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UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Reports Nov 5, 1980

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Committee
Two proposals for new construction to meet the
space needs of the UBC library to the year 2000
have been selected by the President's Committee on
Library Space Requirements, chaired by Dean
Peter Larkin, head of the Faculty of Graduate
Studies.
Proposal A, the one favored by the 33-member
committee, is based on centralization of library services. It calls for construction of two new wings on
either side of the Ladner Clock Tower linking the
Main and Sedgewick Libraries and the demolition
and reconstruction of most of the existing Main
library. (For a map and more details, turn to page
3.)
Proposal B, which is based on decentralization of
library services, also calls for demolition and
reconstruction of most of the Main Library as well
as construction of a new library building on the site
of the present Bookstore or underground in the
vicuiity of the Main Library.
Under both plans, the north and south wings of
the Main Library and the stack area on the east
side of the building would be demolished and
replaced by six storeys of flexible and adaptable
space that would mfct the standards of the Na
tional Building Code and the Fire Code.
Both plans also call for the central, stone-faced
section of the Main Library, built in 1924-25, to remain intact externally as a "heritage" structure.
The interior, however, would be gutted and
renovated to conform to the rebuilt, six-storey
north and south wings and stack area.
It's estimated that the cost of both proposals
would be in excess of $40 million.
Dean Larkin said the committee on library space
requirements had expressed a preference for Plan
A over Plan B "largely on the argument that centralization of library services is desirable from the
subjective perspective of users."
Moreover, he adds, in a report to President
Douglas Kenny commenting on five construction
options prepared by UBC's Department of
Facilities Planning, the A scheme "would probably
lead to the greatest economy of operation, especially in the immediate future" and "would also contribute to the long-term need for revitalizing the
urban design of the campus core."
The report of the Larkin committee and the
facilities planning document setting out the construction options were placed before UBC's Board
of Governors for information when it met yesterday
(Nov. 4).
President Kenny said both items would be forwarded to the President's Committee on Land Use
and the Senate Committee on Academic Building
Needs for study.
Eventually, a detailed proposal for additional
library space will be sent to the Universities Council
of B.C. for consideration.
The library construction options are based on a
series of technical studies prepared by the facilities
planning department. They were ordered last June
following submission of an interim report by the
Larkin committee to President Kenny.
The interim report said UBC should make an
immediate start on a building program to create
more room for the normal growth of book and
other collections until 1990 and to provide adequate space for some other library functions.
The report also said that Doomsday for the UBC
library — the day when the existing library system
runs out of space for new books and other materials
— is less than a decade away.
UBC re
Volume 26, Number 21. Nov. 5, 1980. Published by Information Services, University of B.C., 6328 Memorial Road, Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1W5, 228-3131. Jim
Banham, editor. Lorie Chortyk, editorial assistant. ISSN 0497-2929.
UBC Thunderbirds basketball team (white jerseys) had
little trouble polishing off this Senior A Dogwood team
last week as they prepared for their annual Buchanan
Trophy clash with Simon Fraser Clansmen this Saturday
(Nov. 8). Game time is 8:30 p.m. in the War Memorial
Gymnasium.
Foundation aids UBC law library
The Law Foundation of British Columbia has awarded $186,103 to the
University for purchases for its Law
Library.
The funds, which will be given to
the University in four separate instalments during the current fiscal year,
will be used to maintain subscriptions
to law journals and current law
reports and for the purchase of other
materials in conventional book form
and on microfilm.
Dean Kenneth Lysyk, head of the
law faculty said that in approving the
grant "the Law Foundation has made
a very significant contribution to ex
cellence in legal education and legal
research."
He added: "We tend to regard this
as the 'flagship' law library in British
Columbia and, of course, we hope the
legal profession will share that perception."
Part of the Law Foundation grant
will be used to meet continuing commitments on the part of the Law
Library for the purchase of law
reports and to pay for subscriptions to
costly law journals.
More than $100,000 will be used by
the Law Library to purchase in-print
and out-of-print material in the fields
of the history of law, legal process and
the social sciences.
Part of the grant will be directed
toward the purchase of microfilm
reading equipment and the replacement of deteriorating and heavily used
basic sets of law materials.
The Law Foundation of B.C., the
first established in Canada, was
created by provincial legislation in
1969 to serve as receiver and
distributor of interest accruing on
lawyers' mixed and general trust accounts maintained in banks, trust
companies and other approved
depositories.
Fee hike
averages
13 per cent
Tuition fees will go up an average of
13 per cent at UBC next year, but a
new approach to the setting of fees will
give first-year students a break.
