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UBC Reports Jan 8, 1987

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UBC Archives Serial
Volume 33 Number 2, January 22, 1987
- New labs aid students
President David W. Strangway was on hand recently to officially open two new microcomputer graphics labs in the Civil
and Mechanical Engineering Building. The labs will be used to
teach computer-aided drafting techniques to first-year students.
The new labs were converted and equipped using a
* $169,000 equipment grant made available to the University
; through the provincial government's Fund for Excellence in
Education. Both labs are equipped with 27 IBM Personal
Computers with full memory.
Microcomputers are now used routinely for engineering
design work at ail levels in the School of Engineering. When
not in use for teaching the labs will be available for general use
for engineering students.
Chemist double winner
Dr. Grenfell Patey of The University of British Columbia is
one of four national winners of the prestigious E.W.R. Steacie
Memorial Fellowships awarded by the Natural Sciences arrd
Engineering Research Council (NSERC).
The research awards were presented by the Hon. Frank
Oberle, Minister of State for Science and Technology, at a
ceremony held in Ottawa on Jan. 13.
The Steacie Fellowships recognize outstanding achievements by scientists and engineers who are still at a relatively
early career stage. Winners are relieved of teaching and
administrative duties in order to concentrate full time on
research.
Dr. Patey, who joined UBC in 1980, is a theoretical chemist
whose work in the area of physical chemistry has earned him
an international reputation. His research focuses on the chemistry of water and other liquids and solutions.
Dr. Patey was also named the 1986 winner of the Noranda
Lecture Award of the Chemical Institute of Canada.
Other winners of the 1987 Steacie Fellowships are Dr. Luc
Devroye of McGill University, Dr. Robert Kerrich of the University
of Saskatchewan and Dr. Andre-Marie Tremblay of the University of Sherbrooke.
Six weeks to go until open house
Call goes out to find student volunteers
If you haven't made plans for the weekend of March 6-8,
now's the time to plan to join an anticipated 100,000 campus
visitors to Open House '87. As UBC opens its doors for its
largest Open House ever, it will be your chance to explore the
many aspects of the University that you have yet to discover.
Have your academic or career pursuits curtailed investigating other areas that spark your interest? For instance, have you
ever wondered how genes can be manipulated to reduce birth
defects? Or, how films are made or short stories written?
Open House '87 will be an ideal time to become a curious
observer and ask some of those questions you've been wanting
to ask. All the faculties and departments are participating,
developing programs that will not only show their accomplishments, but will also inform and entertain the viewer.
Many special events are also on the agenda. Open House
will be launched with an unique Celebrity Alumni Concert and
Auction, Thursday, March 5. Many well-known alumni are
returning to UBC to participate in this gala and will also be
sharing their time with Open House visitors during the three-
day event. For example, one of Canada's six astronauts, Bjarni
Tryggvason, will be on hand to speak with aspiring space
explorers; and poet Earle Birney, journalist Allan Fotheringham
and renowned scientist David Suzuki are among the guests
who will debate th3 value of a liberal arts education in an
increasing high-tech world at a special panel discussion Friday,
March 6.
Open House also provides a great opportunity to learn more
about the cultural heritage and traditions of our neighbours on
the Pacific Rim; the Asian Studies department and School of
Music are hosting performances of Peking Opera, a rich and
elaborate stage production which artfully combines traditional
elements of song, drama, and movement; and Indonesian puppets, Japanese pottery and Chinese music are among the many,
displays planned in the Asian Centre.
From hot-air balloon rides to moot courts, from gold-
panning to earthquake simulations, Open House will have
something to please everyone - and it's only six weeks away! If
you haven't done so yet, now's the time to find out what your
department is planning, and become involved. Volunteers are
welcome in all areas, and are essential for a successful event.
Students interested in acting as guides should get in touch with
AMS Vice-President Rebecca Nevraumont at 228-3092. This is
a great opportunity to share your experiences with perspective
UBC students!
March 6,7,8, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. — essential dates for
your calendar. Contact your Open House faculty or student
representative to learn more, or call Community Relations at
228-3131 for further information.
Update on editors
A recent informal survey of UBC faculty who volunteer their
time to edit academic journals elicited responses from several
other editors on campus. ('Editors on campus share similar
tales—and woes', Nov. 20 issue). The head of the department
of language education, Dr. Victor Froese, wrote to say, "I read
with interest your piece on 'Editors on campus...'...In fact, I
wonder how many more journals are edited which were not
mentioned in the article."
Dr. Froese is co-editor of English Quarterly, a publication
dedicated to English theory, scholarship and research. A
second publication designed for teachers of English, Highway
One is edited by colleagues Dr. J. Belanger, Dr. R. Jobe, and
Dr. Syd Butler. Both are official organs of the Canadian Council
of Teachers of English.
In the department of Chemistry, Prof. Brian James has been
section editor of The Canadian Journal of Chemistry since I978,
handling specialized papers on topics such as inorganic chemistry. He estimates he edits about 100 papers a year for this
monthly publication.
Dr. James Trotter, also in the department of chemistry, is
one of 15 co-editors of Acta Crvstallographica. a physics and
chemistry journal with an international readership.
The Community Relations Office would like to hear from
other UBC faculty who act as editors for publications. Letters
can be addressed to The Editor, UBC Reports, or call 228-3131
and leave a message.
UBC President Dr. David W. Strangway greets provincial Minister of Advanced Education and Job
Training, Stanley Hagen, during his first visit to the UBC campus Jan. 8.   It was also the first time Dr.
Strangway has had the opportunity to meet with the new minister informally, to share information about
the University and its goals.
Nominations invited       Clyne lecture stars famous journalist
For the fourth consecutive year, the Vancouver YWCA is
inviting nominations for the Women of Distinction Awards.
Individuals or organizations may nominate women in any one of
seven categories: arts and culture, communications and public
affairs, community and humanitarian service,
entrepreneur/innovator, health and education, management
and the professions, and sport, recreation and fitness.
Last year's nominations attracted more than seventy entries
and former UBC Women's Athletic Director, Marilyn Pomfret,
was the 1986 winner in the sports category. The deadline for
this year's nominations is Feb. 13; nominees will be recognized
at a gala dinner at the Hyatt Regency, May 28. Further
information and nomination forms may be obtained from the
Vancouver YWCA at 683-2531.
Jeffrey Simpson, renowned journalist and political columnist
for the Globe and Mail, is the visiting lecturer for this year's J.V.
Clyne Lecture at the Vancouver Institute Feb. 7. Mr. Simpson's
lecture topic will be "Patronage in Canada".
Faculty, students and staff are invited to a special noon hour
lecture on Feb. 5 at 12:30 in Buchanan A10O, where Mr.
Simpson will speak on the issue "Is Quebec nationalism
dead?".
Jeffrey Simpson has written extensively for publications such
as Saturday night, Report on Business Magazine, and the New
York Times. His book Discipline of Power, won the Governor-
General's award for non-fiction; his second book, a study of the
role and history of political patronage in Canada, is scheduled
for publication in I988.
Educated at Queen's University and the London School of
Economics, Mr. Simpson won a parliamentary internship scholarship before joining the Globe and Mail in I973. From his
Ottawa base, he covered municipal affairs, Quebec politics, and
national affairs. He was also the newspaper's European correspondent from 1981-1983, reporting from London, England.
During his stay in Vancouver, Mr. Simpson has been invited
by the business community to speak to the Board of Trade,
where he will talk on the implications of comprehensive federal
tax reform. While on campus, he will meet with a large number
of faculty and speak to student groups. In addition, Mr.
Simpson will take part in a symposium on the uses of polling in
politics, organized by the Centre for Continuing Education on
Saturday Feb. 7.
The J.V. Clyne lecture series was created in 1985 to honour
the former UBC chancellor, and is a unique program which
brings world leaders in the fields of business, government, law
and the arts to B.C. to give public lectures on campus and in
the community.
Turn to Page Two see LECTURE IF   YOU   ASK   ME
Prof. John Dennison
Prof. John Dennison has been a long-term
observer and commentator on the role and
impact of post-secondary institutions, particularly community colleges, in B.C. A
professor in the department of Administrative and Adult Higher Education, he is coauthor of the recent publication Canada's
Community Colleges: A Critical Analysis.
Prof.   Dennison   earned   his   B.P.E.   and
Money and freedom key to future
M.PJE. from UBC, and his Ed.D from
Washington State University in 1967. He
was appointed to a federal commission in
1978 to review and make recommendations
about the education program in the federal
peninentiary system.
In British Columbia some years ago, a
university president, during an otherwise non-
controversial dialogue on the future of his
institution, remarked that universities really
require only two things from government -
money and freedom. It was a phrase which
produced hardly a reaction in an era when
post-secondary education enjoyed relatively
high priority in the lexicon of public policy.
Nevertheless, while the debate over those two
often contradictory concepts, autonomy and
accountability, has fluctuated in intensity over
the past 25 years, the issue remains unresolved. In the light of current conditions in
university funding, perhaps it deserves a new
perspective.
