday. Tours
can be geared to a group's particular interests.        t
To book a tour, call 228-3131. At least one
day's notice is appreciated.
UBC Child Study Centre
Summer program, July S - Aug. 8, mornings
only, has spaces for 3-5 year olds. Phone
228-6328 for further information.
Museum of Anthropology
Summer hours for the Museum of Anthropology
are noon to 9 p.m. Tuesday, noon to 7 p.m.
Wednesday through Sunday. The museum is
closed on Mondays.
Lost and Found hours
During the summer UBC's Lost and Found,
located in Room 208 of Brock Hall, will be open
the following dates from 9 to 11 a.m.
MAY: 14, 16, 23, 28, 30. JUNE: 11, 18, 25, 27.
JULY: 4, 9, 11, 16. 18, 23, 25, 30. AUGUST: 1,
8, 13, 15, 20, 22, 27, 29.
Telephone number for the Lost and Found is
228-5751.
Nitobe Garden hours
The Nitobe Japanese Garden, located adjacent
to the Asian Centre on West Mall, is open from
10 a.m. to 6 p.m. seven days a week, until
October.
Garden hosts celebration day
Gardening demonstrations, hot air
balloon rides, treasure hunts, gate prizes,
and guided tours are all part of the UBC
Botanical Garden's "celebration day" on
Saturday, May 26, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
The event takes place at the Main
Garden, located at 6250 Stadium Road,
adjacent to Thunderbird Stadium on the
UBC campus. Admission is $1, children
accompanied by an adult admitted free.
Garden staff members will present "how-
to" demonstrations on planting trees and
shrubs, creating hanging baskets, pruning
ornamental trees and shrubs, putting in a
garden drainage system and making trough
gardens (for apartment dwellers).
In addition, there will be treasure hunts
for both children and adults, a gardening
information and advice booth, hot air
balloon rides and guided tours of the B.C.
native garden and the alpine, Asian,
physick and new food gardens. If you'd like
more details about the day's activities, call
the Botanical Garden at 228-3928.
Tea gallery opens May 22
A world-renowned master of the
Japanese tea ceremony will give two public
lecture-demonstrations as part of the
official opening of the Urasenke Tea
Gallery in UBC's Asian Centre.
Soshitsu Sen, Grand Master of the
Urasenke School of Tea in Kyoto, Japan,
will perform and explain the tea ceremony
at the official opening of the UBC gallery
at 7:30 p.m. on May 22 at the Asian
Centre, and again at 1 p.m. on May 23 at
the Robson Square Cinema. Both events
are free of charge.
Built through a grant from the Urasenke
Foundation, the gallery in the Asian
Centre is designed for performing the tea
ceremony and for displaying the beautifully
crafted utensils used in serving tea:

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