Most students entering UBC for the
first time next September will pay
$650 for their initial year, an increase
of only 10.2 per cent from this year's
$590.
The schedule of tuition fees for
1981-82 was approved yesterday
(Nov. 4) by the University's Board of
Governors.
Following student representations,
the Board agreed to request that the
federal and provincial governments
deal with deficiencies in government
student-aid programs. The Board also
asked that steps be taken to ensure
that high school students are fully informed about UBC student-aid programs.
A recommendation from UBC
President Douglas Kenny that the
annual increase in fees be lower for
first year than for higher years was approved by the Board.
"Most students work during the
summer and the graduating high
school student doesn't have the same
chance to earn money that a university
student has," Dr. Kenny said in explaining his position.
He said that while the dollar difference between first-year tuition fees
and fees ft»r the upper years would be
only $20 nejftyear, the new approach,
if projected for future years, could
mean a significant difference a few
years down the road.
"I think the idea of having lower
fees for a student's initial year at a
university could become a pattern for
Canada," Dr. Kenny said.
The UBC Board decided last year
that tuition fees would be set each
November for the following year, and
that the fees should total not less than
10 per cent of the net budgeted
general purpose operating costs for
the current year.
"This year's net operating costs are
$159.8 million, and next year's student fees will bring in about $15.9
million," said Board chairman Dr.
Leslie Peterson. "Students will still be
paying less than 10 per cent of the actual cost of their education, since the
University's costs are bound to be
higher next year."
As part of the fee policy established
by the Board of Governors last year,
student financial aid has also been
reviewed to maintain the University's
policy "that no competent student will
be denied access to the University
because of financial reasons."
Please turn to page 2
See F££S UBCreports
page 2
TABLE 1.
UBC TUITION FEES
1981-82
The 1981-82 fees listed below are for tuition ONLY. They do not include
additional student fees.
1980-81
1981-82
ACADEMIC
TUITION
TUITION
PROGRAM
FEE
FEE
Arts — Year I
Home Economics — Year I
Education — Year I
Nursing — Year I
Science — Year I
$590
$650
Physical Education
and Recreation — Year I
$615
$677
Agricultural Sciences and
Landscape Architecture —
Year I
$630
$695
Arts, Science, Education,
)
Home Economics and Social Work
)
$590
$670
upper years & Diploma programs
in Arts and Education
)
)
Commerce — Year I
Pharmaceutical Sciences — Year I
Rehabilitation Medicine
Physical Education & Recreation —
$615
$695
upper years                                                        )
Nursing — upper years                                    )
$590
$695
Social Work — concentrated program
for degree holders
$590
$700
Agricultural Sciences and
Landscape Architecture — upper years
$630
$725
Librarianship and Archival Studies
$680
$770
Medical Laboratory Science
Commerce — upper years
Dental Hygience
Forestry
Law
Pharmaceutical Sciences — upper years
Licentiate in Accounting
Engineering
Architecture
Music
Dentistry
Medicine
$725
$820
$750
$850
$920
$1050
Diploma programs in Dentistry
$935
$1060
TABLE 2. BASIC TUITION FEES
IN FACULTIES OF ARTS at 18
CANADIAN UNIVERSITIES
1977-78 TO 1980-81
1977/78   1978/79   1979/80   1980/81
University of British Columbia
University of Alberta	
University of Calgary	
University of Saskatchewan ....
University of Manitoba	
University of Toronto	
University of Western Ontario . .
Queen's University  	
University of Guelph	
York University	
McMaster University	
Wilfrid Laurier University	
Carleton University	
Universite Laval  	
McGill University	
Universite de Montreal	
Mount Allison University	
Dalhousie University	
FEES
Continued from page 1
The Board yesterday increased the
amount of bursary funds available
next year for students by $40,000.
Bursaries are awarded on the basis of
financial need and are outright grants
which don't have to be repaid by the
recipients.
Although   the   fee   increases   at
UBC average 13 per cent, Dr. Peter-
536
$536
$536
$590
500
550
550
605
500
550
550
605
572
625
655
655
450
540
570
615
675
675
710
835
689
691
726
817
700
700
735
845
686
686
686
710
765
765
863
915
685
685
720
810
720
720
755
810
680
680
720
813
450
450
450
450
570
570
570
570
540
540
680
680
765
815
865
935
675
700
840
900
son   said   some   increases  would   be
higher to eliminate anomalies.
Degree holders enrolled in a concentrated program in Social Work will
pay a fee of $700, up from $590. Fee
for the upper years of Nursing goes to
$695 from $590, fee for the upper
years of Agriculture goes to $725 from
$630, and fees for Dentistry and
Medicine climb to $1050 from $920.