Of course universities must be held
accountable! - and their accountability applies
to a variety of constituencies in varying
degrees. They are accountableto those students who qualify for admission—to provide
an intellectual experience of high quality which
extends well beyond mechanical accumulation
of knowledge and skills. They are accountable
to the wider community~to ensure that university graduates are critical and creative in
their thinking, competent in their professions,
and disciplined in their judgment. They are
accountable to the elected government of the
province—to provide a cadre of talented individuals who will challenge the status quo,
constructively criticize conventional practice in
their chosen fields, and hence ensure that the
province is on the front edge, rather than the
tail end, of progress.
Universities are also accountable for their
contribution to econcomic growth within the
society that supports them. For this province
such a goal is achieved, not through simple
exploitation of material resources, not even
from the extraction of coal or tourist dollars, but
through the cultivation of the most valuable
asset of any progressive and democrative
society - the intellects of the young and the
motivated among its members.
To attain the highest levels of accountability, universities must be provided with adequate human and material resources, not the
least being a library which provides a rich
source of accumulated and contemporary
knowledge. Above all else, the university must
be able to set its academic goals, based not
upon the political, economic, or social priorities
of the period, but upon the continuing needs
of a complex and evolving society. It is
through its intensive and objective search for
cultural understanding, and through the discipline of scientific enquiry, that the university is   »
best equipped to gauge these needs.
Excellence in research demands a long- ^
term commitment of resources, based upon  ♦
the complexity of the process, rather than
upon the immediate value of the product.
Excellence in teaching is possible only
within an atmosphere of free enquiry by
teachers who place a higher value upon the
intellectual growth of their students than the^
needs of the marketplace.
All of this argument leads to one
inescapable conclusion - that accountability
and autonomy are linked to such an extent that
one is dependent upon the other. In a free
society, universities can provide an unmatched
resource to every component of that society,
but only if they are free to make the critical
decisions which determine their ability to do
so.
V#
If You Ask Me features interviews
with UBC faculty or staff on a
controversial issue which relates to the
universtiy campus. Anyone interested in
being interviewed, or who knows someone
whose views would be of interest to the
campus community, please contact The
Editor, UBC Reports.
Yum Yums celebrates New
Year's festivities with feast
According to the Chinese calendar, January
29 marks the beginning of the Year of the
Rabbit. And Chinese astrologers say it will be
a year of calm, rest and congeniality. New
Year celebrations at Yum Yums in the Old
Auditorium will run from Jan. 27 to Jan. 30,
during which time Food Services will give out
fortune cookies, Chinese tea and red 'good
fortune' envelopes stuffed with good luck candies.
Yum Yums has been offering a Chinese
food menu for the past 18 years. The cafeteria
re-opened in I968 under present manager,
Mary Ip, who previously owned a restaurant in
Kowloon, Hong Kong.
Yum Yums is located in the Old Auditorium
which was built in the I920's. It was the first
cafeteria on campus—affectionately known as
"the Old Caf'--and a room at the back of the
cafeteria served as the faculty dining room. As
Food Services Business Manager, Shirley
Louie recalls, the cafeteria service was closed
in 1968 and banks of vending machines were
installed.
Customers seldom had sufficient change to
operate the machines and it was necessary to
employ a person to distribute change and
keep the premises tidy. Gradually more staff
and services were added and the vending
machines disappeared.
In I969 the University administration had
plans to convert the Old Auditorium into either
warehouse or office space. Shirley Louie
stepped in to retain it as a food service. "We
had no budget, but we managed to get $38
worth of paint to redecorate the interior, and I
borrowed equipment from my cousin who
owned a restaurant at the PNE to install a
Chinese cooking unit in the kitchen." Ms.
Louie said.
Yum Yums hasn't looked back since and
Chinese New Year has become an annual tradition. By the way, check those red "good
fortune" envelopes carefully this year—some of
them will contain coupons for a free menu
item.
Queenie Tsang serves Yum Yums special Chinese New Year's menu.
Asian expert to head international office
LECTURE continued from Page One
UBC's increasing involvement in research,
development projects, and faculty and student
exchanges at the international level has led to
the recent appointment of a coordinator of
international affairs. Mr. Larry Sproule will
become the first director of the new International Liaison Office Feb. 1.
N. ~ Mr. Sproule comes to the University from
the International Development Office of the
Association of Universities and Colleges of
Canada, where he was responsible for facilitating university exchange programs between
Canada and China. His experience in international affairs is extensive; he studied in China
under an exchange scholarship and later
taught in Thailand for several years on the
CUSO program. He has given guest lectures
at all three B.C. universities on China, Sociology and Asian Studies.
Prior to working with AUCC, Mr. Sproule
was at UBC's Institute of Asian Research,
where he helped to promote the University's
expertise as a Pacific Rim research and
resource centre. In addition he has served as
an accompanying advisor to a number of
visiting delegations to Canada, the United
States, and Latin America.
Mr. Sproule speaks seven languages
including fluent'Mandarin. He has an M.A.
from Simon Fraser University, a B.Comm. and
B.A. from the University of Alberta, and has
been a post-graduate student in modern
Chinese history at UBC.
As director of the International Liaison
Office, Mr. Sproule is responsible for promoting and seeking funds for the University's
international projects.  The office will act as a
clearinghouse of information, relating to international activities, providing the information
and assistance needed to develop cooperative
ventures with overseas institutions. Mr.
Sproule will be available to faculty to provide
assistance through the maze of funding agencies and policies, and help develop budgets
and proposals.
The director of the International Liaison
Office will report directly to the Academic Vice-
President, Dr. Daniel Birch. His position will be
funded from overhead generated by international development project contracts.
One of the most visible signs of UBC's
international involvement is in overseas
development projects. The Faculty of Education, for example, is providing the expertise to
run a literacy program broadcast via radio and
television in Bahia, Brazil. In this CIDA funded
project, UBC faculty develop the human
resources needed to maintain a program of
long-distance education. In another project,
the World Bank sponsors Indonesian principals and education administrators to take a
management training program at UBC. The
Faculty of Commerce and Business Administration has a major management training
program in China.
UBC has more than 30 faculty exchange
agreements with foreign universities, in countries such as Poland and Korea, which facilitate
the exchange of students as well as faculty.
UBC is also involved with many programs that
bring foreign students to the campus. These
students make up 18 percent of enrollment at
the graduate level, and outstanding international graduate students are actively encou
raged to come here.
In addition, UBC representatives regularly
travel to overseas destinations as members of
formal delegations, and an increasing number
of delegations from other countries include the
University on their itinerary. The International
Liaison Office will assist in protocol and
arrangements.
Dr. Birch says the scale of international
activities has reached the point where it is
necessary to provide for a full-time coordinator. "People at the departmental level have
sometimes not been aware of the opportunities
available to them," says Dr. Birch. "As well, our
international involvement is probably not as
extensive as it could be. A pool of university
expertise is going untapped because there
hasn't been a means to make overseas agencies aware of it."
Dr. Birch adds that the University's
involvement in any international program has
to provide mutual benefits. "We try not to get
involved in projects which are merely overseas
service," Dr. Birch says. "We try to balance the
need in the other country with the expertise
available at UBC, the benefit to our academic
programs and the opportunities for research."
LETTERS
Letters are welcome and may be on
any topic of interest to the university
community. Please be brief, no more
than 150 words, and send to The Editor,
UBC Reports.
Journalist Jeffrey Simpson
The series is directed by a distinguished
group of people from the private and public
sectors including:  the Lieutenant-Governor of
B.C., the Chief Justice of B.C., the Chairman of   *
the Vancouver Board of Trade, the,. Chancellor,
the Chairman of the Board of Governors, the *
President of the University, the Deans of the   *
faculties of Arts, Commerce and Law, and the
President of the UBC Alumni Association.
J.V. Clyne served as Chancellor of UBC
until his retirement in 1985.   He was at various
times in his career, judge of the B.C. Supreme   *
Court,   Chairman   and   CEO   of   MacMillan
Bloedel,   Director   of   several   other   major  ■*■
Canadian corporations and Chairman of the   *
Canadian  Maritime   Commission.      He  also
headed three Royal Commissions.
The first guest of the J.V. Clyne series was
The Honourable Geoffrey W. Palmer, the
Deputy Minister of Justice of New Zealand.
2    UBC REPORTS January 22,1987 ■CELEBRATE   THE   TEAM
Tennis centre well-kept secret
■fc.-1.-d~H   ^^Js^m>   nm~«-M.ffl»~M.,«~w...»-»   .    .^|1n Tfrfff...^r?1.^...T.^,,11,.-^^h|.... ..:. nv.^ .,.   ■
The dynamic team who run UBC's Tennis Centre, Mike Kerr and Patricio Gonzales.
Tennis—it's the sport of a lifetime, and few
places in Canada have as good programs as
our own University. No longer just a well-kept
secret for those who live, study and work west
of Blanca, UBC's Tennis Centre is fast
becoming Canada's most internationally celebrated tennis facility with its tournament-
ranked and experienced professionals,
acclaimed guest instructors (such as
California's renowned coach Vic Braden), and
overseas tours and clinics, such as the 1985
trip to Guandong Province at the special invitation of the People's Republic of China.