Central Technical Aits College,
an exjtjatpie of Chinese tt^utixitf
T"if ilrti ill ODuglas Kenny at a ascent ceremony in (fee Asian Centre,
now Beating CTWipletipn next
» tfee Nittbe Garden. Prof.
jTang-Zeng, regarded as one of
OdnVs ten leading modern
painters, is renowned for his
catlk^anfay, wfetctt l» • highly
developed *tt in Cliiaa. The
caSigtaony presented w UBC
by one of CMna's
Parkade confusion clarified
Some people, it appears, are a little
confused about the use by faculty and
staff and visitors of the new
1,130-space parkade on Health
Sciences Road immediately west of the
Health Sciences Centre
Here then, for the record, are the
regulations which apply to the use of
the new facility.
• The holder of a faculty and staff
parkade decal and key card can
operate the entrance-exit equipment
by using the entrances marked "Card
Holder". The parkade decals cost
$128 a year and space is guaranteed.
• Visitors, by using the entrance
marked "Visitor", can enter the
parkade by taking a ticket from a spit-
ter machine. The charge for visitors is
by the hour — 50 cents for the first
hour and 25 cents for each additional
hour up to a maximum of $2 a day.
, • The holder of a faculty and staff
decal can use the parkade at any time
for a flat rate of 75 cents a day, or pay
the visitor hourly rate, whichever is
less.
• The UBC Parkade decal entitles
the holder to use any faculty and staff
lot on the campus.
Many years of protest pay off
Years of protests and complaints by
scientists and the general public have
paid off. The Medical Research Council, premier federal health research
funding agency, has announced a five-
year plan for biomedical research with
yearly increases of'about 20 per cent.
Dr. Sidney Katz, associate professor
in the Faculty of Pharmaceutical
Sciences, said the plan will allow
health researchers to begin their
recovery from government neglect.
Dr. Katz, chairman of the Science
Policy Committee of the Canadian
Federation of Biological Societies, said
Ottawa has underfunded health
research in Canada for about a
decade.
"Although I'm glad the plan calls
for more money for regional develop-
Service set
UBC's traditional Remembrance
Day service will be held on Tuesday,
Nov. 11 in the War Memorial Gymnasium at 10:45 a.m.
Taking part in the service will be
representatives from the Canadian
Armed Forces, the 196th Western
Universities Battalion Association, the
War Amputations of Canada, the
Royal Canadian Legion Branch 142
and.the Sir Arthur Pearson Association of War Blinded of Canada, as
well as University representatives.
ment in biomedical research," he said,
"I'm concerned that it doesn't consider Canada's future shortage of biomedical scientists."
He said the government's intention
of entering into the new industrial
area of biotechnology will create a
shortage of biomedical scientists. The
problem will be compounded by the
fact that scientists in the field today
are growing older and few new scientists, because of the last decade of
government underfunding, have been
encouraged to enter the profession.
Rename room
The reading room of the adult
education division of the Faculty of
Education has been renamed the
Coolie Verner Memorial Reading
Room in honor of the late Prof.
Verner, who died in October, 1979.
Prof. Verner, who was internationally known for his activities in the
field of adult education, contributed
1,200 of the some 2,000 volumes that
comprise the reading room collection,
which is housed in the division's headquarters on Toronto Road adjacent to
the UBC campus.
A faculty member at UBC from
1961 to 1967, Prof. Verner established
the fourth graduate program in adult
education in the United States at
Florida State University, where he was
a faculty member from 1953 to 1961,
and the first such program in Canada
as a member of the UBC teaching
staff.
The fee schedule approved yesterday is effective next May 4, the start of
UBC's spring session. Fees for the
spring and summer session rise 13 per
cent per unit of study, to $52 from
$46. The fee for a standard 3-unit correspondence course also goes up 13
per cent, to $156 from $138.
In addition to the tuition fees set by
the University, students at UBC pay
an average $40 a year in special fees
levied by the Alma Mater Society and
other student organizations.
President Kenny said UBC's new
basic tuition fees of $650 (first year)
and $670 (upper years) are still well
below the fees paid by most Canadian
university students. UBCreports
pageS
Library committee favors Plan A option
The options for hew library construction on the UBC campus
developed by the Department of
Facilities Planning are grouped under
two major alternatives labelled Plan A
and Plan B.
The three Plan A options are based
on the concept of centralization or
recentralization of library services.
They assume that some library
branches presently housed in other
buildings — the processing division,
the Crane Library for the blind (now
located in Brock Hall), and the
Mathematics and Music Libraries —
would be incorporated into the Plan A
proposals.
Each of the Plan A options is concerned with the expansion and
enhancement of the Main Library and
imply little change in the present
structure of the library system.
Little change
Dean Peter Larkin, who chairs the
President's Committee on Library
Space Requirements, says that
because the Plan A options "mean little change to the system, there are
negligible implications for collections,
processing, management and costs of
operations. It should be possible to
develop A options that result in improved organization of public services
and centralization of reference divisions. The staging of all of the A options is relatively easy."
The options proposed under Plan B
reflect a policy towards increased
decentralization of library services.
Both options under Plan B involve
construction of a new Science Library
on the site now occupied by the UBC
Bookstore as well as reconstruction
and renovation of the Main Library.
The committee expressed a
preference for an A over a B option,
Dean Larkin said, "largely on the
argument that centralization of
library services is desirable from the
subjective perspective of users." In addition, the A scheme would probably
lead to the greatest economy of operation and contribute to the long-term
need for revitalizing the urban design
of the campus core.
However, Dean Larkin adds, both
the A and B options will probably be
needed in the long run, "and it is really only a question of which should
come first."
The A option recommended by the
Larkin committee involves the construction, in stages, of two new wings
on either side of the Ladner Clock
Tower to link the'Main and Sedgewick
Libraries and the demolition and
reconstruction of the Main Library,
except for the "heritage" section built
in 1924-25, which would be gutted
and renovated.
Cost estimate
The estimated cost of the option
'would be about $43 million. In its
report setting out the five construction
options for the library system, the
facilities planning department emphasizes that the cost estimates for
each of the options should be viewed
as suitable for comparative rather
than budgetary purposes.
The estimates do not include professional fees and services, allowances
for inflation, furnishing costs and
some aspects of demolition, relocation
and developments in association with
the library construction.
The estimated cost associated with
the A option also makes no allowance
for a proposed long-term expansion,
which  would  see  additional  library
-£L-
y
F.^tk^   I        Iwl ^» I ,li ^s^
-TErNM LI^Aptf |5V^M4fe|pM ,!;,f
Map above shows Plan A proposal for expansion of UBC library facilities. Stage
1 of plan involves construction of new wings on either side of the Ladner Clock
Tower to link Main and Sedgewick Libraries. This would be followed by
demolition of north and south wings and stack area of Main Library and construction of new, six-storey building as Stage 2 of project. Stage 3 would involve
gutting and renovating of central stone-faced "heritage" section of the Main
Library, built in 1924-25. Long-range expansion (Stage 4) calls for new
buildings on sites surrounding western end of Sedgewick Library.
Final plans asked by February
UBC's Board of Governors
yesterday (Nov. 4) requested that
final recommendations for new
library construction be ready
when it meets on Feb. 3, 1981.
The Board also passed a motion
asking the administration to pursue further the two construction
options selected by the President's
Committee on Library Space Requirements and to send progress
reports on the library studies to
Dr. William C. Gibson, chairman of the Universities Council,
and Dr. Patrick McGeer, the provincial minister of Universities.
space constructed in the 21st century
on a site now occupied by the
Mathematics Building and Annex, the
Old Auditorium and the Old Administration Building.
Here is how the Department of
Facilities Planning sees the A option
being carried out.
STAGE 1. This stage would involve
the construction in front of the Main
Library building of wings on either
side of the Ladner Clock Tower that
would link the Main Library to the
Sedgewick Library and provide
134,000 net assignable square feet of
temporary and permanent space
(shaded areas labelled Stage 1 on
map).
The wings on either side of the clock
tower would be two storeys in height
and the roofs of each would be level
with the Main Mall, which is also the
roof of the Sedgewick Library. When
construction of the wings is complete,
the roof areas would be extensively
landscaped with grass, shrubs and
trees at an estimated cost of
$1,750,000. Part of the garden and
grassy area below the Ladner Clock
Tower immediately east of the
Sedgewick Library would be undisturbed by the Stage 1 construction,
which would cost an estimated
$17.5-18 million.
STAGE 2. Completion of Stage 1
would enable some divisions housed in
the Main Library to move into permanent or temporary space in one of the
new library wings so that demolition
of the south wing of the Main Library
could begin.
Six storeys high
The new south wing, which would
cost an estimated $10 to $11 million to
build, would be a six-storey structure
with new floor levels quite unrelated
to the existing structure and designed
to provide a flexibility and adaptability the present structure doesn't have.
When the south wing is complete,
the people and divisions housed in the
north wing of the library would move
into the new south wing so that the
demolition and reconstruction process
can be repeated at about the same
cost.
STAGE 3. This stage provides for
the gutting and renovation at an
estimated cost of about $3 million of
the original, stone-faced Main
Library, built in 1924-25, to conform
with the reconstructed Main Library.