Under the direction of Patricio Gonzalez,
the centre has been playing an integral role in
the tennis community of B.C. since 1980. One
of Mr. Gonzalez's first decisions was to hire top
ranked Canadian player, Mike Kerr, the
youngest professional coach ever to work in
the U.S.A. college circuit, to form a competitive
UBC men's tennis team. Together Mr.
Gonzales and Mr. Kerr have incorporated a
wide variety of tennis programs for beginners,
intermediate and advanced players.
Operating as a revenue-generating ancillary service under the Department of Physical
Education, the centre provides extensive junior
programs, Varsity men's and women's teams,
winter and summer tennis, clubs, all-year
round play in eight indoor courts and year-
round tournaments. UBC is also the only
university in Canada to have grass courts,
providing a special opportunity for players to
prepare for world-class grass tournaments
such as Wimbledon.
The centre has a strong outreach program
through    its    clubs,    court-rental    program,
NITEP so successful others follow suit
Since the Native Indian Teacher Education
Program (NITEP) opened its doors in 1974,
more than 500 Native people have registered
in the program. Many of those students now
work in the B.C. school system as certified
teachers, or as tutors, language teachers,
education coordinators, teacher's aides, or in
related professions. Others completed all or
part of the NITEP program and chose an alternate career, moving into post-secondary
education in a different field.
"Our directive is to prepare Native Indian
teachers, but there is a need for Native Indian
people in all professions," says Jo-Ann
Archibald, supervisor of NITEP. The program
makes Native people aware of what the university has to offer. It provides access for
them to post-secondary education, not just
teacher training."
Students enrol for the first two years of the
four-year NITEP program at field centres in
Kamloops, Prince George, Chilliwack or
Victoria. In each of the two years, they combine academic courses with three months of
practical training in local schools. The program stresses assessment," Ms. Archibald
said. "Students have a chance to see if they
are suited to an academic program and to
decide if they want a teaching career." The
training provided in the first two years allows
students to become para-professionals, such
as teacher's aides.
An important feature of NITEP is the support services it provides. "Field centres form
an extended family and create a supportive
group," Ms. Archibald said. "In addition, the
Native Indians working and training in the field
centre are good role models for Native Indian
children."
The opportunity to study at a field centre
also means students don't have to relocate
immediately. "Our students are generally older
than other UBC students, they have had more
living or working experience and many of them
have community or family responsibilities," Ms.
Archibald explains. At UBC, the NITEP building serves as a resource centre for Native
Indian students. It also provides a library,
lounge, and social activities.
Among the 18 Native teacher education
programs in Canada, UBC has graduated the
most Native Indian teachers. In fact, the
NITEP program has been so successful that
other UBC faculties and departments are
proposing similar initiatives. The Department
of Educational Psychology and Special Education, for example, plans to develop a training
program for Native Indian teachers to teach
the hearing impaired.
This September the NITEP program will
become a five year program, reflecting
changes in the faculty of education curriculum.
The number of units required for a degree will
increase and the emphasis of the coursework
will be modified to emphasize arts and science
courses in the first two years. Currently the
first half of the program is oriented towards
education methods.
Two years of arts and science courses will
qualify students for entry into many other UBC
programs by making it easier to transfer college credits." Ms. Archibald said.
public-oriented instructional programs and
numerous tournaments. This year the centre
will host the B.C. High School Championships,
the 3rd Annual Fall Intercollegiate Tournament,
the ICHPER/CAPHER Conference Tennis
Tournament and the B.C. Closed Wheelchair
Championships. Last year, 3,700 tennis
enthusiasts participated in the centre and this
year Mr. Gonzales estimates over 4,000 participants will enjoy the facility.
The centre has easily surpassed its original
goal of "organizing a structure whereby all
players can realize their full potential", and is
now one of the University's leading emissaries
for goodwill and community development in
the local, national and international scene.
For more information call 228-4396, or
drop in at Osborne Centre Unit 2, located
between the Thunderbird Wintersports Centre
and the Tennis Bubble.
Library features
in first report
from President
UBC's Library, the second largest research
library in Canada, is the focus of President
Strangway's first report as President of UBC,
published last week.
"I have chosen to focus on the Library for
my first report because its concerns are critical
to the health and strength of the University,"
says Dr. Strangway. "Among its superb collections are areas of national and international
significance providing a unique and vital
resource for the people of British Columbia,
from university researchers and senior professionals to private industry and consultants."
In the report, Dr. Strangway outlines the
rich history of the Library, looks at the collections as they are today, and details the challenges that have to be faced if the Library is to
be maintained to serve the needs of future
generations. Copies of the report can be
obtained through Community Relations.
Education program changes
NITEP students often have family or community responsibilities.
Students planning to earn their B.Ed,
degrees at UBC will enter a new curriculum in
September. The changes in the teacher education program were approved by Senate last
summer and modify a curriculum that has
been in place since the Faculty of Education
was formed in I956.
"We will be implementing the revised program in stages over the next two years," says
Dr. Murray Elliott, Associate Dean (Teacher
Education) and chairman of the Faculty of
Education's curriculum committee. During the
next year only, the faculty will, in addition to
admitting students to the revised elementary
and secondary programs, continue to admit
some students with two years of post-
secondary education to the four year
elementary education program. In I988 all new
admissions will be to the revised programs.
The new curriculum will take a total of five
years. Students entering elementary education
will be required to have at least three years of
postsecondary education. They will then follow a two year teacher education curriculum,
including a four month practicum, to qualify for
their degree and teaching certificate.
Prospective secondary school teachers will
have to obtain a bachelor's degree before
being admitted to the Faculty of Education.
They will follow an Education program consisting of three consecutive terms, and will
spend most of the second term completing
their practicum requirements in a classroom.
By the end of their three terms—one full
calendar year—students will have qualified for
their teaching certificates, but will need another
four and a half units to complete the B.Ed.
They can, in theory, abandon the B.Ed,
degree after qualifying for a teaching certificate," says Dr. Elliott, "but we expect most students will complete their degree requirements."
Students will have four years within which to
do so.
The new curriculum provides for a
strengthened academic background for elementary school teachers," says Dr. Elliott. The
new program incorporates many recommendations from the I969 report from the Committee on the Future of the Faculty of Education
and responds to the concerns expressed in
the Ministry of Education's recent report "Let's
Talk About Schools".
"It's also a natural extension of evolutionary
changes that have gone on over the past few
years and makes better use of our scarce
resources." Dr. Elliott says. 'The new curriculum takes into account the value educators see
in an extended practicum and better prepares
teachers for dealing with special needs students in the classroom."
Learn to speak a
foreign language
One of the most obvious ways in which
multiculturalism is expressed on campus is
through the variety of credit and non-credit
language courses available to faculty, students
and the public.
If you intend to spend a vacation in Mexico
this year or travel through Europe, the Centre
for Continuing Education probably has the
course for you. The centre offers non-credit
conversational programs in French, Spanish,
Japanese, Mandarin and Cantonese. If you
prefer to combine learning a language with a
holiday, stay with a Mexican family in
Cuernavaca and enjoy two weeks of immersion in the language and culture. Or discover
Quebec culture in a French language immersion in Montreal.
More than 20 modern and classical languages are available to UBC students as credit
courses, including Spanish, Swedish, Slovak,
Sanskrit, Portugese, Polish, Hebrew, Hindi and
its cousin Urdu. There's even an introductory
course in Old Icelandic offered by the department of Germanic Studies.
For the increasing number of international
students on the UBC campus, the English
Programs division of the Language Institute
offers a range of specialized non-credit
English courses designed to meet their various
needs. Students can enroll for college
preparation, for example, or simply improvement of speaking skills.
UBC REPORTS January 22, 1987     3 < *■
f
•.Sc
"M,-*
9
Operating Fuik
The University
General Purpos
The University of British Columbia
General Purpose Operating Fund Budget
1986/87
($000)
INCOME
Provincial Grants
General Operating
University Adjustment Fund
Fee*
Tuition
Non-Credit
Miscellaneous
Other
Interest   on Short-Tent Investments
Sundry
Subtotal
TOTAL INCOME
EXPENSES
Academic
Non-Credit Activity
Academic Service*
Administrative Service*
General
Plant
Student Services k  Avard*
Designated Purposes
Internal Coit Recoveries
Leu:  Expenses paid from prior
year'* appropriations
TOTAL EXPENSES
Excess of Expenses over Income
Less:  Inter-Fund Transfer
Less:  Cash savings to be recovered
Balance
Budget
Nov. 86
163,003
14,136
177.220
34,812
6,637
462
41
901
3
240
S27
4
187
223
297
Table 1.0
Academic
145,895
7,671
22,286
11,891
3.727
26.310
6,239
4,666
(962)
226,330
(1.319)
226
011
1
714
(100)
1
,614
(1
.614)
Agricultural Sciences
Botanical Gardens
Applied Science
Engineering
Architecture
Nursing
Arts
Commerce k  Bus. Admin.