STAGE 4. This provides for long-
range expansion in the 21st century to
the sites surrounding the western end
of the Sedgewick Library.
The net result of this plan, which is
officially called Option A2 in the
facilities planning report, will be to
create about 350,000 net assignable
square feet of library space in the
building complex.
Two other plans, labelled options
Al and A3, were rejected by the
Larkin committee. Option Al, which
also calls for the wings linking the
Main and Sedgewick Libraries,
reconstruction of the main stacks and
renovation of the rest of the existing
Main Libary, is described as
"awkward and uneconomic."
Option A3, which calls for construction of a new central library on
the Mathematics-Old Administration
Building sites and renovation and
reconstruction of the interior of the
Main Library, is labelled "impractical."
B option
Of the two Plan B options explored
by the facuities planning department,
the Larkin committee says Option BI
is preferable.
This would involve construction of a
small-scale structure of about 30,000
net square feet on the site of the existing Bookstore or underground in
front of the Main Library. Units
presently housed in the south wing
would move into this new unit to permit the staged demolition of the south
and north wings and stack area and
renovation of the heritage element of
the Main Library as in Option A2.
Total estimated cost: $42 million.
Option B2, which the Larkin committee regards as "awkward and
uneconomic," calls for construction of
a Science Library as in BI plus interior renovation and construction of
new space for the Main Library. CIBCalendar
UBC CALENDAR DEADLINES
Events in the week of:
Nov. 16 to Nov. 22 Deadline is 5 p.m. Nov. 6
Nov. 23 to Nov. 29 Deadline is 5 p.m. Nov. 13
Send notices to Information Services, 6328 Memorial Rd., (Old Administration Bldg.), Campus. For further information call 228-3131.
THE VANCOUVER INSTITUTE
SATURDAY, NOV. 8
Prof. Julia Levy, Microbiology, UBC, on
Early Cancer Detection By Blood Tests.
SATURDAY, NOV. 15
Prof. Paul C. Gilmore, head, Computer
Science, UBC, on Where Are Computers
Going?
Both lectures in Lecture Hall 2, Woodward Instructional Resources Centre at
8:15 p.m..
SUNDAY, NOV. 9
1:00 p.m. HEALTH SCIENCES SEMINAR. The Health Sciences
Students Association presents a seminar on Cancer
Therapy — A Team Approach, with noted health professionals from the fields of medicine, pharmacy, nursing,
rehabilitation medicine, dentistry and dietetics. Topics
will focus on current trends in cancer treatment. Continues until 4:30 p.m. in Lecture Hall 1, Woodward Instructional Resources Centre. For information, call
Sharon Young, 224-6582.
MONDAY, NOV. 10
12 noon CANCER RESEARCH SEMINAR. Dr. DA. Boyes,
director, Cancer Control Agency of B.C., on Status of
Preclinical Invasive Carcinoma of theOrvix. Lecture
Theatre, B.C. Cancer Research Centre, 601 W. 10th
Ave.
12:30 p.m. PHARMACOLOGY SEMINAR. Prof. J. Parratt,
Physiology and Pharmacology, University of Strathclyde,
Glasgow, on Experimental Aspects of the Treatment of
Myocardial Ischaemia and Infarction. Room 114,
Block C, Medical Sciences Building.
ASIAN RESEARCH INSTITUTE/LAW Lecture.Dr.
Chen Yong-Ling, vice-chairman, History, Central Institute for Nationalities, Beijing, China, on The Other
Chinese: Minority Nationalities in the Peoples
Republic. Room 101102, Law Building.
CENTRE FOR HUMAN SETTLEMENTS Video
Previews. Today's films are Growing Dollars and
Ethiopia: A Famine Report. Room 308, Library Processing Building.
3:30 p.m. STATISTICS WORKSHOP Special Meeting. Dr.Lene
Theil Skovgaard, Statistical Research Unit, Danish
Medical and Social Science Research Council, on Differential Geometry and Statistical Inference. Room
212, Geography Building.
CAMPUS FISHERIES SEMINAR. Prof. Don Ludwig,
Mathematics, UBC, on How Important is Parameter
Uncertainty? What You Don't Know Can Hurt You.
Room 115, Hut B-8.
3:45 p.m. APPLIED MATHEMATICS SEMINAR. Lawrence
Mysak, Mathematics and Oceanography, UBC, on
Baratropic Instability of Flow Along a Trench. Room
203, Mathematics Building.
4:00 p.m. ASTRONOMY SEMINAR. Dr. K.S. Krishna Swamy,
Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Bombay, India,
on C2 Bands in Comets. Room 318, Hennings Building.
4:30 p.m. ZOOLOGY "PHYSIOLOGY GROUP" SEMINAR.
Dr. M.A.R. Koehl, Zoology, University of California,
Berkeley, on Mechanical Adaptions of Giant Kelp.
Room 2449, Biological Sciences Building.
TUESDAY, NOV. 11
Remembrance Day. University closed.
10:45 a.m.    REMEMBRANCE DAY SERVICE will be held in War
Memorial Gymnasium.
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 12
10:30 a.m. MARKETING SEMINAR. Prof. L. Meredith, SFU, on
Marketing Determinants of U.S. Multi-national Corporate Penetration in Canada. Penthouse, Angus
Building.
12 noon INFLATION: FACING UP TO IT, a free noon-hour
series sponsored by the Centre for Continuing Education.
This week Dr. Peter Chinloy, Economics, UBC, on Wage
and Price Controls: Are They the Answer? Auditorium,
Robson Square Media Centre, 800 Hornby St.
12:30 p.m. WEDNESDAY NOON-HOUR CONCERT. Jane
Coop, piano; John Lob an, violin; and Eric Wilson, cello,
perform Music of Mendelssohn and Haydn. Recital
Hall, Music Building.
3:30 p.m. STATISTICS WORKSHOP. Dr. George H. Weiss, Na
tional Institute of Health, Bethesda, Md., on Adaptive
Sampling for Clinical Trials. Room 240, Geography
Building.
ENGLISH   COLLOQUIUM   SERIES.    Prof.   Marc
Beach, English, UBC, on Planning Novels: Some Tactics and Strategies. Penthouse, Buchanan Building.
ECONOMICS THEORY SEMINAR. Hugh Neary on
Long-Run    Membership    Adj ustment    in    Labour-
Managed Firms. Room 351, Brock Hall.
CHEMICAL   ENGINEERING   SEMINAR.    V.
Meenakshi on Anodic Oxidation of Coal-Processing Effluent. Room 206, Chemical Engineering Building.
4:00 p.m.   ANIMAL RESOURCE ECOLOGY SEMINAR.  Dr.
Thomas G.   Northcote,   Institute of Animal  Resource
Ecology, UBC, on Meddling With Migrations: Frustrations of A Long Experimental Affair. Room 32, Hut
B-2.
4:30 p.m.   ENGLISH READING by Swedish authors. Per Olov
Enquist on Night of the Trtbades; Tobias Berggren and
Agneta Pleijel on Recent Poetry and Prose. Salon B,
Faculty Club.
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 12 (Continued)
7:00 p.m. Second of five television dialogues on the topic Jews and
Christians: Past, Present and Future by Prof. William
Nicholls and Dr. Moshe Anion, both of the Department
of Religious Studies, UBC. The series will explore
Christian-Jewish relationships through the ages. Repeated
on Thursday, Nov. 13, at 1 p.m. Channel 10, Vancouver
Cablevision.
7:30 p.m. WEST COAST ART SHOW sponsored by the Van
couver Alumni Panhellenic Association opens and continues on Nov. 13 until 10:30 p.m. each day. Part of the
money realized from the sale of paintings in the show will
be used to repay loan for repair of Panhellenic House on
the UBC campus. Admission $3. University Club, 1021
W. Hastings St.
8:00 p.m. SENATE MEETING. A limited number of tickets for
the observers' gallery are available and must be applied
for at least 24 hours in advance of the meeting. Call
Frances Medley, clerk to Senate, 228-2951. Senate meets
in the Board and Senate Room, Old Administration
Building.
MACKAY LECTURE SERIES. Prof. Alfred Jahn,
Geographical Institute, Wroclaw University, Poland, on
Experimental Observations of Periglacial Landforms
in the Eurasian Arctic. Room 100, Geography Building.
THURSDAY, NOV. 13
9:00a.m. PSYCHIATRY PRESENTATION. Dr. IF. Brock
ington, Illinois Mental Health Institutes, Chicago, on
The Diagnosis and Care of Mothers With Psychiatric
Illness Following Childbirth. Lecture Theatre,
Psychiatric Unit, Health Sciences Centre.
MEDICAL GRAND ROUNDS. Dr. DC. Morris,
Radiology, VGH; Dr. R.A. Sutton, Medicine, VGH; and
Dr. M.D. Whitaker, Medicine, VGH, on The Usefulness
of the Technique of Percutaneous Angioplasty. Lecture
Hall B, Vancouver General Hospital.
12:30 p.m. CO-OP ENGINEERING AND FORESTRY Meeting.
Room 310, Computer Science Building.