Dentistry
Education
Extra-Sessional Studies
Forestry
Graduate Studies
Guided Independent Studies
Health Sciences
Lav
Medicine
Pharmaceutical Sciences
Research Committee Grants
Science
Early Terminations
TOTAL ACADEMIC
Table 2.0
Non-Credit Activity
Non-credit Courses
Agricultural Science!
Commerce k  Bui. Admin.
Guided Independent Studies
Health Sciences
Social Vork
Centre for Continuing Ed.
TOTAL HOI-CREDIT ACTIVITY
Academic
Salaries
Other
Salaries
Ion-
Salary
Items
Cost
Rccot.
2,734
46
6,322
763
2,028
26,007
6,168
2,310
10,776
1,631
1,806
1,493
103
183
2,314
16,908
1,422
16,963
2,276
1.287
441
2,437
106
328
2,869
476
1,106
1,661
46
648
616
76
170
339
6,006
219
4.713
22,340
4S6
60
1.080
106
290
3,669
696
421
1,619
207
302
248
22
46
327
2,678
202
2,672
199
16,028
702
48
949
38
69
1,203
276
679
1,077
134
663
242
42
126
142
1.177
91
200
2,308
(466)
(60)
(387)
(441)
(78)
(369)
(182)
(1,982)
1.688
Table 3.0
Academic Services
Animal Care Centre
Computing Centre
Nedla Services
Lectures Bureau
Libraries
Acquisitions
Operations
University Press
VCUHBS
TOTAL ACADEMIC SERVICES
Ion-
Other
Salary
Cost
1986/87
Salaries
Benefits
Items
Recov.
Budget
239
29
(34)
234
2,838
360
1,969
(220)
4,937
410
61
16
6
4,742
(239)
238
6
4,742
9,743
1,201
964
(216)
11,692
280
36
90
130
(97)
308
180
1986/87
Budget
4,764 „-'y
684
10,788 „
1.002
2,716 w
33,261
6.615
4.074
14,846
2,018
2,960
2,499  jb.
243
633
3.122  „
24,487
1.934  *
200
26,666
2,474
Academic
Other
Salary
Cost
1986/87
Salaries
Salaries
Benefits
Items
Recov.
Budget
«•
9
1
24
34
-
358
599
118
1,176
2,260
*■
12
1
13
257
32
716
1,005
26
5
4
6
41
1,900
827
336
1,165
4,228
7,882
(772)
Table 4.0
Administrative Services
The final operating budget of the University
for 1986/87 was approved at the last meeting
of the Board of Governors, Dec. 4, 1986. The
summary table reflects the total of all general
purpose operating fund income and expense.
Each of the following tables detail the broad
categories of expense. Academic expenses,
for example, are outlined in table 1.0, non-
credit activity in table 2.0 and so on. In considering the 1986/87 budget, the following
points should be noted.
1986/87
- Through removal of faculty positions, academic salary budgets have been reduced
by 1% or $894,000 to cover the unbud-
geted component of the 1985/86 faculty
salary arbitration award.
- Retrenchments committed to in 1985/86 for
1986/87 implementation have been
removed from the recurring expense base.
- A substantial proportion of the one-time
prepaid fees for management consulting
studies are being offset by identified recurring reductions in administrative support
unit operating budgets.
- To maintain its purchasing power at current
levels, the Library's acquisition budget has
been increased by $562,000, composed of
$339,000 in new monies from the Fund for
Excellence in Education and $223,000 reallocated from the salary portion of the
Library's budget. The latter reflects the
results of the management efficiency study
Associate V-P Student Services
Budget, Planning * S N
Campus Nail
Community Relations
Development Office
Financial Services
Information Systems Management
Internal Audit
Occup. Hlth. *  Safety
Personnel Services
President's Officer
Purchasing
Registrar's Office
Vlce-Pres. Academic
Vlce-Pres. Admin. ■ Finance
Vlce-Pres. Research
Early Terminations
TOTAL ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES
Other
Salary
Cost
1986/87
Salaries
Benefits
Items
Recov.
Budget
68
8
22
98
349
43
16
407
196
24
12
232
337
42
469
848
282
35
143
460
1.611
199
146
1.956
1,117
138
239
1,494
168
21
4
193
231
28
13
272
837
103
123
1.063
206
26
79
309
493
61
42
696
1,447
178
607
(7)
2,126
662
68
269
879
211
26
161
888
323
40
82
446
120
6
0
126
(7)
undertaken by the University's external
consultants.
Development activities will be funded at a
level of $425,000, of which $145,000
represents fund campaign recoveries. Of
the total, $170,000 replaces those monies
previously budgeted against the University
Development Fund. This level of funding
will permit achievement of the development
goals and objectives approved by the
Board of Governors.
Community Relations activities include both
internal and external publications. The
budget for this area has been increased by
$380,000 to support the level of activity
reflected in the development goals and
objectives approved by the Board of
Governors.
Administrative systems developments have
been funded in part from base budgets
($900,000 in 1985/86) but primarily from
endowment income. While the base fund-
#
ing level associated with maintenance of
existing systems and development of new
systems is still being defined, there is a
clear need for a substantial increase it\
operating base level funding above that
presently provided. In recognition, thp
operating budget level for 1986/87 has*
been increased by $500,000 with comparable increases anticipated in each of the
next two years. This level of current and
proposed support will provide for: *- it J
<Tl-*<
Budget 1986/87
if British Columbia
9 Operating Funds
000)
^4
Table 5.0
General
Other
Salaries
Salary
Items
Cost
Recov.
Alumni Association Grant
Ceremonies
Chancellor k  Board
Consulting Fees
Fire Casulty Ins. Premium
Fire Protection-standby charges
Legal Fees
Miscellaneous Expenditures*
Novlng Costs k  Travel
Staff Maternity Benefits
Tuition Fee Benefits
University Functions
University Memberships
University Contingencies
TOTAL GEBERAL
36
34
492
68
21
764
1,146
47
191
116
76
74
126
SO
146
303
3,607
(Includes Bank Exchange charges k  Safekeeping of Securities, Faculty Club/Unlverslty Social Centre Triennial
Elections, University Travel, Ionian Mackenzie House, Temporary Employees Slck-tlme. and Performing Eights
UrgmUilz&tlon. J °
Table 6.0
Plant
Facilities Planning
Plant Admin, k  Sched. Dlv.
Plant Custodial Dlv.
Plant Dept. Office
Plant Design k  Construction
Plant Operations
Plant Trades • Utilities Dlv.
Plant Costs for Hospital Space
Other Purchased Services
Utilities
Traffic k  Security
Table 7.0
Student Services & Awards
Athletics Crants
Avards > Financial Aid Office
Graduate Fellowships
General*
Student Couns. k  Resources Cnt.
Student Health Services
Undergraduate Scholarships k  Bursaries
Vomen Students' Office
TOTAL STUDEHT SERVICES k A»ARDS
•(Includes Canada Employment Centre. Child Care Centre,
International House, and Off-campus Accommodation)
11,677
(260)
1986/87
Budget
492
108
59
764
,146
47
191
167
76
74
126
60
146
303
Other
Salary
Cost
1986/87
Salaries
Benefits
Items
Recov.
Budget
86
11
26
123
669
69
37
665
4,622
670
269
6,451
86
11
10
107
266
33
16
313
940
116
31
1,087
4,892
603
1,238
6.733
2,609
(2)
2,607
1S2
152
7,326
7,326
918
113
74
(268)
847
■on-
Other
Salaries
Benefits
Salary
Items
post
Recov.
1986/87
Budget
140
626
296
36
49
1,860
380
119
433
761
IE
63
94
10
39
73
2,235
(737)
144
626
191
205
25
8
238
(737)
- further development of the financial
systems begun last year.
- a new alumni records system designed
to support the University's major fund
raising campaign.
- redevelopment of the University's student systems including touch tone
registration, records, academic program
report, room booking and exam
scheduling, student fees, etc.
- design of new facilities management
systems.
- re-design of the human resources systems — personnel, position control,
payroll.
- design of the budgeting system.
• Academic computing will require a significantly increased level of funding to meet
the continuing requirements of both faculty
and students for teaching and research. To
address local computing needs, $500,000
was budgeted in 1986/87 with comparable
increases anticipated in each of the next
two years.
-The University is strongly committed to
increasing its graduate student numbers
over the next few years. We have budgeted $500,000 in the base for 1986/87 and
a further $500,000 for 1987/88 for teaching .
assistantships and graduate fellowships.
•To encourage the pursuit of external funding for research activity and in recognition
of research related overhead costs borne
by individual units, it is desirable to return
to faculties a portion of the contract overhead received by the University. This
objective has been reflected in the operating budget with the allocation of $315,000
representing 1/3 of the research overhead
dollars earned in 1985/86.
. The move to place the Centre of Continuing
Education on a full cost recovery basis was
begun in 1985/86; the second phase will be
implemented this year. For 1986/87, the
Centre's budget will be $4,228 million of
which $431,000 represents the University's
contribution to direct costs. In addition,
each Faculty with continuing education
activities will be required to display
projected revenues and expenditures in a
separate budget category when detailed
budgets are prepared. Policies are also
being developed to ensure that all of the
University's continuing education activities,
irrespective of the organizational unit with
which they are associated, pay a realistic
portion of overhead charges incurred by
the University on their behalf.