WOMEN'S STUDIES PROGRAM Visiting Speakers
Series. Dr. Barbara Monter, Slavonic Studies, UBC, on
The Real Russian Heroine. Room 202, Buchanan
Building.
ASIAN STUDIES presents a lecture/demonstration of
classical dance of India by Ms. Canna Patel. Room 102,
Lasserre Building.
UNIVERSITY LECTURE (Distinguished Visitors
Program). Robert S. Fitzgerald, Professor Emeritus, Harvard, on A Translator's Homer. Room 100, Buchanan
Building.
B.C. MENTAL RETARDATION INSTITUTE
Series on Sharing the Experience. The third in a series
of four films is June. Lecture Hall 6, Woodward Instructional Resources Centre.
UNIVERSITY SINGERS with director James Schell
perform Music of Byrd, Brahms and Nystedt. Recital
Hall, Music Building.
INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS MANAGEMENT
Seminar. Prof. Carolyn Smart, and Prof. Ilan Vertinsky,
Commerce, UBC, on Strategic Responses to Organizational Environments. Penthouse, Angus Building.
EXPLORING THE NATURE OF EVIL Lecture
Series. Joe Richardson, Religious Studies, UBC, on A
Hindu Perspective. Room 215, Student Union Building.
2:30 p.m. PHYSICS CONDENSED MATTER SEMINAR.
Birger Bergersen, UBC, on The Impurity Band in the
Atomic Limit. Room 318. Hennings Building.
3:30 p.m. APPLIED MATHEMATICS COLLOQUIUM. Dr.
George H. Weiss, National Institute of Health, Bethesda,
Md., on What Is a Mathematician Doing at NIH?
Room 203, Mathematics Building.
4:00 p.m. PHYSICS COLLOQUIUM. Prof. N. Kurti, Oxford
University, on Cailletet, Clifton, Helxnholtz,
Lindemann, Pictet, Simon . . . Physics in Oxford and
in Other Places. Room 201, Hennings Building.
7:00 p.m. SUBFILMS presents All That Jazz. Continues until
Nov. 16. Showings at 7:00 p.m. Thursday, 7:00 and 9:30
p.m. Friday and Saturday, 7:00 p.m. Sunday. Admission
is $1. Auditorium, Student Union Building.
8:00 p.m. CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION Lecture Series on The World As A Machine: Science and
Human Values. Dr. Charles Ungerleider, Education,
UBC, on The IQGame. Room 202, Buchanan Building.
FRIDAY, NOV. 14
10:30 a.m. MEDIEVAL WORKSHOP on Vergil In The Middle
Ages. Registration in the Faculty Club. For information,
call Dr. M. Chiarenza, 228-4049 or 228-2268.
12:30 a.m. DEVELOPMENTAL MEDICINE SEMINAR. Dr. J.
Levy, Microbiology, UBC, on Immunological Methods
for the Detection of Tumour Antigens and the Possible
Applications of These Techniques. First Floor, Willow
Pavilion Lecture Hall, Vancouver General Hospital.
STAGE BAND with director Gary Guthman perform.
Recital Hall, Music Building.
FRENCH/LINGUISTICS LECTURE. Prof. Jurgen
Klausenburger, Linguistics, University of Washington,
Seattle, on French Morphology: Word Boundary Processes—A Generative View of Liaison, Elision. Room
826, Buchanan Tower.
LEON & THEA KOERNER FOUNDATION Lecture, sponsored by the University Lectures Committee.
Prof. Robert Hollander, chairman, Comparative
Literature, Princeton University, on Dante's Vergil:
Tragedy in the Comedy. Room 104, Buchanan Building.
1:00 p.m. MEDICAL GENETICS SEMINAR. Dr. JR. Miller, on
Animal Models For Genetic Diseases. Fourth Floor Conference Room, Health Centre for Children, Vancouver
General Hospital.
FRIDAY, NOV. 14 (Continued)
2:30 p.m. OCEANOGRAPHY SEMINAR. Dr. Robert Given, In
stitute for Marine and Coastal Studies, University of
Southern California, L.A., on Western Regional
Undersea Laboratory (WRUL) Saturation Diving
Facility—Applications for Research. Room 1465,
Biological Sciences Building.
3:30 p.m. FRENCH/LINGUISTICS COLLOQUIUM. Dr.
Jurgen Klausenburger, Linguistics, University of
Washington, Seattle, on The Central Role of Morphology. Room 2225, Buchanan Building
3:45 p.m. APPLIED MATHEMATICS COLLOQUIUM.Trian
taphyllos R. Akylas, Mathematics, M.I.T., Cambridge,
Massachusetts, on Direct Resonance In Nonlinear
Waves. Room 1100, Mathematics Annex
7:00 p.m. FACULTY WOMEN'S CLUB. Vancouver Alderman
Harry Rankin will speak on Wills and Estates. Admission
is $2.50, which includes wine and cheese afterwards.