Summary Table 10.0
Academic
Salaries
Other
Salaries
Ron-
Salary
Items
Academic
Non-credit  Activity
Academic Services
Administrative Services
General
Physical Plant
Student Services k Avarde
Designated Purposes
Internal Cost Recoveries
TOTAL (DIVERSITY
100,241
2,305
3,114
22,340
1,688
13,510
8.647
107
12,368
1.813
1.200
61.673
15
,028
492
1
,666
1
046
13
1
526
363
192
10,066
3,086
7,882
2,306
3,607
11,677
4,800
60
43,484
Cost
Recov.
(1.982)
(772)
(7)
(260)
(737)
(962)
(4.710)
Table 8.0
Designated Purposes
Academic
Salaries
Other
Salaries
Benefits
Ion-
Salary
Items
Cost
Recov.
1986/87
Budget
*
Designated Purposes:
Reserve:  VP Academic
Reserve: VP Admin * Finance
Provision:  Salary Increases
TOTAL OTHER
1.172
1.942
228
69
903
192
22
38
1.422
107
3.037
-
3.114
1,200
192
60
0
4,566
*
Table 9.0
Internal Cost Recoveries
Other
Salaries
Benefits
Ion-
Salary
Items
Cost
Recov.
1986/87
Budget
Research Contract Overhead
TOTAL  IITERIAL COST RECOVERIES
(952)
(962)
*
0
0
0
(962)
(952)
1986/87
Budget
145,693
7,671
22.286
11,891
3,727
26,310
6,239
4,666
(962)
-An Office of International Coordination
reporting to the Academic Vice-President is
being created and will provide assistance in
the area of international activities.
• Faculty salary increases (for merit driven
career progress, merit and anomary-
inequity) have been funded at the level
provided via the Fund for Excellence in
Education. Should the amount finally
agreed upon be greater than this, it will
require a further reduction in the faculty
complement.
The Athletics/Recreation UBC/Sports Camp
Budget is now set up as an ancillary operation. For 1986/87, the University's operating budget grant to this unit is $618,000
which represents 34% of the
Athletics/Recreation budget.
Parking has been transferred to full ancillary
status with no subsidy from university
operating funds.
Designated funding was also provided for
the following two items which were not
reflected in the General Purpose Operating
Funds budget:
The Excellence Fund provided to the three
universities $1 million for research in
general areas of which our share was
$633,000.
Provincial grants of $1.25 million for operating and instructional equipment and $2
million for instructional and administrative
equipment were made to the three universities. From both grants, the University
received $1.97 million. OUTREACH
UBC reaches out to New West families
Prof. John Friesen (left) and staff of the New Westminster Counselling Centre.
AIDS study seeks answers
A team of UBC investigators will receive
$830,000 from the research arm of Health and
Welfare Canada to continue what is presently
the largest study of AIDS (acquired immune
deficiency syndrome) in Canada. The team
will receive the sum from the National Health
and Research Development Program over a
three year period. It is the second time the
NHRDP has awarded funds to this study.
The study began in 1982, before the first
case of AIDS had been reported in Vancouver,
when a group of far-sighted doctors embarked
on a project to investigate the abnormally high
incidence of patients with swollen glands they
were seeing in their practices. They began a
program of patient monitoring and regular lab
testing which soon determined that swollen
glands were an early manifestation of the AIDS
virus.
The Vancouver Lymphadenopathy-AIDS
Study now involves a team of 12 UBC specialists and a study group of 600 homosexual
men, about half of whom are currently infected
with the AIDS virus. The study, based at St.
Paul's Hospital, monitors the group with annual
questionnaires, physical examinations, and
blood tests, including the AIDS antibody test,
in an attempt to understand the natural history
of infection with the AIDS virus. It operates
under strict confidential procedures.
"We are the oldest and largest study of this
kind in Canada," said Dr. Martin Shechter,
assistant professor in the Department of Health
Care and  Epidemiology,  and the principal
investigator of the study. "Because of that fact
we can provide some of the most comprehensive data available today on the natural history
of infection with the AIDS virus."
Dr. Shechter estimates there are between
50,000 to 60,000 people in Canada who carry
the AIDS virus. The majority of those people
may not know they are infected because the
virus can be silent," said Dr. Shechter. "Our
study says 18 percent of people who are
infected with the virus will develop AIDS within
four years. The fundamental question we are
trying to answer is—why do people get AIDS
after being infected?"
The results of the study will become
important in implementing education programs
to help prevent the spread of the AIDS virus.
"Recently we have discovered that younger
people are at higher risk of becoming infected
AIDS because they are not modifying their
behaviour as much as older people are," Dr.
Shechter said. This becomes important when
education programs are implemented because
it means that group needs higher targeting."
Dr. Schechter said the research team plans
to expand the study group to 800 people and
introduce state-of-the-art laboratory tests in
cooperation with the Laboratory Centre for
Disease Control in Ottawa. Dr. Schechter
recently received a National Health Research
Scholar Award from Health and Welfare
Canada to support his research into AIDS and
breast cancer.
Social stigma hides disease
One in 100 people contract the disease
schizophrenia. That figure surprises many
people, says Dr. Barry Jones, Director of the
Schizophrenia Service at the Health Sciences
Centre Hospital. "Schizophrenia is the third
major health problem in Canada after cancer
and heart disease," Dr. Jones said. "It also
carries a social stigma. That's one reason why
we're 20 years behind in medical research and
funding."
Tragically, schizophrenia usually hits young
people in their late teens or early twenties. If s
caused by a chemical disorder in the brain,
and while it can be controlled to some extent
by drugs, schizophrenia is incurable. "It's a
terrible debilitating disease and we know so
little about it," Dr. Jones said.
Raising ' public awareness about
schizophrenia is one major focus of the
Schizophrenia Service. It has been open a
little less than a year, and is the largest clinic of
its kind in Canada. "We offer the most comprehensive treatment for schizophrenics in the
country," Dr. Jones said. Prior to the opening
of the facility, care of the schizophrenic patient
was scattered through various institutions and
resources. "Patients tended to be benignly
neglected, partly because the disease is so
misunderstood, and partly because of the lack
of health professionals who are involved in
treating it." Dr. Jones said.
Within the few months of its operation, the
service has generated a great deal of interest
from community groups, health professionals
and the government. "One focus of the
Schizophrenia Service is to liaise with community groups and other organizations that see
schizophrenia patients," said Dr. Jones.
In addition to providing an important outreach facility, the Schizophrenia Service is
becoming a major research centre. "We have
a big advantage over other hospitals who
might want to offer this kind of service," said
Dr. Jones. "At UBC our facilities for brain
research are second to none, and we have
every opportunity to study this number one
psychiatric disease. And, being a campus
based hospital, we also have the opportunity
for collaborative inter-disciplinary research."
The Schizophrenia Service offers a
program for residents in psychiatry and medi--
cal students, as well as specialized training for
students in other health professions. They're
learning about the illness in a way that wasn't
possible before," said Dr. Jones. "By having
this kind of program at a university we are
providing students with the expertise to deal
with schizophrenic patients and gradually dispelling some of the misinformation surrounding
the disease."
The idea of the family as a central institution
in western society has been rediscovered,
according to a professor of education of UBC.
Prof. John Friesen of the education faculty's
Department of Counselling Psychology bases
his optimism about the future of the family on
two decades of research and public service,
which includes the establishment, with
departmental colleagues, of a counselling centre in New Westminster. The centre's professionals give assistance to those who need help
in dealing with conflicts and other problems.
"In the last five or six years," Prof. Friesen
said, "if s become increasingly clear that there
has been a rediscovery of the family and its
importance in the rearing of children. There
appears to be no substitute for the family as a
place for the expression of intimacy and the
development of affiliative relationships."
Prof. Friesen emphasizes, however, that
many of the families of the last two decades of
the 20th century are radically different from
those of the past.
Gone is the idea of the father as a remote,
patriarchal figure who saw himself as the
breadwinner and who left the day-to-day running of the home and the upbringing of children to his wife.
"In the last 20 years," he said, "there has
been a radical shift in family structure characterized by women taking on second careers
and the father assuming increasing responsibilities for running the home and rearing and
nurturing the children. The distinctive differences between motherhood and fatherhood
have become less clear cut"
One of the major barriers to male acceptance of the new family situation is that men
have not cultivated the expression of emotion
and the bonds of community, Dr. Friesen said.
"Men have learned the skids of logical thinking
and producing in the work place but have
tended to suppress emotional expression in
family situations and in interpersonal relationships generally."
The changing attitude of fathers toward the
family and the development of their children
has emerged from interviews that Dr. Friesen,
his colleagues and graduate students have
conducted in recent years as part of The
Fathering Project."
The New Westminster Counselling Centre,
a joint UBC-New Westminster School Board
project established by Prof. Friesen and his
colleagues a decade ago, operated five days a
week under supervision by Prof. Friesen and
other members of the Counselling Psychology
Department. About 40 families a week visit the
centre for sessions that may vary from a single
meeting up to 20 weeks of counselling.
"We see families in conflict, single parents
and individuals from all socio-economic
groups as well as those who have problems
arising from such things as alcohol abuse.
"In additon to providing a community service. We are able to add to our research data
and provide graduate students with an
opportunity to develop their interviewing and
counselling skills. We get very positive community feedback from the service."
Z?%1.'
UBC animal scientist Dr. Kimberly Cheng looks over the latest batch of chicks hatched
at UBC's Quail Genetic Stock Centre, the largest facility of its kind in North America.
Looking for nerve regrowth
As Rick Hansen nears the end of his
wheelchair odyssey to raise funds for spinal
cord research, his hopes and those of other
disabled people with spinal cord injuries may
well lie in research projects such as that of
UBC zoology professor Dr. John Steeves. Dr.
Steeves is currently working with chicken
embryos to find out more about spinal cord
injury and explore the possibility of stimulating
regeneration in the parts of the nervous system
which affect motor control.
Dr. Steeves said his work will provide
researchers with a better understanding of the
mechanism of nerve cell regeneration. "We
would like to know why peripheral nerves in
the   human   body   regenerate   while  those      *
located in the spinal cord and brain do not,"
says Dr. Steeves.    He is also studying the      *
ability of embryonic birds and mammals to       •
regenerate spinal cord nerve ceHs—an ability
which is lost at birth.
"Until recently, spinal cord research has
focused on post-traumatic care rather than a
cure," said Dr. Steeves.   There was nothing       *
we could do for people with spinal cord injury
except to help them regain maximum mobility.      4.
Now we have more resources and techniques       '
available to us, our focus is shifting to include
the   biological   mechanisms   of   nerve   ceH
regeneration."
6     UBC REPORTS January 22,1987 PEOPLE
•*■    Kathleen Pichora-Fuller
UBC's first Outstanding Young Alumnus
Award will go to a hearing therapist who is a
leading researcher in the new field of hearing
rehabilitation for the elderly. Kathleen Pichora-
Fullerwas chosen by the Alumni Association in
recognition of her work in audiology.
Ms. Pichora-Fuller graduated from UBC in
1980 with a Master's degree in Audiology and
Speech Sciences. She continued her research
in speechreading at Toronto's Mount Sinaii
Hospital and just three years later became
clinic supervisor for the internationally
renowned Mount Sinaii audiology clinic.
Under her direction, the aural rehabilitation
program at Mount Sinaii has become unique in
Canada, says Dr. John Gilbert, director of the
UBC School of Audiology and Speech
Sciences.
Currently president of the Canadian Association of Speech Language Pathologists and
Audiologists,   Ms.   Pichora-Fuller   is   actively
involved in several government task forces and
advisory committees studying services available to the disabled and hearing impaired.
"I suppose it is particularly appropriate I
was chosen as the recipient of this young
award, because I am involved in a young profession," Ms. Pichora-Fuller said. Hearing loss
in the elderly is an old problem, but a relatively
new field of study for audiologists who are trying to remedy the lack of services available.
The Outstanding Young Alumnus Award
will be awarded on an annual basis.
It is with sadness that we learn Mrs. Ida
Green passed away on December 26 at the
age of 83. Mrs. Green and her husband Cecil
Green have been recognized internationally for
their support of university facilities and scientific projects.    Colleges, hospitals, museums,
schools and universities in Canada, Australia,
the United States and Britain have benefited
from Mrs. Green's personal contributions.
Their gifts to UBC have been used for the
purchase and renovation of Cecil Green Park,
which serves as a campus centre of alumni
activities, and for the establishment of the Cecil
H. and Ida Green Visiting professorships,
which have enabled UBC to bring outstanding
teachers and researchers to campus. The
University recognized Ida Green's remarkable
contributions to education and science with an
honourary degree in 1979. In addition to her
philanthropic contributions, Mrs. Green was an
active participant in civic affairs and a pioneer
in the American Association of University
Women, and the provision of Graduate
Fellowships for women students. She is survived by her husband, Cecil Green.
1
Library collects
newspaper data
A research team of B.C. librarians has
begun work at the University of B.C. on the
British Columbia Newspaper Project, which will
serve as a model for creation of a national data
base for newspapers.
The project is funded with a $75,000 grant
from Canada's Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council made to the B.C. Library
Association.
Margaret Friesen, head of the UBC library's
interiibrary loan division and principal co-
investigator on the project, said that completion will enable researchers to determine what
newspapers have been published in B.C.
"since day one," the locations of the files of
each newspaper, the format in which they exist
and how to gain access to them.
"We're even planning to provide information on newspapers that we know were published but for which no records exist," Miss
Frieserv said.'The project is B.C.'s contribution
to fulfilling an objective of the National Library
of Canada to create a national data base for
newspapers.
The B.C. project will serve as a model
which all other Canadian provinces can use to
compile a uniform data base that will give anyone access to all Canadian newspapers," Miss
Friesen said.
The other principal investigator on the project is UBC graduate Linda Hale, a Vancouver
free-lance librarian. Hana Komouros, senior
serials librarian at the University of Victoria
Library, is the project coordinator and Brian
Owen, systems analyst in the UBC library, is
project consultant.
Unique computer project to access archives
The technology of the information age will
soon be used to access the information of the
past. The UBC Archives recently received a
SSHRC renewal grant of $20,850 for the Guide
Project—a computerized repository guide to
UBC's archives and manuscript coiiections.
The guide will give future researchers faster
and easier access to material. "It's going to be
of tremendous assistance," said archivist
Laurenda Daniells. The innovative and unique
project has already generated national interest.
"Many other archivists are waiting to see the
results of our prototype model," Ms. Daniells
said.
A $26,195 grant from the SSHRC Canadian
Research Tools Program in I985 enabled Ms.
Daniells and project archivist, Chris Hives, to
begin processing material for the guide
database. Additional assistance, in the form of
a $12,000 grant from the B.C. Council ot
Archives, funded a six month long separate
project to organize and describe the backlog
of archival material.
"It's really kind of mind-boggling what we
have here," said Ms. Daniells, who seems to
know every document, photo, micro-fiche and
piece of memorabilia—and its location—by
heart. The guide, scheduled to be completed
this summer, will increase awareness of the
scope of material available in the UBC
archives. A catalogue will be available to all
UBC researchers, as well as historians,
genealogists, writers and others from outside
the university, who regularly make use of
archival information.
The UBC Archives contains a wealth of
material, all relating to the university, and going
back to the 1890's when the predecessor of
UBC, McGill University College, fulfilled the
post-secondary requirements of the province.
Items include several thousand tape record-
Chris Hives and Laurenda Daniells use high-tech to access archival materials.
ings, some dating from the I950's, which provide an oral history of facets of university life.
In addition to an extensive photo collection,
researchers will find exquisite architectural
drawings of old library windows stored beside
films of the first Convocation, in I9I5. There are
maps and plans used in the original construction of the campus buildings, and a large set of
lantern slides which UBC professors in the
thirties used to illustrate their public lectures in
a province-wide extension program.    There
are video tapes, personal papers, old scrap-
books of newspaper clippings, minutes of AMS
meetings, monographs and much, much more.
"People often don't realise that today's
records are tomorrow's archives," said Ms.
Daniells. She adds that she hopes the guide
will remind people on campus that the material
in their offices today may well be sought after
by researchers in the future.
"I like to think of the archives as the storehouse of the University memory," Ms. Daniells
said.
UBC Calendar
THE VANCOUVER INSTITUTE
Saturday, Jan. 31
Byzantine Archaeology: A
City Revealed. Prof. James
Russelt, Classics, UBC.
Saturday, Feb. 7
J. V. Clyne Lecture.
Patronage in Canada.
Geoffrey Simpson, Ottawa
Correspondent, Globe and
Mail.
Lecture Hall 2, Woodward Instructional Resources
Centre. Free. 8:15 p.m.
SUNDAY, JAN. 25
African Instruments and Rhythms.
The Museum of Anthropology hosts Jeni LeGoh's,
Roots and All That Jazz. This presentation explores
African instruments and rhythms and their influence on
music and dance of the Americas and the West Indies.
Performance free with museum admission. For further
information call, 228-5087. Great Hall, Museum of
Anthropology. 2:30 p.m.
MONDAY. JAN. 26
Mechanical Engineering Seminar.
Mathematical Modelling of Flow- Induced Vibrations.
Rob Corless, Graduate Student, Mechanical Engineering. Room 1215, Civil and Mechanical Engineering
Building. 3:30 p.m.
Astronomy Seminar.
Cosmic Censorship and the Third Law of Black Hole
Mechanics. Dr. Werner Israel, University of Alberta.
Room 260, Geophysics and Astronomy Building. 4 p.m.
Preventive Medicine and Health
Promotion Lecture.
Are There Health Consequences for Women in the
Workforce? Fran Caruth, Graduate Student, Health
Services Planning and Administration. For further
information call, 228-2258. Room 253, James Mather
Building. 4p.m.
Society and Health Colloquium.