Seating is limited. For reservations, call 738-6152 or
261-9007. Guests are welcome. New Courthouse Complex.
8:00 p.m.    ICE HOCKEY. UBC Thunderbirds meet the University
of Alberta. Thunderbird Winter Sports Centre.
UNIVERSITY SINGERS with director James Schell
perform Music of Byrd, Brahms and Nystedt. Recital
Hall, Music Building.
SATURDAY, NOV. 15
9:30 a.m.    MEDIEVAL WORKSHOP on Vergil In The Middle
Ages. Room 102, Lasserre Building. For further information, call Dr. M. Chiarenza, 228-4049 or 228-2268.
II:JO a.m. POETRY READING (Distinguished Visitors Program). Robert S. Fitzgerald, on Readings From A New
Translation of the Aeneid. Room 102, Lasserre
Building.
8:00 p.m. ICE HOCKEY. UBC Thunderbirds play the University
of Alberta. Thunderbird Winter Sports Centre.
FOOD SERVICES HOURS
All University food services will be closed on Tuesday Nov. 11. Student
Union Building Snack Bar will close at 7 p.m. on Nov. 10.
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
Thornton Wilder's The Skin of Our Teeth continues until Saturday,
Nov.  15 (except Sunday) at Frederic Wood Theatre. Admission is
$5.50; $3 for students. For information and reservations, call 228-2678,
or visit Room 207 of the Frederic Wood Theatre building.
NITOBE GARDEN HOURS
After Nov. 10: Weekdays - 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Closed weekends.
DENTAL HEALTH KIT
A kit containing dental health education materials for kindergarten to
grade three pupils is available for loan. For information, call Karin
Sipko, 228-3228.
COMPUTING EQUIPMENT DISPLAY
Digital Equipment of Canada Ltd. presents a demonstration and
display on Monday, Nov. 10, from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Room 205, Student Union Building.
BROCK HALL HOURS
Brock Hall is now open from 7:30 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. seven days a
week. The Women Student's Lounge is open from 8:00 a.m. to 10:00
p.m.
STUDENT INTERNATIONAL EXCHANGE
Third- and fourth-year Engineering, Forestry, Agricultural Sciences
and Science students are invited to apply for I.A.E.S.T.E. — International Association for the Exchange of Students for Technical Experience. For information, call 228-3022, or visit the Co-op/Internship
Office in Room 213 of Brock Hall.
SKATING LESSONS
UBC's Community Sport Services offers the following classes: Basic and
elementary skating classes for children and adults. Eight Saturdays
beginning Nov. 29. Adult hockey skill development classes. Eight
Thursdays (evenings) beginning Dec. 4. For further information and
brochures, call 228-3688.
FACULTY LIBRARY GUIDE
The 1980/81 edition of the Faculty Library Guide is available at the
Main Library. Phone Information and Orientation Division, 228-2076,
to have a copy mailed to you or ask for one at the Circulation Division,
Main Library.
STATISTICAL CONSULTING SERVICE
The Institute of Applied Mathematics and Statistics offers a free
statistical consulting service to UBC faculty and students for academic
projects. For information, call Dr. J.V. Zidek, 228-2479, or Dr. F.P.
Click, 228-6621.
PSYCHOLOGY EXPERIMENTS
We need right-handed male volunteers to participate in experiments
on verbal memory. The study takes about one hour to complete and includes filling out a questionnaire package. Subjects will be paid $5 and
complete feedback will be provided. For information, call Jeff or Sandy
at the UBC Psychophysiology Lab at 228-2756.
MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY
STUDENT EXHIBITIONS: Contemporary Salish Weaving: Continuity and Change; Kwagiutl Graphics: Tradition in a New
Medium; West Coast Graphics: Images of Change; Bent Boxes. All
exhibits continue until Jan. 3, 1981.
TEMPORARY EXHIBITIONS: Salish Art: Visions of Power, Symbols of Wealth. Continues until April, 1981.
FREE IDENTIFICATION CLINICS:
Bring your collectibles to the Museum and staff will help you with identification. Nov. 25, 6-8 p.m.
SNAKE IN THE GRASS MOVING THEATRE:
Clowns Garbanzo and Koko give Sunday performances until Dec. 7 at
2:30 p.m. Free with Museum admission.
1+
Pod
ftoetagepad   Portpaye
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2027
Vancouver, B.C.

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