Defensive Reticulation: How Physicians Cope with the
Patient Shortage. Prof. Robert Evans, Economics,
UBC. Room 207- 209, Anthropology and Sociology
Building. 4:30 p.m.
International Film Night.
Kagemusha. Akira Kurosawa's epic drama of feudal
conflict. Gate 4 Lounge, International House. 7:30 p.m.
TUESDAY JAN 27
Botany Seminar.
Regulation of Cell Calcium: Active and Passive Transport
Systems.  Dr. Heven Sze, Botany, Universityof Maryland. Room 3219, Biological Sciences Building.  12:30
p.m.
Health Promotion and Systems
Studies.
In Pursuit of Socially Malleable Contingencies in Mental
Health: Selected Findings from a Study of Disabled and
Non-Disabled Adults. Dr. Jay Turner, Medical Sociologist and National Health Scientist. For more information
call, 228-2258. Fourth Floor Board Room, IRC. 12:30
p.m. *
Office For Women Students
Workshop.
Creative Techniques for Reduction of Stress and
Anxiety. Workshops continue on Feb. 3 and Feb. 10.
For more information call, 228-2415. Room 106 A,
Brock Hall. 12:30 p.m.
Office For Women Students
Support Group.
Mature Students Support Group. This group will meet
every Tuesday lunch-hour throughout the term. For
further information call, 228-2415. Women Students
Lounge, Room 223, Brock Hall. 12:30 p.m.
Chemistry Seminar.
Plasma Etching Reactions: A Discussion of Mechanisms. Dr. Harold F. Winters, IBM Almaden Research
Center, San Jose, California.  Room 250, Chemistry
Building.   1 p.m.
Statistics Workshop Seminar.
Optimal Variable Selection in Monitoring of Cardiotoxic
Effects.  Peter Schumacher, Statistical Consulting and
Research Laboratory, UBC.   Room 102, Ponderosa
Annex C.  3:30 p.m.
Research Centre Seminar.
Hereditary Hypoalphalipoproteinemias and
Atherosclerosis,  Dr. Jin Frohlich, Pathology, UBC.
Room 202, Research Centre, 950 West 28th Avenue. 4
p.m.
Religious Studies Film.
Image Before My Eyes. A film about Jewish life in eastern Europe before the Holocaust. Admission free.
Room B212, Buchanan Building. 8:15p.m.
WEDNESDAY JAN 28
Noon-Hour Concert.
Gene Ramsbottom, clarinet, Philippe Etter, viola,
Melinda Coffey, piano. Donation requested. Recital
Hall, Music Building.   1230p.m.
UBC REPORTS January 22, 1987     7 UBC Calendar
Forestry Seminar.
Private Ssctor Investment in Forestry - Current Financial
Status of the B.C. Forest Industry. Mr. Jack Pussepp,
Pern berton Houston Willoughby Ltd., Vancouver. For
information call, 228-2507. Room 166, Macmillan
Building. 12:30 p.m.
•   Reading.
Reading, sponsored by the English and the Creative
Writing Departments, by the Canadian poet Steve
Noves. author of Backing into Heaven. Buchanan
Penthouse. 12:30 p.m.
Oceanography Seminar.
Carbon 14 in Marine Sediments. Dr. S. Emerson,
University of Washington. For more information call
228-2821. Room 1465, Biological Sciences Building.
3:30 p.m.
Geography Colloquium.
Sea Level Changes and Precontact Settlement in
Coastal B.C. Richard Hebda, Botany, B.C. Provincial
Museum. Room 201, Geography Building. 3:30 p.m.
Applied Mathematics Seminar.
Output-Size Sensitive Algorithms in Computational
Geometry. Prof. David Kirkpatrick, Computer Science,
UBC. Room 229, Mathematics Building. 3:45 p.m.
Personnel Services and Financial
Planning Lecture.
RRSPs, Annuities and RRIF's. Jim Rogers, President,
James E. Rogers and Associates. Open to all staff. For
further information call, Maureen Simons, 228-2456 or
Jane Durant, 228-6204. IRC 2. 4:30 p.m.
Zoology and I.A.R.E. Seminar.
The Snowshoe Hare Cycle in the Southern Yukon - The
Last 10 Years and the Next 10 Years. Dr. C J. Krebs,
Zoology, UBC. Room 2000, Biological Sciences Building. 4:30 p.m.'
Cinema 16.
Antonia: Portrait of a Woman. $2.00 plus a one-time
membership fee of $1.00.' For more information call,
228-3697. SUB Auditorium. 7 p.m.
THURSDAY JAN 29
Medical Grand Rounds.
Disorders of Gastric Emptying. Or. Paul Kortan,
University of Toronto. Room G279, Acute Care Unit,
Health Sciences Centre Hospital. 12 noon.
Office For Women Students
Workshop.
Essay Skills Workshops. Nancy Horsman, Office for
Women Students. Workshops continue on Feb. 5 and
Feb. 12. Room B212, Buchanan Building. 12:30 p.m.
i    Geological Sciences Lecture.
I       Orientation Surveys: A Means of Optimizing Geochemi-
■       cal Survey Effectiveness in Mineral Exploration. Dr.
Graham Closs, Colorado School of Mines. Room 330A,
Geological Sciences Building. 12:30 p.m.
CO
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Geological Sciences Lecture.
Models in Exploration Geochemistry. Dr. Graham
Closs, Colorado School of Mines. Room 330A, Geological Sciences Building. 3:30 p.m.
Adventures of the Mind Lecture
Series.
Irrational Behaviour, Group Identification, Fanaticism
and Calamities - A Study of Arthur Koestler*s Theories.
Dr. Ronald Jones, Education, UBC. For further information call, Kerrisdale Community Centre, 266-8331.
Kerrisdale Community Centre. 7:30 p.m.
Faculty Recital.
Hans-Karl Piltz, viola. Recital Hall, Music Building. 8
p.m.
FRIDAY, JAN. 30
Pharmaceutical Sciences Seminar.
The Control of Myocardial Contractility: Role of
Zarcolemmal Calcium. Prof. Glen Langer, Medicine and
Physiology, UCLA. IRC 3. 12:30 p.m.
Noon-Hour Concert.
Collegium Musicum Ensembles. John Sawyer, Ray
Nurse, Morna Russell, directors. Recital Hall, Music
Building. 12:30 p.m.
Medical Genetics Seminar.
Chorionic Villus Sampling - Local and International
Update. Dr. Doug Wilson, Clinical Genetics, Grace
Hospital. Parentcraft Room, Grace Hospital, 4490 Oak
Street. 1 p.m.
Geological Sciences Seminar.
Geological Environments for Patinum - Group Elements
Mineralization - A Chief Overview. Dr. L. J. Hulbert,
Geological Survey of Canada, Ottawa. Room 330A,
Geological Sciences Building. 3:30 p.m.
Chamber Concert.
UBC Student Chamber Ensembles. String, wind and
keyboard divisions. Recital Hall, Music Building. 8 p.m.
International House South Pacific
Night.
Tahitian, Maori and Hawaiian Dancers. Come dressed in
tropical attire. $1.00 non-International House members
and 50c. International House members. Forfurther
information call, 228-5021. Upper Lounge, International
House. 8 p.m.
SATURDAY, JAN 31
Federation of Medical Women of
Canada - B.C. Branch - One Day
Conference.
Woman to Woman: Your Health and Happiness. Panel of
women physicians will present papers and workshops.
$50 includes lunch and handouts. Forfurther information call, 222-5272 or 222-5240. Room 110, Henry
Angus Building. 8:30 p.m.
Thunderbird Women's Gymnastics.
Dual Meet Osborne Gymnasium. 11a.m.
Thunderbirds Rugby.
UBC versus the Vancouver Reps Club team in
McKechnie Cup action. Thunderbird Stadium. 2:30 p.m.
Thunderbird Men's and Women's
Basketball.
UBC hosts teams from the University of Victoria. War
Memorial Gymnasium. 6 p.m. and 8 p.m.
Guest Artist Performance.
Philip Myers, french hom and Robert Rogers, piano.
Works by Beethoven, Strauss, Dukas, Hummel, Poot
and Hindemith. Tickets: Adults $8 and students/seniors
$4. Recital Hall, Music Building. 8 p.m.
MONDAY, FEB. 2
Faculty Recital.
David Branter, alto and soprano saxophones, Melinda
Coffey, piano. Recital Hall, Music Building. 12:30 p.m.
Chemistry Seminar.
Structure and Dynamics of Atomic and Molecular Layers
Deposited on Xe Plated Graphite. Prof. Giacinto Scotes,
Chemistry, University of Waterloo. Room 225, Chemistry Building. 2:30 p.m.
Mechanical Engineering Seminar.
Dynamic Redesign of Modified Structures. Phillip
Welch, Graduate Student. Room 1204, Civil and
Mechanical Engineering Building. 3:30 p.m.
Applied Mathematics Seminar.
Bistable Solitons. Prof. Richard Enns, Physics, SFU.
Room 229, Mathematics Building. 3:45 p.m.
Astronomy Seminar.
Two Stegs Toward the Hubble Constant. Dr. S. Van
Den Bergh. Room 260, Geophysics and Astronomy
Building. 4 p.m.
TUESDAY, FEB. 3
Botany Seminar.
Chasing Green Genes Through the Molecular Jungle.
Dr. B. R. Green, Botany, UBC. Room 3219, Biological
Sciences Building. 12:30 p.m.
C-l-L Lecture in Physical
Chemistry.
Chemical Dynamics In and On Molecular Clusters. Prof.
Giacinto Scoles, Chemistry, University of Waterloo.
Room 250, Chemistry Building. 1 p.m.
Oceanography Seminar.
Wave Growth in Scattered Sea Ice. D. Masson,
Oceanography, UBC. For further information contact   -
228-2821. Room 1465, Biological Sciences Building.
3:30 p.m.
Anatomy Seminar.
Effects of Human Serum on Growth and Chemosensi-
tivities of Cultured Human Breast Cancer Cells. Dr.
Joanne Emerman, Anatomy, UBC. Room B37, Anatomy,
Friedman Building. 4 p.m.
WEDNESDAY, FEB. 4
Pharmacology and Therapeutics
Seminar.
A Single Ca ++ Entry System and a Single Transmitter
Release System at the Motor Nerve Terminal? Dr. D. M.
Quastel, Pharmacology and Therapeutics, UBC. Room
317, Block C, Basic Medical Sciences Building. 12
noon.
Forestry Seminar.
Similarity Mapping: Simple Views from the Stratosphere
and Its Use in Comparing B.C.'s Permanent Sample
Plots. Dr. N. Smith, Forest Science, UBC. Room 166,
MacMillan Building. 12:30 p.m.
Noon-Hour Concert.
Purcell String Quartet. Donation requested. Recital
Hall, Music Building. 12:30 p.m.
Geography Colloquium.
The Impact of Foreign Investment on the Special
Economic Zones of China. Francis Yee, Geography,
UBC. Room 201, Geography Building. 3:30 p.m.
Cinema 16.
Woman of the Dunes. $2.00 plus a one-time membership fee of $1.00. For more information call, 228-3697.
SUB Auditorium. 7 p.m.
Centre for Continuing Education
Debate.
The Defense of Canada: A Debate. Gwynne Dyer,
author and narrator of the television series, War, and
Douglas A. Ross, Institute of International Affairs, UBC,
an expert in the area of arms control and Canadian
defense. General admission $8. Students $5. For
further information call, 222-5238. IRC 2. 7:30 p.m.
THURSDAY, FEB. 5
Medical Grand Rounds.
Neurologic Manifestations of Aids. Drs. J. Oger, G.
Stiver, G. May, J. Hill, Radiology, UBC. Lecture
Theatre, Room G279, Acute Care Unit. 12 noon.
Geological Sciences Seminar.
Upper TriassicTethyan Reefs, Whitehorse Trough,
Yukon. Dr. R. Pam Reid, Universityof Miami. Room
330A, Geological Sciences Building. 12:30 p.m.
Guest Artist Recital.
Stan Fisher, clarinet. Donation requested. Recital Hall,
Music Building. 12:30p.m.
Faculty Association General
Meeting.
Room 100, Mathematics Building. 1 p.m.
Psychology Colloquium.
Apraxiaand Related Communicative Disorders After
Left Cerebral Damage. Dr. Doreen Kimura, University of
Western Ontario. Room 2510, Kenny Building. 4 p.m.
Centre for Continuing Education
Public Forum.
What's the Future of Unemployment Insurance in
Canada? Claude Forget, chairman, Commission of
Inquiry on Unemployment. Admission: $6. Forfurther
information call, 222-5238. IRC 2. 7:30 p.m.
Adventures of the Mind Lecture
Series.
Life in the Universe. Dr. Michael Ovenden, Astronomy,
UBC. For further information call, the Kerrisdale
Community Centre, 266-8331. Kerrisdale Community
Centre. 7:30 p.m.
FRIDAY, FEB. 6
Forestry Seminar.
Current Problems and Techniques in Growth and Yield
Predictions. Dr. George M. Furnival, Forestry, Yale
University. Room 166, MacMillan Building. 12:30p.m.
Distinguished Artists of India
Concert.
Rhythm Workshop and Concert of South Indian Flute
and Mridangam (drum). Prof. Trichy Sankaran, York
University and Prof. T. Viswanathan, Wesleyan University. Asian Centre Auditorium. 12:30 p.m.
Leon and Thea Koerner Lecture.
The Art of Making Scenes: A Do-lt-Yourself Guide to
Theatre. Prof. Ronald Bryden, Drama, Universityof
Toronto. Room A106, Buchanan Building. 12:30 p.m.
Faculty Recital.
James Fankhauser, voice, Rena Sharon, piano. Recital
Hall, Music Building. 12:30 p.m.
Asian Studies Colloquium.
Two Notions of Brahman in Sanskrit Religious Literature. Dave Fern, Graduate Student, Asian Studies,
UBC. Room 604, Asian Centre. 12:45 p.m.
Medical Genetics Seminar.
Case Presentations and Counselling Issues. Faculty,
Clinical Genetics Unit, Grace Hospital. Parentcraft
Room, Grace Hospital, 4490 Oak Street. 1 p.m.
Thunderbird Men's and Women's
Volleyball.
UBC hosts teams from the Universityof Calgary. War
Memorial Gymnasium. 6:30 p.m. and 8 p.m.
Thunderbird Field Hockey.
Indoor Invitational Tournament. UBC Armouries. All
day.
SATURDAY, FEB. 7
Thunderbird Men's and Women's
Volleyball.
UBCTeams Hostthe.University of Lethbridge. War
Memorial Gymnasium. 6:30 p.m. and 8 p.m.
Thunderbird Reid Hockey.
Indoor Invitational Tournament. UBC Armouries. All
day.
NOTICES
Badminton Club.
Faculty and Staff Badminton Club meets Tuesdays 8:30
- 10:30 p.m. and Fridays 7:30-9:30 p.m. (except Jan. 30)
in Gymnasium A of the Robert Osborne Sports Centre.
Fees $15 till April. New members welcome. For more
information, call Bernie 228-4025.
Nitobe Memorial Garden.
The Nitobe Memorial Garden will be closed weekends.
Hours will be Monday to Friday, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Free
admission during winter hours.
Botanical Garden.
The Main Botanical Garden on Stadium Road will be
open daily (including weekends) from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Fitness Appraisal.
The School of Physical Education and Recreation,
through the new John M. Buchanan Fitness and
Research Centre, is administering a comprehensive
physical fitness assessment program available to
students, faculty, staff and the general public. A
complete assessment takes approximately one hour and
encompasses the various fitness tests, an interpretation
of the results, detailed counselling and an exercise
prescription. A fee of $20 for students and $25 for all
others is charged. For additional information, please
call 228-3996, or inquire at Recreation UBC, War
Memorial Gym, Room 203.
London Theatre Tour.
UBC's Centre for Continuing Education is offering a
London theatre tour Feb. 20 to Mar. 2,1987. Trip
includes six theatre performances, visits to Cambridge
University, the Museum of London, the National Portrait
Gallery, a tour of the city's theatres, airfare,
accommodations and transfers. Cost is $2,350. For
more information, call Jo Ledingham at 222-5207.
Computing Centre Non-credit
Courses.
The Computing Centre is offering a series of free non-
credit courses during January, February and March.
These courses are intended primarily for members of
the university community who plan to use the facilities
of the Computing Centre. A complete list of courses is
available by calling 228-6611, or you can pick up a
schedule from the Computing Centre general office
(CSCI420).
Faculty and Staff Exercise Class.
Mondays, Tuesdays and Thursdays. Instructor: S. R.
Brown. For further information call, 228-3996.
Gymnasium B East, R. Osborne Building. 12:30- 1:05
p.m.
Faculty and Staff Hockey.
Ice time has been changed in January and February for
faculty, staff, friends and "oldtimers" hockey to 3:45 -
4:45 p.m. Wednesdays. This is non-contact hockeyfor
those over, or near, 50 years of age. Newcomers are
welcome. For further information call, 228-3188. Rink
1, Thunderbird Arena.
Occupational Stress.
The University Occupational Health and Safety
Committee Task Force on Occupational Stress is
soliciting submissions from faculty and staff on
incidences of occupational stress contributing to
accidents, illness and increases in absentism at the
university. Written submissions should be sent to the
Occupational Health and Saf ety Off ice, Room 209, Old
Administration Building.
Fine Arts Gallery.
Aspectsof Contemporary Canadian Art From the
Collections ofthe Universityof Calgary at the Nickle
Arts Museum. Fine Arts Gallery, Basement, Main
Library Building. Tuesday to Friday, 10 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Saturday, noon - 5 p.m.
Calendar Deadlines
For events in the period Feb. 8 to Feb. 21, notices must be submitted on
proper Calendar forms no later than 4 pjn. on Thursday, Jan. 29 to the
Community Relations Office, 6328 Memorial Road, Room 207, Old
Administration Building.  For more information, call 228-3131.   >

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